RECENT NEWS
SeekingAlpha  2 hrs ago  Comment 
By Frank Holmes: So far this year, small-cap growth stocks have surprisingly been lackluster. After 2013, when it gained a scorching 38.8 percent, the Russell 2000 has delivered a tepid 0.62 percent year-to-date (YTD). (click to...
Yahoo  9 hrs ago  Comment 
Max King, portfolio manager at Investec Asset Management, and Bill O'Neill, head of CIO U.K. wealth management research at UBS, discuss whether investors should buy technology stocks or stick with value names.
SeekingAlpha  Sep 16  Comment 
By Dividend Yield: I'm a passionate dividend investor and I also like to see my dividends growing. For sure, dividend growth is no safe bet or a strategy that makes you rich quick, but it can deliver a solid return. I've build a database with...
SeekingAlpha  Sep 15  Comment 
By Retire Before Dad: My goal as an income investor is to create a portfolio of investments that generate reliable and compounding cash flow to grow my net worth and fund my eventual retirement. I've deployed a strategy of creating multiple...
SeekingAlpha  Sep 14  Comment 
By Dividend Yield: Today, I ran my stock screener for growth stocks with a market capitalization between $2 and 10 billion. Those stocks have a good chance to double if the companies grow earnings and sales further. In order to keep my passive...
SeekingAlpha  Sep 12  Comment 
By FerdiS: I maintain a watch list of dividend growth stocks that I update at least once a month, sometimes more frequently. It contains all of DivGro's holdings, as well as a subset of David Fish's CCC stocks. Currently, there are 183 stocks in...
SeekingAlpha  Sep 12  Comment 
By Dividend Mantra: I determined when I first started investing back in early 2010 that the dividend growth investing strategy was extremely robust for my goals. And I’ve relentlessly pursued it, building up the six-figure portfolio I now...
SeekingAlpha  Sep 12  Comment 
By Value Line: By: Kevin Downing In this stock screen, we set out to find equities that have fallen out of favor with investors, yet still have relatively high sales growth. We chose to focus on sales because, unlike earnings, it is very...
SeekingAlpha  Sep 9  Comment 
By Stocks for the Long Run: I began investing around 2005. I was close to having my mortgage paid. I had more income available than in the past and decided I had to do something with it. Having no background in finance, I simply bought a couple of...
SeekingAlpha  Sep 9  Comment 
By Dividends4Life: A pessimist might say life is a series of bad things happening, then we die. I certainly wouldn't go that far, but life often deals us unfortunate circumstances to work through at what seems to be the most inopportune time....




RELATED WIKI ARTICLES
 

Overview: Growth investing is the philosophy of investing in a security that shows signs of above-average earnings growth as compared to its industry or the overall market, even if the security appears expensive from a price-to-earnings or price-to-book perspective.

Theory: In addition to above average earnings growth, the theory behind growth stock investing, as opposed to value investing, is that stocks breaking into new price highs have no overhead supply. Because there is no overhead supply with stocks breaking into new price highs, the stock runs into less resistance. [1]

People: William O'Neil, who is recognized as the father of growth stock investing[2] dubbed this phenomenon the "Great Market Paradox". O'Neil in his book "How To Make Money In Stocks" claims to have researched the greatest winning stocks, and developed the "CAN SLIM" system that is largely the basis of growth stock investing.


This style of investing is also called capital growth investing since growth investors seek to maximize capital gains, not income from dividends. Companies that generally fall under this category tend to be driven by new technologies and/or domination of a niche market.

Notable proponents of this strategy include Philip Arthur Fisher, Jim Slater, Peter Lynch and Warren Buffett, although the latter has often maintained that there is no theoretical difference between value investing and growth investing.

Wikinvest © 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012. Use of this site is subject to express Terms of Service, Privacy Policy, and Disclaimer. By continuing past this page, you agree to abide by these terms. Any information provided by Wikinvest, including but not limited to company data, competitors, business analysis, market share, sales revenues and other operating metrics, earnings call analysis, conference call transcripts, industry information, or price targets should not be construed as research, trading tips or recommendations, or investment advice and is provided with no warrants as to its accuracy. Stock market data, including US and International equity symbols, stock quotes, share prices, earnings ratios, and other fundamental data is provided by data partners. Stock market quotes delayed at least 15 minutes for NASDAQ, 20 mins for NYSE and AMEX. Market data by Xignite. See data providers for more details. Company names, products, services and branding cited herein may be trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners. The use of trademarks or service marks of another is not a representation that the other is affiliated with, sponsors, is sponsored by, endorses, or is endorsed by Wikinvest.
Powered by MediaWiki