EYE » Topics » We conduct a significant amount of our sales and operations outside of the United States, which subjects us to additional business risks that may cause our profitability to decline.

These excerpts taken from the EYE 10-K filed Feb 24, 2009.

We conduct a significant amount of our sales and operations outside of the United States, which subjects us to additional business risks that may cause our profitability to decline.

Because we manufacture and sell a significant portion of our products in a number of foreign countries, our business is subject to risks associated with doing business internationally. In particular, our products are sold in over 60 countries, and most of our manufacturing facilities are located outside the continental United States, in Añasco, Puerto Rico; Alcobendas, Spain; Hangzhou, China; Uppsala, Sweden; and Groningen, Netherlands. In 2008, on an historical basis, we derived approximately $746.5 million, or 63%, of our net sales, from sales of our products outside of the United States, including 16% of our net sales in Japan. We intend to continue to pursue growth opportunities in sales internationally, which could expose us to greater risks associated with international sales and operations. Our international operations are, and will continue to be, subject to a number of risks and potential costs, including:

 

   

unexpected changes in foreign regulatory requirements;

 

   

differing local product preferences and product requirements;

 

   

fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates;

 

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political and economic instability;

 

   

cultural differences;

 

   

changes in foreign medical reimbursement and coverage policies and programs;

 

   

diminished protection of intellectual property in some countries outside of the United States;

 

   

trade protection measures and import or export licensing requirements;

 

   

difficulty in staffing and managing foreign operations, where turnover tends to be higher;

 

   

difficulty in coordinating foreign management and aligning business practices;

 

   

difficulty in managing foreign operations in accordance with foreign laws as well as laws applicable to U.S. companies with foreign operations, such as the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act;

 

   

differing labor regulations; and

 

   

potentially negative consequences from changes in tax laws.

Any of these factors may, individually or as a group, have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

As we expand our existing international operations, we may encounter new risks. For example, as we focus on building our international sales and distribution networks in new geographic regions, we must continue to develop relationships with qualified local distributors and trading companies. If we are not successful in developing these relationships, we may not be able to grow sales in these geographic regions. These or other similar risks could adversely affect our revenue and profitability.

We conduct a significant amount of our sales and operations outside of the United
States, which subjects us to additional business risks that may cause our profitability to decline.

Because we manufacture and sell
a significant portion of our products in a number of foreign countries, our business is subject to risks associated with doing business internationally. In particular, our products are sold in over 60 countries, and most of our manufacturing
facilities are located outside the continental United States, in Añasco, Puerto Rico; Alcobendas, Spain; Hangzhou, China; Uppsala, Sweden; and Groningen, Netherlands. In 2008, on an historical basis, we derived approximately $746.5 million,
or 63%, of our net sales, from sales of our products outside of the United States, including 16% of our net sales in Japan. We intend to continue to pursue growth opportunities in sales internationally, which could expose us to greater risks
associated with international sales and operations. Our international operations are, and will continue to be, subject to a number of risks and potential costs, including:

STYLE="font-size:6px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px"> 







  

unexpected changes in foreign regulatory requirements;

 







  

differing local product preferences and product requirements;

 







  

fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates;

 


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Table of Contents








  

political and economic instability;

 







  

cultural differences;

 







  

changes in foreign medical reimbursement and coverage policies and programs;

STYLE="font-size:6px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px"> 







  

diminished protection of intellectual property in some countries outside of the United States;

STYLE="font-size:6px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px"> 







  

trade protection measures and import or export licensing requirements;

STYLE="font-size:6px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px"> 







  

difficulty in staffing and managing foreign operations, where turnover tends to be higher;

STYLE="font-size:6px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px"> 







  

difficulty in coordinating foreign management and aligning business practices;

STYLE="font-size:6px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px"> 







  

difficulty in managing foreign operations in accordance with foreign laws as well as laws applicable to U.S. companies with foreign operations, such as the Foreign
Corrupt Practices Act;

 







  

differing labor regulations; and

 







  

potentially negative consequences from changes in tax laws.

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="2">Any of these factors may, individually or as a group, have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="2">As we expand our existing international operations, we may encounter new risks. For example, as we focus on building our international sales and distribution networks in new geographic regions, we must continue to
develop relationships with qualified local distributors and trading companies. If we are not successful in developing these relationships, we may not be able to grow sales in these geographic regions. These or other similar risks could adversely
affect our revenue and profitability.

We conduct a significant amount of our sales and operations outside of the United
States, which subjects us to additional business risks that may cause our profitability to decline.

Because we manufacture and sell
a significant portion of our products in a number of foreign countries, our business is subject to risks associated with doing business internationally. In particular, our products are sold in over 60 countries, and most of our manufacturing
facilities are located outside the continental United States, in Añasco, Puerto Rico; Alcobendas, Spain; Hangzhou, China; Uppsala, Sweden; and Groningen, Netherlands. In 2008, on an historical basis, we derived approximately $746.5 million,
or 63%, of our net sales, from sales of our products outside of the United States, including 16% of our net sales in Japan. We intend to continue to pursue growth opportunities in sales internationally, which could expose us to greater risks
associated with international sales and operations. Our international operations are, and will continue to be, subject to a number of risks and potential costs, including:

STYLE="font-size:6px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px"> 







  

unexpected changes in foreign regulatory requirements;

 







  

differing local product preferences and product requirements;

 







  

fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates;

 


18







Table of Contents








  

political and economic instability;

 







  

cultural differences;

 







  

changes in foreign medical reimbursement and coverage policies and programs;

STYLE="font-size:6px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px"> 







  

diminished protection of intellectual property in some countries outside of the United States;

STYLE="font-size:6px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px"> 







  

trade protection measures and import or export licensing requirements;

STYLE="font-size:6px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px"> 







  

difficulty in staffing and managing foreign operations, where turnover tends to be higher;

STYLE="font-size:6px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px"> 







  

difficulty in coordinating foreign management and aligning business practices;

STYLE="font-size:6px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px"> 







  

difficulty in managing foreign operations in accordance with foreign laws as well as laws applicable to U.S. companies with foreign operations, such as the Foreign
Corrupt Practices Act;

 







  

differing labor regulations; and

 







  

potentially negative consequences from changes in tax laws.

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="2">Any of these factors may, individually or as a group, have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="2">As we expand our existing international operations, we may encounter new risks. For example, as we focus on building our international sales and distribution networks in new geographic regions, we must continue to
develop relationships with qualified local distributors and trading companies. If we are not successful in developing these relationships, we may not be able to grow sales in these geographic regions. These or other similar risks could adversely
affect our revenue and profitability.

These excerpts taken from the EYE 10-K filed Mar 3, 2008.

We conduct a significant amount of our sales and operations outside of the United States, which subjects us to additional business risks that may cause our profitability to decline.

Because we manufacture and sell a significant portion of our products in a number of foreign countries, our business is subject to risks associated with doing business internationally. In particular, our products are sold in over 60 countries, and most of our manufacturing facilities are located outside the continental United States, in Añasco, Puerto Rico; Alcobendas, Spain; Hangzhou, China; Uppsala, Sweden; and Groningen, Netherlands. In 2007, on an historical basis, we derived approximately $632.1 million, or 58%, of our net sales, from sales of our products outside of the United States, including 13% of our net sales in Japan. We intend to continue to pursue growth opportunities in sales internationally, which could expose us to greater risks associated with international sales and operations. Our international operations are, and will continue to be, subject to a number of risks and potential costs, including:

 

   

unexpected changes in foreign regulatory requirements;

 

   

differing local product preferences and product requirements;

 

16


Table of Contents
   

fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates;

 

   

political and economic instability;

 

   

cultural differences;

 

   

changes in foreign medical reimbursement and coverage policies and programs;

 

   

diminished protection of intellectual property in some countries outside of the United States;

 

   

trade protection measures and import or export licensing requirements;

 

   

difficulty in staffing and managing foreign operations, where turnover tends to be higher;

 

   

difficulty in coordinating foreign management and aligning business practices;

 

   

differing labor regulations; and

 

   

potentially negative consequences from changes in tax laws.

Any of these factors may, individually or as a group, have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

As we expand our existing international operations, we may encounter new risks. For example, as we focus on building our international sales and distribution networks in new geographic regions, we must continue to develop relationships with qualified local distributors and trading companies. If we are not successful in developing these relationships, we may not be able to grow sales in these geographic regions. These or other similar risks could adversely affect our revenue and profitability.

We conduct a significant amount of our sales and operations outside of the United
States, which subjects us to additional business risks that may cause our profitability to decline.

Because we manufacture and sell
a significant portion of our products in a number of foreign countries, our business is subject to risks associated with doing business internationally. In particular, our products are sold in over 60 countries, and most of our manufacturing
facilities are located outside the continental United States, in Añasco, Puerto Rico; Alcobendas, Spain; Hangzhou, China; Uppsala, Sweden; and Groningen, Netherlands. In 2007, on an historical basis, we derived approximately $632.1 million,
or 58%, of our net sales, from sales of our products outside of the United States, including 13% of our net sales in Japan. We intend to continue to pursue growth opportunities in sales internationally, which could expose us to greater risks
associated with international sales and operations. Our international operations are, and will continue to be, subject to a number of risks and potential costs, including:

STYLE="font-size:6px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px"> 







  

unexpected changes in foreign regulatory requirements;

 







  

differing local product preferences and product requirements;

SIZE="1"> 


16







Table of Contents








  

fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates;

 







  

political and economic instability;

 







  

cultural differences;

 







  

changes in foreign medical reimbursement and coverage policies and programs;

STYLE="font-size:6px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px"> 







  

diminished protection of intellectual property in some countries outside of the United States;

STYLE="font-size:6px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px"> 







  

trade protection measures and import or export licensing requirements;

STYLE="font-size:6px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px"> 







  

difficulty in staffing and managing foreign operations, where turnover tends to be higher;

STYLE="font-size:6px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px"> 







  

difficulty in coordinating foreign management and aligning business practices;

STYLE="font-size:6px;margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px"> 







  

differing labor regulations; and

 







  

potentially negative consequences from changes in tax laws.

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="2">Any of these factors may, individually or as a group, have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="2">As we expand our existing international operations, we may encounter new risks. For example, as we focus on building our international sales and distribution networks in new geographic regions, we must continue to
develop relationships with qualified local distributors and trading companies. If we are not successful in developing these relationships, we may not be able to grow sales in these geographic regions. These or other similar risks could adversely
affect our revenue and profitability.

This excerpt taken from the EYE 10-K filed Mar 1, 2007.

We conduct a significant amount of our sales and operations outside of the United States, which subjects us to additional business risks that may cause our profitability to decline.

Because we manufacture and sell a significant portion of our products in a number of foreign countries, our business is subject to risks associated with doing business internationally. In particular, our products are sold in over 60 countries, and most of our manufacturing facilities are located outside the continental United States, in Añasco, Puerto Rico; Madrid, Spain; Hangzhou, China, Uppsala, Sweden and Groningen, Netherlands.  In 2006, on an historical basis, we derived approximately $582.2 million, or 58%, of our net sales, from sales of our products outside of the United States, including 14% of our net sales in Japan. We intend to continue to pursue growth opportunities in sales internationally, which could expose us to greater risks associated with international sales and operations. Our international operations are, and will continue to be, subject to a number of risks and potential costs, including:

·                  unexpected changes in foreign regulatory requirements;

·                  differing local product preferences and product requirements;

·                  fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates;

·                  political and economic instability;

·                  cultural differences;

·                  changes in foreign medical reimbursement and coverage policies and programs;

·                  diminished protection of intellectual property in some countries outside of the United States;

·                  trade protection measures and import or export licensing requirements;

·                  difficulty in staffing and managing foreign operations;

14




·                  differing labor regulations; and

·                  potentially negative consequences from changes in tax laws.

Any of these factors may, individually or as a group, have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

As we expand our existing international operations, we may encounter new risks. For example, as we focus on building our international sales and distribution networks in new geographic regions, we must continue to develop relationships with qualified local distributors and trading companies. If we are not successful in developing these relationships, we may not be able to grow sales in these geographic regions. These or other similar risks could adversely affect our revenue and profitability.

This excerpt taken from the EYE 10-K filed Mar 14, 2006.

We conduct a significant amount of our sales and operations outside of the United States, which subjects us to additional business risks that may cause our profitability to decline.

 

Because we manufacture and sell a significant portion of our products in a number of foreign countries, our business is subject to risks associated with doing business internationally. In particular, our products are sold in over 60 countries, and our manufacturing facilities are located outside the continental United States, in Añasco, Puerto Rico; Madrid, Spain; and Hangzhou, China. In connection with the acquisition of Pfizer’s ophthalmic surgical business, we acquired Pfizer’s ophthalmic surgical products and certain manufacturing and research and development facilities located in Uppsala, Sweden and Groningen, Netherlands. In 2005, on an historical basis, we derived approximately $618.2 million, or 67%, of our net sales, from sales of our products outside of the United States, including 19% of our net sales in Japan. We intend to continue to pursue growth opportunities in sales internationally, which could expose us to greater risks associated with international sales and operations. Our international operations are, and will continue to be, subject to a number of risks and potential costs, including:

 

                  unexpected changes in foreign regulatory requirements;

 

                  differing local product preferences and product requirements;

 

                  fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates;

 

                  political and economic instability;

 

                  changes in foreign medical reimbursement and coverage policies and programs;

 

                  diminished protection of intellectual property in some countries outside of the United States;

 

                  trade protection measures and import or export licensing requirements;

 

                  difficulty in staffing and managing foreign operations;

 

                  differing labor regulations; and

 

                  potentially negative consequences from changes in tax laws.

 

Any of these factors may, individually or as a group, have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations. In addition, we are particularly susceptible to the occurrence of any of these risks in Japan, due to our high concentration of sales in Japan.

 

As we expand our existing international operations, we may encounter new risks. For example, as we focus on building our international sales and distribution networks in new geographic regions, we must continue to develop relationships with qualified local distributors and trading companies. If we are not successful in developing these relationships, we may not be able to grow sales in these geographic regions. These or other similar risks could adversely affect our revenue and profitability.

 

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