AMD » Topics » If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

This excerpt taken from the AMD 10-K filed Feb 19, 2010.

If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

Our operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because some of the materials that we purchase are complex, it is difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another. Certain raw materials that are used in the manufacture of our products are available only from a limited number of suppliers.

For example, the manufacturing of our microprocessor products is largely dependent on one supplier of our silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of integrated circuit packages for our microprocessor products. Similarly, certain non-proprietary materials or components such as memory, PCBs, substrates and capacitors used in the manufacture of our graphics products are currently available from only a limited number of sources and are often subject to rapid changes in price and availability. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. The macroeconomic challenges affecting the global economy may impact our key suppliers who may reduce their output and become insolvent which may adversely impact our ability to procure key

 

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materials. For example, in 2009, Qimonda AG, a supplier of memory for our graphics products commenced insolvency proceedings. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, or our foundries are unable to procure materials for manufacturing our products, we would be materially adversely affected.

This excerpt taken from the AMD 10-Q filed May 6, 2009.

If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

Our operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because some of the materials that we purchase are complex, it is difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another. Certain raw materials that are used in the manufacture of our products are available only from a limited number of suppliers.

For example, the manufacturing of our microprocessor products is largely dependent on one supplier of our silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of integrated circuit packages for our microprocessor products. Similarly, certain non-proprietary materials or components such as memory, PCBs, substrates and capacitors used in the manufacture of our graphics products are currently available from only a limited number of sources and are often subject to rapid changes in price and availability. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. The credit market crisis and other macro-economic challenges currently affecting the global economy may impact our key suppliers who may reduce their output and become insolvent which may adversely impact our ability to procure key materials. For example, in January 2009, Qimonda AG, a supplier of memory for our graphics products filed an application with the local court in Munich to commence insolvency proceedings. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, or our foundries are unable to procure materials for manufacturing our products, we would be materially adversely effected.

Our issuance to WCH of 58,000,000 shares of our common stock and warrants to purchase 35,000,000 shares of our common stock, if and when exercised by WCH, will dilute the ownership interests of our existing stockholders, and the conversion of our 5.75% Notes and 6.00% Notes may dilute the ownership interest of our existing stockholders.

        As part of the consummation of the transactions contemplated by the Master Transaction Agreement, we sold to WCH 58,000,000 shares of our common stock and warrants to purchase 35,000,000 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $0.01 per share. Our issuance of the shares to WCH and any subsequent issuance by us of additional shares to WCH upon exercise of the warrants will dilute the ownership interests of our existing stockholders. Any sales in the public market by WCH of any shares we issue to WCH could adversely affect prevailing market prices of our common stock, and the anticipated exercise by WCH of the warrants we issue to WCH could depress the price of our common stock.

Moreover, the conversion of some or all of the 5.75% Notes and the 6.00% Notes may dilute the ownership interests of our existing stockholders. The conversion of the 5.75% Notes and the 6.00% Notes could have a dilutive effect on our earnings per share to the extent that the price of our common stock exceeds the conversion price of the 5.75% Notes and 6.00% Notes. Any sales in the public market of our common stock issuable upon conversion of the 5.75% Notes or 6.00% Notes could adversely affect prevailing market prices of our common stock. In addition, the anticipated conversion of the 5.75% Notes or 6.00% Notes into cash and shares of our common stock could depress the price of our common stock.

These excerpts taken from the AMD 10-K filed Feb 24, 2009.

If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

Our microprocessor manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because the equipment that we purchase is complex, it is difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. Certain raw materials we use in manufacturing our microprocessor products or that are used in the manufacture of our graphics products are available only from a limited number of suppliers.

For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for our silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers that we use to manufacture our microprocessor products. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of integrated circuit packages for our microprocessor products. Similarly, certain non-proprietary materials or components such as memory, PCBs, substrates and capacitors used in the manufacture of our graphics products are currently available from only a limited number of sources and are often subject to rapid changes in price and availability. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. The credit market crisis and other macro-economic challenges currently affecting the global economy may impact our key suppliers who may reduce their output and become insolvent which may adversely impact our ability to procure key materials. For example, in January 2009, Qimonda AG, a supplier of memory for our graphics products filed an application with the local court in Munich to commence insolvency proceedings. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction has in the past and could in the future have a material adverse effect on us.

If essential equipment
or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

Our microprocessor manufacturing
operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or
increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because the equipment that we purchase is complex, it is difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. Certain raw materials we use in
manufacturing our microprocessor products or that are used in the manufacture of our graphics products are available only from a limited number of suppliers.

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="2">For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for our silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers that we use to manufacture our microprocessor products. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of
suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of integrated circuit packages for our microprocessor products. Similarly, certain non-proprietary materials or components such as memory, PCBs,
substrates and capacitors used in the manufacture of our graphics products are currently available from only a limited number of sources and are often subject to rapid changes in price and availability. Interruption of supply or increased demand in
the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. The credit market crisis and other macro-economic challenges currently affecting the global economy may impact our key suppliers who may reduce their output and
become insolvent which may adversely impact our ability to procure key materials. For example, in January 2009, Qimonda AG, a supplier of memory for our graphics products filed an application with the local court in Munich to commence insolvency
proceedings. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction has in the past and could in the future have a material adverse effect on us.

STYLE="margin-top:18px;margin-bottom:0px">Unless we maintain manufacturing efficiency, our future profitability could be materially adversely affected.

STYLE="margin-top:6px;margin-bottom:0px; text-indent:4%">Manufacturing our microprocessor products involves highly complex processes that require advanced equipment. We cannot be sure that we will be able to
maintain or increase our manufacturing efficiency to the same extent as our competitors, including their foundries. We continually modify manufacturing processes and transition to more advanced manufacturing process technologies in an effort to
improve yields and product performance and decrease costs. We may fail to achieve acceptable yields or experience product delivery delays as a result of, among other things, capacity constraints, delays in the development or implementation of new
process technologies, changes in our process technologies, upgrades or expansion of existing facilities, or impurities or other difficulties in the manufacturing process. Any decrease in manufacturing yields could result in an increase in our per
unit costs or force us to allocate our reduced product supply among our customers, which could potentially harm our customer relationships, reputation, revenue and gross profit.

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="2">Our issuance to WCH of 58,000,000 shares of our common stock and warrants to purchase 35,000,000 shares of our common stock, if and when exercised by ATIC, will dilute the ownership interests of our existing
stockholders, and the conversion of our 5.75% Notes and 6.00% Notes may dilute the ownership interest of our existing stockholders.

As
part of the consummation of the transactions contemplated by the Master Transaction Agreement, we intend to sell to WCH 58,000,000 shares of our common stock and warrants to purchase 35,000,000 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of
$0.01 per share. Our issuance of the shares to WCH and any subsequent issuance by us of additional shares to WCH upon exercise of the warrants will dilute the ownership interests of

 


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our existing stockholders. Any sales in the public market by WCH of any shares we issue to WCH could adversely affect prevailing market prices of our common
stock, and the anticipated exercise by WCH of the warrants we issue to WCH could depress the price of our common stock.

Moreover, the
conversion of some or all of the 5.75% Notes and the 6.00% Notes may dilute the ownership interests of our existing stockholders. The conversion of the 5.75% Notes and the 6.00% Notes could have a dilutive effect on our earnings per share to the
extent that the price of our common stock exceeds the conversion price of the 5.75% Notes and 6.00% Notes. Any sales in the public market of our common stock issuable upon conversion of the 5.75% Notes or 6.00% Notes could adversely affect
prevailing market prices of our common stock. In addition, the anticipated conversion of the 5.75% Notes or 6.00% Notes into cash and shares of our common stock could depress the price of our common stock.

STYLE="margin-top:18px;margin-bottom:0px">If we are unable to comply with the covenants in the subsidy grant documents that we receive from the State of Saxony, the Federal Republic of Germany and/or the
European Union for Fab 30, Fab 36, Fab 38 or other research and development projects we may undertake in Germany, we may forfeit or have to repay our subsidies, which could materially adversely affect us.

STYLE="margin-top:6px;margin-bottom:0px; text-indent:4%">We receive capital investment grants and allowances and interest subsidies from the State of Saxony and the Federal Republic of Germany. The subsidy grant
documents typically contain covenants that must be complied with, and noncompliance with the conditions of the grants, allowances and subsidies could result in the forfeiture of all or a portion of any future amounts to be received, as well as the
repayment of all or a portion of amounts received to date. If we are unable to comply with any of the covenants in the grant documents, we could be materially adversely affected.

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="2">If our products are not compatible with some or all industry-standard software and hardware, we could be materially adversely affected.

STYLE="margin-top:6px;margin-bottom:0px; text-indent:4%">Our products may not be fully compatible with some or all industry-standard software and hardware. Further, we may be unsuccessful in correcting any such
compatibility problems in a timely manner. If our customers are unable to achieve compatibility with software or hardware after our products are shipped in volume, we could be materially adversely affected. In addition, the mere announcement of an
incompatibility problem relating to our products could have a material adverse effect on us.

This excerpt taken from the AMD 10-Q filed Nov 6, 2008.

If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

Our microprocessor manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because the equipment that we purchase is complex, it is difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. Certain raw materials we use in manufacturing our microprocessor products or that are used in the manufacture of our graphics products are available only from a limited number of suppliers.

For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for our silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers that we use to manufacture our microprocessor products. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of integrated circuit packages for our microprocessor products. Similarly, certain non-proprietary materials or components such as memory, PCBs, substrates and capacitors used in the manufacture of our graphics products are currently available from only a limited number of sources and are often subject to rapid changes in price and availability. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction has in the past and could in the future have a material adverse effect on us.

 

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This excerpt taken from the AMD 10-Q filed Aug 6, 2008.

If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

Our microprocessor manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because the equipment that we purchase is complex, it is difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. Certain raw materials we use in manufacturing our microprocessor products or that are used in the manufacture of our graphics products are available only from a limited number of suppliers.

For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for our silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers that we use to manufacture our microprocessor products. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of integrated circuit packages for our microprocessor products. Similarly, certain non-proprietary materials or components such as memory, PCBs, substrates and capacitors used in the manufacture of our graphics products are currently available from only a limited number of sources and are often subject to rapid changes in price and availability. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction has in the past and could in the future have a material adverse effect on us.

This excerpt taken from the AMD 10-Q filed May 7, 2008.

If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

Our microprocessor manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because the equipment that we purchase is complex, it is difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. Certain raw materials we use in manufacturing our microprocessor products or that are used in the manufacture of our graphics products are available only from a limited number of suppliers.

For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for our silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers that we use to manufacture our microprocessor products. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of integrated circuit packages for our microprocessor products. Similarly, certain non-proprietary materials or components such as memory, PCBs, substrates and capacitors used in the manufacture of our graphics products are currently available from only a limited number of sources and are often subject to rapid changes in price and availability. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction has in the past and could in the future have a material adverse effect on us.

 

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These excerpts taken from the AMD 10-K filed Feb 26, 2008.

If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

Our microprocessor manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because the equipment that we purchase is complex, it is difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. Certain raw materials we use in manufacturing our microprocessor products or that are used in the manufacture of our graphics products are available only from a limited number of suppliers.

For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for our silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers that we use to manufacture our microprocessor products. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of integrated circuit packages for our microprocessor products. Similarly, certain non-proprietary materials or components such as memory, PCBs, substrates and capacitors used in the manufacture of our graphics products are currently available from only a limited number of sources and are often subject to rapid changes in price and availability. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction has in the past and could in the future have a material adverse effect on us.

 

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If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially
adversely affected.

Our microprocessor manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of
materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because the
equipment that we purchase is complex, it is difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. Certain raw materials we use in manufacturing our microprocessor products or that are used in the manufacture
of our graphics products are available only from a limited number of suppliers.

For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for
our silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers that we use to manufacture our microprocessor products. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of
certain types of integrated circuit packages for our microprocessor products. Similarly, certain non-proprietary materials or components such as memory, PCBs, substrates and capacitors used in the manufacture of our graphics products are currently
available from only a limited number of sources and are often subject to rapid changes in price and availability. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. If
we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction has in the past and could in the future have a material adverse effect on us.

STYLE="margin-top:0px;margin-bottom:0px"> 


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This excerpt taken from the AMD 10-Q filed Nov 7, 2007.

If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

Our microprocessor manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because the equipment that we purchase is complex, it is difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. Certain raw materials we use in manufacturing our microprocessor products or that are used in the manufacture of our graphics products are available only from a limited number of suppliers.

For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for our silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers that we use to manufacture our microprocessor products. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of integrated circuit packages for our microprocessor products. Similarly, certain non-proprietary materials or components such as memory, PCBs, substrates and capacitors used in the manufacture of our graphics products are currently available from only a limited number of sources and often subject to rapid changes in price and availability. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction has in the past and could in the future have a material adverse effect on us.

 

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This excerpt taken from the AMD 10-Q filed Aug 7, 2007.

If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

Our microprocessor manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because the equipment that we purchase is complex, it is difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. Certain raw materials we use in manufacturing our microprocessor products or that are used in the manufacture of our graphics products are available only from a limited number of suppliers.

 

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For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for our silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers that we use to manufacture our microprocessor products. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of integrated circuit packages for our microprocessor products. Similarly, certain non-proprietary materials or components such as memory, PCBs, substrates and capacitors used in the manufacture of our graphics products are currently available from only a limited number of sources and often subject to rapid changes in price and availability. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction has in the past and could in the future have a material adverse effect on us.

This excerpt taken from the AMD 10-Q filed May 9, 2007.

If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

Our microprocessor manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because the equipment that we purchase is complex, it is difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. Certain raw materials we use in manufacturing our microprocessor products or that are used in the manufacture of our graphics products are available only from a limited number of suppliers.

For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for our 200-millimeter and 300-millimeter silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers that we use to manufacture our microprocessor products. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of integrated circuit packages for our microprocessor products. Similarly, certain non-proprietary materials or components such as memory, PCBs, substrates and capacitors used in the manufacture of our graphics products are currently available from only a limited number of sources and often subject to rapid changes in price and availability. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction has in the past and could in the future have a material adverse effect on us.

This excerpt taken from the AMD 10-K filed Mar 1, 2007.

If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

 

Our microprocessor manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because the equipment that we purchase is complex, it is difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. Certain raw materials we use in manufacturing our microprocessor products or that are used in the manufacture of our graphics products are available only from a limited number of suppliers.

 

For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for our 200-millimeter and 300-millimeter silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers that we use to manufacture our microprocessor products. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of integrated circuit packages for our microprocessor products. Similarly, certain non-proprietary materials or components such as memory, PCBs, substrates and capacitors

 

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used in the manufacture of our graphics products are currently available from only a limited number of sources and often subject to rapid changes in price and availability. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction has in the past and could in the future have a material adverse effect on us.

 

This excerpt taken from the AMD 10-Q filed Nov 9, 2006.

If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

Our microprocessor manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because the equipment that we purchase is complex, it is difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. Certain raw materials we use in manufacturing our microprocessor products or that are used in the manufacture of our graphics products are available only from a limited number of suppliers.

For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for our 200-millimeter and 300-millimeter silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers that we use to manufacture our microprocessor products. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of integrated circuit packages for our microprocessor products. Similarly, certain non-proprietary materials or components such as memory, PCBs, substrates and capacitors used in the manufacture of our graphics products are currently available from only a limited number of sources and often subject to rapid changes in price and availability. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction has in the past and could in the future have a material adverse effect on us.

This excerpt taken from the AMD 10-Q filed Aug 11, 2006.

If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

Our manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because the equipment that we purchase is complex, it is difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. Certain raw materials we use in manufacturing our products are available only from a limited number of suppliers.

For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for our 200-millimeter and 300-millimeter silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers. Although we are in the process of qualifying alternate sources, we do not believe that they currently have sufficient capacity to meet our requirements for SOI wafers. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of integrated circuit packages. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction has in the past and could in the future have a material adverse effect on us.

This excerpt taken from the AMD 10-Q filed May 5, 2006.

If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

Our manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because the equipment that we purchase is complex, it is difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. Certain raw materials we use in manufacturing our products are available only from a limited number of suppliers.

For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for our 200-millimeter and 300-millimeter silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers. Although we are in the process of qualifying alternate sources, we do not believe that they currently have sufficient capacity to meet our requirements for SOI wafers. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of integrated circuit packages. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction has in the past and could in the future have a material adverse effect on us.

This excerpt taken from the AMD 10-K filed Feb 27, 2006.

If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

 

Our manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because the equipment that we purchase is complex, it is difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. Certain raw materials we use in manufacturing our products are available only from a limited number of suppliers.

 

For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for our 200-millimeter and 300-millimeter silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers. Although we are in the process of qualifying alternate sources, we do not believe that they currently have sufficient capacity to meet our requirements for SOI wafers. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of integrated circuit packages. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction has in the past and could in the future have a material adverse effect on us.

 

This excerpt taken from the AMD 8-K filed Jan 23, 2006.

If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

 

Our manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to


time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because the equipment that we purchase is complex, it is difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. Certain raw materials we use in the manufacture of our products are available only from a limited number of suppliers.

 

For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for our 200-millimeter and 300-millimeter silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers. Although we are in the process of qualifying alternate sources, we do not believe that they currently have sufficient capacity to meet our requirements for SOI wafers. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of integrated circuit packages. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction has in the past and could in the future have a material adverse effect on us.

 

This excerpt taken from the AMD 10-Q filed Nov 3, 2005.

If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

 

Our manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because the equipment that we purchase is complex, it is difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. Certain raw materials we use in the manufacture of our products are available from a limited number of suppliers.

 

For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for our 200-millimeter and 300-millimeter silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers. Although there are alternative sources available, we have not qualified these sources and we do not believe that they currently have sufficient capacity to meet our requirements for SOI wafers. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of IC packages we purchase. Similarly, we purchase commercial memory die, such as SRAM, pSRAM, 1pSDRAM and NAND from third-party suppliers and incorporate these die into Spansion multi chip package products. Our production of Spansion Flash memory products was constrained in first half of fiscal 2004 because of difficulties in procuring adequate supply of pSRAM. Some of our major suppliers with respect to the Spansion Flash memory business, including Samsung, are also our competitors in the Flash memory market. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction has in the past and could in the future have a material adverse effect on us.

 

This excerpt taken from the AMD 10-Q filed Aug 4, 2005.

If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

 

Our manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because the equipment that we purchase is complex, it is difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. Certain raw materials we use in the manufacture of our products are available from a limited number of suppliers.

 

For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for our 200-millimeter and 300-millimeter silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers. Although there are alternative sources available, we have not qualified these sources and we do not believe that they currently have sufficient capacity to meet our requirements for SOI wafers. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of IC packages we purchase. Similarly, we purchase commercial non-Flash memory die, such as SRAM and pSRAM, from third-party suppliers and incorporate these die into Spansion MCP products. Our production of Spansion Flash memory products was constrained in first half of fiscal 2004 because of difficulties in procuring adequate supply of pSRAM. Some of these suppliers are also our competitors in the Flash memory market. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction has in the past and could in the future have a material adverse effect on us.

 

This excerpt taken from the AMD 10-Q filed May 6, 2005.

If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

 

Our manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because the equipment that we purchase is complex, it is difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. Certain raw materials we use in the manufacture of our products are available from a limited number of suppliers.

 

For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for our 200-millimeter and 300-millimeter silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers. Although there are alternative sources available, we have not qualified these sources and we do not believe that they currently have sufficient capacity to meet our requirements for SOI wafers. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of IC packages we purchase. Similarly, we purchase commercial non-Flash memory die, such as SRAM and pSRAM, from third-party

 

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suppliers and incorporate these die into Spansion MCP products. Our production was constrained in first half of fiscal 2004 because of difficulties in procuring adequate supply of pSRAM. Some of these suppliers are also our competitors in the Flash memory market. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction has in the past and could in the future have a material adverse effect on us.

 

This excerpt taken from the AMD 10-K filed Mar 1, 2005.

If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

 

Our manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because some equipment and material that we purchase is complex, it is sometimes difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. In addition, certain raw materials we use in the manufacture of our products are available from a limited number of suppliers.

 

For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for our 200-millimeter and 300-millimeter silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers. Although there are alternative sources available, we have not qualified these sources and we do not believe that they currently have sufficient capacity to meet our requirements for SOI wafers. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of IC packages we purchase. Similarly, we purchase commercial non-Flash memory die, such as SRAM and pSRAM, from third-party suppliers and incorporate these die into Spansion MCP products. Some of these suppliers are also our competitors in the Flash memory market. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

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