ADBE » Topics » NOTE 11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

This excerpt taken from the ADBE 10-Q filed Apr 4, 2008.

NOTE 13.    COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

Lease Commitments

        We occupy three office buildings in San Jose, California where our corporate headquarters are located. We reference these office buildings as the Almaden Tower and the East and West Towers.

        In August 2004, we extended the lease agreement for our East and West Towers for an additional five years with an option to extend for an additional five years solely at our election. In March 2007, the

19


ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(In thousands, except per share data)

(Unaudited)

NOTE 13.    COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)


Almaden Tower lease was extended for five years, with a renewal option for an additional five years solely at our election. As part of the lease extensions, we purchased the lease receivable from the lessor of the East and West Towers for $126.8 million and a portion of the lease receivable from the lessor of the Almaden Tower for $80.4 million, both of which are recorded as investments in lease receivables on our consolidated balance sheet. This purchase may be credited against the residual value guarantee if we purchase the properties or will be repaid from the sale proceeds if the properties are sold to third parties. Under the agreement for the East and West Towers and the agreement for the Almaden Tower, we have the option to purchase the buildings at any time during the lease term for approximately $143.2 million and $103.6 million, respectively. The residual value guarantees under the East and West Towers and the Almaden Tower obligations are $126.8 million and $89.4 million, respectively.

        These two leases are both subject to standard covenants including certain financial ratios that are reported to the lessors quarterly. As of February 29, 2008, we were in compliance with all covenants. In the case of a default, the lessor may demand we purchase the buildings for an amount equal to the lease balance, or require that we remarket or relinquish the buildings. Both leases qualify for operating lease accounting treatment under SFAS No. 13, "Accounting for Leases," and, as such, the buildings and the related obligations are not included on our consolidated balance sheet. We utilized this type of financing in order to access bank-provided funding at the most favorable rates and to provide the lowest total cost of occupancy for the headquarter buildings. At the end of the lease term, we can extend the lease for an additional five year term, purchase the buildings for the lease balance, remarket or relinquish the buildings. If we choose to remarket or are required to do so upon relinquishing the buildings, we are bound to arrange the sale of the buildings to an unrelated party and will be required to pay the lessor any shortfall between the net remarketing proceeds and the lease balance, up to the residual value guarantee amount.

Guarantees

        The lease agreements for our corporate headquarters provide for residual value guarantees as noted above. Under FASB Interpretation No. 45, ("FIN 45"), "Guarantor's Accounting and Disclosure Requirements for Guarantees, Including Indirect Guarantees of Indebtedness of Others", the fair value of a residual value guarantee in lease agreements entered into after December 31, 2002 must be recognized as a liability on our consolidated balance sheet. As such, we recognized $5.2 million and $3.0 million in liabilities, related to the East and West Towers and Almaden Tower leases, respectively. These liabilities are recorded in other long-term liabilities with the offsetting entry recorded as prepaid rent in other assets. The balance will be amortized to the income statement over the life of the leases. As of February 29, 2008 and November 30, 2007, the unamortized portion of the fair value of the residual value guarantees, for both leases, remaining in other long-term liabilities and prepaid rent was $3.8 million and $4.2 million, respectively.

Royalties

        We have certain royalty commitments associated with the shipment and licensing of certain products. Royalty expense is generally based on a dollar amount per unit shipped or a percentage of the underlying revenue.

20


ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(In thousands, except per share data)

(Unaudited)

NOTE 13.    COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

Indemnifications

        In the normal course of business, we provide indemnifications of varying scope to customers against claims of intellectual property infringement made by third parties arising from the use of our products. Historically, costs related to these indemnification provisions have not been significant and we are unable to estimate the maximum potential impact of these indemnification provisions on our future results of operations.

        To the extent permitted under Delaware law, we have agreements whereby we indemnify our directors and officers for certain events or occurrences while the director or officer is, or was serving, at our request in such capacity. The indemnification period covers all pertinent events and occurrences during the director's or officer's lifetime. The maximum potential amount of future payments we could be required to make under these indemnification agreements is unlimited; however, we have director and officer insurance coverage that reduces our exposure and enables us to recover a portion of any future amounts paid. We believe the estimated fair value of these indemnification agreements in excess of applicable insurance coverage is minimal.

        As part of our limited partnership interest in Adobe Ventures, we have provided a general indemnification to Granite Ventures, an independent venture capital firm and sole general partner of Adobe Ventures, for certain events or occurrences while Granite Ventures is, or was serving, at our request in such capacity provided that Granite Ventures acts in good faith on behalf of the partnership. We are unable to develop an estimate of the maximum potential amount of future payments that could potentially result from any hypothetical future claim, but believe the risk of having to make any payments under this general indemnification to be remote.

Legal Proceedings

        On October 13, 2006, a purported shareholder derivative action entitled Steven Staehr v. Bruce R. Chizen, et al was filed in the Superior Court of California for the County of Santa Clara against certain of our current and former officers and directors, and against Adobe as a nominal defendant. The complaint asserts that stock option grants to executives were priced retroactively by Adobe and were improperly accounted for and alleges various causes of action based on that assertion. The complaint seeks payment by the defendants to Adobe of damages allegedly suffered by it and disgorgement of profits, as well as injunctive relief. On November 27, 2007 the Court granted defendants' demurrer to the second amended complaint and dismissed it without leave to amend. On December 11, 2007, plaintiff filed a motion for reconsideration of the Court's order sustaining the demurrer without leave to amend, but that motion was denied by the Court on January 29, 2008. The Court is expected to issue a final judgment dismissing the complaint shortly.

        In connection with our anti-piracy efforts, conducted both internally and through organizations such as the Business Software Alliance, from time to time we undertake litigation against alleged copyright infringers. Such lawsuits may lead to counter-claims alleging improper use of litigation or violation of other local laws. We believe we have valid defenses with respect to such counter-claims; however, it is possible that our consolidated financial position, cash flows or results of operations could be affected in any particular period by the resolution of one or more of these counter-claims.

21


ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED

NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(In thousands, except per share data)

(Unaudited)

NOTE 13.    COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

        From time to time, in addition to those identified above, Adobe is subject to legal proceedings, claims, investigations and proceedings in the ordinary course of business, including claims of alleged infringement of third-party patents and other intellectual property rights, commercial, employment and other matters. In accordance with GAAP, Adobe makes a provision for a liability when it is both probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. These provisions are reviewed at least quarterly and adjusted to reflect the impacts of negotiations, settlements, rulings, advice of legal counsel, and other information and events pertaining to a particular case. Litigation is inherently unpredictable. However, we believe that we have valid defenses with respect to the legal matters pending against Adobe. It is possible, nevertheless, that our consolidated financial position, cash flows or results of operations could be affected by the resolution of one or more of such contingencies.

This excerpt taken from the ADBE 10-Q filed Oct 2, 2007.

NOTE 11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

In connection with our anti-piracy efforts, conducted both internally and through organizations such as the Business Software Alliance, from time to time we undertake litigation against alleged copyright infringers. Such lawsuits may lead to counter-claims alleging improper use of litigation or violation of other local laws. We believe we have valid defenses with respect to such counter-claims; however, it is possible that our consolidated financial position, cash flows or results of operations could be affected in any particular period by the resolution of one or more of these counter-claims.

From time to time, in addition to those identified above, Adobe is subject to legal proceedings, claims, investigations and proceedings in the ordinary course of business, including claims of alleged infringement of third-party patents and other intellectual property rights, commercial, employment and other matters. In accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, Adobe makes a provision for a liability when it is both probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. These provisions are reviewed at least quarterly and adjusted to reflect the impacts of negotiations, settlements, rulings, advice of legal counsel, and other information and events pertaining to a particular case. Litigation is inherently unpredictable. However, we believe that we have valid defenses with respect to the legal matters pending against Adobe. It is possible, nevertheless, that our consolidated financial position, cash flows or results of operations could be affected by the resolution of one or more of such contingencies.

This excerpt taken from the ADBE 10-Q filed Jul 10, 2007.

NOTE 11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

Lease Commitments

We occupy three office buildings in San Jose, California where our corporate headquarters are located. We reference these office buildings as the Almaden Tower and the East and West Towers.

In August 2004, we extended the lease agreement for our East and West Towers for an additional five years with an option to extend for an additional five years solely at our election. In March 2007, the Almaden Tower lease was extended for five years, with a renewal option for an additional five years solely at our election. As part of the lease extensions, we purchased the lease receivable from the lessor of the East and West Towers for $126.8 million and a portion of the lease receivable from the lessor of the Almaden Tower for $80.4 million, both of which are recorded as investments in lease receivables on our consolidated balance sheet. This purchase may be credited against the residual value guarantee if we purchase the properties or will be repaid from the sale proceeds if the properties are sold to third parties. Under the agreement for the East and West Towers and the agreement for the Almaden Tower, we have

16




ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
(In thousands, except per share data)
(Unaudited)

NOTE 11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

the option to purchase the buildings at any time during the lease term for approximately $143.2 million and $103.6 million, respectively. The residual value guarantees under the East and West Towers and the Almaden Tower obligations are $126.8 million and $89.4 million, respectively.

These two leases are both subject to standard covenants including certain financial ratios that are reported to the lessors quarterly. As of June 1, 2007, we were in compliance with all covenants. In the case of a default, the lessor may demand we purchase the buildings for an amount equal to the lease balance, or require that we remarket or relinquish the buildings. Both leases qualify for operating lease accounting treatment under FASB Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 13, “Accounting for Leases,” and, as such, the buildings and the related obligations are not included on our consolidated balance sheet. We utilized this type of financing in order to access bank-provided funding at the most favorable rates and to provide the lowest total cost of occupancy for the headquarter buildings. At the end of the lease term, we can extend the lease for an additional five year term, purchase the buildings for the lease balance, remarket or relinquish the buildings. If we choose to remarket or are required to do so upon relinquishing the buildings, we are bound to arrange the sale of the buildings to an unrelated party and will be required to pay the lessor any shortfall between the net remarketing proceeds and the lease balance, up to the residual value guarantee amount.

Guarantees

The lease agreements for our corporate headquarters provide for residual value guarantees as noted above. Under FASB Interpretation No. 45, “Guarantor’s Accounting and Disclosure Requirements for Guarantees, Including Indirect Guarantees of Indebtedness of Others”, the fair value of a residual value guarantee in lease agreements entered into after December 31, 2002, must be recognized as a liability on our consolidated balance sheet. As such, we recognized $5.2 million and $3 million in liabilities, related to the extended East and West Towers and Almaden Tower leases, respectively, upon entering into the leases. These liabilities are recorded in other long-term liabilities with the offsetting entry recorded as prepaid rent in other assets. The balance will be amortized to the income statement over the life of the leases. As of June 1, 2007, the unamortized portion of the fair value of the residual value guarantees, for both leases, remaining in other long-term liabilities and prepaid rent was $5 million.

Royalties

We have certain royalty commitments associated with the shipment and licensing of certain products. Royalty expense is generally based on a dollar amount per unit shipped or a percentage of the underlying revenue.

Indemnifications

In the normal course of business, we provide indemnifications of varying scope to customers against claims of intellectual property infringement made by third parties arising from the use of our products. Historically, costs related to these indemnification provisions have not been significant and we are unable

17




ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
(In thousands, except per share data)
(Unaudited)

NOTE 11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

to estimate the maximum potential impact of these indemnification provisions on our future results of operations.

To the extent permitted under Delaware law, we have agreements whereby we indemnify our officers and directors for certain events or occurrences while the officer or director is, or was serving, at our request in such capacity. The indemnification period covers all pertinent events and occurrences during the officer’s or director’s lifetime. The maximum potential amount of future payments we could be required to make under these indemnification agreements is unlimited; however, we have director and officer insurance coverage that reduces our exposure and enables us to recover a portion of any future amounts paid. We believe the estimated fair value of these indemnification agreements in excess of applicable insurance coverage is minimal.

As part of our limited partnership interests in Adobe Ventures, we have provided a general indemnification to Granite Ventures, an independent venture capital firm and sole general partner of Adobe Ventures, for certain events or occurrences while Granite Ventures is, or was serving, at our request in such capacity provided that Granite Ventures acts in good faith on behalf of the partnerships. We are unable to develop an estimate of the maximum potential amount of future payments that could potentially result from any hypothetical future claim, but believe the risk of having to make any payments under this general indemnification to be remote.

Legal Proceedings

On September 6, 2002, Plaintiff Fred B. Dufresne filed suit against Adobe, Microsoft Corporation, Macromedia, Inc. and Trellix Corporation in the U.S. District Court, District of Massachusetts, alleging infringement of U.S. Patent No. 5,835,712, entitled “Client-Server System Using Embedded Hypertext Tags for Application and Database Development.” In May 2007, we resolved this matter without any material effect on our financial statements.

On October 13, 2006, a purported shareholder derivative action entitled Steven Staehr v. Bruce R. Chizen, et al was filed in the Superior Court of California for the County of Santa Clara against certain of the Company’s current and former officers and directors, and against Adobe as a nominal defendant. The complaint asserts that stock option grants to executives were priced retroactively by Adobe and were improperly accounted for, and alleges various causes of action based on that assertion. The complaint seeks payment by the defendants to Adobe of damages allegedly suffered by it and disgorgement of profits, as well as injunctive relief. As of June 1, 2007, we do not believe that a loss is probable or estimable.

In connection with our anti-piracy efforts, conducted both internally and through organizations such as the Business Software Alliance, from time to time we undertake litigation against alleged copyright infringers. Such lawsuits may lead to counter-claims alleging improper use of litigation or violation of other local laws. We believe we have valid defenses with respect to such counter-claims; however, it is possible that our consolidated financial position, cash flows or results of operations could be affected in any particular period by the resolution of one or more of these counter-claims.

18




ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
(In thousands, except per share data)
(Unaudited)

NOTE 11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

From time to time, in addition to those identified above, Adobe is subject to legal proceedings, claims, investigations and proceedings in the ordinary course of business, including claims of alleged infringement of third-party patents and other intellectual property rights, commercial, employment and other matters. In accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, Adobe makes a provision for a liability when it is both probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. These provisions are reviewed at least quarterly and adjusted to reflect the impacts of negotiations, settlements, rulings, advice of legal counsel, and other information and events pertaining to a particular case. Litigation is inherently unpredictable. However, we believe that we have valid defenses with respect to the legal matters pending against Adobe. It is possible, nevertheless, that our consolidated financial position, cash flows or results of operations could be affected by the resolution of one or more of such contingencies.

This excerpt taken from the ADBE 10-Q filed Apr 9, 2007.

NOTE 11.  COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

Lease Commitments

We occupy three office buildings in San Jose, California where our corporate headquarters are located. We reference these office buildings as the “Almaden Tower” and the “East and West Towers.”

In December 2003, upon completion of construction, we began a five year lease agreement for the Almaden Tower. Under the agreement, we have the option to purchase the building at any time during the lease term for approximately $103.0 million. The maximum recourse amount (“residual value guarantee”) under this obligation is $90.8 million. This lease has been subsequently amended and extended effective March 26, 2007. See Note 14 of our Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for more detailed information.

In August 2004, we extended the lease agreement for our East and West Towers for an additional five years with an option to extend for an additional five years solely at Adobe’s election. As part of the lease extension, we purchased a portion of the lease receivable from the lessor for $126.8 million, which is recorded as an investment in lease receivable on our consolidated balance sheet. This purchase may be credited against the residual value guarantee if we purchase the properties or will be repaid from the sale proceeds if the properties are sold to third parties. Under the agreement for the East and West Towers, we have the option to purchase the buildings at any time during the lease term for approximately $143.2 million. The maximum recourse amount (“residual value guarantee”) under this obligation is $126.8 million.

These two leases are both subject to standard covenants including liquidity, leverage and profitability ratios that are reported to the lessors quarterly. As of March 2, 2007, we were in compliance with all covenants. In the case of a default, the lessor may demand we purchase the buildings for an amount equal to the lease balance, or require that we remarket or relinquish the buildings. Both leases qualify for operating lease accounting treatment under Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 13, “Accounting for Leases,” and, as such, the buildings and the related obligations are not included on our consolidated balance sheet. We utilized this type of financing in order to access bank-provided funding at the most favorable rates and to provide the lowest total cost of occupancy for the headquarter buildings. At the end of the lease term, we can extend the lease for an additional five year term (for the East and West Towers lease only), purchase the buildings for the lease balance, remarket or relinquish the buildings. If we choose to remarket or are required to do so upon relinquishing the buildings, we are bound to arrange the sale of the buildings to an unrelated party and will be required to pay the lessor any shortfall between the net remarketing proceeds and the lease balance, up to the maximum recourse amount.

16




ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
(In thousands, except per share data)
(Unaudited)

NOTE 11.  COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

Guarantees

The lease agreements for our corporate headquarters provide for residual value guarantees. Under FIN 45, the fair value of a residual value guarantee in lease agreements entered into after December 31, 2002, must be recognized as a liability on our consolidated balance sheet. As such, we recognized a $5.2 million liability related to the East and West Tower lease that was extended in August 2004. This liability is recorded in other long-term liabilities with the offsetting entry recorded as prepaid rent in other assets. The balance will be amortized to the income statement over the life of the lease. As of March 2, 2007, the unamortized portion of the fair value of the residual value guarantee remaining in other long-term liabilities and prepaid rent was $2.5 million.

Royalties

We have certain royalty commitments associated with the shipment and licensing of certain products. Royalty expense is generally based on a dollar amount per unit shipped or a percentage of the underlying revenue.

Indemnifications

In the normal course of business, we provide indemnifications of varying scope to customers against claims of intellectual property infringement made by third parties arising from the use of our products. Historically, costs related to these indemnification provisions have not been significant and we are unable to estimate the maximum potential impact of these indemnification provisions on our future results of operations.

To the extent permitted under Delaware law, we have agreements whereby we indemnify our officers and directors for certain events or occurrences while the officer or director is, or was serving, at our request in such capacity. The indemnification period covers all pertinent events and occurrences during the officer’s or director’s lifetime. The maximum potential amount of future payments we could be required to make under these indemnification agreements is unlimited; however, we have director and officer insurance coverage that reduces our exposure and enables us to recover a portion of any future amounts paid. We believe the estimated fair value of these indemnification agreements in excess of applicable insurance coverage is minimal.

As part of our limited partnership interests in Adobe Ventures, we have provided a general indemnification to Granite Ventures, an independent venture capital firm and sole general partner of Adobe Ventures, for certain events or occurrences while Granite Ventures is, or was serving, at our request in such capacity provided that Granite Ventures acts in good faith on behalf of the partnerships. We are unable to develop an estimate of the maximum potential amount of future payments that could potentially result from any hypothetical future claim, but believe the risk of having to make any payments under this general indemnification to be remote.

17




ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
(In thousands, except per share data)
(Unaudited)

NOTE 11.  COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

Legal Proceedings

On September 6, 2002, Plaintiff Fred B. Dufresne filed suit against Adobe, Microsoft Corporation, Macromedia, Inc. and Trellix Corporation in the U.S. District Court, District of Massachusetts, alleging infringement of U.S. Patent No. 5,835,712, entitled “Client-Server System Using Embedded Hypertext Tags for Application and Database Development.” The Plaintiff’s complaint asserts that “defendants have infringed, and continue to infringe, one or more claims of the ‘712 patent by making, using, selling and/or offering for sale, inter alia, products supporting Microsoft Active Server Pages technology.” Plaintiff seeks unspecified compensatory damages, preliminary and permanent injunctive relief, trebling of damages for “willful infringement,” and fees and costs. We believe the action has no merit and are vigorously defending against it. As of March 2, 2007, we do not believe that a loss is probable or estimable.

On October 13, 2006, a purported shareholder derivative action entitled Steven Staehr v. Bruce R. Chizen, et al was filed in the Superior Court of California for the County of Santa Clara against certain of the Company’s current and former officers and directors, and against Adobe as a nominal defendant. The complaint asserts that stock option grants to executives were priced retroactively by Adobe and were improperly accounted for, and alleges various causes of action based on that assertion. The complaint seeks payment by the defendants to Adobe of damages allegedly suffered by it and disgorgement of profits, as well as injunctive relief. As of March 2, 2007, we do not believe that a loss is probable or estimable.

In connection with our anti-piracy efforts, conducted both internally and through the Business Software Alliance, from time to time we undertake litigation against alleged copyright infringers. Such lawsuits may lead to counter-claims alleging improper use of litigation or violation of other local law and have recently increased in frequency, especially in Latin American countries. We believe we have valid defenses with respect to such counter-claims; however, it is possible that our consolidated financial position, cash flows or results of operations could be affected in any particular period by the resolution of one or more of these counter-claims.

From time to time, in addition to those identified above, Adobe is subject to legal proceedings, claims, investigations and proceedings in the ordinary course of business, including claims of alleged infringement of third-party patents and other intellectual property rights, commercial, employment and other matters. In accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, Adobe makes a provision for a liability when it is both probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. These provisions are reviewed at least quarterly and adjusted to reflect the impacts of negotiations, settlements, rulings, advice of legal counsel, and other information and events pertaining to a particular case. Litigation is inherently unpredictable. However, we believe that we have valid defenses with respect to the legal matters pending against Adobe. It is possible, nevertheless, that our consolidated financial position, cash flows or results of operations could be affected by the resolution of one or more of such contingencies.

18




ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
(In thousands, except per share data)
(Unaudited)

This excerpt taken from the ADBE 10-Q filed Oct 11, 2006.

NOTE 11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

Lease Commitments

We lease certain facilities and some of our equipment under noncancelable operating lease arrangements that expire at various dates through 2025. We also have one land lease that expires in 2091.

We occupy three office buildings in San Jose, California where our corporate headquarters are located. We reference these office buildings as the “Almaden tower” and the “East and West towers.”

In December 2003, upon completion of construction, we began a five year lease agreement for the Almaden tower. Under the agreement, we have the option to purchase the building at any time during the lease term for the lease balance, which is approximately $103.0 million. The maximum recourse amount (“residual value guarantee”) under this obligation is $90.8 million.

In August 2004, we extended the lease agreement for our East and West towers for an additional five years with an option to extend for an additional five years solely at Adobe’s election. As part of the lease extension, we purchased a portion of the lease receivable of the lessor for $126.8 million, which is recorded as an investment in lease receivable on our consolidated balance sheet. This purchase may be credited against the residual value guarantee if we purchase the properties or repaid from the sale proceeds if the properties are sold to third parties. Under the agreement for the East and West towers, we have the option to purchase the buildings at any time during the lease term for the lease balance, which is approximately $143.2 million. The maximum recourse amount (“residual value guarantee”) under this obligation is $126.8 million.

These two leases are both subject to standard covenants including liquidity, leverage and profitability ratios that are reported to the lessors quarterly. As of September 1, 2006, we were in compliance with all covenants. In the case of a default, the lessor may demand we purchase the buildings for an amount equal to the lease balance, or require that we remarket or relinquish the buildings. Both leases qualify for operating lease accounting treatment under Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 13, “Accounting for Leases,” and, as such, the buildings and the related obligations are not included on our consolidated balance sheet. We utilized this type of financing in order to access bank-provided funding at the most favorable rates and to provide the lowest total cost of occupancy for the headquarter buildings. At the end of the lease term, we can extend the lease for an additional five year term (for the East and West towers lease only), purchase the buildings for the lease balance, remarket or relinquish the buildings. If we choose to remarket or are required to do so upon relinquishing the buildings, we are bound to arrange the

28




ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
(In thousands, except share and per share data)
(Unaudited)

NOTE 11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

sale of the buildings to an unrelated party and will be required to pay the lessor any shortfall between the net remarketing proceeds and the lease balance, up to the maximum recourse amount.

Royalties

We have certain royalty commitments associated with the shipment and licensing of certain products. Royalty expense is generally based on a dollar amount per unit shipped or a percentage of the underlying revenue.

Guarantees

The lease agreements for our corporate headquarters provide for residual value guarantees. Under FASB Interpretation No. 45 (“FIN 45”), “Guarantor’s Accounting and Disclosure Requirements for Guarantees, Including Indirect Guarantees of Indebtedness of Others,” the fair value of a residual value guarantee in lease agreements entered into after December 31, 2002, must be recognized as a liability on our consolidated balance sheet. As such, we recognized a $5.2 million liability related to the East and West towers lease that was extended in August 2004. This liability is recorded in other long-term liabilities with the offsetting entry recorded as prepaid rent in other assets. The balance will be amortized to the income statement over the life of the lease. As of September 1, 2006, the unamortized portion of the fair value of the residual value guarantee remaining in other long-term liabilities and prepaid rent was $3.0 million.

Indemnifications

In the normal course of business, we provide indemnifications of varying scope to customers against claims of intellectual property infringement made by third parties arising from the use of our products. Historically, costs related to these indemnification provisions have not been significant and we are unable to estimate the maximum potential impact of these indemnification provisions on our future results of operations.

To the extent permitted under Delaware law, we have agreements whereby we indemnify our officers and directors for certain events or occurrences while the officer or director is, or was serving, at our request in such capacity. The indemnification period covers all pertinent events and occurrences during the officer’s or director’s lifetime. The maximum potential amount of future payments we could be required to make under these indemnification agreements is unlimited; however, we have director and officer insurance coverage that limits our exposure and enables us to recover a portion of any future amounts paid. We believe the estimated fair value of these indemnification agreements in excess of applicable insurance coverage is minimal.

As part of our limited partnership interests in Adobe Ventures, we have provided a general indemnification to Granite Ventures, an independent venture capital firm and sole general partner of Adobe Ventures, for certain events or occurrences while Granite Ventures is, or was serving, at our request in such capacity provided that Granite Ventures acts in good faith on behalf of the partnerships. We are unable to develop an estimate of the maximum potential amount of future payments that could

29




ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
(In thousands, except share and per share data)
(Unaudited)

NOTE 11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

Rpotentially result from any hypothetical future claim, but believe the risk of having to make any payments under this general indemnification to be remote.

Legal Proceedings

On September 6, 2002, Plaintiff Fred B. Dufresne filed suit against Adobe, Microsoft Corporation, Macromedia, Inc. and Trellix Corporation in the U.S. District Court, District of Massachusetts, alleging infringement of U.S. Patent No. 5,835,712, entitled “Client-Server System Using Embedded Hypertext Tags for Application and Database Development.” The Plaintiff’s complaint asserts that “defendants have infringed, and continue to infringe, one or more claims of the ‘712 patent by making, using, selling and/or offering for sale, inter alia, products supporting Microsoft Active Server Pages technology.” Plaintiff seeks unspecified compensatory damages, preliminary and permanent injunctive relief, trebling of damages for “willful infringement,” and fees and costs. We believe the action has no merit and are vigorously defending against it.

On June 13, 2005, Plaintiff Steve Staehr filed a shareholder derivative action entitled “Steve Staehr, Derivatively on Behalf of Adobe Systems Incorporated v. Bruce R. Chizen, et. al.,” in the Superior Court of the State of California for the County of Santa Clara against Adobe’s directors and naming Adobe as a nominal defendant. The complaint alleges that the defendants breached their fiduciary duties of loyalty and due care and caused Adobe to waste corporate assets by failing to renegotiate or terminate the acquisition agreement with Macromedia following the announcement by Macromedia that it would restate its financial results for the fiscal years ended March 31, 1999 through 2004. On August 18, 2005, Plaintiff amended his complaint to add a purported class action in which Plaintiff seeks, among other things, unspecified monetary damages, attorneys’ fees and certain forms of equitable relief. On May 9, 2006, Plaintiff filed a third amended complaint, to which defendants demurred. A hearing on the demurrer was held on July 7, 2006 and the court granted the defendant’s motion and dismissed the complaint with prejudice.

In connection with our anti-piracy efforts, conducted both internally and through the Business Software Alliance, from time to time we undertake litigation against alleged copyright infringers. Such lawsuits may lead to counter-claims alleging improper use of litigation or violation of other local law and have recently increased in frequency, especially in Latin American countries. We believe we have valid defenses with respect to such counter-claims; however, it is possible that our consolidated financial position, cash flows or results of operations could be affected in any particular period by the resolution of one or more of these counter-claims.

One such case is Consultores en Computación y Contabilidad, S.C. (“CCC”) v. Microsoft, Adobe, Symantec, and Autodesk (the “Defendants”). On March 1, 2002, CCC, a Mexican hardware/software reseller, filed a lawsuit in the Mexico Court of First Instance against the Defendants (all members of the Business Software Alliance). CCC had previously been the target of a criminal anti-piracy enforcement action carried out by the Mexican police authorities on the basis of a piracy complaint filed by the Defendants based on evidence provided to the Defendants. CCC alleged in the lawsuit that it had suffered damages to its reputation as a result of the enforcement action. CCC did not claim economic damages. On

30




ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
(In thousands, except share and per share data)
(Unaudited)

NOTE 11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

November 11, 2002, the trial court judge ruled in favor of the Defendants, holding that no moral damage occurred. After subsequent appeals which were favorable to the Defendants, a court of appeals held that the Defendants were liable to CCC for “moral” damages, and the court remanded the case to the Court of First Instance for a determination of the amount. In December 2005, the Court of First Instance awarded CCC $90 million in damages. The Defendants are appealing the verdict, as are the plaintiffs who seek additional damages. If, after all appeals have been exhausted, the existing verdict stands and is enforceable, Adobe would be responsible for approximately $15 million of the judgment. In August 2006, we entered into a settlement agreement with CCC, which did not have a material effect on our financial statements.

From time to time, in addition to those identified above, Adobe is subject to legal proceedings, claims, investigations and proceedings in the ordinary course of business, including claims of alleged infringement of third-party patents and other intellectual property rights, commercial, employment and other matters. In accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, Adobe makes a provision for a liability when it is both probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. These provisions are reviewed at least quarterly and adjusted to reflect the impacts of negotiations, settlements, rulings, advice of legal counsel, and other information and events pertaining to a particular case. Litigation is inherently unpredictable. However, we believe that we have valid defenses with respect to the legal matters pending against Adobe. It is possible, nevertheless, that our consolidated financial position, cash flows or results of operations could be affected by the resolution of one or more of such contingencies.

This excerpt taken from the ADBE 10-Q filed Jul 11, 2006.
NOTE 11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

Lease Commitments

We lease certain of our facilities and some of our equipment under noncancelable operating lease arrangements that expire at various dates through 2025. We also have one land lease that expires in 2091.

We occupy three office buildings in San Jose, California where our corporate headquarters are located. We reference these office buildings as the “Almaden tower” and the “East and West towers.”

In December 2003, upon completion of construction, we began a five year lease agreement for the Almaden tower. Under the agreement, we have the option to purchase the building at any time during the lease term for the lease balance, which is approximately $103.0 million. The maximum recourse amount (“residual value guarantee”) under this obligation is $90.8 million.

In August 2004, we extended the lease agreement for our East and West towers for an additional five years with an option to extend for an additional five years solely at Adobe’s election. As part of the lease extension, we purchased a portion of the lease receivable of the lessor for $126.8 million, which is recorded as an investment in lease receivable on our consolidated balance sheet. This purchase may be credited against the residual value guarantee if we purchase the properties or repaid from the sale proceeds if the properties are sold to third parties. Under the agreement for the East and West towers, we have the option to purchase the buildings at any time during the lease term for the lease balance, which is approximately $143.2 million. The maximum recourse amount (“residual value guarantee”) under this obligation is $126.8 million.

These two leases are both subject to standard covenants including liquidity, leverage and profitability ratios that are reported to the lessors quarterly. As of June 2, 2006, we were in compliance with all covenants. In the case of a default, the lessor may demand we purchase the buildings for an amount equal to the lease balance, or require that we remarket or relinquish the buildings. Both leases qualify for operating lease accounting treatment under Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 13, “Accounting for Leases,” and, as such, the buildings and the related obligations are not included on our consolidated balance sheet. We utilized this type of financing in order to access bank-provided funding at the most favorable rates and to provide the lowest total cost of occupancy for the headquarter buildings. At the end of the lease term, we can extend the lease for an additional five year term (for the East and West towers lease only), purchase the buildings for the lease balance, remarket or relinquish the buildings. If we choose to remarket or are required to do so upon relinquishing the buildings, we are bound to arrange the

26




ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
(In thousands, except per share data)
(Unaudited)

NOTE 11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

sale of the buildings to an unrelated party and will be required to pay the lessor any shortfall between the net remarketing proceeds and the lease balance, up to the maximum recourse amount.

Royalties

We have certain royalty commitments associated with the shipment and licensing of certain products. Royalty expense is generally based on a dollar amount per unit shipped or a percentage of the underlying revenue.

Guarantees

The lease agreements for our corporate headquarters provide for residual value guarantees. Under FASB Interpretation No. 45 (“FIN 45”), “Guarantor’s Accounting and Disclosure Requirements for Guarantees, Including Indirect Guarantees of Indebtedness of Others,” the fair value of a residual value guarantee in lease agreements entered into after December 31, 2002, must be recognized as a liability on our consolidated balance sheet. As such, we recognized a $5.2 million liability related to the East and West towers lease that was extended in August 2004. This liability is recorded in other long-term liabilities with the offsetting entry recorded as prepaid rent in other assets. The balance will be amortized to the income statement over the life of the lease. As of June 2, 2006, the unamortized portion of the fair value of the residual value guarantee remaining in other long-term liabilities and prepaid rent was $3.3 million.

Indemnifications

In the normal course of business, we provide indemnifications of varying scope to customers against claims of intellectual property infringement made by third parties arising from the use of our products. Historically, costs related to these indemnification provisions have not been significant and we are unable to estimate the maximum potential impact of these indemnification provisions on our future results of operations.

To the extent permitted under Delaware law, we have agreements whereby we indemnify our officers and directors for certain events or occurrences while the officer or director is, or was serving, at our request in such capacity. The indemnification period covers all pertinent events and occurrences during the officer’s or director’s lifetime. The maximum potential amount of future payments we could be required to make under these indemnification agreements is unlimited; however, we have director and officer insurance coverage that limits our exposure and enables us to recover a portion of any future amounts paid. We believe the estimated fair value of these indemnification agreements in excess of applicable insurance coverage is minimal.

As part of our limited partnership interests in Adobe Ventures, we have provided a general indemnification to Granite Ventures, an independent venture capital firm and sole general partner of Adobe Ventures, for certain events or occurrences while Granite Ventures is, or was serving, at our request in such capacity provided that Granite Ventures acts in good faith on behalf of the partnerships. We are unable to develop an estimate of the maximum potential amount of future payments that could

27




ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
(In thousands, except per share data)
(Unaudited)

NOTE 11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

potentially result from any hypothetical future claim, but believe the risk of having to make any payments under this general indemnification to be remote.

Legal Proceedings

On September 6, 2002, Plaintiff Fred B. Dufresne filed suit against Adobe, Microsoft Corporation, Macromedia, Inc. and Trellix Corporation in the U.S. District Court, District of Massachusetts, alleging infringement of U.S. Patent No. 5,835,712, entitled “Client-Server System Using Embedded Hypertext Tags for Application and Database Development.” The Plaintiff’s complaint asserts that “defendants have infringed, and continue to infringe, one or more claims of the ‘712 patent by making, using, selling and/or offering for sale, inter alia, products supporting Microsoft Active Server Pages technology.” Plaintiff seeks unspecified compensatory damages, preliminary and permanent injunctive relief, trebling of damages for “willful infringement,” and fees and costs. We believe the action has no merit and are vigorously defending against it. We cannot estimate any possible loss at this time.

On June 13, 2005, Plaintiff Steve Staehr filed a shareholder derivative action entitled “Steve Staehr, Derivatively on Behalf of Adobe Systems Incorporated v. Bruce R. Chizen, et. al.,” in the Superior Court of the State of California for the County of Santa Clara against Adobe’s directors and naming Adobe as a nominal defendant. The complaint alleges that the defendants breached their fiduciary duties of loyalty and due care and caused Adobe to waste corporate assets by failing to renegotiate or terminate the acquisition agreement with Macromedia following the announcement by Macromedia that it would restate its financial results for the fiscal years ended March 31, 1999 through 2004. . On August 18, 2005, Plaintiff amended his complaint to add a purported class action in which Plaintiff seeks, among other things, unspecified monetary damages, attorneys’ fees and certain forms of equitable relief. On May 9, 2006, Plaintiff filed a Third Amended Complaint, to which defendants demurred. Adobe has obligations under certain circumstances to hold harmless and indemnify each of the defendant directors against judgments, fines, settlements and expenses related to claims against such directors and otherwise to the fullest extent permitted under Delaware law and Adobe’s bylaws and certificate of incorporation. Such obligations may apply to this lawsuit. We believe the action has no merit and are vigorously defending against it. We cannot estimate any possible loss at this time.

In connection with our anti-piracy efforts, conducted both internally and through the Business Software Alliance, from time to time we undertake litigation against alleged copyright infringers. Such lawsuits may lead to counter-claims alleging improper use of litigation or violation of other local law and have recently increased in frequency, especially in Latin American countries. We believe we have valid defenses with respect to such counter-claims; however, it is possible that our consolidated financial position, cash flows or results of operations could be affected in any particular period by the resolution of one or more of these counter-claims.

One such case is Consultores en Computación y Contabilidad, S.C. (“CCC”) v. Microsoft, Adobe, Symantec, and Autodesk (the “Defendants”). On March 1, 2002, CCC, a Mexican hardware/software reseller, filed a lawsuit in the Mexico Court of First Instance against the Defendants (all members of the Business Software Alliance). CCC had previously been the target of a criminal anti-piracy enforcement

28




ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
(In thousands, except per share data)
(Unaudited)

NOTE 11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

action carried out by the Mexican police authorities on the basis of a piracy complaint filed by the Defendants based on evidence provided to the Defendants. CCC alleged in the lawsuit that it had suffered damages to its reputation as a result of the enforcement action. CCC did not claim economic damages. On November 11, 2002, the trial court judge ruled in favor of the Defendants, holding that no moral damage occurred. After subsequent appeals which were favorable to the Defendants, a court of appeals held that the Defendants were liable to CCC for “moral” damages, and the court remanded the case to the Court of First Instance for a determination of the amount. In December 2005, the Court of First Instance awarded CCC $90 million in damages. The Defendants are appealing the verdict, as are the plaintiffs who seek additional damages. If, after all appeals have been exhausted, the existing verdict stands and is enforceable, Adobe would be responsible for approximately $15 million of the judgment. No amounts have been accrued as a loss is not considered probable or estimable at this time.

From time to time, in addition to those identified above, Adobe is subject to legal proceedings, claims, investigations and proceedings in the ordinary course of business, including claims of alleged infringement of third-party patents and other intellectual property rights, commercial, employment and other matters. In accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, Adobe makes a provision for a liability when it is both probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. These provisions are reviewed at least quarterly and adjusted to reflect the impacts of negotiations, settlements, rulings, advice of legal counsel, and other information and events pertaining to a particular case. Litigation is inherently unpredictable. However, we believe that we have valid defenses with respect to the legal matters pending against Adobe. It is possible, nevertheless, that our consolidated financial position, cash flows or results of operations could be affected by the resolution of one or more of such contingencies.

This excerpt taken from the ADBE 10-Q filed Apr 12, 2006.
Note 11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

Lease Commitments

We lease certain of our facilities and some of our equipment under noncancelable operating lease arrangements that expire at various dates through 2025. We also have one land lease that expires in 2091.

We occupy three office buildings in San Jose, California where our corporate headquarters are located. We reference these office buildings as the “Almaden tower” and the “East and West towers.”

In December 2003, upon completion of construction, we began a five year lease agreement for the Almaden tower. Under the agreement, we have the option to purchase the building at any time during the lease term for the lease balance, which is approximately $103.0 million. The maximum recourse amount (“residual value guarantee”) under this obligation is $90.8 million.

In August 2004, we extended the lease agreement for our East and West towers for an additional five years with an option to extend for an additional five years solely at Adobe’s election. As part of the lease extension, we purchased a portion of the lease receivable of the lessor for $126.8 million, which is recorded as an investment in lease receivable on our consolidated balance sheet. This purchase may be credited against the residual value guarantee if we purchase the properties or repaid from the sale proceeds if the properties are sold to third parties. Under the agreement for the East and West towers, we have the option to purchase the buildings at any time during the lease term for the lease balance, which is approximately $143.2 million. The maximum recourse amount (“residual value guarantee”) under this obligation is $126.8 million.

These two leases are both subject to standard covenants including liquidity, leverage and profitability ratios that are reported to the lessors quarterly. As of March 3, 2006, we were in compliance with all covenants. In the case of a default, the lessor may demand we purchase the buildings for an amount equal to the lease balance, or require that we remarket or relinquish the buildings. Both leases qualify for operating lease accounting treatment under Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 13, “Accounting for Leases,” and, as such, the buildings and the related obligations are not included on our consolidated balance sheet. We utilized this type of financing in order to access bank-provided funding at the most favorable rates and to provide the lowest total cost of occupancy for the headquarter buildings. At the end of the lease term, we can extend the lease for an additional five year term (for the East and West towers lease only), purchase the buildings for the lease balance, remarket or relinquish the buildings. If we choose to remarket or are required to do so upon relinquishing the buildings, we are bound to arrange the sale of the buildings to an unrelated party and will be required to pay the lessor any shortfall between the net remarketing proceeds and the lease balance, up to the maximum recourse amount.

Royalties

We have certain royalty commitments associated with the shipment and licensing of certain products. Royalty expense is generally based on a dollar amount per unit shipped or a percentage of the underlying revenue.

26




ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
(In thousands, except per share data)
(Unaudited)

Note 11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

Guarantees

The lease agreements for our corporate headquarters provide for residual value guarantees. Under FASB Interpretation No. 45 (“FIN 45”), “Guarantor’s Accounting and Disclosure Requirements for Guarantees, Including Indirect Guarantees of Indebtedness of Others,” the fair value of a residual value guarantee in lease agreements entered into after December 31, 2002, must be recognized as a liability on our consolidated balance sheet. As such, we recognized a $5.2 million liability related to the East and West towers lease that was extended in August 2004. This liability is recorded in other long-term liabilities with the offsetting entry recorded as prepaid rent in other assets. The balance will be amortized to the income statement over the life of the lease. As of March 3, 2006, the unamortized portion of the fair value of the residual value guarantee remaining in other long-term liabilities and prepaid rent was $3.5 million.

Indemnifications

In the normal course of business, we provide indemnifications of varying scope to customers against claims of intellectual property infringement made by third parties arising from the use of our products. Historically, costs related to these indemnification provisions have not been significant and we are unable to estimate the maximum potential impact of these indemnification provisions on our future results of operations.

To the extent permitted under Delaware law, we have agreements whereby we indemnify our officers and directors for certain events or occurrences while the officer or director is, or was serving, at our request in such capacity. The indemnification period covers all pertinent events and occurrences during the officer’s or director’s lifetime. The maximum potential amount of future payments we could be required to make under these indemnification agreements is unlimited; however, we have director and officer insurance coverage that limits our exposure and enables us to recover a portion of any future amounts paid. We believe the estimated fair value of these indemnification agreements in excess of applicable insurance coverage is minimal.

As part of our limited partnership interests in Adobe Ventures, we have provided a general indemnification to Granite Ventures, an independent venture capital firm and sole general partner of Adobe Ventures, for certain events or occurrences while Granite Ventures is, or was serving, at our request in such capacity provided that Granite Ventures acts in good faith on behalf of the partnerships. We are unable to develop an estimate of the maximum potential amount of future payments that could potentially result from any hypothetical future claim, but believe the risk of having to make any payments under this general indemnification to be remote.

Legal Proceedings

On September 6, 2002, Plaintiff Fred B. Dufresne filed suit against Adobe, Microsoft Corporation, Macromedia, Inc. and Trellix Corporation in the U.S. District Court, District of Massachusetts, alleging infringement of U.S. Patent No. 5,835,712, entitled “Client-Server System Using Embedded Hypertext Tags for Application and Database Development.” The Plaintiff’s complaint asserts that “defendants have infringed, and continue to infringe, one or more claims of the ‘712 patent by making, using, selling and/or

27




ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
(In thousands, except per share data)
(Unaudited)

Note 11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

offering for sale, inter alia, products supporting Microsoft Active Server Pages technology.” Plaintiff seeks unspecified compensatory damages, preliminary and permanent injunctive relief, trebling of damages for “willful infringement,” and fees and costs. We believe the action has no merit and are vigorously defending against it. We cannot estimate any possible loss at this time.

On June 13, 2005, Plaintiff Steve Staehr filed a shareholder derivative action entitled “Steve Staehr, Derivatively on Behalf of Adobe Systems Incorporated v. Bruce R. Chizen, et. al.,” in the Superior Court of the State of California for the County of Santa Clara against Adobe’s directors and naming Adobe as a nominal defendant. The complaint alleges that the defendants breached their fiduciary duties of loyalty and due care and caused Adobe to waste corporate assets by failing to renegotiate or terminate the acquisition agreement with Macromedia following the announcement by Macromedia that it would restate its financial results for the fiscal years ended March 31, 1999 through 2004. The complaint seeks, among other things, unspecified monetary damages, attorneys’ fees and certain forms of equitable relief. On August 18, 2005, Plaintiff amended his complaint to add a purported class action. Adobe has obligations under certain circumstances to hold harmless and indemnify each of the defendant directors against judgments, fines, settlements and expenses related to claims against such directors and otherwise to the fullest extent permitted under Delaware law and Adobe’s bylaws and certificate of incorporation. Such obligations may apply to this lawsuit. We believe the action has no merit and are vigorously defending against it. We cannot estimate any possible loss at this time.

In connection with our anti-piracy efforts, conducted both internally and through the Business Software Alliance, from time to time we undertake litigation against alleged copyright infringers. Such lawsuits may lead to counter-claims alleging improper use of litigation or violation of other local law and have recently increased in frequency, especially in Latin American countries. We believe we have valid defenses with respect to such counter-claims; however, it is possible that our consolidated financial position, cash flows or results of operations could be affected in any particular period by the resolution of one or more of these counter-claims.

One such case is Consultores en Computación y Contabilidad, S.C. (“CCC”) v. Microsoft, Adobe, Symantec, and Autodesk (the “Defendants”). On March 1, 2002, CCC, a Mexican hardware/software reseller, filed a lawsuit in the Mexico Court of First Instance against the Defendants (all members of the Business Software Alliance). CCC had previously been the target of a criminal anti-piracy enforcement action carried out by the Mexican police authorities on the basis of a piracy complaint filed by the Defendants based on evidence provided to the Defendants. CCC alleged in the lawsuit that it had suffered damages to its reputation as a result of the enforcement action. CCC did not claim economic damages. On November 11, 2002, the trial court judge ruled in favor of the Defendants, holding that no moral damage occurred. After subsequent appeals which were favorable to the Defendants, a court of appeals held that the Defendants were liable to CCC for “moral” damages, and the court remanded the case to the Court of First Instance for a determination of the amount. In December 2005, the Court of First Instance awarded CCC $90 million in damages. The Defendants are appealing the verdict, as are the plaintiffs who seek additional damages. If, after all appeals have been exhausted, the existing verdict stands and is enforceable, Adobe would be responsible for approximately $15 million of the judgment. No amounts have been accrued as a loss is not considered probable or estimable at this time.

28




ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
(In thousands, except per share data)
(Unaudited)

Note 11. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

From time to time, in addition to those identified above, Adobe is subject to legal proceedings, claims, investigations and proceedings in the ordinary course of business, including claims of alleged infringement of third-party patents and other intellectual property rights, commercial, employment and other matters. In accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, Adobe makes a provision for a liability when it is both probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. These provisions are reviewed at least quarterly and adjusted to reflect the impacts of negotiations, settlements, rulings, advice of legal counsel, and other information and events pertaining to a particular case. Litigation is inherently unpredictable. However, we believe that we have valid defenses with respect to the legal matters pending against Adobe. It is possible, nevertheless, that our consolidated financial position, cash flows or results of operations could be affected by the resolution of one or more of such contingencies.

This excerpt taken from the ADBE 10-Q filed Oct 5, 2005.
NOTE 10. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

Lease Commitments

We lease certain of our facilities and some of our equipment under noncancelable operating lease arrangements that expire at various dates through 2025. We also have one land lease that expires in 2091.

We occupy three office buildings in San Jose, California where our corporate headquarters are located. We reference these office buildings as the “Almaden tower” and the “East and West towers.”

In December 2003, upon completion of construction of the Almaden tower, we began a five year lease agreement. Under the agreement, we have the option to purchase the building at any time during the lease term for the lease balance, which is approximately $103.0 million. The maximum recourse amount (“residual value guarantee”) under this obligation is $90.8 million.

In August 2004, we extended the lease agreement for our East and West towers for an additional five years with an option to extend for an additional five years solely at Adobe’s election. As part of the lease extension, we purchased a portion of the lease receivable of the lessor for $126.8 million, which is recorded as an investment in lease receivable on our consolidated balance sheet. This purchase may be credited against the residual value guarantee if we purchase the properties or repaid from the sale proceeds if the properties are sold to third parties. Under the agreement for the East and West towers, we have the option to purchase the buildings at any time during the lease term for the lease balance, which is approximately $143.2 million. The residual value guarantee under this obligation is $126.8 million.

16




ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
(In thousands, except share and per share data)
(Unaudited)

NOTE 10. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

These two leases are both subject to standard covenants including liquidity, leverage and profitability ratios that are reported to the lessors quarterly. As of September 2, 2005, we were in compliance with all covenants. In the case of a default, the lessor may demand we purchase the buildings for an amount equal to the lease balance, or require that we remarket or relinquish the buildings. Both leases qualify for operating lease accounting treatment under Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 13, “Accounting for Leases,” and, as such, the buildings and the related obligations are not included on our consolidated balance sheet. We utilized this type of financing in order to access bank-provided funding at the most favorable rates and to provide the lowest total cost of occupancy for the headquarter buildings. At the end of the current lease term, we can extend the lease for an additional five year term (for the East and West towers lease only), purchase the buildings for the lease balance, remarket or relinquish the buildings. If we choose to remarket or are required to do so upon relinquishing the buildings, we are bound to arrange the sale of the buildings to an unrelated party and will be required to pay the lessor any shortfall between the net remarketing proceeds and the lease balance, up to the maximum recourse amount.

Royalties

We have certain royalty commitments associated with the shipment and licensing of certain products. Royalty expense is generally based on a dollar amount per unit shipped or a percentage of the underlying revenue.

Guarantees

The lease agreements for our corporate headquarters provide for residual value guarantees. Under FASB Interpretation No. 45, “Guarantor’s Accounting and Disclosure Requirements for Guarantees, Including Indirect Guarantees of Indebtedness of Others,” the fair value of a residual value guarantee in lease agreements entered into after December 31, 2002, must be recognized as a liability on our consolidated balance sheet. As such, we have recognized a $5.2 million liability related to the East and West towers lease that was extended in August 2004. This liability is recorded in other long-term liabilities with the offsetting entry recorded as prepaid rent in other assets. The balance will be amortized to the income statement over the life of the lease. As of September 2, 2005, the unamortized portion of the fair value of the residual value guarantee remaining in other long-term liabilities and prepaid rent was $4.1 million.

In the normal course of business, we provide indemnifications of varying scope to customers against claims of intellectual property infringement made by third parties arising from the use of our products. Historically, costs related to these indemnification provisions have not been significant and we are unable to estimate the maximum potential impact of these indemnification provisions on our future results of operations.

17




ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
(In thousands, except share and per share data)
(Unaudited)

NOTE 10. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

We have commitments to make certain milestone and/or retention payments typically entered into in conjunction with various acquisitions, for which we have made accruals in our consolidated financial statements. In connection with certain acquisitions and purchases of technology assets, we entered into employee retention agreements and are required to make payments upon satisfaction of certain conditions in the agreements. These costs are being amortized over the retention period to compensation expense. As of September 2, 2005, we have $0.7 million remaining to be paid under our retention agreements.

As permitted under Delaware law, we have agreements whereby we indemnify our officers and directors for certain events or occurrences while the officer or director is, or was serving, at our request in such capacity. The indemnification period covers all pertinent events and occurrences during the officer’s or director’s lifetime. The maximum potential amount of future payments we could be required to make under these indemnification agreements is unlimited; however, we have director and officer insurance coverage that limits our exposure and enables us to recover a portion of any future amounts paid. We believe the estimated fair value of these indemnification agreements in excess of applicable insurance coverage is minimal.

As part of our limited partnership interests in Adobe Ventures, we have provided a general indemnification to Granite Ventures, an independent venture capital firm and sole general partner of Adobe Ventures, for certain events or occurrences while Granite Ventures is, or was serving, at our request in such capacity provided that Granite Ventures acts in good faith on behalf of the partnerships. We are unable to develop an estimate of the maximum potential amount of future payments that could potentially result from any hypothetical future claim, but believe the risk of having to make any payments under this general indemnification to be remote.

Legal Actions

On September 6, 2002, Plaintiff Fred B. Dufresne filed suit against Adobe, Microsoft Corporation, Macromedia, Inc. and Trellix Corporation in the U.S. District Court, District of Massachusetts, alleging infringement of U.S. Patent No. 5,835,712, entitled “Client-Server System Using Embedded Hypertext Tags for Application and Database Development.” The Plaintiff’s complaint asserts that “defendants have infringed, and continue to infringe, one or more claims of the ‘712 patent by making, using, selling and/or offering for sale, inter alia, products supporting Microsoft Active Server Pages technology.” Plaintiff seeks unspecified compensatory damages, preliminary and permanent injunctive relief, trebling of damages for “willful infringement,” and fees and costs. We believe the action has no merit and are vigorously defending against it. We cannot estimate any possible loss at this time.

On June 13, 2005, Plaintiff Steve Staehr filed a shareholder derivative action entitled “Steve Staehr, Derivatively on Behalf of Adobe Systems Incorporated v. Bruce R. Chizen, et. al.,” in the Superior Court of the State of California for the County of Santa Clara against Adobe’s directors and naming Adobe as a nominal defendant. The complaint alleges that the defendants breached their fiduciary duties of loyalty and due care and caused Adobe to waste corporate assets by failing to renegotiate or terminate the acquisition agreement with Macromedia following the announcement by Macromedia that it would restate its financial results for the fiscal years ended March 31, 1999 through 2004 and by failing to conduct

18




ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
(In thousands, except share and per share data)
(Unaudited)

NOTE 10. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

sufficient due diligence prior to entering into the acquisition agreement. The complaint seeks, among other things, unspecified monetary damages, attorneys’ fees and certain forms of equitable relief, including preliminarily and permanently enjoining the consummation of the acquisition. On August 18, 2005, Plaintiff amended his complaint to add a purported class action. Adobe has obligations under certain circumstances to hold harmless and indemnify each of the defendant directors against judgments, fines, settlements and expenses related to claims against such directors and otherwise to the fullest extent permitted under Delaware law and Adobe’s bylaws and certificate of incorporation. Such obligations may apply to this lawsuit. We believe the action has no merit and are vigorously defending against it. We cannot estimate any possible loss at this time.

In connection with our anti-piracy efforts, conducted both internally and through the Business Software Alliance, from time to time we undertake litigation against alleged copyright infringers. Such lawsuits may lead to counter-claims alleging improper use of litigation or violation of other local law and have recently increased in frequency, especially in Latin American countries. We believe we have valid defenses with respect to such counter-claims; however, it is possible that our consolidated financial position, cash flows or results of operations could be affected in any particular period by the resolution of one or more of these counter-claims.

One such case is Consultores en Computación y Contabilidad, S.C. (“CCC”) v. Microsoft, Adobe, Symantec, and Autodesk (the “Defendants”). On March 1, 2002, CCC, a Mexican hardware/software reseller, filed a lawsuit in the Mexico Court of First Instance against the Defendants (all members of the Business Software Alliance). CCC had previously been the target of a criminal anti-piracy enforcement action carried out by the Mexican police authorities on the basis of a piracy complaint filed by the Defendants based on evidence provided to the Defendants. CCC alleged in the lawsuit that it had suffered damages to its reputation as a result of the enforcement action. CCC did not claim economic damages. On November 11, 2002, the trial court judge ruled in favor of the Defendants, holding that no moral damage occurred. After subsequent appeals which were favorable to the Defendants, a court of appeals held that the Defendants were liable to CCC for “moral” damages, and the court remanded the case to the Court of First Instance for a determination of the amount. On September 9, 2005, CCC filed its damages brief, claiming moral damages in excess of $800 million. We believe that the damages claim has no merit and are vigorously defending against it. We cannot estimate any possible loss at this time.

From time to time, in addition to those identified above, Adobe is subject to legal proceedings, claims, investigations and proceedings in the ordinary course of business, including claims of alleged infringement of third-party patents and other intellectual property rights, commercial, employment and other matters. In accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, Adobe makes a provision for a liability when it is both probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. These provisions are reviewed at least quarterly and adjusted to reflect the impacts of negotiations, settlements, rulings, advice of legal counsel, and other information and events pertaining to a particular case. Litigation is inherently unpredictable. However, we believe that we have valid defenses with respect to the legal matters pending against Adobe. It is possible, nevertheless, that our consolidated financial position, cash flows or results of operations could be affected by the resolution of one or more of

19




ADOBE SYSTEMS INCORPORATED
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
(In thousands, except share and per share data)
(Unaudited)

NOTE 10. COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Continued)

such contingencies. No amount has been accrued for these matters as a loss is not considered probable or estimable.

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