ACE » Topics » Brandywine Run-off Entities

This excerpt taken from the ACE 10-K filed Feb 25, 2010.

Brandywine run-off entities

In addition to housing a significant portion of ACE’s A&E exposure, the Brandywine operations include run-off liabilities related to various insurance and reinsurance businesses. The following companies comprise ACE’s Brandywine operations: Century (a Pennsylvania insurer), Century Re (a Pennsylvania insurer, which was merged with Century effective December 31, 2009), and Century International Reinsurance Company Ltd. (a Bermuda insurer (CIRC)). All of the Brandywine companies are direct or indirect subsidiaries of Brandywine Holdings.

The U.S.-based ACE INA companies assumed two contractual obligations in respect of the Brandywine operations in connection with the Restructuring: a dividend retention fund obligation and a surplus maintenance obligation in the form of an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement. INA Financial Corporation established and funded a dividend retention fund (the Dividend Retention Fund) consisting of $50 million plus investment earnings. Pursuant to an interpretation of the Brandywine Restructuring Order, the full balance of the Dividend Retention Fund was contributed to Century as at December 31, 2002. Under the Restructuring Order, while any obligation to maintain the Dividend Retention Fund is in effect, to the extent dividends are paid by INA Holdings Corporation to its parent, INA Financial Corporation, and to the extent INA Financial Corporation then pays such dividends to INA Corporation, a portion of those dividends must be withheld to replenish the principal of the Dividend Retention Fund to $50 million within five years. In 2009, 2008, and 2007, no such dividends were paid and, therefore, no replenishment of the Dividend Retention Fund occurred. The Dividend Retention Fund may not be terminated without prior written approval from the Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner.

In addition, an ACE INA insurance subsidiary provided reinsurance coverage to Century in the amount of $800 million under an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement (the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement), triggered if the statutory capital and surplus of Century falls below $25 million or if Century lacks liquid assets with which to pay claims as they become due, after giving effect to the contribution of the balance, if any, of the Dividend Retention Fund.

Effective December 31, 2004, ACE INA Holdings contributed $100 million to Century in exchange for a surplus note. After giving effect to the contribution and issuance of the surplus note, the statutory surplus of Century at December 31, 2009, was $25 million and approximately $191 million in statutory-basis losses have been ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement on an inception-to-date basis. Century reports the amount ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement in accordance with statutory accounting principles, which differ from GAAP by, among other things, allowing Century to discount its liabilities, including certain asbestos related and environmental pollution liabilities. For GAAP reporting purposes, intercompany reinsurance recoverables related to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement are eliminated upon consolidation. To estimate ACE’s remaining claim exposure under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement on a GAAP basis, ACE adjusts the statutory cession to exclude the discount embedded in statutory loss reserves and adjusts the statutory provision for uncollectible reinsurance to a GAAP basis amount. At December 31, 2009, approximately $493 million in GAAP basis losses were ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement, leaving a remaining limit of coverage under that agreement of approximately $307 million. At December 31, 2008, the remaining limit of coverage under the agreement was $393 million. While ACE believes it has no legal obligation to fund losses above the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement limit of coverage, ACE’s consolidated results would nevertheless continue to include any losses above the limit of coverage for so long as the Brandywine companies remain consolidated subsidiaries of ACE.

 

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NOTES TO THE CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (continued)

ACE Limited and Subsidiaries

 

These excerpts taken from the ACE 10-K filed Feb 27, 2009.

Brandywine run-off entities

In addition to housing a significant portion of our A&E exposure, the Brandywine operations include run-off liabilities related to various insurance and reinsurance businesses. The following companies comprise ACE’s Brandywine operations: Century (a Pennsylvania insurer), Century Re (a Pennsylvania insurer), and Century International Reinsurance Company Ltd. (a Bermuda insurer (CIRC)). All of the Brandywine companies are direct or indirect subsidiaries of Brandywine Holdings.

The U.S.-based ACE INA companies assumed two contractual obligations in respect of the Brandywine operations in connection with the Restructuring: a dividend retention fund obligation and a surplus maintenance obligation in the form of an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement. INA Financial Corporation established and funded a dividend retention fund (the Dividend Retention Fund) consisting of $50 million plus investment earnings. Pursuant to an interpretation of the Brandywine restructuring order, the full balance of the Dividend Retention Fund was contributed to Century as of December 31, 2002. Under the Restructuring Order, while any obligation to maintain the Dividend Retention Fund is in effect, to the extent dividends are paid by INA Holdings Corporation to its parent, INA Financial Corporation, and to the extent INA Financial Corporation then pays such dividends to INA Corporation, a portion of those dividends must be withheld to replenish the principal of the Dividend Retention Fund to $50 million within five years. In 2008, 2007 and 2006, no such dividends were paid and, therefore, no replenishment of the Dividend Retention Fund occurred. The Dividend Retention Fund may not be terminated without prior written approval from the Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner.

In addition, an ACE INA insurance subsidiary provided reinsurance coverage to Century in the amount of $800 million under an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement (the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement) if the statutory capital and surplus of Century falls below $25 million or if Century lacks liquid assets with which to pay claims as they become due, after giving effect to the contribution of the balance, if any, of the Dividend Retention Fund.

Effective December 31, 2004, ACE INA Holdings contributed $100 million to Century in exchange for a surplus note. After giving effect to the contribution and issuance of the surplus note, the statutory surplus of Century at December 31, 2008, was $25 million and approximately $112 million in statutory-basis losses have been ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement on an inception-to-date basis. Century reports the amount ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement in accordance with statutory accounting principles, which differ from GAAP by, among other things, allowing Century to discount its liabilities, including certain asbestos related and environmental pollution liabilities. The reduction in 2008 in statutory-basis losses ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement resulted principally from the cession of certain reinsurance amounts associated with estimates of reinsurer bad debt, to affiliated ACE companies, and from an increase in discount benefit. For

 

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GAAP reporting purposes, intercompany reinsurance recoverables related to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement are eliminated upon consolidation. To estimate ACE’s remaining claim exposure under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement on a GAAP basis, we adjust the statutory cession to exclude the discount embedded in statutory loss reserves and we adjust the statutory provision for uncollectible reinsurance to a GAAP basis amount. At December 31, 2008, approximately $407 million in GAAP basis losses were ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement, leaving a remaining limit of coverage under that agreement of approximately $393 million. At December 31, 2007, the remaining limit of coverage under the agreement was $228 million. The reduction in GAAP-basis losses ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement resulted principally from the previously mentioned cession of certain reinsurance bad debts to affiliated ACE companies. While we believe ACE has no legal obligation to fund losses above the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement limit of coverage, ACE’s consolidated results would nevertheless continue to include any losses above the limit of coverage for so long as the Brandywine companies remain consolidated subsidiaries of ACE.

 

Brandywine run-off entities

STYLE="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px">In addition to housing a significant portion of our A&E exposure, the Brandywine operations include run-off liabilities related to various insurance and reinsurance businesses.
The following companies comprise ACE’s Brandywine operations: Century (a Pennsylvania insurer), Century Re (a Pennsylvania insurer), and Century International Reinsurance Company Ltd. (a Bermuda insurer (CIRC)). All of the Brandywine
companies are direct or indirect subsidiaries of Brandywine Holdings.

The U.S.-based ACE INA companies assumed two contractual obligations in respect
of the Brandywine operations in connection with the Restructuring: a dividend retention fund obligation and a surplus maintenance obligation in the form of an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement. INA Financial Corporation established and
funded a dividend retention fund (the Dividend Retention Fund) consisting of $50 million plus investment earnings. Pursuant to an interpretation of the Brandywine restructuring order, the full balance of the Dividend Retention Fund was
contributed to Century as of December 31, 2002. Under the Restructuring Order, while any obligation to maintain the Dividend Retention Fund is in effect, to the extent dividends are paid by INA Holdings Corporation to its parent, INA Financial
Corporation, and to the extent INA Financial Corporation then pays such dividends to INA Corporation, a portion of those dividends must be withheld to replenish the principal of the Dividend Retention Fund to $50 million within five years. In 2008,
2007 and 2006, no such dividends were paid and, therefore, no replenishment of the Dividend Retention Fund occurred. The Dividend Retention Fund may not be terminated without prior written approval from the Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner.

In addition, an ACE INA insurance subsidiary provided reinsurance coverage to Century in the amount of $800 million under an aggregate excess of loss
reinsurance agreement (the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement) if the statutory capital and surplus of Century falls below $25 million or if Century lacks liquid assets with which to pay claims as they become due, after giving effect to the
contribution of the balance, if any, of the Dividend Retention Fund.

Effective December 31, 2004, ACE INA Holdings contributed $100 million to
Century in exchange for a surplus note. After giving effect to the contribution and issuance of the surplus note, the statutory surplus of Century at December 31, 2008, was $25 million and approximately $112 million in statutory-basis losses
have been ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement on an inception-to-date basis. Century reports the amount ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement in accordance with statutory accounting principles, which differ from GAAP by,
among other things, allowing Century to discount its liabilities, including certain asbestos related and environmental pollution liabilities. The reduction in 2008 in statutory-basis losses ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement resulted
principally from the cession of certain reinsurance amounts associated with estimates of reinsurer bad debt, to affiliated ACE companies, and from an increase in discount benefit. For

 


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GAAP reporting purposes, intercompany reinsurance recoverables related to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement are eliminated upon consolidation. To estimate
ACE’s remaining claim exposure under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement on a GAAP basis, we adjust the statutory cession to exclude the discount embedded in statutory loss reserves and we adjust the statutory provision for uncollectible
reinsurance to a GAAP basis amount. At December 31, 2008, approximately $407 million in GAAP basis losses were ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement, leaving a remaining limit of coverage under that agreement of approximately $393
million. At December 31, 2007, the remaining limit of coverage under the agreement was $228 million. The reduction in GAAP-basis losses ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement resulted principally from the previously mentioned cession
of certain reinsurance bad debts to affiliated ACE companies. While we believe ACE has no legal obligation to fund losses above the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement limit of coverage, ACE’s consolidated results would nevertheless continue to
include any losses above the limit of coverage for so long as the Brandywine companies remain consolidated subsidiaries of ACE.

 

STYLE="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px">Uncertainties relating to ACE’s ultimate Brandywine exposure

In addition to the
Dividend Retention Fund and Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement commitments described above, certain ACE entities are primarily liable for asbestos, environmental, and other exposures that they have reinsured to Century. Accordingly, if Century were
to become insolvent and ACE were to lose control of Century, some or all of the recoverables due to these ACE companies from Century could become uncollectible, yet those ACE entities would continue to be responsible to pay claims to their insureds
or reinsureds. As of December 31, 2008, the aggregate reinsurance balances ceded by the active ACE companies to Century were approximately $1.3 billion. At December 31, 2008, Century’s carried gross reserves (including reserves ceded
by the active ACE companies to Century) were $3.1 billion. We believe the intercompany reinsurance recoverables, which relate to liabilities payable over many years (i.e., 25 years or more), are not impaired at this time. A substantial portion of
the liabilities ceded to Century by its affiliates have in turn been ceded by Century to NICO and, as of December 31, 2008, approximately $1.4 billion of cover remains on a paid basis. Should Century’s loss reserves experience adverse
development in the future and should Century be placed into rehabilitation or liquidation, the reinsurance recoverables due from Century to its affiliates would be payable only after the payment in full of certain expenses and liabilities, including
administrative expenses and direct policy liabilities. Thus, the intercompany reinsurance recoverables would be at risk to the extent of the shortage of assets remaining to pay these recoverables. As of December 31, 2008, losses ceded by
Century to the active ACE companies and other amounts owed to Century by the active ACE companies were approximately $465 million in the aggregate.

STYLE="line-height:16px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:2px;border-bottom:0.3pt solid #000000"> 

Brandywine run-off entities

In addition to housing a significant portion of the A&E exposure, the Brandywine operations include run-off liabilities related to various insurance and reinsurance businesses. The following companies comprise ACE’s Brandywine operations: Century (a Pennsylvania insurer), Century Re (a Pennsylvania insurer), and Century International Reinsurance Company Ltd. (a Bermuda insurer (CIRC)). All of the Brandywine companies are direct or indirect subsidiaries of Brandywine Holdings.

The U.S.-based ACE INA companies assumed two contractual obligations in respect of the Brandywine operations in connection with the Restructuring: a dividend retention fund obligation and a surplus maintenance obligation in the form of an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement. INA Financial Corporation established and funded a dividend retention fund (the Dividend Retention Fund) consisting of $50 million plus investment earnings. Pursuant to an interpretation of the Brandywine restructuring order, the full balance of the Dividend Retention Fund was contributed to Century as of December 31, 2002. Under the Restructuring Order, while any obligation to maintain the Dividend Retention Fund is in effect, to the extent dividends are paid by INA Holdings Corporation to its parent, INA Financial Corporation, and to the extent INA Financial Corporation then pays such dividends to INA Corporation, a portion of those dividends must be withheld to replenish the principal of the Dividend Retention Fund to $50 million within five years. In 2008, 2007, and 2006, no such dividends were paid and, therefore, no replenishment of the Dividend Retention Fund occurred. The Dividend Retention Fund may not be terminated without prior written approval from the Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner.

In addition, an ACE INA insurance subsidiary provided reinsurance coverage to Century in the amount of $800 million under an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement (the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement) if the statutory capital and surplus of Century falls below $25 million or if Century lacks liquid assets with which to pay claims as they become due, after giving effect to the contribution of the balance, if any, of the Dividend Retention Fund.

Effective December 31, 2004, ACE INA Holdings contributed $100 million to Century in exchange for a surplus note. After giving effect to the contribution and issuance of the surplus note, the statutory surplus of Century at December 31, 2008, was $25 million and approximately $112 million in statutory-basis losses have been ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss

 

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (continued)

ACE Limited and Subsidiaries

 

Agreement on an inception-to-date basis. Century reports the amount ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement in accordance with statutory accounting principles, which differ from GAAP by, among other things, allowing Century to discount its liabilities, including certain asbestos related and environmental pollution liabilities. The reduction in 2008 in statutory-basis losses ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement resulted principally from the cession of certain reinsurance amounts associated with estimates of reinsurer bad debts to affiliated ACE companies, and from an increase in discount benefit. For GAAP reporting purposes, intercompany reinsurance recoverables related to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement are eliminated upon consolidation. To estimate ACE’s remaining claim exposure under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement on a GAAP basis, the Company adjusts the statutory cession to exclude the discount embedded in statutory loss reserves and adjusts the statutory provision for uncollectible reinsurance to a GAAP basis amount. At December 31, 2008, approximately $407 million in GAAP basis losses were ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement, leaving a remaining limit of coverage under that agreement of approximately $393 million. At December 31, 2007, the remaining limit of coverage under the agreement was $228 million. The reduction in GAAP-basis losses ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement resulted principally from the previously mentioned cession of certain reinsurance bad debts to affiliated ACE companies. While the Company believes ACE has no legal obligation to fund losses above the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement limit of coverage, ACE’s consolidated results would nevertheless continue to include any losses above the limit of coverage for so long as the Brandywine companies remain consolidated subsidiaries of ACE.

 

This excerpt taken from the ACE 10-Q filed Nov 7, 2008.

Brandywine run-off entities

In addition to housing a significant portion of our A&E exposure, the Brandywine operations include run-off liabilities related to various insurance and reinsurance businesses. The following companies comprise ACE’s Brandywine operations: Century (a Pennsylvania insurer), Century Re (a Pennsylvania insurer), and Century International Reinsurance Company Ltd. (a Bermuda insurer (CIRC)). All of the Brandywine companies are direct or indirect subsidiaries of Brandywine Holdings.

The U.S.-based ACE INA companies assumed two contractual obligations in respect of the Brandywine operations in connection with the Restructuring: a dividend retention fund obligation and a surplus maintenance obligation in the form of an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement. In accordance with the Brandywine restructuring order, INA Financial Corporation established and funded a dividend retention fund (the Dividend Retention Fund) consisting of $50 million plus investment earnings. The full balance of the Dividend Retention Fund was contributed to Century as of December 31, 2002. To the extent future dividends are paid by INA Holdings Corporation to its parent, INA Financial Corporation, and to the extent INA Financial Corporation then pays such dividends to INA Corporation, a portion of those dividends must be withheld to replenish the principal of the Dividend Retention Fund to $50 million within five years. In the six months ended June 30, 2008, and in the years ended December 31 2007 and 2006, no such dividends were paid and, therefore, no replenishment of the Dividend Retention Fund occurred. The Dividend Retention Fund may not be terminated without prior written approval from the Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner to terminate the fund.

In addition, an ACE INA insurance subsidiary provided reinsurance coverage to Century in the amount of $800 million under an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement (the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement) if the statutory capital and surplus of Century falls below $25 million or if Century lacks liquid assets with which to pay claims as they become due, after giving effect to the contribution of the balance, if any, of the Dividend Retention Fund. Coverage under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement was triggered as of December 31, 2002, following contribution of the balance of the Dividend Retention Fund, because Century’s capital and surplus fell below $25 million at December 31, 2002.

Effective December 31, 2004, ACE INA Holdings contributed $100 million to Century in exchange for a surplus note. After giving effect to the contribution and issuance of the surplus note, the statutory surplus of Century at June 30, 2008, was $25 million and approximately $297 million in statutory-basis losses were ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement. Century reports the amount ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement in accordance with statutory accounting principles, which differ from GAAP by, among other things, allowing Century to discount its asbestos and environmental reserves. For GAAP reporting purposes, intercompany reinsurance recoverables related to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement are eliminated upon consolidation. To estimate ACE’s remaining claim exposure under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement on a GAAP basis, we adjust the statutory cession to exclude the discount embedded in statutory loss reserves and we adjust the statutory provision for uncollectible reinsurance to a GAAP basis amount. At June 30, 2008, approximately $570 million in GAAP basis losses were ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement, leaving a remaining limit of coverage under that agreement of approximately $230 million. At December 31, 2007, the remaining limit of coverage under the agreement was $228 million. While we believe ACE has no legal obligation to fund losses above the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement limit of coverage, ACE’s consolidated results would nevertheless continue to include any losses above the limit of coverage for so long as the Brandywine companies remain consolidated subsidiaries of ACE.

This excerpt taken from the ACE 10-Q filed Aug 8, 2008.

Brandywine run-off entities

In addition to housing a significant portion of our A&E exposure, the Brandywine operations include run-off liabilities related to various insurance and reinsurance businesses. The following companies comprise ACE’s Brandywine operations: Century (a Pennsylvania insurer), Century Re (a Pennsylvania insurer), and Century International Reinsurance Company Ltd. (a Bermuda insurer (CIRC)). All of the Brandywine companies are direct or indirect subsidiaries of Brandywine Holdings.

The U.S.-based ACE INA companies assumed two contractual obligations in respect of the Brandywine operations in connection with the Restructuring: a dividend retention fund obligation and a surplus maintenance obligation in the form of an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement. In accordance with the Brandywine restructuring order, INA Financial Corporation established and funded a dividend retention fund (the Dividend Retention Fund) consisting of $50 million plus investment earnings. The full balance of the Dividend Retention Fund was contributed to Century as of December 31, 2002. To the extent future dividends are paid by INA Holdings Corporation to its parent, INA Financial Corporation, and to the extent INA Financial Corporation then pays such dividends to INA Corporation, a portion of those dividends must be withheld to replenish the principal of the Dividend Retention Fund to $50 million within five years. In the quarter ended March 31, 2008, and in the years ended December 31, 2007 and 2006, no such dividends were paid and, therefore, no replenishment of the Dividend Retention Fund occurred. The obligation to maintain and to replenish the Dividend Retention Fund as necessary and to the extent dividends are paid is ongoing until ACE INA receives prior written approval from the Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner to terminate the fund.

 

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In addition, an ACE INA insurance subsidiary provided reinsurance coverage to Century in the amount of $800 million under an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement (the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement) if the statutory capital and surplus of Century falls below $25 million or if Century lacks liquid assets with which to pay claims as they become due, after giving effect to the contribution of the balance, if any, of the Dividend Retention Fund. Coverage under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement was triggered as of December 31, 2002, following contribution of the balance of the Dividend Retention Fund, because Century’s capital and surplus fell below $25 million at December 31, 2002.

Effective December 31, 2004, ACE INA Holdings contributed $100 million to Century in exchange for a surplus note. After giving effect to the contribution and issuance of the surplus note, the statutory surplus of Century at March 31, 2008, was $25 million and approximately $317 million in statutory-basis losses were ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement. Century reports the amount ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement in accordance with statutory accounting principles, which differ from GAAP by, among other things, allowing Century to discount its asbestos and environmental reserves. For GAAP reporting purposes, intercompany reinsurance recoverables related to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement are eliminated upon consolidation. To estimate ACE’s remaining claim exposure under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement on a GAAP basis, we adjust the statutory cession to exclude the discount embedded in statutory loss reserves and we adjust the statutory provision for uncollectible reinsurance to a GAAP basis amount. At March 31, 2008, approximately $569 million in GAAP basis losses were ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement, leaving a remaining limit of coverage under that agreement of approximately $231 million. At December 31, 2007, the remaining limit of coverage under the agreement was $228 million. While we believe ACE has no legal obligation to fund losses above the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement limit of coverage, ACE’s consolidated results would nevertheless continue to include any losses above the limit of coverage for so long as the Brandywine companies remain consolidated subsidiaries of ACE.

This excerpt taken from the ACE 10-K filed Feb 29, 2008.

Brandywine run-off entities

In addition to housing a significant portion of the A&E exposure, the Brandywine operations include run-off liabilities related to various insurance and reinsurance businesses. The following companies comprise ACE’s Brandywine operations: Century (a Pennsylvania insurer), Century Re (a Pennsylvania insurer), and Century International Reinsurance Company Ltd. (a Bermuda insurer (CIRC)). All of the Brandywine companies are direct or indirect subsidiaries of Brandywine Holdings.

The U.S.-based ACE INA companies assumed two contractual obligations in respect of the Brandywine operations in connection with the Restructuring: a dividend retention fund obligation and a surplus maintenance obligation in the form of an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement. In accordance with the Brandywine restructuring order, INA Financial Corporation established and funded a dividend retention fund (the Dividend Retention Fund) consisting of $50 million plus investment earnings. The full balance of the Dividend Retention Fund was contributed to Century as of December 31, 2002. To the extent future dividends are paid by INA Holdings Corporation to its parent, INA Financial Corporation, and to the extent INA Financial Corporation then pays such dividends to INA Corporation, a portion of those dividends must be withheld to replenish the principal of the Dividend Retention Fund to $50 million within five years. In 2007, 2006, and 2005, no such dividends were paid and therefore, no replenishment of the Dividend Retention Fund occurred. The obligation to maintain and to replenish the Dividend Retention Fund as necessary and to the extent dividends are paid is ongoing until ACE INA receives prior written approval from the Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner to terminate the fund.

In addition, an ACE INA insurance subsidiary provided reinsurance coverage to Century in the amount of $800 million under an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement (the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement) if the statutory capital and surplus of Century falls below $25 million or if Century lacks liquid assets with which to pay claims as they become due, after giving effect to the contribution of the balance, if any, of the Dividend Retention Fund. Coverage under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement was triggered as of December 31, 2002, following contribution of the balance of the Dividend Retention Fund, because Century’s capital and surplus fell below $25 million at December 31, 2002.

Effective December 31, 2004, ACE INA Holdings contributed $100 million to Century in exchange for a surplus note. After giving effect to the contribution and issuance of the surplus note, the statutory surplus of Century at December 31, 2007, was $25 million and approximately $321 million in statutory-basis losses were ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement. Century reports the amount ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement in accordance with statutory accounting principles, which differ from GAAP by, among other things, allowing Century to discount its asbestos and environmental reserves. For GAAP reporting purposes, intercompany reinsurance recoverables related to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement are eliminated upon consolidation. To estimate ACE’s remaining claim exposure under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement on a GAAP basis, the Company adjusts the statutory cession to exclude the discount embedded in statutory loss reserves and adjusts the statutory provision for uncollectible reinsurance to a GAAP basis amount. At December 31, 2007, approximately $572 million in GAAP basis losses were ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement, leaving a remaining limit of coverage under that agreement of approximately $228 million. At December 31, 2006, the remaining limit of coverage under the agreement was $255 million. While we believe ACE has no legal obligation to fund losses above the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement limit of coverage, ACE’s consolidated results would nevertheless continue to include any losses above the limit of coverage for so long as the Brandywine companies remain consolidated subsidiaries of ACE.

 

This excerpt taken from the ACE 10-Q filed Nov 7, 2007.

Brandywine Run-off Entities

In addition to housing a significant portion of our A&E exposure, the Brandywine operations include run-off liabilities related to various insurance and reinsurance businesses. The following companies comprise ACE’s Brandywine operations: Century (a Pennsylvania insurer), Century Re (a Pennsylvania insurer), and Century International Reinsurance Company Ltd. (a Bermuda insurer (CIRC)). All of the Brandywine companies are direct or indirect subsidiaries of Brandywine Holdings.

The U.S.-based ACE INA companies assumed two contractual obligations in respect of the Brandywine operations in connection with the Restructuring: a dividend retention fund obligation and a surplus maintenance obligation in the form of an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement. In accordance with the Brandywine restructuring order, INA Financial Corporation established and funded a dividend retention fund (the Dividend Retention Fund) consisting of $50 million plus investment earnings. The full balance of the Dividend Retention Fund was contributed to Century as of December 31, 2002. To the extent future dividends are paid by INA Holdings Corporation to its parent, INA Financial Corporation, and to the extent INA Financial Corporation then pays such dividends to INA Corporation, a portion of those dividends must be withheld to replenish the principal of the Dividend Retention Fund to $50 million within five years. In the six months ended June 30, 2007, and in 2006, 2005, and 2004, no such dividends were paid and therefore, no replenishment of the Dividend Retention Fund occurred. The obligation to maintain and to replenish the Dividend Retention Fund as necessary and to the extent dividends are paid is ongoing until ACE INA receives prior written approval from the Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner to terminate the fund.

In addition, an ACE INA insurance subsidiary provided reinsurance coverage to Century in the amount of $800 million under an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement (the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement) if

 

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the statutory capital and surplus of Century falls below $25 million or if Century lacks liquid assets with which to pay claims as they become due, after giving effect to the contribution of the balance, if any, of the Dividend Retention Fund. Coverage under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement was triggered as of December 31, 2002, following contribution of the balance of the Dividend Retention Fund, because Century’s capital and surplus fell below $25 million at December 31, 2002.

Effective December 31, 2004, ACE INA Holdings contributed $100 million to Century in exchange for a surplus note. After giving effect to the contribution and issuance of the surplus note, the statutory surplus of Century at June 30, 2007, was $25 million and approximately $345 million in statutory-basis losses were ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement. Century reports the amount ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement in accordance with statutory accounting principles, which differ from GAAP by, among other things, allowing Century to discount its asbestos and environmental reserves. For GAAP reporting purposes, intercompany reinsurance recoverables related to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement are eliminated upon consolidation. To estimate ACE’s remaining claim exposure under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement on a GAAP basis, we adjust the statutory cession to exclude the discount embedded in statutory loss reserves and we adjust the statutory provision for uncollectible reinsurance to a GAAP basis amount. At June 30, 2007, approximately $544 million in GAAP basis losses were ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement, leaving a remaining limit of coverage under that agreement of approximately $256 million. At December 31, 2006, the remaining limit of coverage under the agreement was $255 million. While we believe ACE has no legal obligation to fund losses above the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement limit of coverage, ACE’s consolidated results would nevertheless continue to include any losses above the limit of coverage for so long as the Brandywine companies remain consolidated subsidiaries of ACE.

This excerpt taken from the ACE 10-Q filed Aug 7, 2007.

Brandywine Run-off Entities

In addition to housing a significant portion of our A&E exposure, the Brandywine operations include run-off liabilities related to various insurance and reinsurance businesses. The following companies comprise ACE’s Brandywine operations: Century (a Pennsylvania insurer), Century Re (a Pennsylvania insurer) and Century International Reinsurance Company Ltd. (a Bermuda insurer (CIRC)). All of the Brandywine companies are direct or indirect subsidiaries of Brandywine Holdings.

The U.S.-based ACE INA companies assumed two contractual obligations in respect of the Brandywine operations in connection with the Restructuring: a dividend retention fund obligation and a surplus maintenance obligation in the form of an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement. In accordance with the Brandywine restructuring order, INA Financial Corporation established and funded a dividend retention fund (the Dividend Retention Fund) consisting of $50 million plus investment earnings. The full balance of the Dividend Retention Fund was contributed to Century as of December 31, 2002. To the extent future dividends are paid by INA Holdings Corporation to its parent, INA Financial Corporation, and to the extent INA Financial Corporation then pays such dividends to INA Corporation, a portion of those dividends must be withheld to replenish the principal of the Dividend Retention Fund to $50 million within five years. In 2006, 2005, and 2004, no such dividends were paid and therefore, no replenishment of the Dividend Retention Fund occurred. The obligation to maintain and to replenish the Dividend Retention Fund as necessary and to the extent dividends are paid is ongoing until ACE INA receives prior written approval from the Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner to terminate the fund.

In addition, the ACE INA insurance subsidiaries provided insurance coverage to Century in the amount of $800 million under an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement (the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement) if the statutory capital and surplus of Century falls below $25 million or if Century lacks liquid assets with which to pay claims as they become due, after giving effect to the contribution of the balance, if any, of the Dividend Retention Fund. Coverage under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement was triggered as of December 31, 2002, following contribution of the balance of the Dividend Retention Fund, because Century’s capital and surplus fell below $25 million at December 31, 2002.

Effective December 31, 2004, ACE INA Holdings contributed $100 million to Century in exchange for a surplus note. After giving effect to the contribution and issuance of the surplus note, the statutory surplus of Century at March 31, 2007, was $25 million and approximately $346 million in statutory-basis losses were ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement. Century reports the amount ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss

 

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Agreement in accordance with statutory accounting principles, which differ from GAAP by, among other things, allowing Century to discount its asbestos and environmental reserves. For GAAP reporting purposes, intercompany reinsurance recoverables related to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement are eliminated upon consolidation. To estimate ACE’s remaining claim exposure under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement under GAAP, we adjust the statutory cession to exclude the discount embedded in statutory loss reserves and we adjust the statutory provision for uncollectible reinsurance to a GAAP basis amount. At March 31, 2007, approximately $654 million in GAAP basis losses were ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement, leaving a remaining limit of coverage under that agreement of approximately $146 million. At December 31, 2006, the remaining limit of coverage under the agreement was also $146 million. While we believe ACE has no legal obligation to fund losses above the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement limit of coverage, ACE’s consolidated results would nevertheless continue to report any losses above the limit of coverage for so long as the Brandywine companies remain consolidated subsidiaries of ACE.

This excerpt taken from the ACE 10-Q filed May 8, 2007.

Brandywine Run-off Entities

In addition to housing a significant portion of our A&E exposure, the Brandywine operations include run-off liabilities related to various insurance and reinsurance businesses. The following companies comprise ACE’s Brandywine operations: Century (a Pennsylvania insurer), Century Re (a Pennsylvania insurer) and Century International Reinsurance Company Ltd. (a Bermuda insurer (CIRC)). All of the Brandywine companies are direct or indirect subsidiaries of Brandywine Holdings.

The U.S.-based ACE INA companies assumed two contractual obligations in respect of the Brandywine operations in connection with the Restructuring: a dividend retention fund obligation and a surplus maintenance obligation in the form of an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement. In accordance with the Brandywine restructuring order, INA Financial Corporation established and funded a dividend retention fund (the Dividend Retention Fund) consisting of $50 million plus investment earnings. The full balance of the Dividend Retention Fund was contributed to Century as of December 31, 2002. To the extent future dividends are paid by INA Holdings Corporation to its parent, INA Financial Corporation, and to the extent INA Financial Corporation then pays such dividends to INA Corporation, a portion of those dividends must be withheld to replenish the principal of the Dividend Retention Fund to $50 million within five years. In 2006, 2005, and 2004, no such dividends

 

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were paid and, therefore, no replenishment of the Dividend Retention Fund occurred. The obligation to maintain and to replenish the Dividend Retention Fund as necessary and to the extent dividends are paid is ongoing until ACE INA receives prior written approval from the Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner to terminate the fund.

In addition, the ACE INA insurance subsidiaries provided insurance coverage to Century in the amount of $800 million under an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement (the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement) if the statutory capital and surplus of Century falls below $25 million or if Century lacks liquid assets with which to pay claims as they become due, after giving effect to the contribution of the balance, if any, of the Dividend Retention Fund. Coverage under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement was triggered as of December 31, 2002 following contribution of the balance of the Dividend Retention Fund, because Century’s capital and surplus fell below $25 million at December 31, 2002.

Effective December 31, 2004, ACE INA Holdings contributed $100 million to Century in exchange for a surplus note. After giving effect to the contribution and issuance of the surplus note, the statutory surplus of Century at December 31, 2006, was $25 million and approximately $349 million in statutory-basis losses were ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement. Century reports the amount ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement in accordance with statutory accounting principles, which differ from GAAP by, among other things, allowing Century to discount its asbestos and environmental reserves. For GAAP reporting purposes, intercompany reinsurance recoverables related to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement are eliminated upon consolidation. To estimate ACE’s remaining claim exposure under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement under GAAP, we adjust the statutory cession to exclude the discount embedded in statutory loss reserves, and we adjust the statutory provision for uncollectible reinsurance to a GAAP basis amount. At December 31, 2006, approximately $654 million in GAAP basis losses were ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement, leaving a remaining limit of coverage under that agreement of approximately $146 million. At December 31, 2005, the remaining limit of coverage under the agreement was $7 million. The increase in the remaining limit in 2006 was primarily related to the sale of the run-off reinsurance subsidiaries. While we believe ACE has no legal obligation to fund losses above the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement limit of coverage, ACE’s consolidated results would nevertheless continue to report any losses above the limit of coverage for so long as the Brandywine companies remain consolidated subsidiaries of ACE.

This excerpt taken from the ACE 10-K filed Mar 1, 2007.

Brandywine Run-off Entities

In addition to housing a significant portion of the A&E exposure, the Brandywine operations include run-off liabilities related to various insurance and reinsurance businesses. The following companies comprise ACE’s Brandywine operations: Century (a Pennsylvania insurer), Century Re (a Pennsylvania insurer) and Century International Reinsurance Company Ltd. (a Bermuda insurer (CIRC)). All of the Brandywine companies are direct or indirect subsidiaries of Brandywine Holdings.

The U.S.-based ACE INA companies assumed two contractual obligations in respect of the Brandywine operations in connection with the Restructuring: a dividend retention fund obligation and a surplus maintenance obligation in the form of an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement. In accordance with the Brandywine restructuring order, INA Financial Corporation established and funded a dividend retention fund (the Dividend Retention Fund) consisting of $50 million plus investment earnings. The full balance of the Dividend Retention Fund was contributed to Century as of December 31, 2002. To the extent future dividends are paid by INA Holdings Corporation to its parent, INA Financial Corporation, and to the extent INA Financial Corporation then pays such dividends to INA Corporation, a portion of those dividends must be withheld to replenish the principal of the Dividend Retention Fund to $50 million within five years. In 2006, 2005 and 2004, no such dividends were paid and, therefore, no replenishment of the Dividend Retention Fund occurred. The obligation to maintain and to replenish the Dividend Retention Fund as necessary and to the extent dividends are paid is ongoing until ACE INA receives prior written approval from the Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner to terminate the fund.

In addition, the ACE INA insurance subsidiaries provided insurance coverage to Century in the amount of $800 million under an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement (the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement) if the statutory capital and surplus of Century falls below $25 million or if Century lacks liquid assets with which to pay claims as they become due, after giving effect to the contribution of the balance, if any, of the Dividend Retention Fund. Coverage under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement was triggered as of December 31, 2002, following contribution of the balance of the Dividend Retention Fund, because Century’s capital and surplus fell below $25 million at December 31, 2002.

Effective December 31, 2004, ACE INA Holdings contributed $100 million to Century in exchange for a surplus note. After giving effect to the contribution and issuance of the surplus note, the statutory surplus of Century at December 31, 2006 was $25 million and approximately $349 million in statutory-basis losses were ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement. Century reports the amount ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement

 

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (continued)

ACE Limited and Subsidiaries

 

in accordance with statutory accounting principles, which differ from GAAP by, among other things, allowing Century to discount its asbestos and environmental reserves. For GAAP reporting purposes, intercompany reinsurance recoverables related to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement are eliminated upon consolidation. To estimate ACE’s remaining claim exposure under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement under GAAP, the Company adjusts the statutory cession to exclude the discount embedded in statutory loss reserves. At December 31, 2006, approximately $654 million in GAAP basis losses were ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement, leaving a remaining limit of coverage under that agreement of approximately $146 million. At December 31, 2005, the remaining limit of coverage under the agreement was $7 million. The increase in the remaining limit in 2006 was primarily related to the sale of the run-off reinsurance subsidiaries. While we believe ACE has no legal obligation to fund losses above the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement limit of coverage, ACE’s consolidated results would nevertheless continue to report any losses above the limit of coverage for so long as the Brandywine companies remain consolidated subsidiaries of ACE.

 

This excerpt taken from the ACE 10-K filed Mar 16, 2006.

Brandywine Run-off Entities

As part of the acquisition of the CIGNA P&C business, NICO provided $2.5 billion of reinsurance protection to Century on all Brandywine loss and loss adjustment expense reserves and on the A&E reserves of various ACE INA insurance

 

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NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (continued)

ACE Limited and Subsidiaries

 

subsidiaries reinsured by Century (in each case, including uncollectible reinsurance). The benefits of this NICO contract (the “Brandywine NICO Agreement”) flow to the other Brandywine companies and to the ACE INA insurance subsidiaries through reinsurance agreements between those companies and Century. The Brandywine NICO Agreement was exhausted on an incurred basis with the increase in the A&E reserves in the fourth quarter of 2002.

In addition to housing a significant portion of our A&E exposure, the Brandywine operations include run-off liabilities related to various insurance and reinsurance businesses. The following companies comprise ACE’s Brandywine operations: Century, a Pennsylvania insurer, Century Re, ACE American Re, Brandywine Reinsurance Company S.A.-N.V., a Belgium insurer (Brandywine SANV), Century International Reinsurance Company Ltd., a Bermuda insurer (CIRC), and Brandywine Reinsurance Company (UK) Ltd., a U.K. insurer (BRUK). All of the Brandywine companies are direct or indirect subsidiaries of Brandywine Holdings except for BRUK, which is a direct subsidiary of ACE INA International Holdings, Ltd. (ACE INA International Holdings). BRUK’s liabilities have been ceded to Century through CIRC.

The U.S.-based ACE INA companies assumed two contractual obligations in respect of the Brandywine operations in connection with the Restructuring: a dividend retention fund obligation and a surplus maintenance obligation in the form of an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement. In accordance with the Brandywine restructuring order, INA Financial Corporation established and funded a dividend retention fund (the “Dividend Retention Fund”) consisting of $50 million plus investment earnings. The full balance of the Dividend Retention Fund was contributed to Century as of December 31, 2002. To the extent future dividends are paid by INA Holdings Corporation to its parent, INA Financial Corporation, and to the extent INA Financial Corporation then pays such dividends to INA Corporation, a portion of those dividends must be withheld to replenish the principal of the Dividend Retention Fund to $50 million within five years. In 2005, 2004 and 2003, no such dividends were paid, and therefore no replenishment of the Dividend Retention Fund occurred. The obligation to maintain and to replenish the Dividend Retention Fund as necessary and to the extent dividends are paid is ongoing until ACE INA receives prior written approval from the Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner to terminate the fund.

In addition, the ACE INA insurance subsidiaries are obligated to provide insurance coverage to Century in the amount of $800 million under an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement (the “Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement”) if the statutory capital and surplus of Century falls below $25 million or if Century lacks liquid assets with which to pay claims as they become due, after giving effect to the contribution of the balance, if any, of the Dividend Retention Fund. Coverage under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement was triggered as of December 31, 2002 following contribution of the balance of the Dividend Retention Fund, because Century’s capital and surplus fell below $25 million at December 31, 2002.

Effective December 31, 2004, ACE INA Holdings contributed $100 million to Century in exchange for a surplus note. After giving effect to the contribution and issuance of the surplus note, the statutory surplus of Century at December 31, 2005 was $25 million and approximately $465 million in statutory-basis losses were ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement. Century reports the amount ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement in accordance with statutory accounting principles, which differ from GAAP by, among other things, allowing Century to discount its asbestos and environmental reserves. For GAAP reporting purposes, intercompany reinsurance recoverables related to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement are eliminated in consolidation. To estimate ACE’s remaining claim exposure under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement under GAAP, the Company adjusts the statutory cession to exclude the discount embedded in statutory loss reserves. At December 31, 2005, approximately $793 million in GAAP basis losses were ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement, leaving a remaining limit of coverage under that agreement of approximately $7 million. While the Company believes ACE has no legal obligation to fund losses above the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement limit of coverage, ACE’s consolidated results would nevertheless continue to report any losses above the limit of coverage for so long as those Brandywine companies remain consolidated subsidiaries of ACE.

 

This excerpt taken from the ACE 10-Q filed Nov 9, 2005.

Brandywine Run-off Entities

 

As part of the acquisition of the CIGNA P&C business, NICO provided $2.5 billion of reinsurance protection to Century on all Brandywine loss and loss adjustment expense reserves and on the A&E reserves of various ACE INA insurance subsidiaries reinsured by Century (in each case, including uncollectible reinsurance). The benefits of this NICO agreement (the “Brandywine NICO Agreement”) flow to the other Brandywine companies and to the ACE INA insurance subsidiaries through reinsurance agreements between those companies and Century. The Brandywine NICO Agreement was exhausted on an incurred basis with the increase in the A&E reserves in the fourth quarter of 2002.

 

In addition to housing a significant portion of our A&E exposure, the Brandywine operations include run-off liabilities related to various insurance and reinsurance businesses. The following companies comprise ACE’s Brandywine operations: Century, a Pennsylvania insurer, Century Re, ACE American Re, Brandywine Reinsurance Company S.A.-N.V., a Belgium insurer (Brandywine SANV), Century International Reinsurance Company Ltd., a Bermuda insurer (CIRC), and Brandywine Reinsurance Company (UK) Ltd., a U.K. insurer (BRUK). All of the Brandywine companies are direct or indirect subsidiaries of Brandywine Holdings except for BRUK, which is a direct subsidiary of ACE INA International Holdings, Ltd. (ACE INA International Holdings). BRUK’s liabilities have been ceded to Century through CIRC.

 

The U.S.-based ACE INA companies assumed two contractual obligations in respect of the Brandywine operations in connection with the Restructuring: a dividend retention fund obligation and a surplus maintenance obligation in the form of an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement. In accordance with the Brandywine restructuring order, INA Financial Corporation established and funded a dividend retention fund (the “Dividend Retention Fund”) consisting of $50 million plus investment earnings. The full balance of the Dividend Retention Fund was contributed to Century as of December 31, 2002. To the extent future dividends are paid by INA Holdings Corporation to its parent, INA Financial Corporation, and to the extent INA Financial Corporation then pays such dividends to INA Corporation, a portion of those dividends must be withheld to replenish the principal of the Dividend Retention Fund to $50 million within five years. In the nine months ended September 30, 2005, and in 2004 and 2003, no such dividends were paid, and therefore no replenishment of the Dividend Retention Fund occurred. The obligation to maintain and to replenish the Dividend Retention Fund as necessary and to the extent dividends are paid is ongoing until ACE INA receives prior written approval from the Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner to terminate the fund.

 

In addition, the ACE INA insurance subsidiaries are obligated to provide insurance coverage to Century in the amount of $800 million under an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement (the “Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement”) if the statutory capital and surplus of Century falls below $25 million or if Century lacks liquid assets with which to pay claims as they become due, after giving effect to the contribution of the balance, if any, of the Dividend Retention Fund. Coverage under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement was triggered as of December 31, 2002 following contribution of the balance of the Dividend Retention Fund, because Century’s capital and surplus fell below $25 million at December 31, 2002.

 

Effective December 31, 2004, ACE INA Holdings contributed $100 million to Century in exchange for a surplus note. After giving effect to the contribution and issuance of the surplus note, the statutory surplus of Century at June 30, 2005 was $25 million and approximately $451 million in statutory-basis losses were ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement. Century reports the amount ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement in accordance with statutory accounting principles, which differ from GAAP by, among other things, allowing Century to discount its asbestos and environmental reserves. For GAAP reporting purposes, intercompany reinsurance recoverables related to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement are eliminated in consolidation. To estimate ACE’s remaining claim exposure under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement under GAAP, we adjust the statutory cession to exclude the discount embedded in statutory loss reserves. At June 30, 2005, approximately $764 million in GAAP basis losses were ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement, leaving a remaining limit of coverage under that agreement of approximately $36 million. While we believe ACE has no legal obligation to fund losses above the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement limit of coverage, ACE’s consolidated results would nevertheless continue to report any losses above the limit of coverage for so long as those Brandywine companies remain consolidated subsidiaries of ACE.

 

This excerpt taken from the ACE 10-K filed Aug 12, 2005.

Brandywine Run-off Entities

As part of the acquisition of the CIGNA P&C business, NICO provided $2.5 billion of reinsurance protection to Century on all Brandywine loss and loss adjustment expense reserves, and on the A&E reserves of various ACE INA insurance subsidiaries reinsured by Century (in each case, including uncollectible reinsurance). The benefits of this NICO agreement (the “Brandywine NICO Agreement”) flow to the other Brandywine companies and to the ACE INA insurance subsidiaries through reinsurance agreements between those companies and Century. The Brandywine NICO Agreement was exhausted on an incurred basis with the increase in the A&E reserves in the fourth quarter of 2002.

In addition to housing a significant portion of the Company’s A&E exposure, the Brandywine operations include run-off liabilities related to various insurance and reinsurance businesses. The following companies comprise the Company’s Brandywine operations: Century, a Pennsylvania insurer, Century Re, ACE American Re, Brandywine Reinsurance

 

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NOTES  TO  CONSOLIDATED  FINANCIAL  STATEMENTS  (continued)

ACE Limited and Subsidiaries

 

Company S.A.-N.V., a Belgium insurer (Brandywine SANV), Century International Reinsurance Company Ltd., a Bermuda insurer (CIRC), and Brandywine Reinsurance Company (UK) Ltd., a U.K. insurer (BRUK). All of the Brandywine companies are direct or indirect subsidiaries of Brandywine Holdings except for BRUK, which is a direct subsidiary of ACE INA International Holdings, Ltd. (ACE INA International Holdings). BRUK’s liabilities have been ceded to Century through CIRC.

The U.S.-based ACE INA companies assumed two contractual obligations in respect of the Brandywine operations in connection with the Restructuring: a dividend retention fund obligation and a surplus maintenance obligation in the form of an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement. In accordance with the Brandywine restructuring order, INA Financial Corporation established and funded a dividend retention fund (the “Dividend Retention Fund”) consisting of $50 million plus investment earnings. The full balance of the Dividend Retention Fund was contributed to Century as of December 31, 2002. To the extent future dividends are paid by INA Holdings Corporation to its parent, INA Financial Corporation, and to the extent INA Financial Corporation then pays such dividends to INA Corporation, a portion of those dividends must be withheld to replenish the principal of the Dividend Retention Fund to $50 million within five years. In 2004 and 2003, no such dividends were paid, and therefore no replenishment of the Dividend Retention Fund occurred. The obligation to maintain and to replenish the Dividend Retention Fund as necessary and to the extent dividends are paid is ongoing until ACE INA receives prior written approval from the Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner to terminate the fund.

In addition, the ACE INA insurance subsidiaries are obligated to provide insurance coverage to Century in the amount of $800 million under an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement (the “Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement”) if the statutory capital and surplus of Century falls below $25 million or if Century lacks liquid assets with which to pay claims as they become due, after giving effect to the contribution of the balance, if any, of the Dividend Retention Fund. Coverage under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement was triggered as of December 31, 2002 following contribution of the balance of the Dividend Retention Fund, because Century’s capital and surplus fell below $25 million at December 31, 2002.

Effective December 31, 2004, ACE INA Holdings contributed $100 million to Century in exchange for a surplus note. After giving effect to the contribution and issuance of the surplus note, the statutory surplus of Century at December 31, 2004 was $25 million and approximately $458.4 million in statutory-basis losses were ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement. Century reports the amount ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement in accordance with statutory accounting principles, which differ from GAAP by, among other things, allowing Century to discount its asbestos and environmental reserves. For GAAP reporting purposes, intercompany reinsurance recoverables related to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement are eliminated in consolidation. To estimate ACE’s remaining claim exposure under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement under GAAP, the Company adjusts the statutory cession to exclude the discount embedded in statutory loss reserves. At December 31, 2004, approximately $769.1 million in GAAP basis losses were ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement, leaving a remaining limit of coverage under that agreement of approximately $30.9 million. If the limit of coverage were to be exhausted, ACE’s results would nevertheless continue to recognize losses arising from any adverse loss reserve development of the Brandywine entities for so long as those companies remain consolidated subsidiaries of ACE.

 

This excerpt taken from the ACE 10-Q filed Aug 12, 2005.

Brandywine Run-off Entities

 

As part of the acquisition of the CIGNA P&C business, NICO provided $2.5 billion of reinsurance protection to Century on all Brandywine loss and loss adjustment expense reserves and on the A&E reserves of various ACE INA insurance subsidiaries reinsured by Century (in each case, including uncollectible reinsurance). The benefits of this NICO agreement (the “Brandywine NICO Agreement”) flow to the other Brandywine companies and to the ACE INA insurance subsidiaries through reinsurance agreements between those companies and Century. The Brandywine NICO Agreement was exhausted on an incurred basis with the increase in the A&E reserves in the fourth quarter of 2002.

 

In addition to housing a significant portion of our A&E exposure, the Brandywine operations include run-off liabilities related to various insurance and reinsurance businesses. The following companies comprise ACE’s Brandywine operations: Century, a Pennsylvania insurer, Century Re, ACE American Re, Brandywine Reinsurance Company S.A.-N.V., a Belgium insurer (Brandywine SANV), Century International Reinsurance Company Ltd., a Bermuda insurer (CIRC), and Brandywine Reinsurance Company (UK) Ltd., a U.K. insurer (BRUK). All of the Brandywine companies are direct or indirect subsidiaries of Brandywine Holdings except for BRUK, which is a direct subsidiary of ACE INA International Holdings, Ltd. (ACE INA International Holdings). BRUK’s liabilities have been ceded to Century through CIRC.

 

The U.S.-based ACE INA companies assumed two contractual obligations in respect of the Brandywine operations in connection with the Restructuring: a dividend retention fund obligation and a surplus maintenance obligation in the form of an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement. In accordance with the Brandywine restructuring order, INA Financial Corporation established and funded a dividend retention fund (the “Dividend Retention Fund”) consisting of $50 million plus investment earnings. The full balance of the Dividend Retention Fund was contributed to Century as of December 31, 2002. To the extent future dividends are paid by INA Holdings Corporation to its parent, INA Financial Corporation, and to the extent INA Financial Corporation then pays such dividends to INA Corporation, a portion of those dividends must be withheld to replenish the principal of the Dividend Retention Fund to $50 million within five years. In 2004 and 2003, no such

 

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dividends were paid, and therefore no replenishment of the Dividend Retention Fund occurred. The obligation to maintain and to replenish the Dividend Retention Fund as necessary and to the extent dividends are paid is ongoing until ACE INA receives prior written approval from the Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner to terminate the fund.

 

In addition, the ACE INA insurance subsidiaries are obligated to provide insurance coverage to Century in the amount of $800 million under an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement (the “Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement”) if the statutory capital and surplus of Century falls below $25 million or if Century lacks liquid assets with which to pay claims as they become due, after giving effect to the contribution of the balance, if any, of the Dividend Retention Fund. Coverage under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement was triggered as of December 31, 2002 following contribution of the balance of the Dividend Retention Fund, because Century’s capital and surplus fell below $25 million at December 31, 2002.

 

Effective December 31, 2004, ACE INA Holdings contributed $100 million to Century in exchange for a surplus note. After giving effect to the contribution and issuance of the surplus note, the statutory surplus of Century at December 31, 2004 was $25 million and approximately $458 million in statutory-basis losses were ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement. Century reports the amount ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement in accordance with statutory accounting principles, which differ from GAAP by, among other things, allowing Century to discount its asbestos and environmental reserves. For GAAP reporting purposes, intercompany reinsurance recoverables related to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement are eliminated in consolidation. To estimate ACE’s remaining claim exposure under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement under GAAP, we adjust the statutory cession to exclude the discount embedded in statutory loss reserves. At December 31, 2004, approximately $769 million in GAAP basis losses were ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement, leaving a remaining limit of coverage under that agreement of approximately $31 million. If the limit of coverage were to be exhausted, ACE’s results would nevertheless continue to recognize losses arising from any adverse loss reserve development of the Brandywine entities for so long as those companies remain consolidated subsidiaries of ACE.

 

This excerpt taken from the ACE 10-Q filed Aug 12, 2005.

Brandywine Run-off Entities

 

As part of the acquisition of the CIGNA P&C business, NICO provided $2.5 billion of reinsurance protection to Century on all Brandywine loss and loss adjustment expense reserves and on the A&E reserves of various ACE INA insurance subsidiaries reinsured by Century (in each case, including uncollectible reinsurance). The benefits of this NICO agreement (the “Brandywine NICO Agreement”) flow to the other Brandywine companies and to the ACE INA insurance subsidiaries through reinsurance agreements between those companies and Century. The Brandywine NICO Agreement was exhausted on an incurred basis with the increase in the A&E reserves in the fourth quarter of 2002.

 

In addition to housing a significant portion of our A&E exposure, the Brandywine operations include run-off liabilities related to various insurance and reinsurance businesses. The following companies comprise ACE’s Brandywine operations: Century, a Pennsylvania insurer, Century Re, ACE American Re, Brandywine Reinsurance Company S.A.-N.V., a Belgium insurer (Brandywine SANV), Century International Reinsurance Company Ltd., a Bermuda insurer (CIRC), and Brandywine Reinsurance Company (UK) Ltd., a U.K. insurer (BRUK). All of the Brandywine companies are direct or indirect subsidiaries of Brandywine Holdings except for BRUK, which is a direct subsidiary of ACE INA International Holdings, Ltd. (ACE INA International Holdings). BRUK’s liabilities have been ceded to Century through CIRC.

 

The U.S.-based ACE INA companies assumed two contractual obligations in respect of the Brandywine operations in connection with the Restructuring: a dividend retention fund obligation and a surplus maintenance obligation in the form of an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement. In accordance with the Brandywine restructuring order, INA Financial Corporation established and funded a dividend retention fund (the “Dividend Retention Fund”) consisting of $50 million plus investment earnings. The full balance of the Dividend Retention Fund was contributed to Century as of December 31, 2002. To the extent future dividends are paid by INA Holdings Corporation to its parent, INA Financial Corporation, and to the extent INA Financial Corporation then pays such dividends to INA Corporation, a portion of those dividends must be withheld to replenish the principal of the Dividend Retention Fund to $50 million within five years. In the six months ended June 30, 2005, and in 2004 and 2003, no such dividends were paid, and therefore no replenishment of the Dividend Retention Fund occurred. The obligation to maintain and to replenish the Dividend Retention Fund as necessary and to the extent dividends are paid is ongoing until ACE INA receives prior written approval from the Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner to terminate the fund.

 

In addition, the ACE INA insurance subsidiaries are obligated to provide insurance coverage to Century in the amount of $800 million under an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement (the “Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement”) if the statutory capital and surplus of Century falls below $25 million or if Century lacks liquid assets with which to pay claims as they become due, after giving effect to the contribution of the balance, if any, of the Dividend Retention Fund. Coverage under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement was triggered as of December 31, 2002 following contribution of the balance of the Dividend Retention Fund, because Century’s capital and surplus fell below $25 million at December 31, 2002.

 

Effective December 31, 2004, ACE INA Holdings contributed $100 million to Century in exchange for a surplus note. After giving effect to the contribution and issuance of the surplus note, the statutory surplus of Century at March 31, 2005 (the most recently available date) was $25 million and approximately $459 million in statutory-basis losses were ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement. Century reports the amount ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement in accordance with statutory accounting principles, which differ from GAAP by, among other things, allowing Century to discount its asbestos and environmental reserves. For GAAP reporting purposes, intercompany reinsurance recoverables related to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement are eliminated in consolidation. To estimate ACE’s remaining claim exposure under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement under GAAP, we adjust the statutory cession to exclude the discount embedded in statutory loss reserves. At March 31, 2005, approximately $770 million in GAAP basis losses were ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement, leaving a remaining limit of coverage under that agreement of approximately $30 million. If the limit of coverage were to be exhausted, ACE’s results would nevertheless continue to recognize losses arising from any adverse loss reserve development of the Brandywine entities for so long as those companies remain consolidated subsidiaries of ACE.

 

This excerpt taken from the ACE 10-Q filed May 10, 2005.

Brandywine Run-off Entities

 

As part of the acquisition of the CIGNA P&C business, NICO provided $2.5 billion of reinsurance protection to Century on all Brandywine loss and loss adjustment expense reserves and on the A&E reserves of various ACE INA insurance subsidiaries reinsured by Century (in each case, including uncollectible reinsurance). The benefits of this NICO agreement (the “Brandywine NICO Agreement”) flow to the other Brandywine companies and to the ACE INA insurance subsidiaries through reinsurance agreements between those companies and Century. The Brandywine NICO Agreement was exhausted on an incurred basis with the increase in the A&E reserves in the fourth quarter of 2002.

 

In addition to housing a significant portion of our A&E exposure, the Brandywine operations include run-off liabilities related to various insurance and reinsurance businesses. The following companies comprise ACE’s Brandywine operations: Century, a Pennsylvania insurer, Century Re, ACE American Re, Brandywine Reinsurance Company S.A.-N.V., a Belgium insurer (Brandywine SANV), Century International Reinsurance Company Ltd., a Bermuda insurer (CIRC), and Brandywine Reinsurance Company (UK) Ltd., a U.K. insurer (BRUK). All of the Brandywine companies are direct or indirect subsidiaries of Brandywine Holdings except for BRUK, which is a direct subsidiary of ACE INA International Holdings, Ltd. (ACE INA International Holdings). BRUK’s liabilities have been ceded to Century through CIRC.

 

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The U.S.-based ACE INA companies assumed two contractual obligations in respect of the Brandywine operations in connection with the Restructuring: a dividend retention fund obligation and a surplus maintenance obligation in the form of an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement. In accordance with the Brandywine restructuring order, INA Financial Corporation established and funded a dividend retention fund (the “Dividend Retention Fund”) consisting of $50 million plus investment earnings. The full balance of the Dividend Retention Fund was contributed to Century as of December 31, 2002. To the extent future dividends are paid by INA Holdings Corporation to its parent, INA Financial Corporation, and to the extent INA Financial Corporation then pays such dividends to INA Corporation, a portion of those dividends must be withheld to replenish the principal of the Dividend Retention Fund to $50 million within five years. In 2004 and 2003, no such dividends were paid, and therefore no replenishment of the Dividend Retention Fund occurred. The obligation to maintain and to replenish the Dividend Retention Fund as necessary and to the extent dividends are paid is ongoing until ACE INA receives prior written approval from the Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner to terminate the fund.

 

In addition, the ACE INA insurance subsidiaries are obligated to provide insurance coverage to Century in the amount of $800 million under an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement (the “Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement”) if the statutory capital and surplus of Century falls below $25 million or if Century lacks liquid assets with which to pay claims as they become due, after giving effect to the contribution of the balance, if any, of the Dividend Retention Fund. Coverage under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement was triggered as of December 31, 2002 following contribution of the balance of the Dividend Retention Fund, because Century’s capital and surplus fell below $25 million at December 31, 2002.

 

Effective December 31, 2004, ACE INA Holdings contributed $100 million to Century in exchange for a surplus note. After giving effect to the contribution and issuance of the surplus note, the statutory surplus of Century at December 31, 2004 was $25 million and approximately $458 million in statutory-basis losses were ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement. Century reports the amount ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement in accordance with statutory accounting principles, which differ from GAAP by, among other things, allowing Century to discount its asbestos and environmental reserves. For GAAP reporting purposes, intercompany reinsurance recoverables related to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement are eliminated in consolidation. To estimate ACE’s remaining claim exposure under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement under GAAP, we adjust the statutory cession to exclude the discount embedded in statutory loss reserves. At December 31, 2004, approximately $769 million in GAAP basis losses were ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement, leaving a remaining limit of coverage under that agreement of approximately $31 million. If the limit of coverage were to be exhausted, ACE’s results would nevertheless continue to recognize losses arising from any adverse loss reserve development of the Brandywine entities for so long as those companies remain consolidated subsidiaries of ACE.

 

This excerpt taken from the ACE 10-K filed Mar 16, 2005.

Brandywine Run-off Entities

As part of the acquisition of the CIGNA P&C business, NICO provided $2.5 billion of reinsurance protection to Century on all Brandywine loss and loss adjustment expense reserves and on the A&E reserves of various ACE INA insurance subsidiaries reinsured by Century (in each case, including uncollectible reinsurance). The benefits of this NICO agreement (the “Brandywine NICO Agreement”) flow to the other Brandywine companies and to the ACE INA insurance subsidiaries through reinsurance agreements between those companies and Century. The Brandywine NICO Agreement was exhausted on an incurred basis with the increase in the A&E reserves in the fourth quarter of 2002.

In addition to housing a significant portion of the Company’s A&E exposure, the Brandywine operations include run-off liabilities related to various insurance and reinsurance businesses. The following companies comprise the Company’s Brandywine operations: Century, a Pennsylvania insurer, Century Re, ACE American Re, Brandywine Reinsurance Company S.A.-N.V., a Belgium insurer (Brandywine SANV), Century International Reinsurance Company Ltd., a Bermuda insurer (CIRC), and Brandywine Reinsurance Company (UK) Ltd., a U.K. insurer (BRUK). All of the Brandywine companies are direct or indirect subsidiaries of Brandywine Holdings except for BRUK, which is a direct subsidiary of ACE INA International Holdings, Ltd. (ACE INA International Holdings). BRUK’s liabilities have been ceded to Century through CIRC.

The U.S.-based ACE INA companies assumed two contractual obligations in respect of the Brandywine operations in connection with the Restructuring: a dividend retention fund obligation and a surplus maintenance obligation in the form of an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement. In accordance with the Brandywine restructuring order, INA Financial Corporation established and funded a dividend retention fund (the “Dividend Retention Fund”) consisting of $50

 

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NOTES  TO  CONSOLIDATED  FINANCIAL  STATEMENTS  (continued)

ACE Limited and Subsidiaries

 

million plus investment earnings. The full balance of the Dividend Retention Fund was contributed to Century as of December 31, 2002. To the extent future dividends are paid by INA Holdings Corporation to its parent, INA Financial Corporation, and to the extent INA Financial Corporation then pays such dividends to INA Corporation, a portion of those dividends must be withheld to replenish the principal of the Dividend Retention Fund to $50 million within five years. In 2004 and 2003, no such dividends were paid, and therefore no replenishment of the Dividend Retention Fund occurred. The obligation to maintain and to replenish the Dividend Retention Fund as necessary and to the extent dividends are paid is ongoing until ACE INA receives prior written approval from the Pennsylvania Insurance Commissioner to terminate the fund.

In addition, the ACE INA insurance subsidiaries are obligated to provide insurance coverage to Century in the amount of $800 million under an aggregate excess of loss reinsurance agreement (the “Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement”) if the statutory capital and surplus of Century falls below $25 million or if Century lacks liquid assets with which to pay claims as they become due, after giving effect to the contribution of the balance, if any, of the Dividend Retention Fund. Coverage under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement was triggered as of December 31, 2002 following contribution of the balance of the Dividend Retention Fund, because Century’s capital and surplus fell below $25 million at December 31, 2002.

Effective December 31, 2004, ACE INA Holdings contributed $100 million to Century in exchange for a surplus note. After giving effect to the contribution and issuance of the surplus note, the statutory surplus of Century at December 31, 2004 was $25 million and approximately $458.4 million in statutory-basis losses were ceded to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement. Century reports the amount ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement in accordance with statutory accounting principles, which differ from GAAP by, among other things, allowing Century to discount its asbestos and environmental reserves. For GAAP reporting purposes, intercompany reinsurance recoverables related to the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement are eliminated in consolidation. To estimate ACE’s remaining claim exposure under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement under GAAP, the Company adjusts the statutory cession to exclude the discount embedded in statutory loss reserves. At December 31, 2004, approximately $769.1 million in GAAP basis losses were ceded under the Aggregate Excess of Loss Agreement, leaving a remaining limit of coverage under that agreement of approximately $30.9 million. If the limit of coverage were to be exhausted, ACE’s results would nevertheless continue to recognize losses arising from any adverse loss reserve development of the Brandywine entities for so long as those companies remain consolidated subsidiaries of ACE.

 

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