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Advanced Micro Devices 10-K 2005
Form 10-K
Table of Contents

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 


 

FORM 10-K

 

(Mark One)

  x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934.  

 

For the fiscal year ended December 26, 2004

 

OR

 

  ¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934.  

 

For the transition period from ____________ to ____________

 

Commission File Number 1-7882

 


 

ADVANCED MICRO DEVICES, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware   94-1692300
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)   (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
One AMD Place, Sunnyvale, California   94088
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

 

(408) 749-4000

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 


 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

(Title of each class)


 

(Name of each exchange

on which registered)


$.01 Par Value Common Stock   New York Stock Exchange

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

 

None

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes  x  No  ¨

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is an accelerated filer (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes  x  No  ¨

 

Aggregate market value of the common stock held by non-affiliates based on the reported closing price of common stock on June 25, 2004, which was the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter.

 

$5,488,863,023

 

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date.

 

393,889,539 shares of common stock as of February 22, 2005

 


 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

 

Portions of the Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held on April 28, 2005, are incorporated into Part II and III hereof.

 


 

AMD, the AMD Arrow logo, AMD Athlon, AMD Opteron, AMD Sempron, AMD Turion, AMD PowerNow!, Alchemy, Geode and combinations thereof are trademarks of AMD. Spansion and MirrorBit, and combinations thereof, are trademarks of Spansion LLC. Vantis is a trademark of Lattice Semiconductor Corporation. Legerity is a trademark of Legerity, Inc. Microsoft, Windows, and Windows NT are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other jurisdictions. MIPS is a registered trademark of MIPS Technologies, Inc. in the United States and/or other jurisdictions. HyperTransport is a licensed trademark of the HyperTransport Technology Consortium. NetWare is a registered trademark of Novell, Inc. in the United States and/or other jurisdictions. Other terms used to identify companies and products may be trademarks of their respective owners.


Table of Contents

Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.

 

FORM 10-K

For The Fiscal Year Ended December 26, 2004

 

INDEX

 

PART I    1
    ITEM 1.   BUSINESS    1
    ITEM 2.   PROPERTIES    15
    ITEM 3.   LEGAL PROCEEDINGS    16
    ITEM 4.   SUBMISSION OF MATTERS TO A VOTE OF SECURITY HOLDERS    16
PART II    17
    ITEM 5.  

MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

   17
    ITEM 6.   SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA    18
    ITEM 7.  

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

   20
    ITEM 7A.   QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURE ABOUT MARKET RISK    66
    ITEM 8.   FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA    69
    ITEM 9.  

CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

   120
    ITEM 9A.   CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES    120
    ITEM 9B.   OTHER INFORMATION    120
PART III    121
    ITEM 10.   DIRECTORS AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE REGISTRANT    121
    ITEM 11.   EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION    121
    ITEM 12.  

SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS

   121
    ITEM 13.   CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS    121
    ITEM 14.   PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES    121
PART IV    122
    ITEM 15.   EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES    122
SIGNATURES    131

 

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PART I

 

ITEM 1.     BUSINESS

 

Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

 

The statements in this report include forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are based on current expectations and beliefs and involve numerous risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from expectations. These forward-looking statements should not be relied upon as predictions of future events as we cannot assure you that the events or circumstances reflected in these statements will be achieved or will occur. You can identify forward-looking statements by the use of forward-looking terminology including “believes,” “expects,” “may,” “will,” “should,” “seeks,” “intends,” “plans,” “pro forma,” “estimates,” or “anticipates” or the negative of these words and phrases or other variations of these words and phrases or comparable terminology. The forward-looking statements relate to, among other things: our sales, operating results and anticipated cash flows; capital expenditures; depreciation and amortization expenses; research and development expenses; marketing, general and administrative expenses; the development and timing of the introduction of new products and technologies, including our dual-core microprocessors, AMD Turion 64 microprocessors, ORNAND architecture and QuadBit technology; customer and market acceptance of our AMD Opteron, AMD Athlon 64, AMD Turion 64 and AMD Sempron microprocessors; customer and market acceptance of Spansion Flash memory products based on MirrorBit and floating gate technology, including the ORNAND architecture; our ability to remain competitive and maintain or increase our market position; our ability to maintain and develop key relationships with our existing and new customers; the ability to produce our microprocessor and Flash memory products in the volumes and mix required by the market; our ability to maintain the level of investment in research and development and capacity that is required to remain competitive; our ability to transition to advanced manufacturing process technologies in a timely and effective way; our ability to achieve cost reductions in the amounts and in the timeframes anticipated; the process technology transitions in our wafer fabrication facilities; and our ability to gain market share in high-growth global markets such as China, Latin America, India and Eastern Europe.

 

For a discussion of the factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the forward-looking statements, see the “Financial Condition” and “Risk Factors” sections set forth in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” beginning on page 20 below and such other risks and uncertainties as set forth below in this report or detailed in our other Securities and Exchange Commission reports and filings. We assume no obligation to update forward-looking statements.

 

General

 

We are a leading semiconductor company with manufacturing facilities in the United States, Europe and Asia, and sales offices throughout the world. We design, manufacture and market industry-standard digital integrated circuits, or ICs, that are used in diverse product applications such as desktop and mobile personal computers, or PCs, workstations, servers, communications equipment such as mobile telephones, and automotive and consumer electronics. Our products consist primarily of microprocessors and Flash memory devices. In addition, we offer embedded microprocessors for personal connectivity devices and specific consumer markets.

 

Additional Information

 

We were incorporated under the laws of Delaware on May 1, 1969. Our mailing address and executive offices are located at One AMD Place, Sunnyvale, California 94088, and our telephone number is (408) 749-4000. References in this report to “AMD,” “we,” “us,” “our,” or the “Company” shall mean Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. and our consolidated subsidiaries, including Spansion LLC and its subsidiaries, unless the context indicates otherwise.

 

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Effective June 30, 2003, we established Spansion LLC, our Flash memory majority-owned subsidiary in which we hold a 60 percent interest and Fujitsu Limited holds the remaining 40 percent. Spansion is headquartered in Sunnyvale, California, and its manufacturing, research and assembly operations are in the United States and Asia. As part of the formation of Spansion, we and Fujitsu contributed to Spansion our respective interests in Fujitsu AMD Semiconductor Limited, our former manufacturing joint venture, which we refer to as the Manufacturing Joint Venture in this report. We also contributed our Flash memory inventory, our manufacturing facility in Austin, Texas (Fab 25), our memory research and development facility in Sunnyvale, California (the SDC) and our Flash memory assembly and test facilities in Thailand, Malaysia and Suzhou, China. Fujitsu contributed its Flash memory division, including related inventory, cash and its Flash memory assembly and test facility in Malaysia. Spansion is managed by a ten-member board of managers of which we are currently entitled to appoint six managers and Fujitsu is entitled to appoint four managers.

 

For a description of certain financing arrangements for Spansion, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” beginning on page 20, below.

 

We post on the Investor Relations page of our Web site, www.amd.com, a link to our filings with the SEC, our Principles of Corporate Governance, our Code of Ethics for our Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Corporate Controller and other senior finance executives, our “Worldwide Standards of Business Conduct,” which applies to our directors and all our employees, and the charters of our Audit, Compensation, Finance and Nominating and Corporate Governance committees. Our filings with the SEC are posted as soon as reasonably practical after they are filed electronically with the SEC. You can also obtain copies of these documents by writing to us at: Corporate Secretary, AMD, One AMD Place, M/S 68, Sunnyvale, California 94088, or emailing us at: Corporate.Secretary@amd.com. All these documents and filings are available free of charge.

 

For financial information about geographic areas and for segment information with respect to sales and operating results, refer to the information set forth in Note 9 of our consolidated financial statements, beginning on page 104, below.

 

For a discussion of the risk factors related to our business operations, please see the sections entitled, “Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements,” above, and the “Risk Factors” and “Financial Condition” sections set forth in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” beginning on page 20, below.

 

Our Industry

 

Semiconductors are critical components used in a variety of electronic products and systems. An IC is a semiconductor device that consists of many interconnected transistors on a single chip. Since the invention of the transistor in 1948, improvements in IC process and design technologies have led to the development of smaller, more complex and more reliable ICs at a lower cost per function. In order to satisfy the demand for faster, smaller and lower-cost ICs, semiconductor manufacturers have continually developed improvements in manufacturing and process technology. For example, ICs are increasingly being manufactured using smaller geometries. In addition, the size of silicon wafers from which ICs are produced has increased, with some semiconductor manufacturers migrating from 200-millimeter wafers to 300-millimeter wafers. Use of smaller process geometries can result in products that are higher performing, use less power and cost less to manufacture on a per unit basis. Use of larger wafers can contribute further to a decrease in manufacturing costs per unit and increase capacity by yielding more chips per wafer.

 

The availability of low-cost semiconductors, together with increased customer demand for sophisticated electronic systems, has led to the proliferation of semiconductors. Today, virtually all electronic products use

 

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semiconductors, including PCs and related peripherals, wired and wireless voice and data communications and networking products including mobile telephones, facsimile and photocopy machines, home entertainment equipment, industrial control equipment and automobiles.

 

Within the global semiconductor industry, we primarily participate in two markets:

 

    microprocessors, which are used for control and computing tasks, and complementary chipset components, which perform essential logic functions that support the microprocessors; and

 

    Flash memory devices, which are used to store data and programming instructions.

 

In addition, we offer embedded microprocessors for personal connectivity devices and specific consumer markets.

 

Computation Products

 

The Microprocessor Market

 

A microprocessor is an IC that serves as the central processing unit, or CPU, of a computer. It generally consists of millions of transistors that process data and control other devices in the system, acting as the brain of the computer. The performance of a microprocessor is a critical factor impacting the performance of a PC and other similar devices. The principal indicators of microprocessor performance are work-per-cycle, or how many instructions are executed per cycle, and clock speed, representing the rate at which its internal logic operates, measured in units of hertz, or cycles processed per second. Other factors impacting microprocessor performance include memory size, data access speed and power consumption. Developments in circuit design and manufacturing process technologies have resulted in significant advances in microprocessor performance over the past two decades. We market our processors based on overall performance, which is a function of both architecture and clock speed. We believe overall performance is a better indicator of CPU capability than simply clock speed.

 

The microprocessor market is characterized by short product life cycles and migration to ever-higher-performance microprocessors. To compete successfully in this market, microprocessor manufacturers must transition to new process technologies at a fast pace and offer higher-performance microprocessors in significantly greater volumes. They also must achieve manufacturing yield and volume goals in order to sell microprocessors at competitive prices.

 

A factor driving change in the microprocessor industry is the introduction of 64-bit computing. The bit rating of a microprocessor generally denotes the largest amount of numerical data that a microprocessor can handle in a single clock cycle. For approximately the last ten years, microprocessors have had 32-bit computing capabilities. While 32-bit processors have historically been sufficient, we believe that they will face challenges as new data and memory-intensive consumer and enterprise software applications gain popularity. Microprocessors with 64-bit processing capabilities enable systems to have greater performance by allowing software applications and operating systems to access more memory and process more data. From applications for multimedia and gaming, to grid computing and extensive enterprise databases, we believe the demand for 64-bit computing will increase across the computing industry. Additionally, we believe that the introduction of advanced operating systems, such as Microsoft® Windows® 64, and software applications designed to take advantage of the 64-bit platform, will drive further adoption of 64-bit processors.

 

Another emerging trend in the microprocessor industry is the introduction of dual-core processors, which consist of two processor cores on one semiconductor die. Over the last ten years as microprocessors have increased in transistor density and overall performance capabilities, they have increasingly faced power consumption challenges. By enabling numerous operations to be executed simultaneously across two processor cores, we believe dual-core processors will increase processor performance with a minimal increase in power consumption.

 

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Improvements in the performance characteristics of microprocessors and decreases in production costs resulting from advances in manufacturing process technology, as well as lower selling prices, have increased the demand for microprocessors over time. The greatest demand for our microprocessors today is from PC manufacturers. Factors that we believe will stimulate growth in the demand for microprocessors include lower-priced PC systems, enhanced product features, and strategic purchases of new PC systems to deploy new tools and technologies. In addition, we believe that there will be increased demand for microprocessors from server manufacturers as enterprises continue to upgrade their networks.

 

Microprocessor Products

 

We currently offer microprocessor products for desktop and mobile PCs, servers and workstations. Our microprocessors are based on the x86 architecture. In addition, we design them based on a superscalar reduced instruction set computer, or RISC, architecture. RISC architecture allows microprocessors to perform fewer types of computer instructions thereby allowing the microprocessor to operate at a higher speed. We also design our microprocessors to be compatible with operating system software such as Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows NT®, Windows 98 (and Windows predecessor operating systems), Linux, NetWare®, Solaris and UNIX.

 

Desktop PCs.    Our microprocessors for desktop PCs consist of AMD Athlon 64 FX, AMD Athlon 64 and AMD Sempron processors. In September 2003, we introduced our AMD Athlon 64 microprocessor, the first Windows-compatible, x86 architecture-based 64-bit PC processor. AMD Athlon 64 processors are based on the AMD64 technology platform, which extends the industry-standard x86 instruction set architecture to 64-bit computing. We designed our AMD Athlon 64 processors to allow simultaneous 32-bit and 64-bit computing, enabling users to protect their information technology investments by continuing to use their 32-bit software applications while implementing 64-bit applications on the timetable of their choice. We design our AMD Athlon 64 processors for enterprises and sophisticated PC users that seek to access large amounts of data and memory. Simultaneously with our introduction of the AMD Athlon 64 processor, we introduced the AMD Athlon 64 FX processor, designed specifically for gamers, PC enthusiasts and digital content creators who require products that can perform graphic-intensive tasks. Our AMD Sempron microprocessors, which we introduced in July 2004, are designed for value-conscious consumers of desktop and notebook PCs.

 

Mobile PCs.    Our microprocessors for the mobile computing market consist of mobile AMD Athlon 64 processors, mobile AMD Sempron processors and AMD Athlon XP-M processors. In January 2005, we announced our new AMD Turion 64 mobile technology, and we expect to introduce our AMD Turion 64 processors in the first half of 2005. Our OEM customers incorporate our processors into a variety of designs, including full-size and thin-and-light notebooks. We have designed our mobile processor products for high-performance computing and wireless connectivity. They feature advanced power management from AMD PowerNow! technology, which offers reduced power consumption and extended system battery life. We intend to continue to invest in our mobile microprocessor product portfolio with increasing emphasis on low-power computing.

 

Servers and Workstations.    Our x86 microprocessors for servers and workstations consist of the AMD Opteron and AMD Athlon MP processors. A server is a powerful computer on a network that is dedicated to a particular purpose and stores large amounts of information and performs the critical functions for that purpose. A workstation is essentially a heavy-duty desktop, designed for tasks such as computer-aided design. We introduced our first 64-bit microprocessor for servers and workstations, AMD Opteron, in April 2003. Like the AMD Athlon 64 processors, the AMD Opteron processors for servers and workstations are based on the AMD64 technology and are designed to allow simultaneous 32-bit and 64-bit computing. AMD Opteron processors were the first processors to extend the industry-standard x86 instruction set architecture to 64-bit computing. AMD Opteron processors can be used in a variety of server applications, including business processing (enterprise resource planning, customer relationship management, and supply chain management) and business intelligence. AMD Opteron processors can also be used in workstation applications such as engineering

 

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and digital content creation software, and other information technology infrastructure applications such as intensive Web serving and messaging.

 

Dual-Core Processors. We are currently developing dual-core processor technology, which we believe provides a path for increasing processor performance with a minimal increase in power consumption. In August 2004, we demonstrated the first x86 dual-core processor when we showed a Hewlett Packard HP Proliant server powered by our AMD Opteron dual-core processors. We plan to offer dual-core processors for servers and workstations in mid-2005, followed by dual-core processors for the PC market in the second half of 2005.

 

Chipsets. We also sell chipset products and make available motherboard reference design kits, designed to support our microprocessors for use in PCs and embedded products. A chipset provides the interface between all of a PC’s subsystems and sends data from the microprocessor to all the input/output and storage devices, such as the keyboard, mouse, monitor and hard drive. The primary reason we offer these products to our customers is to provide them with a solution that will allow them to use our microprocessors and develop and introduce their products into the market more quickly.

 

Our AMD Opteron and AMD Athlon 64 processors support HyperTransport technology, which is a high-bandwidth communications interface we initially developed, as well as integrated memory controllers that enable substantially higher performance than existing, non-integrated memory controller architectures. We expect our advanced architecture to provide users with even greater performance improvements as operating systems and software applications begin leveraging the benefits of our 64-bit architecture. To that end, we work with Microsoft to incorporate 64-bit support into the Windows operating system. Microsoft has indicated that it intends to release its Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1, Windows Server 2003 for 64-bit Extended Systems and Windows XP 64-bit Extended Systems in the first half of 2005. We believe that the backward compatibility of our AMD64-based processors will allow users to migrate more easily from current 32-bit operating systems and applications to future 64-bit operating systems and applications on a common hardware platform.

 

The Flash Memory Market

 

Flash memory is an important semiconductor component used in electronic devices such as mobile phones, digital cameras, DVD players, set top boxes, MP3 players and automotive electronics such as navigation systems. Flash memory differs from other types of memory due to its ability to retain stored information after power is turned off. Most electronic products use Flash memory to store important program instructions, or code, as well as multimedia content, or data. Code storage retains the basic operating instructions, operating system software or program code, which allows an electronic product to function while data storage retains digital content, such as multimedia files. For example, Flash memory in camera phones retains both the program code, which enables users to turn on and operate the phone, and also stores data such as digital photos.

 

The Flash memory market can be divided into three major categories based on application. Portable, battery-powered communications applications are categorized as “wireless.” Solid-state removable memory applications are categorized as “removable storage.” All other applications, such as consumer and automotive electronics, are categorized as “embedded.” Applications within the wireless category include mobile phones, smart phones and personal digital assistants, or PDAs. Applications within the removable storage category include USB drives and memory cards. Applications within the embedded category include consumer electronics, automotive electronics and networking and telecom equipment such as hubs, switches and routers. Currently, we serve the wireless and embedded categories of the NOR Flash memory market with our Spansion Flash memory products.

 

There are two major architectures of Flash memory employed in the market today: NOR and NAND. NOR Flash memory, which is generally more reliable than NAND Flash memory and less prone to data corruption, is typically used to store program code. NAND Flash memory has been generally less expensive to manufacture and is typically used in devices that require high-capacity data storage such as memory cards for digital cameras and MP3 players. Within the Flash memory market, we sell NOR Flash memory products.

 

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Flash Memory Products

 

Our Spansion Flash memory products encompass a broad spectrum of densities and features and are primarily designed to support code, or mixed code and data storage applications in the wireless and embedded categories of the Flash memory market. Our products are used in mobile telephones, consumer electronics, automotive electronics, networking equipment and other applications that require memory to be non-volatile and electrically rewritten. Our Spansion Flash memory products are based on two technologies today: single bit-per-cell floating gate technology and two bits-per-cell MirrorBit technology.

 

Floating Gate Technology. Floating gate is the conventional memory cell technology that is utilized by most Flash memory companies today. A memory cell comprises a transistor having a source, a drain and a control gate. The control gate regulates the current flow between the source and the drain, thereby defining whether the memory cell stores a “0” bit or a “1” bit by storing a charge in the cell storage medium. The “floating gate” is a conductive storage medium between the control gate and the source and drain. It is referred to as a floating gate because it is electrically isolated or “floating” from the rest of the cell to ensure that stored charge does not leak away resulting in memory loss. Our products using floating gate are typically used for code storage and code execution as well as in applications that take advantage of their ease of in-system re-programmability. In addition, floating gate technology has the ability to operate at very high read speeds and temperatures, which we believe is optimal for harsh environments such as automotive applications. Spansion Flash memory products using floating gate technology are available in densities from one megabit to 128 megabits. These products are designed to meet the requirements of a range of Flash memory market segments, from the low-end, low-density value segment to the high-performance, high-density wireless segment.

 

MirrorBit Technology. Our Spansion Flash memory products also include devices based on MirrorBit technology, our proprietary technology that stores two bits of data in a single memory cell thereby doubling the density, or storage capacity, of each memory cell and enabling higher density products. However, unlike the conductive storage medium used by floating gate technology, MirrorBit technology stores charge in a non-conductive storage medium without a floating gate. NOR Flash memory products based on MirrorBit technology require fewer wafer fabrication process steps to manufacture and have a simpler cell architecture compared to similar products based on single-bit-per-cell or multi-level-cell (MLC) floating gate technology. As a result, MirrorBit technology can contribute to a smaller die size and improved unit production yields. Due to these characteristics, for a given density, NOR Flash memory products based on MirrorBit technology can be less expensive to manufacture than similar products based on conventional floating gate single-bit-per-cell or MLC technology.

 

Our Spansion Flash memory products based on MirrorBit technology are available in densities ranging from 16 megabits to 512 megabits. We believe the lower cost and higher yields of MirrorBit technology enable us to manufacture higher density NOR Flash products at a cost that is not achievable using competing NOR MLC floating gate technology. We believe our MirrorBit technology will allow us to compete in certain portions of the Flash memory market, such as data storage, with die sizes that are similar to NAND Flash memory products on the same process geometry and where high densities and low cost-per-bit are important.

 

We are developing a new architecture, ORNAND, based on our MirrorBit technology, which we believe will allow us to develop products that combine some of the best attributes of NOR architecture and NAND architecture. We believe that ORNAND architecture will allow us to offer products with higher densities in our traditional NOR Flash memory markets, while enabling us to enter and compete in new markets that have traditionally been served by NAND-based products, such as removable storage. During 2004, we also demonstrated the ability of MirrorBit technology to store four bits-per-cell, which we refer to as QuadBit, with a working proof-of-concept. If successful, we believe our QuadBit technology would enable us to target the higher density and lower cost portions of the removable storage category, which is currently served by vendors of NAND-based products.

 

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Our Spansion Flash memory products implement different features and interfaces to address different customer requirements. These different features and interfaces may be supported on both floating gate and MirrorBit technology. For example, we provide products that support faster burst- and page-mode read interfaces. Burst-mode products allow fast access to data in a continuous sequential operation, while page-mode products allow fast random access to data within a page. The wireless market in particular currently demands such solutions. In addition, Spansion products may also include features such as Advanced Sector Protection, which improves security by protecting Flash memory content against inadvertent or deliberate changes to code or data, and simultaneous read/write, which improves system performance by allowing a device to conduct read, write or erase operations simultaneously.

 

Packaging is an integral element of our Spansion Flash memory products. We offer a range of packaging options, from single-die configurations and multi-chip products (MCPs) to package-less solutions, such as Known Good Die. Our packaging includes lead-frame and ball grid array or BGA, which describe the mechanical connection between the package and the printed circuit board. Our packages in the embedded markets mostly use lead-frame solutions while our packages for the wireless markets almost exclusively use BGA solutions due to the small physical size or form factor enabled by BGA. A significant percentage of our products are shipped as MCPs due to increasing demand for smaller mobile phones. Mobile phone manufacturers are especially interested in MCPs due to the single, space-saving package, low power consumption, and high performance. Our MCP products incorporate Spansion Flash memory devices and third-party non-Flash memory die, such as static RAM, or SRAM, or pseudo-static RAM, or pSRAM devices, which we purchase from outside vendors.

 

The Embedded Processor Market

 

In addition to our primary microprocessor and Flash memory markets, we also offer embedded microprocessors for personal connectivity devices and specific consumer markets. Personal connectivity devices can be classified into five main segments: computer devices such as thin clients; smart handheld devices and PDAs; access devices such as gateways and access points; entertainment devices such as media players and digital TVs; and automotive devices such as in-car navigation systems, telematics and media playback. The applications in these devices typically require highly integrated systems-on-chip, or SoCs, that include high-performance, low-power embedded processors and microcontrollers.

 

Personal Connectivity Solutions

 

We offer low-power, high-performance embedded microprocessor products for personal connectivity devices. Our products include low-power x86 and MIPS® architecture-based embedded processors. We design these embedded processors to address customer needs in non-PC markets where Internet connectivity and/or low power processing is a priority. Typically these embedded processors are used in products that require high to moderate levels of performance where key features include reduced cost, mobility, low power and small form factor. Products that use our embedded processors are targeted for specific market segments using SoC design techniques.

 

Our embedded microprocessor products consist of the AMD Geode family and the AMD Alchemy family of products. AMD Geode microprocessors are based on the x86 architecture and are optimized for high performance and low power. The Geode technology integrates complex functionality, such as processing, system logic, graphics, and audio and video decompression onto one integrated device. We target our AMD Geode processors at each of the five market segments referenced above. With the AMD Geode family of microprocessors, we are able to extend the range of our x86-based product offerings to serve markets from embedded appliances to high-end servers.

 

We developed our AMD Alchemy embedded processors for portable media players, Internet access points, and gateways in which low power consumption is a key factor. All of these products have an architecture that provides a 32-bit MIPS instruction set. They support operating systems such as Microsoft Windows, CE.NET, Linux, VxWorks, and other operating systems.

 

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In October 2004, we launched the Personal Internet Communicator (PIC), a consumer device that we believe will help provide affordable Internet access to first time technology users in high-growth markets such as Brazil, the Caribbean, China, India, Mexico and Russia. Through the PIC, end users are provided with access to a variety of communication and productivity tools such as an Internet browser, e-mail, word processing, spreadsheet applications and a presentation viewer. The PIC runs on an operating system powered by Microsoft Windows technology. The PIC is manufactured by third-parties, and is designed to be branded, marketed and sold by local service providers such as telecommunications companies and government-sponsored communications programs. We supply the embedded microprocessors for the PIC. We developed the PIC in support of our 50x15 initiative, which is our goal to deliver affordable, accessible Internet connectivity and computing capabilities to 50 percent of the world’s population by 2015.

 

We believe our personal connectivity solutions offer our customers high performance at low power, faster time to market and lower product costs. Our strategy is to continue providing cost-effective embedded microprocessors for personal connectivity devices that our customers can deploy quickly in their applications.

 

Marketing and Sales

 

We market and sell our products, other than Flash memory products, under the AMD trademark. We sell our products through our direct sales force and through third-party distributors and independent sales representatives in both domestic and international markets pursuant to non-exclusive agreements. Our AMD channel partner programs provide product information, training and marketing materials.

 

Spansion Flash memory products are marketed and sold under the Spansion trademark. We and Fujitsu act as distributors of Spansion Flash memory products and receive a commission from Spansion. We distribute Spansion products in the same manner as we sell our other products, through our direct sales force and through third-party distributors and independent sales representatives.

 

We market our products through our direct marketing and co-marketing programs. Our direct marketing activities include print and Web-based advertising as well as consumer and trade events and other industry and consumer communications. In addition, we have cooperative advertising and marketing programs with our customers, including market development programs. Under these programs, eligible customers can use market development funds in partial reimbursement for advertisements and marketing programs related to our products.

 

Customers

 

Our customers consist primarily of OEMs and third-party distributors in both domestic and international markets. We generally warrant that products sold to our customers will, at the time of shipment, be free from defects in workmanship and materials and conform to our approved specifications. Subject to certain exceptions, we offer a three-year limited warranty to end users for microprocessor products that are commonly referred to as “processors in a box” and a one-year limited warranty to direct purchasers of all other microprocessor, Flash memory and embedded processor products. Under limited circumstances, we may offer an extended limited warranty to direct purchasers of Flash memory products or of microprocessor products that are intended for systems targeted at the commercial and embedded end markets. Generally, our customers may cancel orders 30 days prior to shipment without incurring a penalty.

 

Original Equipment Manufacturers

 

We focus on three types of OEMs: multi-nationals, selected regional accounts and target market customers. Large multi-nationals and regional accounts are our core OEM customers. Our OEM customers for microprocessors include numerous foreign and domestic manufacturers of PCs and PC motherboards. Our OEM customers for Flash memory products include foreign and domestic manufacturers of mobile telephones, consumer electronics, automotive electronics and networking equipment companies. Generally, OEMs do not

 

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have a right to return our products other than pursuant to the standard limited warranty. However, from time to time we may agree to repurchase a portion of these products pursuant to negotiated terms.

 

No OEM customer accounted for ten percent or more of our consolidated gross sales in 2002. In 2003 and 2004, one of our customers, Fujitsu, accounted for approximately 13 percent and 22 percent of our consolidated gross sales. Fujitsu primarily distributes Spansion Flash memory products. However, Fujitsu also is an OEM customer with respect to our microprocessor products.

 

Third-Party Distributors

 

Our authorized distributors resell to sub-distributors and mid-sized and smaller OEMs and to electronic manufacturing service providers and other companies. Distributors typically maintain an inventory of our products. In most instances, our agreements with distributors protect their inventory of our products against price reductions and provide return rights with respect to any product that we have removed from our price book or that is not more than twelve months older than the manufacturing code date. In addition, some agreements with our distributors may contain standard stock rotation provisions permitting limited levels of product returns.

 

No distributor accounted for ten percent or more of our consolidated gross sales in 2002. In each of 2003 and 2004, one of our distributors, Avnet, Inc., accounted for approximately 13 percent of our consolidated gross sales. Avnet primarily distributes our microprocessor products. In addition, in 2003 and 2004, Fujitsu accounted for approximately 13 percent and 22 percent of our consolidated gross sales. Fujitsu primarily distributes Spansion Flash memory products. However, Fujitsu is also an OEM customer with respect to our microprocessor products.

 

Competition

 

The IC industry is intensely competitive. Products compete on performance, quality, reliability, price, adherence to industry standards, software and hardware compatibility, marketing and distribution capability, brand recognition and availability. Technological advances in the industry result in frequent product introductions, regular price reductions, short product life cycles and increased product capabilities that may result in significant performance improvements.

 

Competition in the Microprocessor Market

 

Intel Corporation has dominated the market for microprocessors used in desktop and mobile PCs for many years. Intel is also a dominant competitor in the server segment of the microprocessor market. Because of its dominant position in the microprocessor market, Intel has been able to control x86 microprocessor and PC system standards and dictate the type of products the microprocessor market requires of Intel’s competitors. In addition, Intel’s significant financial resources enable it to market its products aggressively, to target our customers and our channel partners with special incentives, and to discipline customers who do business with us. These aggressive activities can result in lower unit sales and average selling prices for our products, and adversely affect our margins and profitability. Intel also exerts substantial influence over PC manufacturers and their channels of distribution through the “Intel Inside” brand program and other marketing programs. As long as Intel remains in this dominant position, we may be materially adversely affected by Intel’s:

 

    pricing and allocation strategies and actions, including aggressive pricing for microprocessors to increase market share;

 

    product mix and introduction schedules;

 

    product bundling, marketing and merchandising strategies;

 

    exclusivity payments to its current and potential customers;

 

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    control over industry standards, PC manufacturers and other PC industry participants, including motherboard, memory, chipset and basic input/output system, or BIOS, suppliers; and

 

    strong brand, and marketing and advertising expenditures in support of the brand.

 

Intel also dominates the PC system platform, which includes core logic chipsets, graphics chips, motherboards and other components necessary to assemble a PC system. As a result, PC OEMs are highly dependent on Intel, less innovative on their own and, to a large extent, are distributors of Intel technology. Additionally, Intel is able to drive de facto standards for x86 microprocessors that could cause us and other companies to have delayed access to such standards. In marketing our microprocessors to OEMs, we depend on third-party companies other than Intel for the design and manufacture of core-logic chipsets, graphics chips, motherboards, BIOS software and other components. In recent years, many of these third-party designers and manufacturers have lost significant market share to Intel or exited the business. In addition, Intel has significant leverage over these companies because they support each new generation of Intel’s microprocessors.

 

Currently, we do not plan to develop microprocessors that are bus interface protocol compatible with Intel microprocessors because our patent cross-license agreement with Intel does not extend to Intel’s proprietary bus interface protocol. Thus, our microprocessors are not designed to function with motherboards and chipsets designed to work with Intel microprocessors. Our ability to compete with Intel in the market for microprocessors will depend on our continued success in developing and maintaining relationships with infrastructure providers in order to ensure that these third-party designers and manufacturers of motherboards, chipsets and other system components support our microprocessor offerings, particularly our AMD64-based microprocessors.

 

Similarly, we offer OEMs and other companies motherboard reference design kits designed to support our processors. The primary reason we offer these products is to provide our customers with a solution that will allow them to use our microprocessors and develop and introduce their products in the market more quickly.

 

We expect Intel to maintain its dominant position in the microprocessor market and to continue to invest heavily in research and development, new manufacturing facilities and other technology companies. Intel has substantially greater financial resources than we do and accordingly spends substantially greater amounts on research and development and production capacity than we do. We expect competition from Intel to continue and increase in the future to the extent Intel reduces the prices for its products and as Intel introduces new competitive products. For example, in 2004, Intel introduced a 64-bit processor for servers and workstations that runs existing 32-bit software applications. These processors compete with our AMD Opteron microprocessors. In addition, Intel recently announced that it will offer dual-core 64-bit processors for the desktop market in the second quarter of 2005. Moreover, Intel currently manufactures certain of its microprocessor products on 300-millimeter wafers using 90-nanometer process technology, which can result in products that are higher performing, use less power and cost less to manufacture. We are currently transitioning to 90-nanometer process technology for microprocessor manufacturing, and we expect to transition to using 300-millimeter wafers in 2006.

 

Competition in the Flash Memory Market

 

With respect to Flash memory products, our principal competitors are Intel, Samsung, Toshiba, STMicroelectronics N.V., Sharp Electronics Corporation, Silicon Storage Technology, and Macronix International. Most of these competitors market devices incorporating multi-level-cell floating gate technology that store fractional charge levels within a single cell thereby permitting the storage of two bits per cell. We believe many of our other competitors plan to develop multi-level-cell technology.

 

We expect competition in the market for Flash memory devices to increase as existing manufacturers introduce new products, new manufacturers enter the market, industry-wide production capacity increases and competitors aggressively price their Flash memory products to increase market share. In addition, we and certain of our competitors have licensed non-volatile memory technology called NROM technology from a third party.

 

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NROM technology allows memory devices to store two bits of data in a memory cell using a nitride-based non-conducting storage medium. NROM technology has similar characteristics to our MirrorBit technology and may allow these competitors to develop Flash memory technology that is competitive with MirrorBit technology. Furthermore, NAND Flash memory vendors gained an increasing share of the overall Flash memory market in 2003 and 2004. If further significant improvements in NAND Flash memory technology occur in the future, applications currently using NOR Flash memory may transition to NAND Flash memory. As a result, NAND Flash memory vendors may gain a substantial share of the overall Flash memory market.

 

Competition With Respect to Our Personal Connectivity Solutions

 

With respect to our embedded processors for personal connectivity devices, our principal competitors are Freescale (formerly Motorola Semiconductor), Hitachi, Intel, NEC Corporation, Toshiba, and Via Technologies. We expect competition in the market for these devices to increase as our principal competitors focus more resources on developing low-power embedded processor solutions.

 

Research and Development

 

Our research and development is focused on product design and system and process development. We have devoted significant resources to product design and to developing and improving manufacturing process technologies. In order to remain competitive, we must continue to maintain our technology leadership. In particular, we have made and continue to make significant investments in manufacturing process technologies and in strategic relationships with industry-leading companies relating to manufacturing process technology development.

 

Our research and development expenses for fiscal 2004, 2003, and 2002 were $935 million, $852 million and $816 million.

 

Microprocessors

 

We conduct product and system research and development activities for our microprocessor products in the United States with additional design and development engineering teams located in Germany, China, Japan and India. With respect to process development, some research and development takes place at Fab 30. We also have a joint development agreement with IBM pursuant to which we work together to develop new microprocessor process technologies to be implemented on silicon wafers. On September 15, 2004, we amended our joint development agreement and extended the relationship for an additional three years, from December 31, 2005 to December 31, 2008. Under the amended development agreement, we agreed to continue to develop jointly new microprocessor process technologies. In addition, we received a license from IBM to have our products made in 90-nanometer and 65-nanometer at a third-party foundry or a joint manufacturing facility owned by us and a third-party foundry. The development agreement may be extended further by the mutual agreement of the parties, and can also be terminated immediately by either party if the other party permanently ceases doing business, becomes bankrupt or insolvent, liquidates or undergoes a change of control, or can be terminated by either party upon 30 days written notice upon a failure of the other party to perform a material obligation thereunder.

 

Flash Memory

 

We conduct product and system research and development activities for our Flash memory products primarily in Sunnyvale, California and in Japan, with additional design and development engineering teams located in the United States, Europe and Asia. Currently, our primary development focus with respect to Flash memory is on products based on MirrorBit technology for the wireless and embedded business markets. In addition, we are developing new non-volatile memory process technology, including 90-nanometer floating gate technology and 90-nanometer MirrorBit technology utilizing three-layer copper interconnect. Our SDC facility is developing processes on 200-millimeter and 300-millimeter wafer technology.

 

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As of December 26, 2004, our Spansion Flash memory products were manufactured on 110-, 130-, 170-, 200-, 230- and 320-nanometer process technologies. In addition, we plan to be in production on 90-nanometer process technology in the second half of 2005.

 

Manufacturing, Assembly and Test Facilities

 

We operate 12 owned manufacturing facilities, of which five are wafer fabrication facilities and seven are assembly and test facilities. In addition, we have substantially finished the construction of our Fab 36 wafer fabrication facility, and we are in the process of installing equipment. Fab 36 is located adjacent to Fab 30 and will be equipped to manufacture microprocessor products on 300-millimeter wafers at 65-nanometer geometries and below.

 

Our microprocessor and Flash memory fabrication is conducted at the facilities described in the chart below:

 

Facility Location    Wafer Size
(diameter in
millimeters)
  

Production
Technology

(in nanometers)

  

Approximate

Clean Room

Square
Footage

Microprocessor Products

              

Dresden, Germany

              

Fab 30

   200    90 and 130    150,000

Flash Memory Products

              

Austin, Texas

              

Fab 25

   200    110    120,000

Aizu-Wakamatsu, Japan

              

JV1

   200    230 and 320    70,000

JV2

   200    200 and 230    91,000

JV3

   200    110, 130 and 170    118,000

 

As of December 26, 2004, we manufactured our microprocessor products at Fab 30, primarily on 90-nanometer process technology. With respect to our Flash memory products, JV3 employs mostly 110-nanometer technology in production. We are also manufacturing 90-nanometer MirrorBit technology development wafers in Fab 25 and plan to be in production with this technology in the second half of 2005. We use process technologies at 200-nanometers and above to manufacture our low-to medium-density Spansion Flash memory products. During 2004, we transitioned the manufacturing of certain of these products from 230-nanometer to 200-nanometer process technology to further reduce our manufacturing costs.

 

We have foundry arrangements with third parties for the production of our embedded processor and chipset products. In addition, in November 2004 we entered into sourcing and manufacturing technology agreements with Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing pursuant to which Chartered will become an additional manufacturing source for our AMD64-based microprocessors. We intend to use the additional capacity provided by Chartered to augment production at our manufacturing facilities. We expect that Chartered will commence production for us in 2006.

 

We have also developed an approach to manufacturing that we call Automated Precision Manufacturing, or APM. APM comprises a suite of automation, optimization and real-time data analysis technologies which automate the way decisions are made within our fabrication facilities. We use APM during process technology transitions, and believe APM enables greater efficiency, higher baseline yields, better binning and faster yield learning.

 

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Our current assembly and test facilities for microprocessor and Flash memory products are described in the chart set forth below:

 

Facility Location    Approximate
Manufacturing
Area Square
Footage
   Activity     

Computation Products

              

Penang, Malaysia

   112,000    Assembly & Test     

Singapore

   194,000    Test     

Suzhou, China

   44,310    Test     

Flash Memory Products

              

Bangkok, Thailand

   78,000    Assembly & Test     

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

   71,300    Assembly & Test     

Penang, Malaysia

   71,000    Assembly & Test     

Suzhou, China

   30,250    Assembly & Test     

 

Some assembly and final testing of our microprocessor and personal connectivity solutions products is also performed by subcontractors in the United States and Asia.

 

Intellectual Property and Licensing

 

We rely on a combination of protections provided by contracts, copyrights, patents, trademarks and other common law rights such as trade secret laws, to protect our products and technologies from unauthorized third-party copying and use. As of December 26, 2004, we had more than 6,500 U.S. patents and had over 2,000 patent applications pending in the United States. In certain cases, we have filed corresponding applications in foreign jurisdictions. We expect to file future patent applications in both the United States and abroad on significant inventions, as we deem appropriate. We do not believe that any individual patent, or the expiration thereof, is or would be material to our business.

 

In May 2001, we signed a patent cross-license agreement with Intel Corporation, under which we granted each other a non-exclusive license under each party’s patents for the manufacture and sale of semiconductor products worldwide. We pay Intel a royalty for certain licensed microprocessor products sold by us or any AMD affiliate anywhere in the world. The license terminates in January 2010.

 

In connection with the formation of Spansion, we and Fujitsu transferred to Spansion an ownership interest in, or granted Spansion a license to, use all patents, copyrights, trade secrets (know-how), trademarks and maskwork rights necessary for Spansion’s business. Specifically, under an intellectual property contribution and assignment agreement, we and Fujitsu:

 

    assigned our respective ownership interest in jointly held patents developed by the Manufacturing Joint Venture;

 

    contributed ownership rights of the Manufacturing Joint Venture in patents held jointly by us, Fujitsu and the Manufacturing Joint Venture;

 

    granted to Spansion joint ownership interest in all maskworks and trade secrets and copyrights in specified software necessary for Spansion’s business;

 

    granted Spansion a license to copyrights in other software necessary for Spansion’s business; and

 

    transferred our respective ownership interest in all trademarks necessary for Spansion’s business.

 

In addition, we and Fujitsu entered into cross license agreements with Spansion pursuant to which we and Fujitsu each granted Spansion a non-exclusive license to all semiconductor patents wholly owned by us or as to which we had the right to grant licenses or sublicenses (without such grant resulting in the payment of royalties).

 

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The agreements enable Spansion to use these patent rights within the scope of their business, but Spansion is not permitted to grant licenses or sublicenses to third parties with respect to these licensed patent rights.

 

Spansion granted to us and Fujitsu a license to its patents for use in the manufacture and sale of semiconductor products. The patent cross-license agreements terminate upon the later of July 1, 2013 or upon the transfer of all of our or Fujitsu’s ownership or economic interest in Spansion, unless earlier terminated upon 30 days notice following a change of control of the other party.

 

In addition to the patent cross-licenses, and for so long as we have a controlling interest in Spansion, we have the right to sublicense Spansion’s patents and patent applications. In return, for as long as we have a controlling interest in Spansion, we are required to enforce our patents to minimize losses to Spansion from third party claims that Spansion is infringing such third party’s intellectual property rights. At such time as our direct or indirect beneficial ownership interest in Spansion decreases to fifty percent or less, we will no longer be contractually obligated to defend Spansion in connection with such third party claims.

 

Effective June 30, 2003, we entered into a patent cross-license with Fujitsu whereby each party was granted a non-exclusive license under certain of the other party’s respective semiconductor-related patents. This patent cross-license agreement terminates upon the tenth anniversary of the agreement, unless earlier terminated upon 30 days notice following a change of control of the other party. In addition, we entered into numerous cross-licensing and technology exchange agreements with other companies under which we both transfer and receive technology and intellectual property rights.

 

Backlog

 

We manufacture and market standard lines of products. Consequently, a significant portion of our sales are made from inventory on a current basis. Sales are made primarily pursuant to purchase orders for current delivery or agreements covering purchases over a period of time, which orders or agreements may be revised or canceled without penalty. Generally, in light of current industry practice and experience, we do not believe that such agreements provide meaningful backlog figures or are necessarily indicative of actual sales for any succeeding period.

 

Employees

 

As of December 26, 2004, we had approximately 8,300 employees and Spansion had approximately 7,600 employees. Approximately 220 individuals remained employed by us or Fujitsu but were made available on a full-time basis to Spansion or its subsidiaries. We expect that substantially all of these individuals will become employees of Spansion or its subsidiaries in 2005. Certain employees of Spansion Japan are represented by a union. We believe that our relationship with our employees is good.

 

Raw Materials

 

Our manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because some equipment and material that we purchase is complex, it is sometimes difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. In addition, certain raw materials we use in the manufacture of our products are available from a limited number of suppliers. For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for our 200-millimeter and 300-millimeter silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers. Although there are alternative sources available for us to procure these wafers, we have not qualified these sources and do not believe that they currently have sufficient capacity to meet our requirements. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and also rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of IC packages we purchase. Similarly, we purchase commercial non-Flash memory die, such as SRAM and pSRAM, from third-party suppliers and incorporate these

 

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die into Spansion multi-chip package products. Some of these suppliers are also our competitors. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

In June 2002, we formed Advanced Mask Technology Center GmbH and Co. KG, or AMTC, and Maskhouse Building Administration GmbH and Co. KG, or BAC, two joint ventures with Infineon Technologies AG and Dupont Photomasks, Inc., for the purpose of constructing and operating an advanced photomask facility in Dresden, Germany. Photomasks are used during the production of ICs. The purpose of AMTC is to conduct research, development and pilot production of optical photomasks for advanced lithography technology. AMTC has commenced pilot production of optical photomasks and has provided test photomasks to Fab 30 for qualification and production photomasks. We intend to procure advanced photomasks from AMTC pursuant to the terms of our joint venture arrangement and use these photomasks in the manufacture of certain of our microprocessor products.

 

Environmental Regulations

 

Many aspects of our business operations and products are regulated by domestic and international environmental laws and regulations. These regulations include limitations on discharge of pollutants to air, water, and soil; remediation requirements; product chemical content limitations; manufacturing chemical use and handling restrictions; pollution control requirements; waste minimization considerations; and treatment, transport, storage and disposal of solid and hazardous wastes. If we fail to comply with any of the applicable environmental regulations we may be subject to fines, suspension of production, alteration of our manufacturing processes, sales limitations, and/or criminal and civil liabilities. Existing or future regulations could require us to procure expensive pollution abatement or remediation equipment; to modify product designs; or to incur other expenses to comply with environmental regulations. Any failure to control the use, disposal or storage, or adequately restrict the discharge of hazardous substances could subject us to future liabilities and could have a material adverse effect on our business. We believe we are in material compliance with applicable environmental requirements, and do not expect those requirements to result in material expenditures in the foreseeable future.

 

ITEM 2.     PROPERTIES

 

Our principal engineering, manufacturing, warehouse and administrative facilities (excluding Spansion) comprise approximately 3.7 million square feet and are located in the United States, Germany, Singapore, China and Malaysia. Approximately 2.2 million square feet of this space is in buildings we own. We lease approximately 115,000 square feet of land in Singapore and 270,000 square feet of land in Suzhou, China for our microprocessor assembly and test facilities, and we lease the building for our microprocessor assembly and test facility in Suzhou, China. We acquired approximately 9.7 million square feet of land in Dresden, Germany for Fab 30. In August 2004, we transferred 5.4 million square feet to our German Subsidiary, AMD Fab 36 Limited Liability Company & Co. KG, or AMD Fab 36 KG, for Fab 36. Fab 36 and the land owned by AMD Fab 36 KG is encumbered by a lien which will secure AMD Fab 36 KG’s obligations under the Fab 36 Term Loan. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Fab 36 Term Loan and Guarantee and Fab 36 Partnership Agreements.”

 

Spansion’s principal engineering, manufacturing and administrative facilities comprise approximately 4.4 million square feet and are located in the United States, France, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Thailand and China. Approximately 4.2 million square feet of this space is in buildings Spansion owns. The remainder of this space is leased, primarily from us. Spansion also leases approximately 625,000 square feet of land in Suzhou, China for its assembly and test facility and approximately 3.9 million square feet of land in Japan for its wafer fabrication facilities. Spansion’s assembly and test facility in Suzhou, China is encumbered by a lien securing the Spansion Term Loan and its Fab 25 facility in Austin, Texas is encumbered by a lien securing the July 2003 Spansion Term Loan. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—July 2003 Spansion Term Loan and Guarantee,” and “—Spansion China Term Loan,” below.

 

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In addition to principal engineering, manufacturing, warehouse and administrative facilities, we lease sales office facilities in 21 locations globally, totaling approximately 200,000 square feet. These facilities are generally located in commercial centers near our customers, principally in the United States, Latin America, Europe and the Asia region.

 

We have an operating lease on property containing two buildings with an aggregate of approximately 364,000 square feet, located on 45.6 acres of land in Sunnyvale, California (One AMD Place). This operating lease ends in December 2018. In 2000, we entered into a lease agreement for three buildings, totaling 175,000 square feet, located adjacent to One AMD Place, which we call AMD Square, to be used as engineering offices and lab facilities. During 2002, we determined that we no longer required AMD Square. As of December 28, 2003, AMD Square is vacant, and we are actively marketing it for sublease. During 2003, we also vacated approximately 75,000 square feet of leased administrative office space in Austin, Texas. We continue to have lease obligations with respect to these facilities ranging from 18 to 24 months, and we are marketing these facilities for sublease.

 

Our and Spansion’s leases cover facilities with expiration terms of generally one to 20 years. We currently do not anticipate difficulty in either retaining occupancy of any of our facilities through lease renewals prior to expiration or through month-to-month occupancy, or replacing them with equivalent facilities.

 

ITEM 3.     LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

Environmental Matters

 

We are named as a responsible party on Superfund clean-up orders for three sites in Sunnyvale, California that are on the National Priorities List. Since 1981, we have discovered hazardous material releases to the groundwater from former underground tanks and proceeded to investigate and conduct remediation at these three sites. The chemicals released into the groundwater were commonly used in the semiconductor industry in the United States in the wafer fabrication process prior to 1979.

 

In 1991, we received Final Site Clean-up Requirements Orders from the California Regional Water Quality Control Board relating to the three sites. We have entered into settlement agreements with other responsible parties on two of the orders. Under these agreements other parties have assumed most of the costs as well as the lead in conducting remediation activities under the orders. We remain responsible for these costs in the event that the other parties do not fulfill their obligations under the settlement agreements.

 

To address anticipated future remediation costs under the orders, we have computed and recorded an estimated environmental liability of approximately $3.7 million in accordance with applicable accounting rules and have not recorded any potential insurance recoveries in determining the estimated costs of the cleanup. The progress of future remediation efforts cannot be predicted with certainty, and these costs may change. We believe that the potential liability, if any, in excess of amounts already accrued, will not have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations.

 

Other Matters

 

We are a defendant or plaintiff in various other actions that arose in the normal course of business. In the opinion of management, the ultimate disposition of these matters will not have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations.

 

ITEM 4.     SUBMISSION OF MATTERS TO A VOTE OF SECURITY HOLDERS

 

No matters were submitted to a vote of security holders during the fourth quarter of the fiscal year covered by this report.

 

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PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

 

Our common stock (symbol “AMD”) is listed on the New York Stock Exchange. On February 22, 2005, there were 7,653 registered holders of our common stock. We have never paid cash dividends on our stock and may be restricted from doing so pursuant to the loan agreement that we entered into with several domestic financial institutions. In addition, under the July 2003 Spansion Term Loan, Spansion is prohibited from paying dividends to us in certain circumstances, and under the Fab 36 Loan Agreements, AMD Fab 36 KG and the affiliated limited partners are generally prohibited from paying any dividends or other payments to us. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” beginning on page 20, below. The high and low sales price per share of common stock (based on the intra-day high and low sales price) were as follows:

 

     High

   Low

Fiscal year ended December 28, 2003

                       

First quarter

   $      7.79    $      4.78

Second quarter

          8.59           5.80

Third quarter

          12.87           6.25

Fourth quarter

          18.50           10.52
     High

   Low

Fiscal year ended December 26, 2004

                       

First quarter

   $      17.50           13.60

Second quarter

          17.60           13.65

Third quarter

          16.00           10.76

Fourth quarter

          24.95           12.22

 

The information under the caption, “Equity Compensation Plan Information,” in our Proxy Statement for our Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held on April 28, 2005 (2005 Proxy Statement) is incorporated herein by reference.

 

During 2004, we did not sell any of our equity securities that were not registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, except as previously disclosed by us in a Current Report on Form 8-K or a Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

 

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ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

Five Years Ended December 26, 2004

(In thousands except per share amounts)

 

     2004(1)     2003(1)     2002     2001     2000  

Net Sales

   $ 5,001,435     $ 3,519,168     $ 2,697,029     $ 3,891,754     $ 4,644,187  

Expenses:

                                        

Cost of sales

     3,032,585       2,327,063       2,105,661       2,589,747       2,514,637  

Research and development

     934,574       852,075       816,114       650,930       641,799  

Marketing, general and administrative

     807,011       587,307       670,065       620,030       599,015  

Restructuring and other special charges (recoveries), net

     5,456       (13,893 )     330,575       89,305       —    
       4,779,626       3,752,552       3,922,415       3,950,012       3,755,451  

Operating income (loss)

     221,809       (233,384 )     (1,225,386 )     (58,258 )     888,736  

Gain on sale of Legerity

     —         —         —         —         336,899  

Interest income and other, net

     (31,150 )(2)     21,116       32,132       25,695       86,301  

Interest expense

     (112,328 )     (109,960 )     (71,349 )     (61,360 )     (60,037 )

Income (loss) before income taxes, minority interest, equity in net income of joint venture and extraordinary item

     78,331       (322,228 )     (1,264,603 )     (93,923 )     1,251,899  

Minority interest in loss of subsidiary

     18,663 (1)     44,761 (1)     —         —         —    

Provision (benefit) for income taxes

     5,838       2,936       44,586 (4)     (14,463 )     256,868  

Income (loss) before equity in net income of joint venture and extraordinary item

     91,156       (280,403 )     (1,309,189 )     (79,460 )     995,031  

Equity in net income of joint venture

     —         5,913       6,177       18,879       11,039  

Income (loss) before extraordinary item

     91,156       (274,490 )     (1,303,012 )     (60,581 )     1,006,070  

Extraordinary item—debt retirement, net of tax benefit

     —         —         —         —         (23,044 )

Net income (loss)

   $ 91,156     $ (274,490 )   $ (1,303,012 )   $ (60,581 )   $ 983,026  

Net income (loss) per share

                                        

Basic—income (loss) before extraordinary item

   $ 0.25     $ (0.79 )   $ (3.81 )   $ (0.18 )   $ 3.25  

Diluted—income (loss) before extraordinary item

   $ 0.25     $ (0.79 )   $ (3.81 )   $ (0.18 )   $ 2.95  

Basic—income (loss) after extraordinary item

   $ 0.25     $ (0.79 )   $ (3.81 )   $ (0.18 )   $ 3.18  

Diluted—income (loss) after extraordinary item

   $ 0.25     $ (0.79 )   $ (3.81 )   $ (0.18 )   $ 2.89  

Shares used in per share calculation

                                        

Basic

     358,886       346,934       342,334       332,407       309,331  

Diluted

     371,066       346,934       342,334       332,407       350,000  

Long-term debt, capital lease obligations and other, less current portion

   $ 2,042,894     $ 2,328,435     $ 1,892,404     $ 672,945     $ 1,167,973  

Total assets(3)

   $ 7,844,210     $ 7,049,772     $ 5,694,453     $ 5,636,445     $ 5,767,735  
(1)   2004 and 2003 include consolidated Spansion results and are not comparable to prior years. Minority interest consists primarily of the elimination of income or loss from Fujitsu, the holder of a minority ownership interest in Spansion.

 

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(2)   Interest income and other, net includes a charge of approximately $32 million associated with our exchange of $201 million of our 4.50% Notes for common stock and a charge of approximately $14 million in connection with the prepayment of the Dresden Term Loan.

 

(3)   Total assets as of December 30, 2001 and December 29, 2002 reflect a reclassification of certain prior period amounts to conform to current period presentation.

 

(4)   The 2002 income tax provision was recorded primarily for taxes due on income generated in certain state and foreign tax jurisdictions. No tax benefit was recorded in 2002 on pre-tax losses due to the establishment of a valuation allowance against the remainder of our U.S. deferred tax assets, net of U.S. deferred liabilities, in the fourth quarter, due to the incurrence of continuing substantial operating losses in the U.S.

 

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ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and related notes as of December 26, 2004 and December 28, 2003, and for each of the three years in the period ended December 26, 2004, which are included in this annual report. Certain prior period amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current period presentation.

 

Overview

 

We design, manufacture and market industry-standard digital ICs that are used in diverse product applications such as desktop and mobile PCs, workstations, servers, communications equipment such as mobile phones and automotive and consumer electronics. Our products consist primarily of microprocessors and Flash memory devices. We also sell embedded microprocessors for personal connectivity devices and other consumer markets.

 

In 2004, we continued to focus on customer-centric innovation by developing microprocessor and Flash memory products that assist our customers in adding functionality and enhancing the performance of their products. We continued to design and develop microprocessor products based on AMD64 technology, which allow our customers to protect their existing investments by continuing to use their 32-bit software applications while transitioning to a 64-bit platform. As of December 26, 2004, sales of AMD64-based processors represented approximately one-half of our net sales for the Computation Products segment.

 

In Flash memory, we continued to manufacture products based on our MirrorBit technology, which we believe will enable our customers to cost effectively include next-generation applications, such as high-resolution cameras and streaming video, on their mobile phone. We also introduced floating gate memory products manufactured on 110-nanometer technology and substantially completed the integration of our and Fujitsu’s Flash memory operations in Spansion.

 

We also continued to devote resources to develop advanced manufacturing process technologies. During 2004, we successfully transitioned to smaller manufacturing geometries for both our microprocessor and Flash memory products. As of December 26, 2004, we were manufacturing our microprocessor products using primarily 90-nanometer technology and we were manufacturing our highest density and performance Flash memory products on 110-nanometer floating gate and MirrorBit technology.

 

In 2004, despite a net loss in the fourth quarter, we returned to a full year of profitability. Total net sales for 2004 of $5.0 billion increased 42 percent compared with net sales of $3.5 billion for 2003. This increase was driven primarily by increased sales of microprocessors and Flash memory products across all geographies as well as the effects of consolidating Spansion’s results of operations, which include sales by Spansion to Fujitsu, for the twelve months in 2004 as compared to six months in 2003.

 

Our transition to smaller manufacturing process geometries for both our microprocessor and Flash memory products contributed to lower manufacturing costs per unit and higher overall gross margins, which, along with increased net sales, contributed to a net income of $91 million in 2004 compared to a net loss of $274 million in 2003.

 

We also substantially completed the construction of Fab 36, our 300-millimeter wafer fabrication facility in Dresden, Germany and we are currently in the process of installing equipment. We believe the new capacity provided by this facility, which we expect to be in volume production in 2006, will allow us to satisfy anticipated demand for our microprocessors.

 

However, in 2004, the cyclical Flash memory market posed unique challenges for us. In the second half of 2004, Memory Products net sales decreased by $259 million, compared to the first half of 2004. Factors that

 

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contributed to this decline included aggressive pricing by competitors and an imbalance in the supply and demand for Flash memory products. In addition, decreased demand from the wireless handset market in Asia, in part due to channel inventory accumulation by wireless handset OEMs in China, contributed to a decline in Memory Products net sales during the third quarter of 2004. The down-turn in the overall Flash memory market, lower than expected sales in Japan and a delay in our qualification of a Flash memory product for the wireless category contributed to lower Memory Products net sales during the fourth quarter of 2004.

 

For 2005, we believe critical success factors include: continuing to increase market acceptance of our AMD64 technology, particularly in the enterprise segment; taking products based on our second-generation MirrorBit technology to market and effectively ramping such products to mass production on a timely basis; strengthening our relationships with key customers and establishing relationships with new customers that are industry leaders in their markets; successfully developing and continuing to transition to the latest manufacturing process technologies for both our microprocessor and Flash memory products; developing and introducing new microprocessor products for the mobile, server and workstation markets, including dual-core processors, on a timely basis and increasing our share of those markets; developing and introducing new Flash memory products on a timely basis; controlling costs; increasing the adoption of MirrorBit technology; and expanding our participation in high-growth global markets, including China, Latin America, India and Eastern Europe.

 

We intend the discussion of our financial condition and results of operations that follows to provide information that will assist you in understanding our financial statements, the changes in certain key items in those financial statements from year to year, the primary factors that resulted in those changes, and how certain accounting principles, policies and estimates affect our financial statements.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Our discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted United States accounting principles. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts in our consolidated financial statements. We evaluate our estimates on an on-going basis, including those related to our revenues, inventories, asset impairments, restructuring charges and income taxes. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities. Although actual results have historically been reasonably consistent with management’s expectations, the actual results may differ from these estimates or our estimates may be affected by different assumptions or conditions.

 

We believe the following critical accounting policies are the most significant to the presentation of our financial statements and require the most difficult, subjective and complex judgments.

 

Revenue Reserves.    We record a provision for estimated sales returns and allowances on product sales and a provision for estimated future price reductions in the same period that the related revenues are recorded. We base these estimates on actual historical sales returns, allowances, historical price reductions, market activity, and other known or anticipated trends and factors. These estimates are subject to management’s judgment, and actual provisions could be different from our estimates and current provisions, resulting in future adjustments to our revenues and operating results.

 

Inventory Valuation.    At each balance sheet date, we evaluate our ending inventories for excess quantities and obsolescence. This evaluation includes analysis of sales levels by product and projections of future demand. These projections assist us in determining the carrying value of our inventory and are also used for near-term factory production planning. Inventories on hand in excess of forecasted demand of generally six months or less, are not valued. In addition, we write off inventories that are considered obsolete. We adjust remaining specific inventory balances to approximate the lower of our standard manufacturing cost or market value. Among other

 

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factors, management considers forecasted demand in relation to the inventory on hand, competitiveness of product offerings, market conditions and product life cycles when determining obsolescence and net realizable value. If we anticipate future demand or market conditions to be less favorable than our projections as forecasted, additional inventory write-downs may be required, and would be reflected in cost of sales in the period the revision is made. This would have a negative impact on our gross margins in that period. If in any period we are able to sell inventories that were not valued or that had been written off in a previous period, related revenues would be recorded without any offsetting charge to cost of sales, resulting in a net benefit to our gross margin in that period. To the extent these factors materially affect our gross margins, we would disclose them in our filings with the SEC.

 

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets.    We consider no less frequently than quarterly whether indicators of impairment of long-lived assets are present. These indicators may include, but are not limited to, significant decreases in the market value of an asset and significant changes in the extent or manner in which an asset is used. If these or other indicators are present, we determine whether the estimated undiscounted cash flows attributable to the assets in question are less than their carrying value. If less, we recognize an impairment loss based on the excess of the carrying amount of the assets over their respective fair values. Fair value is determined by discounted future cash flows, appraisals or other methods. If the asset determined to be impaired is to be held and used, we recognize an impairment loss through a charge to our operating results to the extent the present value of anticipated net cash flows attributable to the asset is less than the asset’s carrying value, which we depreciate over the remaining estimated useful life of the asset. We may incur additional impairment losses in future periods if factors influencing our estimates of the undiscounted cash flows change.

 

Restructuring Charges.    We record and account for our restructuring activities following formally approved plans that identify the actions and timeline over which the restructuring activities will occur. Our remaining restructuring accruals include estimates pertaining to facility exit costs and subleasing assumptions resulting from exiting certain facilities. We review these accruals on a quarterly basis and adjust these accruals when changes in facts and circumstances suggest actual amounts will differ from our estimates. Although we do not anticipate significant changes, actual costs may be different than our original or revised estimates. These changes in estimates can result in increases or decreases to our results of operations in future periods and would be presented on the restructuring and other special charges (recoveries), net, line of our consolidated operating statements.

 

Income Taxes.    In determining taxable income for financial statement reporting purposes, we must make certain estimates and judgments. These estimates and judgments are applied in the calculation of certain tax liabilities and in the determination of the recoverability of deferred tax assets, which arise from temporary differences between the recognition of assets and liabilities for tax and financial statement reporting purposes.

 

We must assess the likelihood that we will be able to recover our deferred tax assets. If recovery is not likely, we must increase our provision for taxes by recording a charge to income tax expense, in the form of a valuation allowance, for the deferred tax assets that we estimate will not ultimately be recoverable. We consider past performance, future expected taxable income and prudent and feasible tax planning strategies in determining the need for a valuation allowance. In fiscal 2002, we recorded a valuation allowance against all of our U.S. deferred tax assets, net of deferred tax liabilities, based on past performance and the likelihood of realization of our deferred tax assets at the time. In fiscal 2003, we continued to provide a valuation allowance against all of our U.S. deferred tax assets, net of deferred tax liabilities. In fiscal 2004, a portion of the valuation allowance was utilized as a result of net operating profits. If we later determine that it is more likely than not that the net deferred tax assets will be realized, an appropriate amount of the previously provided valuation allowance will be reversed, resulting in a benefit to our earnings. Such benefits would be recorded on the income tax provision (benefit) line of our statement of operations.

 

In addition, the calculation of our tax liabilities involves dealing with uncertainties in the application of complex tax rules and the potential for future adjustment by the Internal Revenue Service or other taxing

 

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jurisdiction. If our estimates of these taxes are greater or less than actual results, an additional tax benefit or charge will result.

 

Results Of Operations

 

In March 1993, we and Fujitsu formed Fujitsu AMD Semiconductor Limited, a joint venture for the purpose of manufacturing Flash memory devices. Through the Manufacturing Joint Venture, we and Fujitsu constructed and operated advanced integrated circuit manufacturing facilities in Aizu-Wakamatsu, Japan. Effective June 30, 2003, we and Fujitsu executed agreements to integrate our Flash memory operations. The Manufacturing Joint Venture was contributed to a new entity, Spansion LLC, which is owned 60 percent by us and 40 percent by Fujitsu. As a result of this transaction, we began consolidating Spansion’s results of operations on June 30, 2003. Prior to June 30, 2003, we accounted for our share of the Manufacturing Joint Venture’s operating results under the equity method.

 

As Spansion did not exist prior to June 30, 2003, the results of our operations for periods prior to the third quarter of 2003 do not include the consolidation of Spansion’s results of operations. Accordingly, our operating results for the years ended December 26, 2004 and December 28, 2003 are not fully comparable with our results for prior periods. Also, because we have a 60 percent controlling interest in Spansion, Fujitsu’s 40 percent share in the net income (loss) of Spansion is reflected as a minority interest adjustment to our consolidated financial statements. This minority interest adjustment does not correspond to operating income (loss) of our Memory Products segment because operating income (loss) for our Memory Products segment includes operations incremental to those of Spansion. In addition, the minority interest calculation is based on Spansion’s net income (loss) rather than operating income (loss).

 

We review and assess operating performance using segment revenues and operating income before interest, taxes and minority interest. These performance measures include the allocation of expenses to the operating segments based on management judgment. Prior to the third quarter of 2003, we had two reportable segments: the Core Products segment, which consisted of the microprocessor, memory products and other IC products operating segments, and the Foundry Services segment, which consisted of fees for products sold to Vantis Corporation, our former programmable logic devices subsidiary, and Legerity Inc., our former voice communication products subsidiary.

 

Beginning in the third quarter of 2003, we changed our reportable segments to the Computation Products segment, which includes microprocessor products for desktop and mobile PCs, servers and workstations and chipset products, and the Memory Products segment, which includes Flash memory products. In addition, in the fourth quarter of 2004, we began presenting our Personal Connectivity Solutions operating segment as a separate reportable segment because the operating loss from this operating segment exceeded 10 percent of the combined profit of all our operating segments and therefore this operating segment became a reportable segment under the requirements of Statement of Financial Standards 131, “Segment Reporting” (FAS 131). Previously, we included our Personal Connectivity Solutions operating segment in our All Other category. The Personal Connectivity Solutions segment includes primarily low power, high performance x86 and MIPS architecture-based embedded microprocessors. In addition to our three reportable segments, we also have the All Other category, which is not a reportable segment, and which includes certain operating expenses and credits that are not allocated to the operating segments. Prior period segment information has been reclassified to conform to the current period presentation. However, because Spansion did not exist prior to June 30, 2003, the results of operations for periods prior to June 30, 2003 did not include the consolidation of Spansion’s operations. Accordingly, the segment operating information for the Memory Products segment for the year ended December 26, 2004, is not comparable to the reclassified segment information for the prior periods presented.

 

We use a 52- to 53-week fiscal year ending on the last Sunday in December. The years ended December 26, 2004, December 28, 2003 and December 29, 2002, each included 52 weeks.

 

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The following is a summary of our net sales and operating income (loss) by segment and category for 2004, 2003 and 2002.

 

     2004     2003     2002  
     (in millions)  

Net sales

                        

Computation Products

   $ 2,528     $ 1,960     $ 1,756  

Memory Products

     2,342       1,419       741  

Personal Connectivity Solutions

     131       140       166  

All Other

     —         —         34  

Total Net Sales

   $ 5,001     $ 3,519     $ 2,697  

Operating income (loss)

                        

Computation Products

   $ 303     $ (23 )   $ (661 )

Memory Products

     35       (189 )     (159 )

Personal Connectivity Solutions

     (72 )     (14 )     (25 )

All Other

     (44 )     (7 )     (380 )

Total Operating Income (Loss)

   $ 222     $ (233 )   $ (1,225 )

 

Computation Products

 

Computation Products net sales of $2.5 billion in 2004 increased 29 percent compared to net sales of $2.0 billion in 2003. The increase was primarily due to a 19 percent increase in average selling prices and a nine percent increase in microprocessor unit shipments. The increase in average selling prices was primarily due to increased sales of our higher-priced AMD64-based processors, particularly our AMD Athlon 64 processors, which contributed to a richer product mix. Similarly, the increase in unit shipments reflected the increased demand for these processors. As of December 26, 2004, sales of AMD64-based processors represented approximately one-half of our net sales for the Computation Products segment. Sales increased across all geographic regions, and growth was particularly strong in North America and Asia.

 

Computation Products net sales of $2.0 billion in 2003 increased 12 percent compared to net sales of $1.8 billion in 2002. The increase was primarily due to a 15 percent increase in microprocessor unit shipments due primarily to increased demand from our OEM customers. The increase in net sales was partially offset by a decline of four percent in the average selling prices.

 

Computation Products operating income of $303 million in 2004 increased by $326 million compared to an operating loss of $23 million in 2003. The increase was primarily due to a 29 percent increase in net sales, partially offset by a 12 percent increase in operating expenses. Operating expenses increased due primarily to an increase in marketing and cooperative advertising costs of $79 million in connection with our AMD64-based products, a nine percent increase in unit shipments, and a $28 million increase in research and development costs. The increase in research and development costs was due primarily to a $29 million increase in Fab 36 start-up costs and a $24 million increase in silicon design related to future generations of our microprocessors offset by a $23 million decrease in Fab 30 research and development activities.

 

Computation Products operating loss of $23 million in 2003 improved by $638 million compared to an operating loss of $661 million in 2002. The improvement was primarily due to a 12 percent increase in net sales and a decrease in both manufacturing costs of $330 million and marketing, general and administrative expenses of $39 million, as a result of our cost reduction initiatives and the 2002 Restructuring Plan. In addition, cooperative advertising and marketing expenses decreased by $55 million from 2002.

 

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Memory Products

 

Memory Products net sales of $2.3 billion in 2004 increased 65 percent compared to net sales of $1.4 billion in 2003. The increase was primarily due to increased demand for Flash memory products across all geographies, which resulted in a nine percent increase in average selling prices, and the effect of consolidating Spansion’s results of operations, which include Spansion’s sales to Fujitsu of $1.1 billion for 12 months in 2004 compared to $449 million for six months in 2003. In the second half of 2003, demand for Flash memory products began to increase significantly, and this trend continued through the first half of 2004. In the second half of 2004, however, our Memory Products net sales declined due to aggressive pricing by competitors and an imbalance in the supply and demand for Flash memory products. In addition, decreased demand from the wireless handset market in Asia, due in part to channel inventory accumulation by wireless OEMs in China, contributed to a decline in Memory Products net sales during the third quarter. The downturn in the overall Flash memory market, lower than expected sales in Japan and a delay in qualifying a new Flash memory product for the wireless category contributed to lower Memory Products net sales during the fourth quarter. Further quantification of the breakdown in the increase in net sales is not practical due to the reorganization of geographical sales territories between AMD and Fujitsu.

 

Memory Products net sales of $1.4 billion in 2003 increased 92 percent compared to net sales of $741 million in 2002. The increase was primarily due to the effect of consolidating Spansion’s results of operations, which include Spansion’s sales to Fujitsu during the last six months of fiscal 2003 and increased demand for Flash memory products, particularly in the second half of 2003. Further quantification of the breakdown in the increase in net sales is not practical due to the reorganization of geographical sales territories between AMD and Fujitsu.

 

Memory Products operating income of $35 million increased $224 million from an operating loss of $189 million in 2003. The increase was primarily due to the effect of consolidating Spansion’s results of operations, which include Spansion’s sales to Fujitsu, for 12 months in 2004 compared to six months in 2003. In addition, our manufacturing costs decreased due to our transition to 110-nanometer process technology for certain of our Flash memory products in 2004 and as a result of increased shipments of Flash memory products based on MirrorBit technology, which are less expensive to manufacture than Flash memory products based on floating gate technology. Further quantification of the changes is not practical due to the consolidation of Spansion on June 30, 2003.

 

Memory Products operating loss of $189 million in 2003 increased $30 million from an operating loss of $159 million in 2002. Further quantification of the changes is not practical due to the consolidation of Spansion on June 30, 2003.

 

Personal Connectivity Solutions

 

Personal Connectivity Solutions (PCS) net sales of $131 million in 2004 decreased seven percent compared to net sales of $140 million in 2003. The decrease was primarily due to a $43 million decrease in sales of certain end-of-life embedded microprocessors, partially offset by a $33 million increase in sales of AMD Geode products. We acquired the Geode product line from National Semiconductor in August 2003. Accordingly, the increase in sales of AMD Geode products in 2004 was due to the fact that in 2004 we had 12 months of sales whereas in 2003 we had approximately four months of sales.

 

PCS net sales of $140 million in 2003 decreased 15 percent compared to net sales of $166 million in 2002. The decrease was primarily due to a $53 million decrease in sales of certain end-of-life embedded microprocessors and networking products, partially offset by a $28 million increase in sales of AMD Geode and wireless products.

 

PCS operating loss of $72 million in 2004 increased compared to an operating loss of $14 million in 2003. The increase in the operating loss was primarily due to a $48 million increase in operating expenses. Operating

 

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expenses increased due to an increase of approximately $35 million in manufacturing costs as a result of a change in product mix, and an aggregate increase of $14 million in research and development expenses and marketing, general and administrative expenses as a result of activities related to our AMD Geode products and other product development. Manufacturing costs increased primarily because we manufactured more AMD Geode products, which generally are more expensive to manufacture than our other embedded processors.

 

PCS operating loss of $14 million in 2003 improved compared to the operating loss of $25 million in 2002. The improvement was primarily due to sales of $12 million of certain embedded microprocessors and networking products that had been previously written off.

 

All Other Category

 

There were no net sales generated in the All Other category in 2003 or 2004.

 

All Other net sales of zero in 2003 decreased from $34 million in 2002 due to the discontinuation of our Foundry Services in 2002.

 

All Other operating loss of $44 million in 2004 increased from $6 million in 2003, primarily due to an increase of approximately $30 million in corporate bonus and profit sharing expense. In addition, All Other operating loss in 2004 included approximately $5 million of restructuring and other special charges, while in 2003 we had a $14 million credit adjustment to the restructuring charge.

 

All Other operating loss of $6 million in 2003 improved by $374 million compared to an operating loss of $380 million in 2002, primarily due to $331 million of restructuring and other special charges included in the All Other category for 2002, compared to a $14 million credit adjustment to the restructuring charge in 2003.

 

Comparison of Gross Margin, Expenses, Interest Income and Other, Net, Interest Expense and Taxes

 

The following is a summary of certain consolidated statement of operations data for 2004, 2003 and 2002:

 

     2004     2003     2002  
     (in millions except for
percentages)
 

Cost of sales

   $ 3,033     $ 2,327     $ 2,106  

Gross margin

     39 %     34 %     22 %

Research and development expense

   $ 935     $ 852     $ 816  

Marketing, general and administrative expense

     807       587       670  

Restructuring and other special charges (recoveries), net

     5       (14 )     331  

Interest income and other, net

     31       (21 )     (32 )

Interest expense

     112       110       71  

Income tax provision

     6       3       45  

 

Gross margin percentage increased to 39 percent in 2004 compared to 34 percent in 2003. The increase in gross margin was primarily due to an increase in net sales of 42 percent and lower unit manufacturing costs resulting from our transition to smaller, more cost efficient, manufacturing process technologies for both of our microprocessors and Flash memory products. Further quantification of the improvement in gross margin percentage is not practical due to the consolidation of Spansion’s operating results as of June 30, 2003.

 

Gross margin percentage increased to 34 percent in 2003 compared to 22 percent in 2002. The increase in gross margin was primarily due to an increase in net sales of 30 percent, accompanied by an increase in cost of sales of only ten percent. Our cost of sales increased at a lower rate than net sales primarily due to cost reductions from the 2002 Restructuring Plan and other cost reduction initiatives. In addition, microprocessor unit sales

 

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increased 15 percent while average selling prices of microprocessor products decreased by four percent, and we realized revenues of $63 million, or approximately two gross margin percentage points, from the sale of microprocessor products that had been previously written off. Further quantification of the improvement in gross margin percentage is not practical due to the consolidation of Spansion’s operating results as of June 30, 2003.

 

We amortize capital grants and allowances, interest subsidies and research and development subsidies that we receive from the State of Saxony and the Federal Republic of Germany for Fab 30 as they are earned. The amortization of these grants and subsidies is recognized as a credit to research and development expenses and cost of sales. The credit to cost of sales totaled $67.1 million in 2004, $46.2 million in 2003 and $37.5 million in 2002.

 

Research and development expenses of $935 million in 2004 increased ten percent from $852 million in 2003 due in part to higher research and development expenses as result of the consolidation of Spansion’s results of operation, an increase in start-up costs of approximately $29 million associated with the Fab 36 project and a $24 million increase in silicon design related to future generations of our microprocessors. These factors were partially offset by a $23 million decrease in Fab 30 research and development activities. Research and development expenses of $852 million in 2003 increased four percent from $816 million in 2002, due in part to higher research and development expenses as a result of the consolidation of Spansion’s results of operation, $23 million in research and development efforts related to new microprocessors, and $58 million paid to IBM to jointly develop new process technologies for use in future microprocessor products. The increases in research and development expenses were offset by a $35 million reduction in research and development costs, primarily due to the reduction of research and development activities associated with our PCS products and the absence of the $42 million charge representing amounts paid to IBM in 2002 in exchange for consulting services relating to optimizing the performance of our manufacturing processes.

 

We amortize capital grants and allowances, interest subsidies and research and development subsidies that we receive from the State of Saxony and the Federal Republic of Germany for Fab 30 as they are earned. The amortization of these grants and subsidies is recognized as a credit to research and development expenses and cost of sales. The credit to research and development expenses totaled $20.7 million in 2004, $29 million in 2003 and $21.8 million in 2002.

 

Marketing, general and administrative expenses of $807 million in 2004 increased 37 percent compared to $587 million in 2003, primarily due to increased sales and cooperative advertising and marketing expenses of $112 million primarily associated with our AMD 64-based processors, expenses from Spansion of $153 million for 12 months of 2004 compared to $78 million for six months in 2003 and new regulatory compliance costs of $15 million.

 

Marketing, general and administrative expenses of $587 million in 2003 decreased 12 percent compared to $670 million in 2002. The decrease was primarily due to decreased cooperative advertising and marketing expenses of $55 million and cost reductions from the 2002 Restructuring Plan and other cost reduction initiatives.

 

Effects of 2002 Restructuring Plan

 

In December 2002, we began implementing a restructuring plan (the 2002 Restructuring Plan) to further align our cost structure to industry conditions resulting from weak customer demand and industry-wide excess inventory.

 

As part of this plan, and as a result of our agreement with IBM to jointly develop future generations of our microprocessor manufacturing process technology, we ceased microprocessor related research and development in the SDC and eliminated most of the related resources, including the sale or abandonment of certain equipment used in the SDC.

 

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The 2002 Restructuring Plan resulted in the consolidation of facilities, primarily at our Sunnyvale, California site and at sales offices worldwide. We vacated and are attempting to sublease certain facilities currently occupied under long-term operating leases through 2011. We also terminated the implementation of certain partially completed enterprise resource planning (ERP) software and other information technology implementation activities, resulting in the abandonment of certain software, hardware and capitalized development costs.

 

Pursuant to the 2002 Restructuring Plan, we recorded restructuring costs and other special charges of $330.6 million in the fourth quarter of 2002, consisting primarily of $68.8 million of anticipated severance and fringe benefit costs, an asset impairment charge of $32.5 million relating to a license that has no future use because of its association with discontinued microprocessor development activities, asset impairment charges of $30.6 million resulting from the abandonment of equipment previously used in microprocessor process development and manufacturing activities, anticipated exit costs of $138.9 million almost wholly related to vacating and consolidating our facilities and a charge of $55.5 million resulting from the abandonment of partially completed ERP software and other information technology implementation activities.

 

During 2003, management approved the sale of additional equipment primarily used in the SDC that was identified as no longer useful in our operations. As a result, we recorded approximately $11 million of asset impairment charges in the first quarter of 2003, including $3.3 million of charges for decommission costs necessary to complete the sale of the equipment.

 

During 2003, we also revised our estimates of the number of positions to be eliminated pursuant to the 2002 Restructuring Plan from 2,000 to 1,800 in response to the additional resources required due to the Spansion transaction. As a result, we reversed $8.9 million of the estimated severance and fringe benefit accrual. As of December 26, 2004, 1,786 employees had been terminated pursuant to the 2002 Restructuring Plan resulting in cumulative cash payments of $60 million in severance and employee benefit costs.

 

During 2004, we adjusted the restructuring accrual related to the 2002 Restructuring Plan, which resulted in an additional $5.2 million restructuring charge for the period. The adjustment was primarily related to a change in our estimate of potential sublease opportunities associated with abandoned facilities located in Sunnyvale, California.

 

With the exception of exit costs consisting primarily of remaining lease payments on abandoned facilities net of estimated sublease income that are payable through 2011, we have completed the activities associated with the 2002 Restructuring Plan. With the formation of Spansion and other business changes, we no longer track the overall cost savings from the 2002 Restructuring Plan because we do not believe this information would be useful.

 

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The following table summarizes activities under the 2002 Restructuring Plan through December 26, 2004:

 

     Severance
and
Employee
Benefits
    Asset
Impairment
    Exit and
Equipment
Decommission
Costs
    Other
Restructuring
Charges
    Total  
     (in thousands)  

2002 provision

   $ 68,770     $ 118,590     $ 138,900     $ 4,315     $ 330,575  

Non-cash charges

     —         (118,590 )     —         —         (118,590 )

Cash charges

     (14,350 )     —         (795 )     —         (15,145 )

Accruals at December 29, 2002

   $ 54,420       —       $ 138,105     $ 4,315     $ 196,840  

2003 provision

     —       $ 7,791     $ 3,314       —       $ 11,105  

Cash charges

     (38,816 )     —         (20,796 )     (4,300 )     (63,912 )

Non-cash charges

     —         (7,791 )     —         —         (7,791 )

Non-cash adjustments

     (8,864 )     —         —         (15 )     (8,879 )

Accruals at December 28, 2003

   $ 6,740       —       $ 120,623       —       $ 127,363  

Cash charges

     (6,789 )             (20,150 )             (26,939 )

Non-cash adjustments

   $ 49             $ 5,203             $ 5,252  

Accruals at December 26, 2004

     —         —       $ 105,676       —       $ 105,676  

 

Effects of 2001 Restructuring Plan

 

In 2001, in response to the continued slowdown in the semiconductor industry and a resulting decline in revenues, we implemented a restructuring plan (the 2001 Restructuring Plan). We completed our execution of the 2001 Restructuring Plan as of December 26, 2004.

 

During 2003, we reduced the estimated accrual of the facility and equipment decommission costs by $12.2 million based on the most current information available and we realized a recovery of approximately $3.9 million for the excess of the sale price over the estimated fair value of equipment that we determined was impaired as a result of the 2001 Restructuring Plan. Both amounts were included in restructuring and other special charges (recoveries), net. With the formation of Spansion and other business changes, we no longer track the overall cost savings from this 2001 Restructuring Plan because we do not believe the information would be useful.

 

The following table summarizes activity under the 2001 Restructuring Plan from December 30, 2001 through December 26, 2004:

 

     Severance
and
Employee
Benefits
   

Facilities

and
Equipment
Decommission
Costs

    Other
Facilities
Exit
Costs
    Total      
     (in thousands)      

Accruals at December 30, 2001

   $ 26,622     $ 15,500     $ 646     $ 42,768      

Cash charges

     (26,622 )     (445 )     —         (27,067 )    

Accruals at December 29, 2002

   $ —       $ 15,055     $ 646     $ 15,701      

Non-cash adjustments

     —         (11,574 )     (646 )     (12,220 )    

Cash charges

     —         (2,485 )     —         (2,485 )    

Accruals at December 28, 2003

   $ —       $ 996     $ —       $ 996      

Cash charges

     —         (991 )     —         (991 )    

Non-cash adjustments

     —         (5 )     —         (5 )    

Accruals at December 26, 2004

   $ —       $ —       $ —       $ —        

 

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Interest Income and Other, Net

 

We recorded a net charge of interest income and other, net of $31 million in 2004 compared to interest income and other, net of approximately $21 million in 2003. This charge was due primarily to a charge of approximately $32 million related to a series of transactions pursuant to which we exchanged $201 million of our 4.50% Convertible Senior Notes due 2007 (the 4.50% Notes) for our common stock. The charge represented the difference between the fair value of the common stock issued in the transactions and the fair value of common stock issuable pursuant to the original conversion terms of the 4.50% Notes. In addition, interest income and other, net, in 2004 included a charge of approximately $14 million in connection with our prepayment of the Dresden Term Loan, and a loss of approximately $6 million during the second quarter of 2004 resulting from the mark-to-market of certain foreign currency forward contracts that we used as economic hedges of forecasted capital contributions to AMD Fab 36 KG, which do not qualify as accounting hedges.

 

Interest income and other, net, of approximately $21 million in 2003 decreased 34 percent from $32 million in 2002. The decrease was primarily due to a decrease in investment income of $16 million caused by lower cash equivalents and short-term investment balances and a charge of $2.3 million in 2003 for other-than-temporary declines in our equity investments. This decrease was offset by a gain of approximately $6 million based on the difference between the carrying value and fair value of assets contributed by us to Spansion. Fujitsu now owns a 40 percent interest in these assets. The gain on the deemed sale of these assets to Spansion was limited to the difference in carrying value of our interest in the assets following the completion of the transaction and the carrying value of the assets immediately prior to the transaction.

 

Interest Expense

 

Interest expense of $112 million in 2004 was flat compared to $110 million in 2003. On October 29, 2004, we sold $600 million of 7.75% Senior Notes due 2012 (the 7.75% Notes). Interest accrued on the 7.75% Notes was partially offset by the absence of interest expense, as of November 2, 2004, for amounts outstanding under the Dresden Term Loan, which we prepaid on November 2, 2004, and the absence of interest expense with respect to $201 million of our 4.50% Notes, which we exchanged for our common stock in a series of transactions during the fourth quarter of 2004. We also capitalized interest during 2004 of $9 million in connection with our Fab 36 construction activities in Dresden, Germany.

 

Interest expense of $110 million in 2003 increased 55 percent compared to $71 million in 2002. The increase was due primarily to annual interest charges of $18 million on our 4.50% Notes sold in November 2002, $5 million of interest on $110 million outstanding under our revolving credit facility, and the Spansion transaction, which resulted in additional interest expense of approximately $9 million in 2003. In addition, in 2002 we capitalized interest of $10.7 million on continued expansion and facilitization of Fabs 25 and 30 compared to $1.5 million in 2003.

 

Income Taxes

 

We recorded an income tax provision of $6 million in 2004, $3 million in 2003 and $45 million in 2002. The income tax provision in 2004 primarily reflects U.S. income taxes, including taxes on the dividends repatriated from controlled foreign corporations, partially offset by foreign tax benefits because of losses in certain foreign jurisdictions. The income tax provision in 2003 primarily reflected income tax expense generated in certain foreign jurisdictions, offset by a benefit of a U.S. federal tax refund from a carryback claim we filed in 2003. The 2002 income tax provision was recorded primarily for taxes due on income generated in certain foreign tax jurisdictions and the establishment of a valuation allowance against the remainder of our U.S. deferred tax assets, net of U.S. deferred tax liabilities in the fourth quarter, due to continuing substantial operating losses in the United States.

 

As of December 26, 2004, we had federal and state net operating loss carryforwards of approximately $930 million and $45 million. We also had foreign loss carryforwards of approximately $88 million. We also had

 

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federal and state tax credit carryforwards of approximately $246 million and $86 million. The net operating loss and tax credit carryforwards will expire at various dates beginning in 2005 through 2024, if not utilized. We maintain a full valuation allowance against all our net U.S. federal and state deferred tax assets and certain of our foreign deferred tax assets ($694 million at December 26, 2004) because of our history of recent losses.

 

Other Items

 

International sales as a percent of net sales were 79 percent in 2004, 80 percent in 2003 and 73 percent in 2002. During 2004 and 2003, approximately 22 and 15 percent of our net sales were denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, primarily the Japanese yen, as compared to one percent during 2002. The increase in the percentage in 2004 and 2003 compared to 2002 was primarily due to the consolidation of Spansion’s results of operations, effective June 30, 2003, which include sales by Spansion to Fujitsu, which are denominated in yen. Our foreign exchange risk exposure resulting from these sales is partially mitigated as a result of our yen-denominated manufacturing costs. In addition, we are subject to foreign currency risk related to our manufacturing costs in Fab 30, which are denominated in euro. We use foreign currency forward and option contracts to reduce our exposure to the euro, but future exchange rate fluctuations may cause increases or decreases to our Fab 30 and Fab 36 manufacturing costs. The impact on our operating results from changes in foreign currency rates individually and in the aggregate has not been material, on an annual basis, principally as a result of our foreign currency hedging activities. See “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosure About Market Risk,” below.

 

FINANCIAL CONDITION

 

Our cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments at December 26, 2004 totaled $1.2 billion, which included approximately $196 million in cash, cash equivalents, and short-term investments of Spansion. Spansion’s operating agreement governs its ability to use this cash for operations or to distribute it to us and Fujitsu. Pursuant to the operating agreement, and subject to restrictions contained in third party loan agreements, Spansion must first distribute any cash balance to us and Fujitsu in an amount sufficient to cover each party’s estimated tax liability, if any, related to Spansion’s taxable income for each fiscal year. Any remaining cash balance after the tax liability distribution would be used by Spansion to fund its operations in accordance with its budget. If any cash remains, it must be used to repay Spansion’s outstanding debt to us and Fujitsu. Any remaining cash may be distributed at the discretion of Spansion’s Board of Managers, to us and Fujitsu, pro rata, based on each party’s membership interest at the time of distribution, which currently is 60 percent and 40 percent.

 

Due to our repayment of amounts outstanding under the Dresden Term Loan on November 2, 2004 and the related termination of the Dresden Loan Agreements effective December 23, 2004, we are no longer required to maintain a compensating cash balance. Therefore, as of December 26, 2004, our compensating cash balance was zero as compared to $218 million as of December 28, 2003.

 

Net Cash Provided by (Used in) Operating Activities

 

Net cash provided by operating activities was approximately $1.1 billion in 2004. Net income of $91 million, non-cash charges, consisting primarily of $1.2 billion of depreciation and amortization expense and a $32 million charge associated with our exchange of $201 million of our 4.50% Notes for common stock, contributed to the positive cash flows from operations. The net changes in operating assets in 2004 as compared to 2003 included an increase in accounts receivable due to higher net sales, and increased inventories due primarily to an increase in microprocessor inventories resulting from a higher percentage of AMD64-based processors and improved market conditions. For fiscal 2004, Fujitsu accounted for approximately 23 percent of our consolidated accounts receivable and approximately 22 percent of our consolidated gross sales.

 

Net cash provided by operating activities was approximately $296 million in 2003. Although we had a net loss of $274 million for the year, adjustments for non-cash charges, which were primarily depreciation and

 

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amortization, resulted in a positive cash flow from operations. The net changes in operating assets in 2003 as compared to 2002 included an increase in accounts receivable due to higher net sales and the consolidation of Spansion’s results of operations, which include Spansion’s sales to Fujitsu, and an increase in net inventory due to the consolidation of Spansion’s results of operations. For fiscal 2003, Fujitsu accounted for approximately 31 percent of our consolidated accounts receivable and approximately 13 percent of our consolidated gross sales. In 2003, the net changes in payables and accrued liabilities primarily included payments of $90 million for a technology license from IBM and approximately $64 million of payments under the 2002 Restructuring Plan.

 

Net cash used in operating activities was $120 million in 2002, primarily as a result of our net loss of $1.3 billion, adjusted by non-cash charges. Changes in operating assets and liabilities in 2002 as compared to 2001 were attributable to a decrease in accounts receivable due to a 31 percent decrease in net sales. At December 29, 2002, inventory increased as compared to December 29, 2001 due to an increase of products to support anticipated 2003 sales, a change in the mix of inventory, and the impact of Flash memory production from Fab 25 following its conversion from a microprocessor manufacturing facility.

 

Net Cash Provided by (Used in) Investing Activities

 

Net cash used in investing activities was $1.6 billion in 2004, primarily as a result of $1.4 billion used to purchase property, plant and equipment, including approximately $569 million used to construct Fab 36, and a net cash outflow of $150 million from sales and purchases of available-for-sale securities, offset by $34 million in proceeds from sales of property, plant and equipment.

 

Net cash provided by investing activities was $83 million in 2003, primarily as a result of net cash proceeds of $482 million from sales and purchases of available-for-sale securities, $148 million of cash acquired in conjunction with the Spansion transaction and $30 million in proceeds from sales of property, plant and equipment, offset by $570 million used to purchase property, plant and equipment.

 

Net cash used in investing activities was $854 million in 2002, including $705 million used for purchases of property, plant and equipment primarily for Fab 30 and Fab 25, $27 million, net of cash acquired, used to acquire Alchemy Semiconductor, and $131 million from net purchases of available-for-sale securities, offset by $9 million of proceeds from sales of property, plant and equipment.

 

Net Cash Provided by (Used in) Financing Activities

 

Net cash provided by financing activities was $413 million in 2004. This amount included $745 million of proceeds from financing activities, including $588 million in proceeds, net of $13 million in debt issuance costs, from the issuance of our 7.75% Notes, approximately $250 million in investments from the non-affiliated limited partners of AMD Fab 36 KG, $60 million of proceeds from equipment sale and leaseback transactions, $30 million of capital investment grants and allowances from the Federal Republic of Germany and the Free State of Saxony for the Fab 36 project, $124 million in proceeds from the issuance of stock under our Employee Stock Purchase Plan and the exercise of stock options and the elimination of our $224 million compensating cash balance due to the prepayment of our Dresden Term Loan. These amounts were offset by $898 million in payments on debt and capital lease obligations, including approximately $647.2 million used to prepay amounts outstanding under the Dresden Term Loan, including accrued and unpaid interest.

 

Net cash provided by financing activities was $267 million in 2003, primarily due to $245 million received from equipment sale and leaseback transactions completed by Spansion, a $40 million cash note to Spansion from Fujitsu as part of the Spansion transaction, $155 million of capital investment allowances received from the Federal Republic of Germany for the Fab 30 project and $35 million of proceeds from issuance of stock under our Employee Stock Purchase Plan and the exercise of stock options, offset by $141 million in payments on debt and capital lease obligations, and a $74 million increase in our compensating cash balance, which represented the minimum cash balance that AMD Saxony was required to maintain in order to comply with the minimum liquidity covenant set forth in the Dresden Term Loan.

 

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Net cash provided by financing activities was $907 million in 2002, primarily due to $486 million in proceeds, net of $14 million in debt issuance costs, from the issuance of our 4.75% Debentures, $391 million in proceeds, net of $11 million in debt issuance costs, from the issuance of our 4.50% Notes, $108 million drawn under the July 2003 Spansion Term Loan, net of $2 million in debt issuance costs, $120 million drawn under our revolving credit facility, $21 million in proceeds from equipment lease financings, $29 million in proceeds from the issuance of stock under our Employee Stock Purchase Plan and the exercise of stock options, and $76 million of net capital investment allowances and interest subsidies received from the Federal Republic of Germany and the State of Saxony for the Fab 30 project. These amounts were offset by payments of $325 million on debt and capital lease obligations.

 

Liquidity

 

We believe that cash flows from operations and current cash balances, together with currently available credit facilities (see “Revolving Credit Facilities,” below) and external financing, will be sufficient to fund our operations and capital investments in the short term and long term. We also believe that we have sufficient financing arrangements in place to fund the estimated $2.5 billion required to facilitize Fab 36. See “Fab 36 Term Loan and Guarantee and Fab 36 Partnership Agreements,” below. Should additional funding be required, such as to meet payment obligations of our long-term debts when due, we may need to raise the required funds through borrowings or public or private sales of debt or equity securities. Such funding may be obtained through bank borrowings, or from issuances of additional debt or equity securities, which may be issued from time to time under an effective registration statement; through the issuance of securities in a transaction exempt from registration under the Securities Act of 1933; or a combination of one or more of the foregoing. We believe that, in the event of such requirements, we will be able to access the capital markets on terms and in amounts adequate to meet our objectives. However, given the possibility of changes in market conditions or other occurrences, there can be no certainty that such funding will be available in quantities or on terms favorable to us.

 

Revolving Credit Facilities

 

AMD Revolving Credit Facility

 

Our revolving credit facility provides for a secured revolving line of credit of up to $100 million that expires in July 2007. We can borrow, subject to amounts set aside by the lenders, up to 85 percent of our eligible accounts receivable from OEMs and 50 percent of our eligible accounts receivable from distributors. As of December 26, 2004, no borrowings were outstanding under our revolving credit facility.

 

Pursuant to the terms of our revolving credit facility, we have to comply, among other things, with the following financial covenants if our net domestic cash (as defined in our revolving credit facility) declines below $125 million:

 

    restrictions on our ability to pay cash dividends on our common stock;

 

    maintain an adjusted tangible net worth (as defined in our revolving credit facility) as follows:

 

Measurement Date    Amount
     (in millions)

Last day of each fiscal quarter in 2004

   $ 1,425

Last day of each fiscal quarter in 2005

   $ 1,850

Last day of each fiscal quarter thereafter

   $ 2,000

 

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    achieve EBITDA (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization) according to the following schedule:

 

Period    Amount
     (in millions)

Four fiscal quarters ending December 31, 2004

   $ 950

Four fiscal quarters ending March 31, 2005 and four fiscal quarters ending each fiscal quarter thereafter

   $ 1,050

 

As of December 26, 2004, net domestic cash, as defined, totaled $831 million and the preceding financial covenants were not applicable. Our obligations under our revolving credit facility are secured by all of our accounts receivable, inventory, general intangibles (excluding intellectual property) and the related proceeds, excluding Spansion’s accounts receivable, inventory and general intangibles.

 

Spansion Japan Revolving Loan Agreement

 

In March 2004, Spansion Japan Limited, a subsidiary of Spansion, entered into a revolving credit facility agreement with certain Japanese financial institutions in the aggregate amount of 15 billion yen (approximately $145 million as of December 26, 2004). Spansion Japan can draw under the facility until March 24, 2005.

 

The revolving facility consists of two tranches: tranche A in the aggregate amount of up to nine billion yen (approximately $87 million as of December 26, 2004) and tranche B in the aggregate amount of up to six billion yen (approximately $58 million as of December 26, 2004). However, as described in more detail below, the total amount that Spansion Japan can draw is limited based on the value of Spansion Japan’s accounts receivable from Fujitsu, which are pledged as security to the lenders. As of December 26, 2004, there were no borrowings outstanding under this facility.

 

Amounts borrowed under tranche A bear interest at a rate of TIBOR plus 0.55 percent. Amounts borrowed under tranche B bear interest at a rate of TIBOR plus 1.2 percent. Spansion Japan must first fully draw under tranche A prior to drawing amounts under tranche B. Borrowings must be used for working capital purposes and must be repaid no later than April 24, 2005.

 

Pursuant to the terms of the revolving credit facility agreement, Spansion Japan is required to comply with the following financial covenants:

 

    ensure that assets exceed liabilities as of the end of each fiscal year and each six-month (mid-year) period;

 

    maintain an adjusted tangible net worth (as defined in the agreement) at an amount not less than 60 billion yen (approximately $579 million as of December 26, 2004) as of the last day of each fiscal quarter;

 

    maintain total net income plus depreciation of $213 million as of the last day of fiscal year 2004; and

 

    ensure that as of the last day of each of the third and fourth quarter of 2004, the ratio of (a) net income plus depreciation to (b) the sum of interest expenses plus the amount of scheduled debt repayments plus capital expenditures for its facilities located in Aizu-Wakamatsu, Japan, for such period, is not less than 120%.

 

As of December 26, 2004, Spansion Japan was in compliance with these financial covenants.

 

As security for amounts outstanding under the revolving facility, Spansion Japan pledged its accounts receivable from Fujitsu. The accounts receivable are held in trust pursuant to the terms of a trust agreement. Under the trust agreement, Spansion Japan is required to maintain the value of its accounts receivable at specified thresholds (as defined by the trust agreement), based upon the amounts outstanding under tranche A and tranche B. In addition, the trustee collects payments from Fujitsu into a separate trust account and releases these amounts to Spansion Japan, subject to the calculated thresholds, upon instruction from the agent for the lenders. At any

 

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time when the accounts receivable balance in the trust account is less than the required thresholds, Spansion Japan is required to do one of the following to cure the shortfall:

 

    provide additional cash to the trust; or

 

    repay a specified portion of the outstanding loans.

 

Amounts outstanding under the revolving credit facility may become automatically due and payable upon the occurrence of specified events with respect to Spansion Japan, including: filings or proceedings in bankruptcy, failure to pay any obligations under the revolving credit facility that have become due, failure to pay other third-party indebtedness where such debt exceeds 200 million yen (approximately $2 million as of December 26, 2004), or if the value of the accounts receivable from Fujitsu held in trust is below the required thresholds and such shortfall is not remedied within three business days. In addition, amounts outstanding under the revolving credit facility may become automatically due and payable upon the occurrence of specified events with respect to Fujitsu including: filings or proceedings in bankruptcy, default by Fujitsu with respect to payments to Spansion Japan or other obligations under their purchase and sale agreement, or default by Fujitsu with respect to other third-party indebtedness where such debt exceeds one billion yen (approximately $10 million as of December 26, 2004). As of December 26, 2004, the amount of accounts receivable held in the trust was approximately $166 million.

 

Because most amounts under the Spansion Japan Revolving Loan are denominated in yen, the dollar amounts stated above are subject to change based on applicable exchange rates. We used the exchange rate as of December 26, 2004 of 103.62 yen to one U.S. dollar to translate the amounts denominated in yen into U.S. dollars.

 

Contractual Cash Obligations and Guarantees

 

The following table summarizes our principal contractual cash obligations at December 26, 2004, and is supplemented by the discussion following the table.

 

Principal contractual cash obligations at December 26, 2004 were:

 

     Total    2005    2006    2007    2008    2009    2010 and
beyond
     (in thousands)

4.75% Debentures

   $ 500,000    $ —      $ —      $ —      $ —      $ —      $ 500,000

4.50% Notes

     201,500      —        —        201,500      —        —        —  

7.75% Notes

     600,000      —        —        —        —        —        600,000

Repurchase Obligations to Fab 36 Partners (1)

     121,931      16,242      26,422      26,422      26,422      26,423      —  

July 2003 Spansion Term Loan

     44,599      27,500      17,099      —        —        —        —  

Spansion Japan Term Loan

     127,389      46,323      46,323      34,743      —        —        —  

Fujitsu Cash Note

     40,000      10,000      30,000      —        —        —        —  

AMD Penang Term Loan

     6,325      1,518      1,518      1,518      1,518      253      —  

Spansion China Loan

     32,499      32,499      —        —        —        —        —  

Capital Lease Obligations

     184,853      96,746      83,079      4,816      212      —        —  

Operating Leases

     430,854      76,865      63,812      51,007      44,547      39,071      155,552

Unconditional Purchase Commitments (2)(3)

     1,281,200      281,662      205,951      209,301      183,774      43,074      357,438

Total principal contractual cash obligations

   $ 3,571,150    $ 589,355    $ 474,204    $ 529,307    $ 256,473    $ 108,821    $ 1,612,990

 

 

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(1)   This is the amount of silent partnership contributions received by AMD Fab 36 KG as of December 26, 2004 from the unaffiliated limited partners under the Fab 36 partnership agreements. Assuming certain milestones are met by AMD Fab 36 KG, we expect to receive a total of up to $189 million of silent partnership contributions. AMD Fab 36 Holding and AMD Fab 36 Admin are required to repurchase each partner’s silent partnership contribution in annual installments one year after the partner has contributed the full amount required under the partnership agreements. As of December 26, 2004, Fab 36 Beteiligungs had contributed the full amount required under the partnership agreements, but Leipziger Messe had not contributed the full amount. Therefore, the condition precedent to our repurchase obligations with respect to Leipziger Messe’s silent partnership contribution had not been met. See “Fab 36 Term Loan and Guarantee and Fab 36 Partnership Agreements,” below.
(2)   Purchase orders for goods and services that are cancelable upon notice and without significant penalties are not included in the amounts above.
(3)   We have unconditional purchase commitments for goods and services where payments are based, in part, on volume or type of services we require. In those cases, we only included the minimum volume or purchase commitment in the table above.

 

4.75% Convertible Senior Debentures Due 2022

 

On January 29, 2002 we issued $500 million of our 4.75% Convertible Senior Debentures due 2022 (the 4.75% Debentures) in a private offering pursuant to Rule 144A and Regulation S of the Securities Act.

 

The interest rate payable on the 4.75% Debentures will reset on August 1, 2008, August 1, 2011 and August 1, 2016 to a rate equal to the interest rate payable 120 days prior to the reset dates on 5-year U.S. Treasury Notes, plus 43 basis points. The interest rate will not be less than 4.75 percent and will not exceed 6.75 percent. Holders have the right to require us to repurchase all or a portion of our 4.75% Debentures on February 1, 2009, February 1, 2012, and February 1, 2017. The holders of the 4.75% Debentures also have the ability to require us to repurchase the 4.75% Debentures in the event that we undergo specified fundamental changes, including a change of control. In each such case, the redemption or repurchase price would be 100 percent of the principal amount of the 4.75% Debentures plus accrued and unpaid interest. The 4.75% Debentures are convertible by the holders into our common stock at a conversion price of $23.38 per share at any time. At this conversion price, each $1,000 principal amount of the 4.75% Debentures will be convertible into approximately 43 shares of our common stock. Issuance costs incurred in the amount of approximately $14 million are amortized ratably, which approximates the effective interest method, over the term of the 4.75% Debentures, as interest expense.

 

As of February 5, 2005, the 4.75% Debentures are redeemable by us for cash at our option at specified prices expressed as a percentage of the outstanding principal amount plus accrued and unpaid interest, provided that we may not redeem the 4.75% Debentures prior to February 5, 2006, unless the last reported sale price of our common stock is at least 130 percent of the then-effective conversion price for at least 20 trading days within a period of 30 consecutive trading days ending within five trading days of the date of the redemption notice.

 

The redemption prices for the specified periods are as follows:

 

Period   

Price as a

Percentage of

Principal Amount

 

Beginning on February 5, 2005 through February 4, 2006

   102.375 %

Beginning on February 5, 2006 through February 4, 2007

   101.583 %

Beginning on February 5, 2007 through February 4, 2008

   100.792 %

Beginning on February 5, 2008

   100.000 %

 

We may elect to purchase or otherwise retire our 4.75% Debentures with cash, stock or other assets from time to time in open market or privately negotiated transactions, either directly or through intermediaries, or by tender offer when we believe that market conditions are favorable to do so. Such purchases may have a material effect on our liquidity, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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4.50% Convertible Senior Notes Due 2007

 

On November 25, 2002, we issued $402.5 million of 4.50% Convertible Senior Notes due 2007 (the 4.50% Notes) in a registered offering. Interest on the 4.50% Notes is payable semiannually in arrears on June 1 and December 1 of each year, beginning June 1, 2003. Beginning on December 4, 2005, the 4.50% Notes are redeemable by us at our option for cash at specified prices expressed as a percentage of the outstanding principal amount plus accrued and unpaid interest, provided that we may not redeem the 4.50% Notes unless the last reported sale price of our common stock is at least 150 percent of the then-effective conversion price for at least 20 trading days within a period of 30 trading days ending within five trading days of the date of the redemption notice.

 

The redemption prices for the specified periods are as follows:

 

Period   

Price as a

Percentage of

Principal Amount

 

Beginning on December 4, 2005 through November 30, 2006

   101.800 %

Beginning on December 1, 2006 through November 30, 2007

   100.900 %

On December 1, 2007

   100.000 %

 

The 4.50% Notes are convertible at the option of the holder at any time prior to the close of business on the business day immediately preceding the maturity date of December 1, 2007, unless previously redeemed or repurchased, into shares of common stock at a conversion price of $7.37 per share, subject to adjustment in certain circumstances. At this conversion price, each $1,000 principal amount of the 4.50% Notes will be convertible into approximately 135 shares of our common stock. Issuance costs incurred in the amount of approximately $12 million are amortized ratably, over the term of the 4.50% Notes, as interest expense, approximating the effective interest method.

 

Holders have the right to require us to repurchase all or a portion of our 4.50% Notes in the event that we undergo specified fundamental changes, including a change of control. In each such case, the redemption or repurchase price would be 100 percent of the principal amount of the 4.50% Notes plus accrued and unpaid interest.

 

As of December 26, 2004 we had exchanged an aggregate of $201 million of our 4.50% Notes for 29,391,261 shares of our common stock in a series of transactions. As a result of these transactions, we recognized a charge of approximately $32 million, which represented the difference between the fair value of the shares issued in the transactions and the fair value of shares issuable pursuant to the original conversion terms of the 4.50% Notes.

 

We may elect to purchase or otherwise retire the remainder of our 4.50% Notes with cash, stock or other assets from time to time in open market or privately negotiated transactions, either directly or through intermediaries, or by tender offer when we believe that market conditions are favorable to do so. Such purchases may have a material effect on our liquidity, financial condition and results of operations.

 

7.75% Senior Notes Due 2012

 

On October 29, 2004, we issued $600 million of 7.75% Senior Notes due 2012 (the 7.75% Notes) in a private offering pursuant to Rule 144A and Regulation S under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended. We used the net proceeds from the sale of the 7.75% Notes plus existing cash to prepay the full amount outstanding under the Dresden Term Loan, including accrued and unpaid interest and a prepayment premium. See “Repayment of Dresden Term Loan,” below. The 7.75% Notes mature on November 1, 2012. Interest on the 7.75% Notes is payable semiannually in arrears on May 1 and November 1, beginning May 1, 2005. Prior to November 1, 2008, we may redeem some or all of the 7.75% Notes at a price equal to 100% of the principal amount plus accrued and

 

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unpaid interest plus a “make-whole” premium, as defined in the agreement. Thereafter, we may redeem the 7.75% Notes for cash at the following specified prices plus accrued and unpaid interest:

 

Period    Price as
Percentage of
Principal Amount
 

Beginning on November 1, 2008 through October 31, 2009

   103.875 %

Beginning on November 1, 2009 through October 31, 2010

   101.938 %

Beginning on November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011

   100.000 %

On November 1, 2011

   100.000 %

 

In addition, on or prior to November 1, 2007, we may redeem up to 35 percent of the 7.75% Notes with the proceeds of certain sales of our equity securities at 107.75 percent of the principal amount thereof, plus accrued and unpaid interest.

 

Holders have the right to require us to repurchase all or a portion of our 7.75% Notes in the event that we undergo a change of control, as defined in the indenture governing the 7.75% Notes at a repurchase price of 101% of the principal amount plus accrued and unpaid interest.

 

The indenture governing the 7.75% Notes contains certain covenants that limit, among other things, our ability and the ability of our restricted subsidiaries, which include all of our subsidiaries except Spansion and its subsidiaries, from:

 

    incurring additional indebtedness;

 

    paying dividends and making other restricted payments;

 

    making certain investments, including investments in our unrestricted subsidiaries;

 

    creating or permitting certain liens;

 

    creating or permitting restrictions on the ability of the restricted subsidiaries to pay dividends or make other distributions to us;

 

    using the proceeds from sales of assets;

 

    entering into certain types of transactions with affiliates; and

 

    consolidating or merging or selling our assets as an entirety or substantially as an entirety.

 

We also entered into a registration rights agreement with the initial purchasers of the 7.75% Notes, which granted the holders certain exchange and registration rights with respect to the 7.75% Notes. We agreed to:

 

    file a registration statement within 90 days after October 29, 2004 enabling holders to exchange 7.75% Notes for publicly registered notes with substantially identical terms;

 

    use commercially reasonable efforts to cause the registration statement to become effective within 180 days after October 29, 2004;

 

    use commercially reasonable efforts to effect an exchange offer of the 7.75% Notes for registered notes within 225 days after October 29, 2004; and

 

    file a shelf registration statement for the resale of the 7.75% Notes if we cannot effect the exchange offer within the time periods listed above.

 

If we do not meet these deadlines, additional interest of 0.25% per instance will be paid on the 7.75% Notes until the obligations under the registration rights agreement are fulfilled. On January 20, 2005 we filed a registration statement on Form S-4 in order to enable holders to exchange the outstanding 7.75% Notes for publicly registered notes with substantially identical terms.

 

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Issuance costs incurred in connection with this transaction in the amount of approximately $13 million will be amortized ratably over the term of the 7.75% Notes as interest expense, approximating the effective interest method.

 

Fab 36 Term Loan and Guarantee and Fab 36 Partnership Agreements

 

We are facilitizing our new 300-millimeter wafer fabrication facility, Fab 36, in Dresden, Germany, which is located adjacent to Fab 30. Fab 36 is owned by a German limited partnership named AMD Fab 36 Limited Liability Company & Co. KG, or AMD Fab 36 KG. We control the management of AMD Fab 36 KG through a wholly owned Delaware subsidiary, AMD Fab 36 LLC, which is a general partner of AMD Fab 36 KG. Accordingly, AMD Fab 36 KG is our indirect consolidated subsidiary. We expect that Fab 36 will produce future generations of our microprocessor products, and that it will be in volume production in 2006. AMD, Leipziger Messe GmbH, a nominee of the State of Saxony, Fab 36 Beteiligungs GmbH, an investment consortium arranged by M+W Zander Facility Engineering GmbH, the general contractor for the project, and a consortium of banks are providing financing for the project. Leipziger Messe and Fab 36 Beteiligungs are limited partners in AMD Fab 36 KG. We also anticipate receiving up to approximately $735 million in grants and allowances from federal and state German authorities for the Fab 36 project. We expect that capital expenditures for Fab 36 through 2007 will be approximately $2.5 billion in the aggregate.

 

The funding to construct and facilitize Fab 36 consists of:

 

    Equity contributions from us of $792 million under the partnership agreements, revolving loans from us of up to approximately $1.0 billion, and guarantees from us for amounts owed by AMD Fab 36 KG and its affiliates to the lenders and unaffiliated limited partners;

 

    investments of up to approximately $433 million from Leipziger Messe and Fab 36 Beteiligungs;

 

    loans of up to approximately $947 million from a consortium of banks;

 

    up to approximately $735 million of subsidies consisting of grants and allowances, from the Federal Republic of Germany and the State of Saxony; and

 

    a loan guarantee from the Federal Republic of Germany and the State of Saxony of 80 percent of the losses sustained by the lenders referenced above after foreclosure on all other security.

 

As of December 26, 2004, we had contributed $248 million of equity in AMD Fab 36 KG and no loans were outstanding. These amounts have been eliminated in our consolidated financial statements.

 

On April 21, 2004, AMD, AMD Fab 36 KG, AMD Fab 36 LLC, AMD Fab 36 Holding GmbH, a German company and wholly owned subsidiary of AMD that owns substantially all of our limited partnership interest in AMD Fab 36 KG, and AMD Fab 36 Admin GmbH, a German company and wholly owned subsidiary of AMD Fab 36 Holding that owns the remainder of our limited partnership interest in AMD Fab 36 KG, (collectively referred to as the AMD companies) entered into a series of agreements (the partnership agreements) with the unaffiliated limited partners of AMD Fab 36 KG, Leipziger Messe and Fab 36 Beteiligungs, relating to the rights and obligations with respect to their limited partner and silent partner contributions in AMD Fab 36 KG. The partnership has been established for an indefinite period of time. A partner may terminate its participation in the partnership by giving twelve months advance notice to the other partners. The termination becomes effective at the end of the year following the year during which the notice is given. However, other than for good cause, a partner’s termination will not be effective before December 31, 2015.

 

Also on April 21, 2004, AMD Fab 36 KG entered into a term loan agreement and other related agreements (the Fab 36 Loan Agreements) with a consortium of banks led by Dresdner Bank AG, a German financial institution, to finance the purchase of equipment and tools required to operate Fab 36. The consortium of banks agreed to make available up to $947 million in loans to AMD Fab 36 KG upon its achievement of specified milestones, including attainment of “technical completion” at Fab 36, which requires certification by the banks’

 

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technical advisor that AMD Fab 36 KG has a wafer fabrication process suitable for high-volume production of advanced microprocessors and has achieved specified levels of average wafer starts per week and average wafer yields, as well as cumulative capital expenditures of approximately $1.4 billion. We currently anticipate that AMD Fab 36 KG will attain these milestones and first be able to draw on the loans in 2006. The amounts borrowed under the Fab 36 Loan Agreements are repayable in quarterly installments commencing in September 2007 and terminating in March 2011.

 

AMD Fab 36 KG pledged substantially all of its current and future assets as security under the Fab 36 Loan Agreements, we pledged our equity interest in AMD Fab 36 Holding and AMD Fab 36 LLC, AMD Fab 36 Holding pledged its equity interest in AMD Fab 36 Admin and its partnership interest in AMD Fab 36 KG and AMD Fab 36 Admin and AMD Fab 36 LLC pledged all of their partnership interests in AMD Fab 36 KG. We guaranteed the obligations of AMD Fab 36 KG to the lenders under the Fab 36 Loan Agreements. We also guaranteed repayment of grants and allowances by AMD Fab 36 KG, should such repayment be required pursuant to the terms of the subsidies provided by the federal and state German authorities. Pursuant to the terms of the guarantee, we have to comply with specified adjusted tangible net worth and EBITDA financial covenants if the sum of our and our subsidiaries’ cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments, less the amount outstanding under any third-party revolving credit facility or term loan agreement with an original maturity date for amounts borrowed of up to one year (group consolidated cash), declines below the following amounts:

 

Amount

(in thousands)

  

if Moody’s

Rating is at least

       

if Standard & Poor’s Rating

is at least

$500,000    B1 or lower    and    B+ or lower
425,000    Ba3    and    BB-
400,000    Ba2    and    BB
350,000    Ba1    and    BB+
300,000    Baa3 or better    and    BBB-or better

 

As of December 26, 2004, group consolidated cash was greater than $500 million, and therefore, the preceding financial covenants were not applicable.

 

The partnership agreements set forth each limited partner’s aggregate capital contribution to AMD Fab 36 KG and the milestones for such contributions. Pursuant to the terms of the partnership agreements, AMD, through AMD Fab 36 Holding and AMD Fab 36 Admin, agreed to provide an aggregate of $792 million, Leipziger Messe agreed to provide an aggregate of $271 million and Fab 36 Beteiligungs agreed to provide an aggregate of $162 million. The capital contributions of Leipziger Messe and Fab 36 Beteiligungs are comprised of limited partnership contributions and silent partnership contributions. These contributions are due at various dates upon the achievement of milestones relating to the construction and operation of Fab 36.

 

The partnership agreements also specify that the unaffiliated limited partners will receive a guaranteed rate of return of between 11 percent and 13 percent per annum on their total investment depending upon the monthly wafer output of Fab 36. We guaranteed these payments by AMD Fab 36 KG.

 

Pursuant to the terms of the partnership agreements and subject to the prior consent of the Federal Republic of Germany and the State of Saxony, AMD Fab 36 Holding and AMD Fab 36 Admin have a call option over the limited partnership interests held by Leipziger Messe and Fab 36 Beteiligungs, first exercisable three and one-half years after the relevant partner has completed the applicable capital contribution and every three years thereafter. Also, commencing five years after completion of the relevant partner’s capital contribution, Leipziger Messe and Fab 36 Beteiligungs each have the right to sell their limited partnership interest to third parties (other than competitors), subject to a right of first refusal held by AMD Fab 36 Holding and AMD Fab 36 Admin, or to put their limited partnership interest to AMD Fab 36 Holding and AMD Fab 36 Admin. The put option is thereafter exercisable every three years. Leipziger Messe and Fab 36 Beteiligungs also have a put option in the event they are outvoted at AMD Fab 36 KG partners’ meetings with respect to certain specified matters such as increases in the partners’ capital contributions beyond those required by the partnership agreements, investments

 

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significantly in excess of the business plan, or certain dispositions of the limited partnership interests of AMD Fab 36 Holding and AMD Fab 36 Admin. The purchase price under the put option is the partner’s capital account balance plus accumulated or accrued profits due to such limited partner. The purchase price under the call option is the same amount, plus a premium of $4.7 million to Leipziger Messe and a premium of $2.8 million to Fab 36 Beteiligungs. The right of first refusal price is the lower of the put option price or the price offered by the third party that triggered the right. We guaranteed the payments under the put options.

 

In addition, AMD Fab 36 Holding and AMD Fab 36 Admin are obligated to repurchase the silent partnership interest of Leipziger Messe’s and Fab 36 Beteiligungs’ contributions over time. Specifically, AMD Fab 36 Holding and AMD Fab 36 Admin are required to repurchase Leipziger Messe’s silent partnership interest of $108 million in annual 25 percent installments commencing one year after Leipziger Messe has completed its limited partnership and silent partnership contributions, and Fab 36 Beteiligungs’ silent partnership interest of $81 million in annual 20 percent installments commencing in October 2005.

 

For accounting and financial reporting purposes under United States generally accepted accounting principles, we classified the silent partnership contributions as debt, based on their fair value because of the mandatory redemption features described in the prior paragraph. Each accounting period, we increase the carrying value of this debt towards our ultimate redemption value of the silent partnership contributions by the guaranteed annual rate of return of between 11 percent to 13 percent. We classify this periodic accretion to redemption value as interest expense.

 

The limited partnership contributions that AMD Fab 36 KG expects to receive from Leipziger Messe and Fab 36 Beteiligungs are subject to the put and call provisions referenced above. These contributions are not mandatorily redeemable, but rather are subject to redemption outside of the control of AMD Fab 36 Holding and AMD Fab 36 Admin. Upon consolidation, we initially record these contributions as minority interest, based on their fair value. Each accounting period, we increase the carrying value of this minority interest toward our ultimate redemption value of these contributions by the guaranteed rate of return of between 11 percent and 13 percent. We classify this periodic accretion of redemption value as an additional minority interest allocation. No separate accounting is required for the put and call options because they are not freestanding instruments and not considered derivatives under SFAS 133, Accounting for Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities.

 

As of December 26, 2004, AMD Fab 36 KG received $122 million of silent partnership contributions and $128 million of limited partnership contributions from the unaffiliated limited partners. These contributions were recorded as debt and minority interest, respectively, in the accompanying consolidated balance sheet.

 

In addition to support from us and the consortium of banks referred to above, the Federal Republic of Germany and the State of Saxony have agreed to support the Fab 36 project in the form of:

 

    a loan guarantee equal to 80 percent of the losses sustained by the lenders after foreclosure on all other security; and

 

    subsidies consisting of grants and allowances totaling up to approximately $735 million.

 

As of December 26, 2004, AMD Fab 36 KG received cash allowances of $5 million for investments made in 2003 and cash grants of $25 million for investments made in 2003 and 2004.

 

The Fab 36 Loan Agreements also require that we:

 

    provide funding to AMD Fab 36 KG if cash shortfalls occur, including funding shortfalls in government subsidies resulting from any defaults caused by AMD Fab 36 KG or its affiliates; and

 

    guarantee 100 percent of AMD Fab 36 KG’s obligations under the Fab 36 Loan Agreements until the loans are repaid in full.

 

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Under the Fab 36 Loan Agreements, AMD Fab 36 KG, AMD Fab 36 Holding and AMD Fab 36 Admin are generally prevented from paying dividends or making other payments to us. In addition, AMD Fab 36 KG would be in default under the Fab 36 Loan Agreements if we or any of the AMD companies fail to comply with certain obligations thereunder or upon the occurrence of certain events and if, after the occurrence of the event, the lenders determine that their legal or risk position is adversely affected. Circumstances that could result in a default include:

 

    failure of any limited partner to make contributions to AMD Fab 36 KG as required under the partnership agreements or our failure to provide loans to AMD Fab 36 KG as required under the Fab 36 Loan Agreements;

 

    failure to pay any amount due under the Fab 36 Loan Agreements within five days of the due date;

 

    occurrence of any event which the lenders reasonably believe has had or is likely to have a material adverse effect on the business, assets or condition of AMD Fab 36 KG or AMD or their ability to perform under the Fab 36 Loan Agreements;

 

    filings or proceedings in bankruptcy or insolvency with respect to us, AMD Fab 36 KG or any limited partner;

 

    occurrence of a change in control (as defined in the Fab 36 Loan Agreements) of AMD;

 

    AMD Fab 36 KG’s noncompliance with certain affirmative and negative covenants, including restrictions on payment of profits, dividends or other distributions except in limited circumstances and restrictions on incurring additional indebtedness, disposing of assets and repaying subordinated debt; and

 

    AMD Fab 36 KG’s noncompliance with certain financial covenants, including minimum tangible net worth, minimum interest cover ratio, loan to fixed asset value ratio and a minimum cash covenant.

 

In general, any default with respect to other indebtedness of AMD or AMD Fab 36 KG that is not cured, would result in a cross-default under the Fab 36 Loan Agreements.

 

The occurrence of a default under the Fab 36 Loan Agreements would permit the lenders to accelerate the repayment of all amounts outstanding under the Fab 36 Loan Agreements. In addition, the occurrence of a default under these agreements could result in a cross-default under our loan agreements, including the indentures governing our 4.75% Debentures, 4.50% Notes and 7.75% Notes. We cannot assure you that we would be able to obtain the funds necessary to fulfill these obligations. Any such failure would have a material adverse effect on us.

 

Generally, the amounts under the Fab 36 Loan Agreements and the partnership agreements are denominated in euros. However, we report these amounts in U.S. dollars, which are subject to change based on applicable exchange rates. We used the exchange rate at December 26, 2004, of 0.739 euro to one U.S. dollar, to translate the amounts denominated in euros into U.S. dollars. However, with respect to amounts of limited partnership and other equity contributions, investment grants, allowances and subsidies received by AMD Fab 36 KG through December 26, 2004, we used the historical exchange rates that were in effect at the time AMD Fab 36 KG received these amounts to convert amounts denominated in euros into U.S. dollars.

 

July 2003 Spansion Term Loan and Guarantee

 

Under our July 2003 Spansion Term Loan, as amended, amounts borrowed bear interest at a variable rate of LIBOR plus four percent, which was 5.98 percent at December 26, 2004. Repayment occurs in equal, consecutive, quarterly principal and interest installments ending in September 2006. As of December 26, 2004, $45 million was outstanding under the July 2003 Spansion Term Loan, of which 60 percent is guaranteed by us and 40 percent is guaranteed by Fujitsu. Spansion granted a security interest in certain property, plant and equipment as security under the July 2003 Spansion Term Loan. In addition, as security for our guarantee obligations, we granted a security interest in certain of our assets, including our accounts receivable, inventory, general intangibles (excluding intellectual property) and the related proceeds.

 

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Pursuant to the terms of the July 2003 Spansion Term Loan, Spansion is required to comply with the following financial covenants during an enhanced covenant period, which occurs if either Spansion’s net domestic cash balance (as defined in the July 2003 Spansion Term Loan) as of the last day of any fiscal quarter is below $60 million or if its net worldwide cash balance (as defined in the July 2003 Spansion Term Loan) as of the last day of any fiscal quarter is below $130 million:

 

    maintain an adjusted tangible net worth (as defined in the July 2003 Spansion Term Loan) of not less than $850 million;

 

    achieve EBITDA according to the following schedule:

 

Period    Amount
     (in millions)

For the four quarters ending December 2004

   $ 550

For the four quarters ending in 2005

   $ 640

For the four quarters ending in 2006

   $ 800

 

    maintain a fixed charge coverage ratio (as defined in the July 2003 Spansion Term Loan) according to the following schedule:

 

Period    Ratio

Period ending December 2004

   1.0 to 1.00

Full Fiscal Year 2005

   1.0 to 1.00

Full Fiscal Year 2006

   0.9 to 1.00

 

In addition, during an enhanced covenant period, Spansion is restricted in its ability to pay cash dividends to us or Fujitsu.

 

As of December 26, 2004, Spansion’s net domestic cash balance was $119 million and its net worldwide cash balance was $196 million. Because Spansion was not in an enhanced covenant period, the preceding financial covenants were not applicable.

 

Spansion Japan Term Loan and Guarantee

 

As a result of the formation of Spansion, the third-party loans of the Manufacturing Joint Venture were refinanced from the proceeds of a term loan entered into between Spansion Japan, which owns the assets of the Manufacturing Joint Venture, and a Japanese financial institution. Under the agreement, the amounts borrowed bear an interest rate of TIBOR plus a spread that is determined by Fujitsu’s current debt rating and Spansion Japan’s non-consolidated net asset value as of the last day of its fiscal year. The interest rate was 0.98 percent as of December 26, 2004. Repayment occurs in equal, consecutive, quarterly principal installments ending in June 2007. As of December 26, 2004, $127 million was outstanding under this term loan agreement. Spansion Japan’s assets are pledged as security for its borrowings under this agreement. Also, Fujitsu guaranteed 100 percent of the amounts outstanding under this facility. We agreed to reimburse Fujitsu 60 percent of any amount paid by Fujitsu under its guarantee of this loan. Pursuant to the terms of the Spansion Japan Term Loan, Spansion Japan is required to comply with the following financial covenants:

 

    ensure that assets exceed liabilities as of the end of each fiscal year and each six-month period during such fiscal year;

 

    maintain an adjusted tangible net worth (as defined in the loan agreement), as of the last day of each fiscal quarter, of not less than 60 billion yen (approximately $579 million based on the exchange rate as of December 26, 2004);

 

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    maintain total net income plus depreciation, as of the last day of each fiscal period, as follows:

 

Period    Amount
     (in millions)

Fiscal year 2004

   $ 221

Fiscal year 2005

   $ 204

Fiscal year 2006

   $ 188

 

    ensure that as of the last day of any fiscal quarter, the ratio of (a) net income plus depreciation to (b) the sum of (i) interest expense for such period plus (ii) scheduled amortization of debt for borrowed money (as defined in the loan agreement) for such period, including lease rentals plus (iii) maintenance capital expenditures for Spansion Japan’s existing and after acquired real property and improvements at its manufacturing facilities located in Aizu-Wakamatsu, Japan, is not less than:

 

Period    Percentage  

Third and fourth fiscal quarters of 2004

   120 %

Fiscal year 2005

   120 %

Fiscal year 2006

   120 %

 

As of December 26, 2004, Spansion Japan was in compliance with these financial covenants.

 

Because most amounts under the Spansion Japan Term Loan are denominated in yen, the dollar amounts are subject to change based on applicable exchange rates. We used the exchange rate as of December 26, 2004 of 103.62 yen to one U.S. dollar to translate the amounts denominated in yen into U.S. dollars.

 

Fujitsu Cash Note

 

As a result of the Spansion transaction, Fujitsu loaned $40 million to Spansion pursuant to a promissory note. The note bears an interest rate of LIBOR plus four percent, which was 5.98 percent as of December 26, 2004, and has a term of three years. The interest rate cannot exceed seven percent. The note is repayable in four equal payments on September 30, 2005, December 31, 2005, March 31, 2006 and June 30, 2006. Interest is payable quarterly.

 

AMD Penang Term Loan

 

On January 29, 2004, our subsidiary in Malaysia, AMD Export Sdn. Bhd., or AMD Penang, entered into a term loan agreement with a local financial institution. Under the terms of the loan agreement, AMD Penang can borrow up to 30 million Malaysian Ringgit (approximately $8 million as of December 26, 2004) in order to fund the purchase of equipment. The loan bears a fixed annual interest rate of 5.9 percent and is payable in equal, consecutive, monthly principal and interest installments through February 2009. The total amount outstanding as of December 26, 2004 was approximately $6 million.

 

Spansion China Loan

 

During the second quarter of 2004, Spansion (China) Limited, a subsidiary of Spansion, entered into two revolving loan agreements with a local financial institution. Under the terms of the revolving foreign exchange loan agreement, Spansion China can borrow in U.S. dollars up to an amount of $18 million. Under the terms of the revolving Renminbi (RMB) loan agreement, Spansion China can borrow up to RMB 120 million (approximately $14.5 million as of December 26, 2004). The interest rate on the U.S. dollar denominated loans is LIBOR plus one percent and the interest rate on the RMB denominated loans is fixed at 4.779 percent. The maximum term of each loan is 12 months from the date of each drawdown. As of December 26, 2004, Spansion China had fully drawn on the loans.

 

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Capital Lease Obligations

 

As of December 26, 2004, we had aggregate outstanding capital lease obligations of approximately $185 million. Obligations under these lease agreements are collateralized by the assets leased and are payable through 2008. Leased assets consist principally of machinery and equipment. We guaranteed approximately $87 million of Spansion’s and its subsidiaries’ aggregate outstanding capital lease obligations as of December 26, 2004.

 

Operating Leases

 

We lease certain of our facilities, including our executive offices in Sunnyvale, California, and in some jurisdictions we lease the land on which these facilities are built, under lease agreements that expire at various dates through 2032. We lease certain of our manufacturing and office equipment for terms ranging from one to five years. Total future lease obligations as of December 26, 2004, were approximately $431 million, of which $106 million was recorded as a liability for certain facilities that were included in our 2002 Restructuring Plan.

 

Unconditional Purchase Commitments

 

Total non-cancelable purchase commitments as of December 26, 2004, were approximately $1.3 billion for periods through 2020. These purchase commitments include approximately $546 million related to contractual obligations to purchase energy and gas for Fab 30 and Fab 36 and $250 million representing future payments to IBM pursuant to the joint development agreement. As IBM’s services are being performed ratably over the life of the agreement, we expense the payments as incurred. Our non-cancelable purchase commitments also include approximately $141 million to M+W Zander for the design and construction of Fab 36 and other related services. These payments will be made to M+W Zander as services are performed. In addition, unconditional purchase commitments also include approximately $68 million for software maintenance agreements that require periodic payments through 2009. As a result, we have not recorded any liabilities relating to these agreements. The remaining commitments primarily consist of non-cancelable contractual obligations to purchase raw materials, natural resources and office supplies. Purchase orders for goods and services that are cancelable without significant penalties are not included in the amount set forth in the table above.

 

Other Long-Term Liabilities

 

The only component of Other Long-Term Liabilities that requires us to make cash payments is a net restructuring accrual of approximately $87 million relating to the net future operating lease payments on certain facilities that were included in our 2002 Restructuring Plan. We will make these payments through 2011. We included these amounts in the operating lease total in the table above. The other components of Other Long-Term Liabilities do not require us to make cash payments and primarily consist of approximately $274 million of deferred grants and subsidies related to the Fab 30 and Fab 36 projects and a $22 million deferred gain as a result of the sale and leaseback of our corporate marketing, general and administrative facility in Sunnyvale, California in 1998.

 

Repayment of Dresden Term Loan

 

AMD Saxony, our indirect, wholly owned German subsidiary, continues to facilitize Fab 30, which began production in the second quarter of 2000. AMD, the Federal Republic of Germany, the State of Saxony and a consortium of banks provided financing for the Fab 30 project. We currently estimate that the construction and facilitization costs of Fab 30 will be $2.5 billion when it is fully equipped by the end of 2005. As of December 26, 2004, we had invested approximately $2.4 billion in the Fab 30 project.

 

In March 1997, AMD Saxony entered into a loan agreement and other related agreements (the Dresden Loan Agreements) with a consortium of banks led by Dresdner Bank AG, a German financial institution, in order to finance the project. On November 2, 2004, AMD Saxony prepaid the full amount outstanding under the Dresden Term Loan plus accrued and unpaid interest and a prepayment premium, and the Dresden Term Loan

 

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and related security agreements were terminated effective December 23, 2004. We recognized a charge of approximately $14 million (included in interest income and other, net) associated with the prepayment of the Dresden Term Loan, which included the prepayment premium of approximately $8.5 million and write-off of remaining capitalized financing costs of approximately $5.3 million.

 

Also in March 1997, AMD Saxony entered into a Subsidy Agreement with the Federal Republic of Germany and the State of Saxony in support of the Fab 30 project. Under this agreement, the Federal Republic of Germany and the State of Saxony agreed to provide:

 

    guarantees equal to 65 percent of the amount outstanding under the Dresden Term Loan, which was zero as of December 26, 2004;

 

    capital investment grants and allowances totaling up to approximately $493 million as of December 26, 2004; and

 

    interest subsidies totaling $208 million as of December 26, 2004.

 

Of these amounts, AMD Saxony received approximately $411 million in capital investment grants and allowances and $153 million in interest subsidies through December 26, 2004. AMD Saxony also received $58 million in research and development subsidies through December 26, 2004. Amounts received under the Subsidy Agreement are recorded as a long-term liability on our financial statements and are amortized to operations ratably over the contractual life of the Subsidy Agreement as a reduction to operating expenses. As of December 26, 2004, these amounts were being amortized ratably through December 2007. AMD Saxony has received substantially all investment grants and allowances and interest subsidies to which it is entitled. Noncompliance with the conditions of the grants, allowances and subsidies contained in the Subsidy Agreement could result in the forfeiture of all or a portion of the future amounts to be received, as well as the repayment of all or a portion of amounts received to date.

 

Under the original Subsidy Agreement, AMD Saxony undertook to attain a certain employee headcount by December 2003 and to maintain such headcount until December 2008. In April 2004, the German governmental authorities advised AMD Saxony that rather than maintaining employee headcount attained by December 2003 through December 2008, it would be required to maintain employee headcount attained as of December 2002 through December 2007. Beginning in April 2004, we adjusted the quarterly amortization of the grants and allowances until December 2007.

 

In December 2002, AMD Saxony reduced its anticipated employment levels as a result of the 2002 Restructuring Plan. Consequently, as of December 26, 2004, headcount was below the level agreed to by AMD Saxony at which AMD Saxony would be entitled to receive the maximum amount of capital investment grants and allowances available. Although the maximum amount of capital investment grants and allowances available under the Subsidy Agreement was reduced from $563 million to approximately $493 million, this reduction did not result in a repayment of capital investment grants and allowances already received. We adjusted the quarterly amortization of these amounts accordingly.

 

Sachsische Aufbaubank GmbH, (the SAB) an entity acting on behalf of the Free State of Saxony, requested that AMD Saxony exchange investment grants that it had previously received in the amount of approximately $101 million for an equivalent amount of investment allowances. AMD Saxony has agreed to repay these investment grants in 2005. AMD Saxony will receive the corresponding amount of investment allowances from the German tax authorities. There is no right of setoff between these two amounts because investment grants are co-financed by the State of Saxony and the Federal Republic of Germany whereas investment allowances are financed only by the Federal Republic of Germany. Accordingly, as of December 26, 2004, we recorded a receivable for the investment allowances and a payable in a corresponding amount for the investment grants. The receivable and payable are included in prepaid expenses and other current assets and accrued liabilities on the consolidated balance sheets. We believe that the exchange will not have an impact on our operating results and cash flows.

 

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Guarantees

 

Guarantees of Indebtedness Recorded on Our Consolidated Balance Sheet

 

The following table summarizes the principal guarantees issued as of December 26, 2004 related to underlying liabilities that are already recorded on our consolidated balance sheet as of December 26, 2004 and their expected expiration dates by year. No incremental liabilities are recorded on our consolidated balance sheet for these guarantees. For more information on these guarantees, see “Contractual Cash Obligations and Guarantees,” above.

 

     Amounts
Guaranteed (1)
   2005    2006    2007    2008    2009    2010
and
Beyond
     (in thousands)

July 2003 Spansion term loan guarantee

   $ 26,759    $ 16,500    $ 10,259      —        —        —      —  

Spansion Japan term loan guarantee

   $ 76,433    $ 27,794    $ 27,794    $ 20,845      —        —      —  

Spansion capital lease guarantees

   $ 87,303    $ 49,557    $ 34,475    $ 3,271      —        —      —  

Repurchase Obligations to Fab 36 partners (2)

   $ 121,931    $ 16,242    $ 26,422    $ 26,422    $ 26,422    $ 26,423    —  

Total guarantees

   $ 312,426    $ 110,093    $ 98,950    $ 50,538    $ 26,422    $ 26,423    —  
(1)   Amounts represent the principal amount of the underlying obligations guaranteed and are exclusive of obligations for interest, fees and expenses.
(2)   This is the amount of silent partnership contributions received by AMD Fab 36 KG, as of December 26, 2004 from the unaffliated limited partners under the Fab 36 partnership agreements. Assuming certain milestones are met by AMD Fab 36 KG, we expect to receive a total of up to $189 million of silent partnership contributions. AMD Fab 36 Holding and AMD Fab 36 Admin are required to repurchase each partner’s silent partnership contribution in annual installments one year after the partner has contributed the full amount required under the partnership agreements. We guaranteed these obligations. As of December 26, 2004, Fab 36 Beteiligungs had contributed the full amount required under the partnership agreements, but Leipziger Messe had not contributed the full amount. Therefore, the condition precedent to our repurchase obligations with respect to Leipziger Messe’s silent partnership contribution had not been met. See “Fab 36 Term Loan and Guarantee and Fab 36 Partnership Agreements,” above.

 

Guarantees of Indebtedness not Recorded on Our Consolidated Balance Sheet

 

The following table summarizes the principal guarantees issued as of December 26, 2004 for which the related underlying liabilities are not recorded on our consolidated balance sheet as of December 26, 2004 and their expected expiration dates:

 

     Amounts
Guaranteed (1)
   2005    2006    2007    2008    2009    2010 and
Beyond
     (in thousands)

Spansion operating lease guarantees

   $ 24,414    $ 13,267    $ 8,069    $ 2,052    $ 1,026    —        —  

AMTC revolving loan guarantee

   $ 43,308      —        —      $ 43,308      —      —        —  

AMTC rental guarantee (2)

   $ 153,489      —        —        —        —      —      $ 153,489

Other

   $ 5,629    $ 1,813    $ 3,816      —        —      —        —  

Total guarantees

   $ 226,840    $ 15,080    $ 11,885    $ 45,360    $ 1,026    —      $ 153,489
(1)   Amounts represent the principal amount of the underlying obligations guaranteed and are exclusive of obligations for interest, fees and expenses.
(2)   Amount of the guarantee diminishes as the rent is paid.

 

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Spansion Operating Lease Guarantees

 

We guaranteed certain operating leases entered into by Spansion and its subsidiaries totaling approximately $24 million as of December 26, 2004. The amounts guaranteed are reduced by the lease payments paid by Spansion over the lease term. Under the provision of FIN 45, we have not recorded any liability in our consolidated financial statements associated with these guarantees because they are for our subsidiary’s performance obligations.

 

AMTC and BAC Guarantees

 

The Advanced Mask Technology Center GmbH & Co. KG (AMTC) and Maskhouse Building Administration GmbH & Co., KG (BAC) are joint ventures formed by us, Infineon Technologies AG and DuPont Photomasks, Inc. for the purpose of constructing and operating an advanced photomask facility in Dresden, Germany. The results of operations of AMTC, which we account for following the equity method of accounting, are immaterial to our consolidated financial statements. To finance the project, BAC and AMTC entered into a $162 million revolving credit facility and a $102 million term loan in December 2002. Also in December 2002, in order to occupy the photomask facility, AMTC entered into a rental agreement with BAC. With regard to these commitments by BAC and AMTC, as of December 26, 2004, we guaranteed up to approximately $43 million plus interest and expenses under the revolving loan, and up to approximately $20 million, initially, under the rental agreement. The obligations under the rental agreement guarantee diminish over time through 2011 as the term loan is repaid. However, under certain circumstances of default by the other tenant of the photomask facility under its rental agreement with BAC and certain circumstances of default by more than one joint venture partner under its rental agreement guarantee obligations, the maximum potential amount of our obligations under the rental agreement guarantee is approximately $153 million. As of December 26, 2004, $80 million was drawn under the revolving credit facility, and $78 million was drawn under the term loan. We have not recorded any liability in our consolidated financial statements associated with these guarantees because they were issued prior to December 31, 2002, the effective date of FIN 45.

 

Other Financial Matters

 

Spansion LLC.    During the four-year period commencing on June 30, 2003, we are obligated to provide Spansion with additional funding to finance operations shortfalls, if any. Generally, Spansion is first required to seek any required financing from external sources. However, if such third-party financing is not available, we must provide funding to Spansion equal to our pro-rata ownership interest, which is currently 60 percent. At this time, we believe that Spansion would be able to obtain such external financing when needed. However, there is no assurance that this will happen and currently we cannot estimate the amount of such additional funding, if any, that we are required to provide during this four-year period.

 

Sale Leaseback Transaction

 

In January 2005, Spansion Japan entered into a sale and leaseback transaction for certain semiconductor manufacturing equipment in the amount of approximately 8.2 billion yen (approximately $79 million based on the exchange rate as of December 26, 2004). As the sales proceeds slightly exceed the net book value of the equipment, there is a minimal deferred gain to be recognized on the sale. Under the agreement, the lease payments will be made in six equal semi-annual payments and the lease will terminate on December 31, 2007. At the expiration of the lease term, Spansion Japan has the option to purchase the equipment at an agreed upon price, which we believe to be a bargain purchase option. In addition, Spansion Japan can renew the lease if the lessor and Spansion Japan both agree upon the renewal terms not later than six months prior to the expiration of the lease term. During the term of the lease, Spansion Japan is required to comply with certain financial covenants.

 

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Outlook

 

During the first quarter of 2005, for our Computation Products segment, we expect net sales to decline slightly compared to the fourth quarter of 2004. For our Memory Products segment, we expect net sales to decline during the first quarter of 2005 compared to the fourth quarter of 2004 due to continued imbalance in supply and demand, continued pressure on average selling prices and seasonality.

 

In fiscal 2005, we expect capital expenditures of approximately $1.5 billion. We expect depreciation and amortization expense to be approximately $1.2 billion, and research and development expenses, both in total dollars and as a percentage of sales, to increase primarily due to Fab 36 start-up costs of approximately $200 million. We also expect total marketing, general and administrative expenses to increase in 2005, but to decline as a percentage of sales.

 

In 2005, our strategy is to expand our position in the enterprise segment with our AMD64-based processors; to leverage our Spansion product portfolio to expand our position in the Flash memory market, and to increase the adoption of our MirrorBit technology. However, economic and industry conditions remain uncertain and continue to make it particularly difficult to forecast product demand. If economic conditions do not continue to improve in the near term in accordance with our expectations, or if the semiconductor industry experiences a significant downturn, our revenues and profitability will be adversely affected.

 

Supplementary Stock-Based Incentive Compensation Disclosures

 

Section I.    Option Program Description

 

Our stock option programs are intended to attract, retain and motivate highly qualified employees. On April 29, 2004, our stockholders approved the 2004 Equity Incentive Plan (the 2004 Plan), which had previously been approved by our Board of Directors. Stock options available for grant under our equity compensation plans that were in effect before April 29, 2004, (the Prior Plans), including those that were not approved by our stockholders, were consolidated into the 2004 Plan. As of April 29, 2004, equity awards are made only from the 2004 Plan. Under our Prior Plans key employees generally were, and under the 2004 Plan key employees generally are, granted nonqualified stock options (NSOs) to purchase our common stock. Generally, options vest and become exercisable over a four-year period from the date of grant and expire five to ten years after the date of grant. Any incentive stock options (ISOs) granted under the Prior Plans or the 2004 Plan have exercise prices of not less than 100 percent of the fair market value of the common stock on the date of grant. Exercise prices of NSOs range from $0.01 to the fair market value of the common stock on the date of grant. Under the 2004 Plan, we have also granted awards of restricted stock. The purchase price for an award of restricted stock is $0.01 per share. Restricted stock can be granted to any employee or consultant. Restricted stock that vests based on continued service does not fully vest for three years from the date of grant. Restricted stock that vests based on performance does not vest for at least one year from the date of grant.

 

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Section II.    General Option Information

 

The following is a summary of stock option activity for the years ended December 26, 2004 and December 28, 2003:

 

    

Year-ended

December 26, 2004


  

Year-ended

December 28, 2003


     Number of
Shares
    Weighted-
Average
Exercise
Price
   Number of
Shares
    Weighted-
Average
Exercise
Price
     (in thousands except share price)

Options:

                         

Outstanding at beginning of year

   40,969     $ 12.92    60,408     $ 18.58

Granted

   26,121     $ 14.54    5,575     $ 9.46

Canceled

   (3,425 )   $ 23.20    (22,642 )   $ 27.69

Exercised

   (9,981 )   $ 10.08    (2,372 )   $ 7.86

Outstanding at end of year

   53,684     $ 13.58    40,969     $ 12.92

Exercisable at end of year

   32,250     $ 13.72    28,624     $ 13.66

Available for grant at beginning of year

   29,613            13,019        

Available for grant at end of year

   23,901            29,613        

 

In-the-money and out-of-the-money stock option information as of December 26, 2004, was as follows:

 

     Exercisable

   Unexercisable

    Total

As of End of Quarter    Shares    Weighted
Average
Exercise
Price
   Shares    Weighted
Average
Exercise
Price
    Shares     Weighted
Average
Exercise
Price
     (in thousands except share price)

In-the-Money

   29,071    $ 11.84    21,079    N/A (3)   50,150     $ 12.40

Out-of-the-Money(1)

   3,179    $ 30.86    355    N/A (3)   3,534     $ 30.23

Total Options Outstanding

   32,250    $ 13.72    21,434          53,684 (2)   $ 13.58
(1)   Out-of-the-money stock options have an exercise price equal to or above $22.12, the closing price of AMD’s common stock, on the last trading day of our fiscal year, December 23, 2004.
(2)   Includes 232,088 shares outstanding from treasury stock as non-plan grants.
(3)   Weighted average exercise price information is not available.

 

Section III.    Distribution and Dilutive Effect of Options

 

Options granted to employees, including officers, and non-employee directors were as follows:

 

     2004     2003     2002  

Net grants(1) during the period as % of outstanding shares(2)

   5.79 %   -4.87 %   2.44 %

Grants to listed officers(3) during the period as % of total options granted

   3.59 %   11.77 %   14.33 %

Grants to listed officers during the period as % of outstanding shares

   0.24 %   0.19 %   0.49 %

Cumulative options and awards held by listed officers as % of total options and awards outstanding

   11.94 %   22.90 %   17.93 %
(1)   Options grants are net of options canceled.
(2)   Shares outstanding are as of December 26, 2004, December 28, 2003 and December 29, 2002.
(3)   The “listed officers” are those executive officers listed in the summary compensation table in our proxy statements for our annual meeting of stockholders to be held on April 28, 2005, and the annual meetings of stockholders held in 2004 and 2003.

 

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On June 27, 2003, we filed a Tender Offer Statement with the SEC and made an offer, which was approved by our stockholders, to exchange certain stock options to purchase shares of our common stock, outstanding under eligible option plans and held by eligible employees, for replacement options to be granted no sooner than six months and one day from the cancellation of the surrendered options. The offer to exchange expired on July 25, 2003. Options to purchase approximately 19 million shares of our common stock were tendered for exchange and cancelled on July 28, 2003. On January 30, 2004, we granted options to purchase approximately 12 million shares of our common stock at an exercise price that represented the closing price of our common stock on that date, in exchange for options cancelled. We did not record compensation expense as a result of the exchange.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

 

In December 2004, the Financial Accounting Standard Board (FASB) issued a revision to Statement of Financial Accounting Standard No. 123, “Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation” (SFAS 123R). SFAS 123R eliminates our ability to use the intrinsic value method of accounting under APB Opinion 25, “Accounting for Stock Issued to Employees,” and generally requires a public entity to reflect on its income statement, instead of pro forma disclosures in its financial footnotes, the cost of employee services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments based on the grant-date fair value of the award. The grant-date fair value will be estimated using option-pricing models adjusted for the unique characteristics of those equity instruments. Among other things, SFAS 123R also requires entities to estimate the number of instruments for which the requisite service is expected to be rendered and, if the terms or conditions of an equity award are modified after the grant date, to recognize incremental compensation cost for such a modification by comparing the fair value of the modified award with the fair value of the award immediately before the modification. In addition, SFAS 123R amends FASB Statement No. 95, “Statement of Cash Flows,” to require that excess tax benefits be reported as a financing cash inflow rather than as a reduction of taxes paid. SFAS 123R is effective generally for public companies as of the beginning of the first interim or annual reporting period that begins after June 15, 2005. SFAS 123R applies to all awards granted after the required effective date and to awards modified, repurchased, or cancelled after that date. As of the required effective date, all public entities that used the fair-value-based method for either recognition or disclosure under the original Statement 123 will apply this revised statement using a modified version of prospective application. Under that transition method, compensation cost is recognized on or after the required effective date for the portion of outstanding awards for which the requisite service has not yet been rendered, based on the grant-date fair value of those awards calculated under the original Statement 123 for either recognition or pro forma disclosures. For periods before the required effective date, those entities may elect to apply a modified version of retrospective application under which financial statements for prior periods are adjusted on a basis consistent with the pro forma disclosures required for those periods by the original Statement 123. We are currently evaluating the requirements of SFAS 123R and will adopt this statement at the effective date. Although we cannot estimate the exact amount at this time, we expect that the adoption of this statement will have a material effect on our financial statements.

 

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RISK FACTORS

 

If we cannot generate sufficient operating cash flow or obtain external financing, we may be unable to make all of our planned capital expenditures or fulfill our obligations to Fab 36 or Spansion.

 

Our ability to fund capital expenditures in accordance with our business plan depends on generating sufficient cash flow from operations and the availability of external financing. In 2005, we plan to make approximately $1.5 billion in capital expenditures.

 

Moreover, under the partnership agreement for AMD Fab 36 KG, our German subsidiaries, AMD Fab 36 Holding and AMD Fab 36 Admin are obligated to invest approximately $792 million into AMD Fab 36 KG. In addition, under the revolving credit agreement among AMD, AMD Fab 36 Holding and AMD Fab 36 KG, we or AMD Fab 36 Holding are required to provide up to approximately $1.0 billion to AMD Fab 36 KG. Loans provided to AMD Fab 36 KG under this revolving credit agreement are unsecured and subordinated to the rights of the consortium of banks that will also be providing financing to AMD Fab 36 KG.

 

We are also obligated through June 30, 2007 to provide Spansion with additional funding to finance operational cash flow needs. Generally, Spansion must seek any required financing from external sources. However, if third-party financing is not available, either on a non-recourse basis to us or with guarantees based on our pro rata ownership interest, we must provide funding to Spansion equal to our pro rata ownership interest in Spansion, which is currently 60 percent. An inability to meet our funding obligations for Spansion could, among other things, result in additional equity in Spansion being issued to Fujitsu or third parties, which would reduce our ownership in and control over Spansion.

 

Our capital expenditures, together with ongoing operating expenses, will be a substantial drain on our cash flow and may decrease our cash balances. The timing and amount of our capital requirements cannot be precisely determined at this time and will depend on a number of factors, including demand for products, product mix, changes in semiconductor industry conditions and market competition. We regularly assess markets for external financing opportunities, including debt and equity. Additional debt or equity financing may not be available when needed or, if available, may not be available on satisfactory terms. Our inability to obtain needed debt and/ or equity financing or to generate sufficient cash from operations may require us to abandon projects or curtail capital expenditures. If we curtail capital expenditures or abandon projects, we could be materially adversely affected. For example, if we abandon the Fab 36 project, we will have to write off related costs that we capitalized and we will be required to continue to make payments or otherwise be liable pursuant to then-existing contracts that we cannot terminate at will or without significant penalties.

 

We have a substantial amount of indebtedness that could adversely affect our financial position.

 

As of December 26, 2004, we had consolidated debt of approximately $1.9 billion. In addition, we guaranteed approximately $227 million of obligations, which are not reflected on our balance sheet. Our substantial indebtedness may:

 

    make it difficult for us to satisfy our financial obligations, including making scheduled principal and interest payments;

 

    limit our ability to borrow additional funds for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions and general corporate and other purposes;

 

    limit our ability to use our cash flow or obtain additional financing for future working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions or other general corporate purposes;

 

    require us to use a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to make debt service payments;

 

    limit our flexibility to plan for, or react to, changes in our business and industry;

 

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    place us at a competitive disadvantage compared to our less leveraged competitors; and

 

    increase our vulnerability to the impact of adverse economic and industry conditions.

 

We and our subsidiaries may be able to incur substantially more debt, including secured debt, in the future.

 

Subject to the restrictions in the agreements governing our existing indebtedness, we and our subsidiaries may incur significant additional debt, including secured debt, in the future. In particular, as of December 26, 2004, we and our subsidiaries would have had the following additional borrowings available:

 

    Up to $100 million under our revolving credit facility. Amounts borrowed under this facility are secured by all of our accounts receivable, inventory, general intangibles (excluding intellectual property) and the related proceeds, excluding Spansion’s accounts receivable, inventory and general intangibles.

 

    Spansion Japan had up to 15 billion yen (approximately $145 million as of December 26, 2004) available under a revolving credit facility.

 

    AMD Fab 36 KG will have the ability, subject to achieving certain milestones, to borrow up to $947 million (based on an exchange rate of 0.739 euro to one U.S. dollar as of December 26, 2004) from a consortium of banks under the Fab 36 Loan Agreements during 2006 and 2007.

 

Although the terms of the agreements governing our existing indebtedness contain restrictions on the incurrence of additional debt, these restrictions are subject to a number of important exceptions, and debt incurred in compliance with these restrictions could be substantial.

 

We may not be able to generate sufficient cash to service our debt obligations.

 

Our ability to make payments on and to refinance our debt, or our guarantees of other parties’ debts, will depend on our financial and operating performance, which may fluctuate significantly from quarter to quarter, and is subject to prevailing economic conditions and financial, business and other factors, many of which are beyond our control. We cannot assure you that we will continue to generate sufficient cash flow or that we will be able to borrow funds in amounts sufficient to enable us to service our debt, or to meet our working capital and capital expenditure requirements. If we are not able to generate sufficient cash flow from operations or to borrow sufficient funds to service our debt due to borrowing base restrictions or otherwise, we may be required to sell assets or equity, reduce capital expenditures, refinance all or a portion of our existing debt or obtain additional financing. We cannot assure you that we will be able to refinance our debt, sell assets or equity or borrow more funds on terms acceptable to us, if at all.

 

Our debt instruments impose restrictions on us that may adversely affect our ability to operate our business.

 

The indentures governing our 4.50% Notes, 4.75% Debentures and 7.75% Notes contain various covenants that limit our ability to:

 

    incur additional indebtedness;

 

    pay dividends and make other restricted payments;

 

    make certain investments, including investments in our unrestricted subsidiaries;

 

    create or permit certain liens;

 

    create or permit restrictions on the ability of certain restricted subsidiaries to pay dividends or make other distributions to us;

 

    use the proceeds from sales of assets;

 

    enter into certain types of transactions with affiliates; and

 

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    consolidate or merge or sell our assets as an entirety or substantially as an entirety.

 

In addition:

 

    The guarantees associated with the Fab 36 Loan Agreements contain restrictive covenants, including a prohibition on the ability of AMD Fab 36 KG and its affiliated limited partners to pay us dividends and other payments, and also require us to maintain specified financial ratios when group consolidated cash is below specified amounts.

 

    Our revolving credit facility contains restrictive covenants, including a prohibition on our ability to pay dividends, and also requires us to maintain specified financial ratios and satisfy other financial condition tests when our net domestic cash is below specified amounts.

 

    The July 2003 Spansion Term Loan, as amended, contains restrictive covenants, including a prohibition on Spansion’s ability to pay dividends and also requires Spansion to maintain specified financial ratios and satisfy other financial condition tests when its net domestic cash or its net worldwide cash is below specified amounts.

 

Our ability to satisfy the covenants, financial ratios and tests of our debt instruments can be affected by events beyond our control. We cannot assure you that we will meet those requirements. A breach of any of these covenants, financial ratios or tests could result in a default under the applicable agreement.

 

In addition, our agreements contain cross-default provisions whereby a default under one agreement would likely result in cross default under agreements covering other borrowings. For example, the occurrence of a default with respect to any indebtedness that results in acceleration of the maturity date or any failure to repay debt when due in an amount in excess of $50 million would cause a cross default under the indenture governing our 7.75% Notes. Similarly, a default with respect to any indebtedness in excess of $25 million would cause a cross-default under the indentures governing our 4.75% Debentures and 4.50% Notes. The occurrence of a default under any of these borrowing arrangements would permit the applicable lenders or note holders to declare all amounts outstanding under those borrowing arrangements to be immediately due and payable and would permit the lenders to terminate all commitments to extend further credit. If we were unable to repay those amounts, the lenders could proceed against any collateral granted to them to secure that indebtedness. We have granted a security interest in substantially all of our inventory and accounts receivable under our revolving credit facility, and in certain property, plant and equipment under the July 2003 Spansion Term Loan Agreement. If the lenders under any of the credit facilities or the note holders or the trustee under the indentures governing our 4.75% Debentures, 4.50% Notes and 7.75% Notes accelerate the repayment of borrowings, we cannot assure you that we will have sufficient assets to repay those borrowings and our other indebtedness.

 

If we lose Microsoft Corporation’s support for our products, or if there is a significant delay in Microsoft’s release of an operating system that works with our AMD64 technology, our ability to sell our microprocessors could be materially adversely affected.

 

Our ability to innovate beyond the x86 instruction set controlled by Intel depends partially on Microsoft designing and developing its operating systems to run on or support our microprocessor products. If Microsoft does not continue to design and develop its operating systems so that they work with our x86 instruction sets, including the timely introduction of an operating system that works with our AMD64 technology, independent software providers may forego designing their software applications to take advantage of our innovations and customers may not purchase PCs with our microprocessors. If we fail to retain the support of Microsoft, our ability to market our microprocessors could be materially adversely affected.

 

In July 2004, Microsoft announced a delay in the release of its Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1, Windows Server 2003 for 64-bit Extended Systems and Windows XP 64-bit for 64-bit Extended Systems. The new Windows editions are designed to take advantage of 64-bit extensions to the standard x86 instruction set. Microsoft estimated that the release of this software will occur in the first half of 2005. Previously, Microsoft

 

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estimated the release date for this software would be in late 2004. This delay could adversely impact the timing of development of 64-bit applications by independent software providers and the adoption of 64-bit computing by end users. As a result, this delay could have a material adverse effect on our ability to sell our AMD 64-based processors.

 

We must achieve further market acceptance of our 64-bit technology, AMD64, or we will be materially adversely affected.

 

We designed our AMD64-based processors to provide users with the ability to take advantage of 64-bit applications while preserving their ability to run existing 32-bit applications on servers and workstations and on desktop and mobile PCs. Market acceptance of these processors is subject to risks and uncertainties including:

 

    the support of operating system and application program providers for our 64-bit instruction set, including timely development of 64-bit applications;

 

    the willingness of users to purchase products with 64-bit capability prior to the availability of operating systems and software applications that take full advantage of our AMD64 technology;

 

    our ability to produce these processors in a timely manner on advanced process technologies, in the volume and with the performance and feature set required by customers; and

 

    the availability, performance and feature set of motherboards, memory and chipsets designed for these processors.

 

If we are unable to achieve further market acceptance of our AMD64 technology, we will be materially adversely affected.

 

We cannot be certain that our substantial investments in research and development of process technologies will lead to timely improvements in technology and equipment used to fabricate our products or that we will have sufficient resources to invest in the level of research and development that is required to remain competitive.

 

We make substantial investments in research and development for process technologies in an effort to design and manufacture leading-edge microprocessors. We cannot be certain that we will be able to develop, or obtain or successfully implement leading-edge process technologies needed to manufacture future generations of our products profitably or on a timely basis. Furthermore, we cannot assure you that we will have sufficient resources to maintain the level of investment in research and development that is required for us to remain competitive.

 

For example, we have a joint development agreement with IBM, pursuant to which we work together to develop new process technologies. In September 2004, we amended this agreement and extended its termination date from December 2005 to December 2008. Under this amended agreement, we anticipate that from December 26, 2004 through December 2008, we would pay fees to IBM of between approximately $220 million and $250 million in connection with joint development projects. In addition, from the beginning of 2002 through December 26, 2004, we paid approximately $247 million to IBM in connection with agreements and services related to license grants and research and development activities.

 

If this agreement were to be terminated, we would either have to resume research and development activities for microprocessors internally or find an alternative partner. In either case, our research and development costs could increase, and we could experience delays or other setbacks in the development of new process technologies, any of which could materially adversely affect us. Moreover, the successful and timely development and implementation of silicon-on-insulator technology and the achievement of other milestones set forth in the joint development agreement are critical to our AMD64-based processors and to our ability to commence operations at Fab 36 in accordance with our planned schedule.

 

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The semiconductor industry is highly cyclical and has experienced severe downturns that materially adversely affected, and may in the future materially adversely affect, our business.

 

The semiconductor industry is highly cyclical and has experienced significant downturns, often in connection with maturing product cycles, manufacturing overcapacity and declines in general economic conditions. Our historical financial results have also been subject to substantial fluctuations. Our financial performance has been, and may in the future be, negatively affected by these downturns. We incurred substantial losses in recent downturns, due to:

 

    the cyclical nature of supply/demand imbalances in the semiconductor industry;

 

    a decline in demand for end-user products that incorporate our semiconductors;

 

    excess inventory levels in the channels of distribution, including our customers;

 

    excess production capacity; and

 

    accelerated declines in average selling prices.

 

For example, in 2001 and 2002, we implemented restructuring plans due to weak customer demand associated with the downturn in the semiconductor industry. Similarly, in the fourth quarter of 2004, the downturn in the Flash memory market contributed to a decline in our Memory Product net sales. If these conditions in the semiconductor industry occur, we could be materially adversely affected.

 

Fluctuations in demand for PCs and mobile telephones and other consumer electronics may adversely affect sales of our products.

 

The Computation Products segment of our business is dependent upon the market for computers, including PCs. Industry-wide fluctuations in the computer marketplace have materially adversely affected us in the past and may materially adversely affect us in the future. Depending on the growth rate of computers sold, sales of our microprocessors may not grow and may even decrease. If end-user demand for computers is below our expectations, we could be materially adversely affected. In addition, potential market share increases by customers who exclusively purchase microprocessors from Intel Corporation, such as Dell, Inc., could further materially adversely affect us.

 

The Memory Products segment of our business is dependent to a large degree upon demand for mobile telephones as well as consumer electronics, automotive electronics and other embedded applications. If demand for these devices is below our expectations or if the manufacturers of successive generations of these devices do not require NOR-based Flash memory products or increasing Flash memory content, we could be materially adversely affected.

 

Intense competition in the microprocessor and Flash memory markets could materially adversely affect us.

 

The IC industry is intensely competitive. With respect to our microprocessor products, our competitor is Intel. Microprocessor products compete on performance, quality, reliability, price, adherence to industry standards, software and hardware compatibility, marketing and distribution capability, brand recognition and availability. After a product is introduced, costs and average selling prices normally decrease over time as production efficiency improves, and successive generations of products are developed and introduced for sale. We may not be able to compete effectively if we fail to reduce our costs on existing products or fail to develop and introduce, on a cost-effective and timely basis, new products or enhanced versions of existing products with higher margins.

 

Our principal competitors in the Flash memory market are Intel, Samsung, Toshiba, STMicroelectronics N.V., Sharp Electronics Corporation, Silicon Storage Technology and Macronix International. The Flash memory market is characterized by migration to higher density and lower cost devices and a competitive pricing

 

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environment. In addition, ample capacity for manufacturing Flash memory products exists due to recent capital investment by some of our competitors, which is likely to further contribute to a competitive pricing environment. In the past, including the second half of 2004, the net increases of supply, meaning the difference of capacity additions less capacity reductions due to obsolescence, exceeded demand requirements leading to oversupply situations and downturns in the industry. In the second half of 2004, fluctuations in the rate at which industry capacity grew relative to the growth rate in demand for Flash memory products, particularly NOR-based products, contributed to a decrease in our average selling prices and hurt our results of operations. If this continues in the future we would be materially adversely affected.

 

To compete successfully, we must transition to technologies that meet the increasing demand for higher Flash memory content in mobile phones, consumer electronics and automotive applications, among other markets, at competitive prices. We expect competition in the Flash memory market to increase as existing manufacturers introduce new products, new manufacturers enter the market, industry-wide production capacity increases, to the extent potential customers choose NAND-based products over NOR-based products and competitors aggressively price their Flash memory products. In addition, we and certain of our competitors have licensed non-volatile memory technology called NROM technology from a third party. NROM technology allows memory devices to store two bits of data in a memory cell. NROM technology has similar characteristics to our MirrorBit technology, which may allow these competitors to develop Flash memory technology that is competitive with MirrorBit technology.

 

Intel Corporation’s dominance of the microprocessor market, its position in the Flash memory market and its business practices may limit our ability to compete effectively.

 

Intel has dominated the market for microprocessors used in desktop and mobile PCs for many years. Intel is also a dominant competitor in the server segment of the microprocessor market and a significant competitor in the Flash memory market. Intel’s significant financial resources enable it to market its products aggressively, to target our customers and our channel partners with special incentives, and to discipline customers who do business with us. These aggressive activities can result in lower unit sales and average selling prices for our products, particularly microprocessors and Flash memory products, and adversely affect our margins and profitability. As long as Intel remains in this dominant position, we may be materially adversely affected by Intel’s:

 

    pricing and allocation strategies and actions, including aggressive pricing for Flash memory products and microprocessors to increase market share;

 

    product mix and introduction schedules;

 

    product bundling, marketing and merchandising strategies;

 

    exclusivity payments to its current and potential customers;

 

    control over industry standards, PC manufacturers and other PC industry participants, including motherboard, memory, chipset and basic input/output system, or BIOS, suppliers; and

 

    strong brand, and marketing and advertising expenditures in support of the brand.

 

For example, with respect to the microprocessor market, Intel exerts substantial influence over PC manufacturers and their channels of distribution through the “Intel Inside” brand program and other marketing programs. Because of its dominant position in the microprocessor market, Intel has been able to control x86 microprocessor and PC system standards and dictate the type of products the microprocessor market requires of Intel’s competitors. Intel also dominates the PC system platform, which includes core logic chipsets, graphics chips, motherboards and other components necessary to assemble a PC system. As a result, PC OEMs are highly dependent on Intel, less innovative on their own and, to a large extent, are distributors of Intel technology. Additionally, Intel is able to drive de facto standards for x86 microprocessors that could cause us and other companies to have delayed access to such standards. In marketing our microprocessors to OEMs, we depend on

 

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third-party companies other than Intel for the design and manufacture of core-logic chipsets, graphics chips, motherboards, BIOS software and other components. In recent years, many of these third-party designers and manufacturers have lost significant market share to Intel or exited the business. In addition, Intel has significant leverage over these companies because they support each new generation of Intel’s microprocessors.

 

We do not currently plan to develop microprocessors that are bus interface protocol compatible with Intel microprocessors because our patent-cross license agreement with Intel does not extend to Intel’s proprietary bus interface protocol. Thus, our microprocessors are not designed to function with motherboards and chipsets designed to work with Intel microprocessors. Our ability to compete with Intel in the market for microprocessors will depend on our continued success in developing and maintaining relationships with infrastructure providers in order to ensure that these third-party designers and manufacturers of motherboards, chipsets and other system components support our microprocessor offerings, particularly AMD64-based microprocessors. A failure of the designers and manufacturers of motherboards, chipsets and other system components to support our microprocessor offerings, particularly our AMD64-based microprocessors, could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

We expect Intel to maintain its dominant position in the microprocessor market, to continue to be a significant competitor in the Flash memory market and to continue to invest heavily in research and development, new manufacturing facilities and other technology companies. Intel has substantially greater financial resources than we do and accordingly spends substantially greater amounts on research and development and production capacity than we do. We also expect competition from Intel to increase to the extent Intel reduces prices on its microprocessor and/or Flash memory products and introduces new competitive products. For example, in 2004 Intel introduced a 64-bit processor for servers and workstations that runs existing 32-bit software applications. This processor competes with our AMD Opteron microprocessor. In addition, Intel recently announced that it will offer dual-core 64-bit processors for the desktop market in the second quarter of 2005. Moreover, Intel currently manufactures certain of its microprocessor products on 300-millimeter wafers using 90-nanometer process technology, which can result in products that are higher performing, use less power and cost less to manufacture. We are currently completing our transition to 90-nanometer process technology for microprocessor manufacturing, and we expect to transition to 300-millimeter wafers in 2006. To the extent Intel manufactures its microprocessor products on larger wafers and smaller process technologies earlier than we do, we may be more vulnerable to Intel’s aggressive pricing strategies for microprocessor products. Intel’s dominant position in the microprocessor market, its existing relationships with top-tier OEMs and its aggressive pricing strategies could result in lower unit sales and average selling prices for our products, which could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

The loss of a significant customer may have a material adverse effect on us.

 

Collectively, our top five OEM and distributor customers (including Fujitsu) accounted for approximately 50 percent of our total gross revenues in 2004. In addition, our Flash memory product sales growth is dependent to a large extent on demand for high-end mobile telephones and our sales in the wireless market have been concentrated in a limited group of customers. If we were to lose a significant customer, or if one of our top customers downsizes or otherwise contracts its operations, demand for our products could decrease and we would be materially adversely affected.

 

If we fail to keep pace with new product designs and improvements or if we pursue technologies that do not become commercially accepted, customers may not buy our products and we may be adversely affected.

 

Our success depends to a significant extent on the development, qualification, implementation and acceptance of new product designs and improvements that provide value to our customers. Our ability to develop and qualify such products and related technologies to meet evolving industry requirements and at prices acceptable to our customers are significant factors in determining our competitiveness in our target markets. If we are delayed in developing or qualifying new technologies, we could be materially adversely affected. For

 

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example, during the second half of 2004 we experienced a delay in qualifying a new Spansion Flash memory product for the wireless segment. This delay contributed to lower than anticipated Flash memory product revenues for the quarter ended December 26, 2004. Qualifying this product in accordance with our specifications and our revised schedule is critical to our ability to increase sales of our Memory Products segment.

 

In addition, we plan to introduce our dual-core microprocessors for servers and workstations in mid-2005, followed by dual-processors for the PC market in the second half of 2005. If we are not able to introduce dual-core processors on a timely basis or if our dual-core processors do not achieve market acceptance, we will be materially adversely affected.

 

A lack of market acceptance of MirrorBit technology could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

We believe that market acceptance of MirrorBit technology is a critical factor impacting our ability to increase Flash memory product revenues and market share and decrease the cost of products in our Memory Products segment. MirrorBit technology is a memory cell architecture that enables Flash memory products to store two bits of data in a single memory cell thereby doubling the density or storage capacity of each memory cell. A lack of continued market acceptance of MirrorBit technology, adoption of such technology at a slower rate than we anticipate, or any substantial difficulty in transitioning Flash memory products, including those based on MirrorBit technology, to any future process technology could reduce our ability to be competitive in the market.

 

Spansion Flash memory products are based on NOR architecture, and a significant market shift to NAND architecture could materially adversely affect us.

 

Flash memory products are generally based on either NOR architecture or NAND architecture. NAND has historically been the preferred architecture for data storage because of attributes such as high densities and fast write and erase speeds. NOR has been the preferred architecture for code storage because of its fast read performance and superior reliability. To date, our Flash memory products have been based on NOR architecture, and we do not manufacture products based on NAND architecture.

 

During 2003 and 2004, industry sales of products based on NAND architecture grew at higher rates than sales of NOR-based products. This resulted in NAND vendors gaining a greater share of the overall Flash memory market. As mobile telephones and other consumer-driven applications become more advanced they will require higher density Flash memory to meet increased data storage requirements. Because storage requirements will increase to accommodate data-intensive applications, customers may increasingly choose NAND-based products. Any significant shift in the marketplace to products based on NAND architecture or other architectures may reduce the total market available to us and therefore reduce our revenues and market share.

 

We intend to address end markets traditionally served by NAND-based products with products based on our ORNAND architecture. We are currently developing these products and if they, or any future products based on our MirrorBit technology and ORNAND architecture, fail to achieve acceptance in markets traditionally served by NAND architecture, or at all, we could be materially adversely affected.

 

We are required to reach agreement with Fujitsu regarding certain actions of our majority-owned subsidiary, Spansion, and our interests may not be aligned.

 

We own 60 percent of the equity interest in Spansion while Fujitsu owns the remaining 40 percent. Although we are entitled to appoint a majority of the board of managers, which generally manages the affairs of Spansion, certain actions by Spansion require Fujitsu’s consent for as long as Fujitsu maintains specific levels of equity ownership in Spansion. In addition, based upon designated thresholds of Fujitsu’s percentage interest in Spansion, certain actions require the affirmative vote of at least a majority of the managers appointed by Fujitsu. These actions, which primarily represent protective rights for Fujitsu as a minority member, include:

 

    major investments, acquisitions and dispositions of assets;

 

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    a merger or consolidation resulting in the transfer of more than 50% of the equity interests;

 

    settlement of major legal proceedings and other actions;

 

    approval of certain material contracts between us and Spansion;

 

    changes to the equity capital structure of the Spansion; and

 

    winding-up Spansion or one of its material subsidiaries.

 

There can be no guarantee that our interests and those of Fujitsu will be aligned with respect to such decisions and we may be unable to take steps that we believe are desirable. In addition, a reduction in our percentage interest may result in our inability to appoint a majority of Spansion’s board of managers, which could result in the loss of effective control of Spansion, although the results of operations of Spansion may continue to impact significantly our results of operations and we still may be required to make loans to, and guarantee indebtedness of, Spansion.

 

Our operating results are subject to quarterly and seasonal sales patterns.

 

A substantial portion of our quarterly sales have historically been made in the last month of the quarter. This uneven sales pattern makes prediction of net sales for each financial period difficult and increases the risk of unanticipated variations in quarterly results and financial condition. In addition, our operating results tend to vary seasonally. For example, demand in the retail sector of the PC market is often stronger during the fourth quarter as a result of the winter holiday season. European sales are often weaker during the summer months. Many of the factors that create and affect seasonal trends are beyond our control.

 

Manufacturing capacity constraints and manufacturing capacity utilization rates may adversely affect us.

 

There may be situations in which our manufacturing facilities are inadequate to meet the demand for certain of our products. Our inability to obtain sufficient manufacturing capacity to meet demand, either in our own facilities or through foundry or similar arrangements with third parties, could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

At times we may underutilize our manufacturing facilities as a result of reduced demand for certain of our products. During such times, many of our costs remain fixed and cannot be reduced in proportion to the reduced revenues for such a period. We are substantially increasing our manufacturing capacity by facilitizing Fab 36, transitioning to smaller manufacturing process technologies and making significant capital investments in our existing manufacturing facilities. If the increase in demand for our products is not consistent with our expectations, we may underutilize manufacturing facilities. This has in the past had, and in the future may have, a material adverse effect on us.

 

Unless we maintain manufacturing efficiency, our future profitability could be materially adversely affected.

 

Manufacturing our products involves highly complex processes that require advanced equipment. Our manufacturing efficiency is an important factor in our profitability, and we cannot be sure that we will be able to maintain or increase our manufacturing efficiency to the same extent as our competitors. We continuously modify manufacturing processes in an effort to improve yields and product performance and decrease costs. We may fail to achieve acceptable yields or experience product delivery delays as a result of, among other things, capacity constraints, construction delays, delays in the development of new process technologies, changes in our process technologies, upgrades or expansion of existing facilities, or impurities or other difficulties in the manufacturing process.

 

We are currently completing the transition to 90-nanometer process technology for our microprocessor products. In addition, we plan to transition the manufacture of certain Flash memory products to 90-nanometer

 

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process technology in the second half of 2005. During periods when we are implementing new process technologies, manufacturing facilities may not be fully productive. A substantial delay in the technology transitions to smaller process technologies could have a material adverse effect on us, particularly if our competitors transition to more cost effective technologies earlier than we do. Our results of operations could also be adversely affected by the increase in fixed costs and operating expenses related to increases in production capacity if revenues do not increase proportionately.

 

If our microprocessors are not compatible with some or all industry-standard software and hardware, we could be materially adversely affected.

 

Our microprocessors may not be fully compatible with some or all industry-standard software and hardware. Further, we may be unsuccessful in correcting any such compatibility problems in a timely manner. If our customers are unable to achieve compatibility with software or hardware after our products are shipped in volume, we could be materially adversely affected. In addition, the mere announcement of an incompatibility problem relating to our products could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

Costs related to defective products could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

One or more of our products may be found to be defective after the product has been shipped to customers in volume. The cost of a recall, software fix, product replacements and/or product returns may be substantial and could have a material adverse effect on us. In addition, modifications needed to fix the defect may impede performance of the product.

 

If essential equipment or materials are not available to manufacture our products, we could be materially adversely affected.

 

Our manufacturing operations depend upon obtaining deliveries of equipment and adequate supplies of materials on a timely basis. We purchase equipment and materials from a number of suppliers. From time to time, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supply to us or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. Because some equipment and material that we purchase is complex, it is sometimes difficult for us to substitute one supplier for another or one piece of equipment for another. In addition, certain raw materials we use in the manufacture of our products are available from a limited number of suppliers.

 

For example, we are largely dependent on one supplier for our 200-millimeter and 300-millimeter silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers. Although there are alternative sources available, we have not qualified these sources and we do not believe that they currently have sufficient capacity to meet our requirements for SOI wafers. We are also dependent on key chemicals from a limited number of suppliers and rely on a limited number of foreign companies to supply the majority of certain types of IC packages we purchase. Similarly, we purchase commercial non-Flash memory die, such as SRAM and pSRAM, from third-party suppliers and incorporate these die into Spansion MCP products. Some of these suppliers are also our competitors in the Flash memory market. Interruption of supply or increased demand in the industry could cause shortages and price increases in various essential materials. If we are unable to procure certain of these materials, we may have to reduce our manufacturing operations. Such a reduction could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

Our inability to continue to attract and retain qualified personnel may hinder our product development programs.

 

Our future success depends upon the continued service of numerous qualified engineering, manufacturing, marketing, sales and executive personnel. If we are not able to continue to attract, retain and motivate qualified personnel necessary for our business, the progress of our product development programs could be hindered, and we could be materially adversely affected.

 

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We outsource to third parties certain supply-chain logistics functions, including physical distribution of our products, and co-source some information technology services.

 

We rely on a third-party provider to deliver our products to our customers and to distribute materials for our manufacturing facilities. In addition, we rely on a third-party provider in India to provide certain information technology services to us, including helpdesk support, desktop application services, business and software support applications, server and storage administration, data center operations, database administration, and voice, video and remote access. Our relationships with these providers are governed by fixed term contracts. We cannot guarantee that these providers will fulfill their respective responsibilities in a timely manner in accordance with the contract terms, in which case our internal operations, the distribution of our products to our customers and the distribution of materials for our facilities could be materially adversely affected. Also, we cannot guarantee that our contracts with these third-party providers will be renewed, in which case we would have to transition these functions in-house or secure new providers, which could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

In addition, we decided to outsource or co-source these functions to third parties primarily to lower our operating expenses and to create a more variable cost structure. However, if the costs related to administration, communication and coordination of these third-party providers are greater than we expect, then we will not realize our anticipated cost savings.

 

Uncertainties involving the ordering and shipment of, and payment for, our products could materially adversely affect us.

 

Sales of our products are typically made pursuant to individual purchase orders. We generally do not have long-term supply arrangements with our microprocessor customers. From time to time, we enter into long-term supply arrangements with our Flash memory customers. Generally, our customers may cancel orders 30 days prior to shipment without incurring a significant penalty. We base our inventory levels on customers’ estimates of demand for their products, which are difficult to predict. This difficulty may be compounded when we sell to OEMs indirectly through distributors, as our forecasts for demand are then based on estimates provided by multiple parties. In addition, our customers may change their inventory practices on short notice for any reason. The cancellation or deferral of product orders, the return of previously sold products or overproduction due to failure of anticipated orders to materialize could result in excess or obsolete inventory, which could result in write-downs of inventory. Because market conditions are uncertain, these and other factors could materially adversely affect us.

 

Our reliance on third-party distributors subjects us to certain risks.

 

We market and sell our products directly and through third-party distributors pursuant to agreements that can generally be terminated for convenience by either party upon prior notice to the other party. In addition, these agreements are non-exclusive and permit our distributors to offer our competitors’ products. In 2004, one of our distributors, Avnet, accounted for approximately 13 percent of our consolidated gross sales. In addition, Fujitsu accounted for approximately 22 percent of our consolidated gross sales in 2004. Fujitsu primarily distributes Spansion Flash memory products. Accordingly, we are dependent on our distributors to supplement our direct marketing and sales efforts. If any significant distributor or a substantial number of our distributors terminated their relationship with us or decided to market our competitors’ products over our products, our ability to bring our products to market would be impacted and we could be materially adversely affected. Additionally, distributors typically maintain an inventory of our products. In most instances, our agreements with distributors protect their inventory of our products against price reductions, as well as provide return rights for any product that we have removed from our price book or that is not more than twelve months older than the manufacturing code date. In addition, some agreements with our distributors contain standard stock rotation provisions permitting limited levels of product returns. We defer the gross margins on our sales to distributors, resulting from both our deferral of revenue and related product costs, until the applicable products are re-sold by the distributors. However, in the event of an unexpected significant decline in the price of our products, the price

 

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protection rights we offer to our distributors could materially adversely affect us because our revenue would decline.

 

Our operations in foreign countries are subject to political and economic risks, which could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

We have international sales operations and as part of our business strategy, we are continuing to seek expansion of product sales in high growth markets. Our international sales as a percentage of our total consolidated net sales were approximately 80 percent and 79 percent in 2003 and 2004. Nearly all product assembly and final testing of our products are performed at manufacturing facilities in China, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand. We manufacture our microprocessors in Germany and certain Spansion Flash memory products are manufactured in Japan. We also depend on foreign foundry suppliers for the production of certain of our embedded microprocessors for personal connectivity devices and we depend on an international joint venture for the manufacture of optical photomasks that we intend to use in the manufacture of our microprocessors. The political and economic risks associated with our operations in foreign countries include, without limitation:

 

    expropriation;

 

    changes in a specific country’s or region’s political or economic conditions;

 

    trade protection measures and import or export licensing requirements;

 

    difficulty in protecting our intellectual property;

 

    changes in foreign currency exchange rates;

 

    restrictions on transfers of funds and other assets of our subsidiaries between jurisdictions;

 

    changes in freight and interest rates;

 

    disruption in air transportation between the United States and our overseas facilities; and

 

    loss or modification of exemptions for taxes and tariffs.

 

Any of the above events could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

Worldwide economic and political conditions may adversely affect demand for our products.

 

The last economic slowdown in the United States and worldwide adversely affected demand for our products. Although economic conditions have improved since the second half of 2003, another decline in the worldwide semiconductor market or a future decline in economic conditions or consumer confidence in any significant geographic area would likely decrease the overall demand for our products, which could have a material adverse effect on us. For example, China’s economy has been growing at a fast pace over the past several years, and Chinese authorities have recently introduced various measures to slow down the pace of economic growth. For example, during the third quarter of 2004, decreased demand from the wireless handset market in Asia, in part due to channel inventory accumulation by wireless handset OEMs in China, contributed to a decline in Memory Products net sales. If Chinese authorities are not able to stage an orderly slowdown, China’s economy could be affected. If economic conditions decline, whether in China or worldwide, we could be materially adversely affected.

 

In addition, the occurrence and threat of terrorist attacks and the consequences of sustained military action in the Middle East have in the past, and may in the future, adversely affect demand for our products. Terrorist attacks may negatively affect our operations directly or indirectly and such attacks or related armed conflicts may directly impact our physical facilities or those of our suppliers or customers. Furthermore, these attacks may make travel and the transportation of our products more difficult and more expensive, ultimately affecting our sales.

 

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Also as a result of terrorism, the United States has been and may continue to be involved in armed conflicts that could have a further impact on our sales, our supply chain and our ability to deliver products to our customers. Political and economic instability in some regions of the world may also result and could negatively impact our business. The consequences of armed conflicts are unpredictable, and we may not be able to foresee events that could have a material adverse effect on us. More generally, any of these events could cause consumer confidence and spending to decrease or result in increased volatility to the United States economy and worldwide financial markets. Any of these occurrences could have a material adverse effect on us and also may result in volatility of the market price for our securities.

 

Unfavorable currency exchange rate fluctuations could adversely affect us.

 

As a result of our foreign operations, we have sales, costs, assets and liabilities that are denominated in foreign currencies, primarily the European Union euro and the Japanese yen. For example:

 

    a significant portion of our manufacturing costs for our microprocessor products is denominated in euro while sales of those products are denominated primarily in U.S. dollars;

 

    certain manufacturing costs for our Spansion Flash memory products are denominated in yen;

 

    some fixed asset purchases are denominated in euro and yen;

 

    sales of our Flash memory products in Japan are denominated in yen; and

 

    certain costs of our Fab 36 project are denominated in euro.

 

As a consequence, movements in exchange rates could cause our U.S. dollar-denominated expenses to increase as a percentage of net sales, affecting our profitability and cash flows. Whenever we believe appropriate, we hedge a portion of our foreign currency exchange exposure to protect against fluctuations in currency exchange rates. As of December 26, 2004 we had an aggregate of $483 million (notional amount) of short-term foreign currency forward contracts and purchased call option contracts denominated in euro and yen. However, generally, we hedge only a portion of our foreign currency exchange exposure. Moreover, we determine our total foreign currency exchange exposure using projections of long-term expenditures for items such as equipment and materials used in manufacturing. We cannot assure you that our hedging activities will eliminate foreign exchange rate exposure. Failure to do so could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flow.

 

In addition, even where revenues and expenses are matched, we must translate euro and yen denominated results of operations, assets and liabilities for our foreign subsidiaries to U.S. dollars in our consolidated financial statements. Consequently, increases and decreases in the value of the U.S. dollar versus the euro or yen will affect our reported results of operations and the value of our assets and liabilities in our consolidated balance sheet, even if our results of operations or the value of those assets and liabilities has not changed in their original currency. These transactions could significantly affect the comparability of our results between financial periods and/or result in significant changes to the carrying value of our assets, liabilities and shareholders’ equity.

 

Our inability to effectively control the sales of our products on the gray market could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

We market and sell our products directly to OEMs and through authorized third-party distributors. From time to time, our products are diverted from our authorized distribution channels and are sold on the “gray market.” Gray market products entering the market result in shadow inventory that is not visible to us, thus making it difficult to forecast demand accurately. Also, when gray market products enter the market, we and our distribution channel compete with heavily discounted products, which adversely affects demand for our products. In addition, our inability to control gray marketing activities could result in customer satisfaction issues, because any time products are purchased outside our authorized distribution channel, there is a risk that our customers are

 

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buying counterfeit or substandard products, including products that may have been altered, mishandled or damaged, or used products represented as new. Our inability to control sales of our products on the gray market could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

If we cannot adequately protect our technology or other intellectual property in the United States and abroad, through patents, copyrights, trade secrets, trademarks and other measures, we may lose a competitive advantage and incur significant expenses.

 

We rely on a combination of protections provided by contracts, copyrights, patents, trademarks and other common law rights, such as trade secrets, to protect our intellectual property. However, we cannot assure you that we will be able to adequately protect our technology or other intellectual property from third party infringement or from misappropriation in the United States and abroad. Any patent licensed by us or issued to us could be challenged, invalidated or circumvented or rights granted thereunder may not provide a competitive advantage to us. Furthermore, patent applications that we file may not result in issuance of a patent or, if a patent is issued, the patent may not be issued in a form that is advantageous to us. Despite our efforts to protect our rights, others may independently develop similar products, duplicate our products or design around our patents and other rights. In addition, it is difficult to monitor compliance with, and enforce, our intellectual property on a worldwide basis in a cost-effective manner.

 

We may become a party to intellectual property claims or litigation that could cause us to incur substantial costs or pay substantial damages or prohibit us from selling our products.

 

From time to time, we have been notified that we may be infringing intellectual property rights of others. If any such claims are asserted against us, we may seek to obtain a license under the third party’s intellectual property rights. We cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain all necessary licenses on satisfactory terms, if at all. In the event we cannot obtain a license, we may be prevented from using some technology, which could result in our having to stop the sale of some of our products, increase the costs of selling some of our products, or damage our reputation. We could decide, in the alternative, to resort to litigation to challenge such claims. Such challenges could be extremely expensive and time-consuming and could have a material adverse effect on us. We cannot assure you that litigation related to the intellectual property rights of us and others will always be avoided or successfully concluded.

 

Our failure to comply with any applicable environmental regulations could result in a range of consequences, including fines, suspension of production, alteration of manufacturing processes, sales limitations, and criminal and civil liabilities.

 

Failure to comply with any applicable environmental regulations could result in a range of consequences including fines, suspension of production, alteration of manufacturing process, sales limitations, and criminal and civil liabilities.

 

Existing or future regulations could require us to procure expensive pollution abatement or remediation equipment; to modify product designs; or to incur other expenses associated with compliance with environmental regulations. Any failure to control the use of, disposal or storage of, or adequately restrict the discharge of, hazardous substances could subject us to future liabilities and could have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

Future litigation proceedings may materially adversely affect us.

 

From time to time we are a defendant or plaintiff in various legal actions. Litigation can involve complex factual and legal questions and its outcome is uncertain. Any claim that is successfully asserted against us may cause us to pay substantial damages. In addition, future litigation may result in injunctions against future product sales. Even if we were to prevail, any litigation could be costly and time-consuming and would divert the

 

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attention of our management and key personnel from our business operations, which could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

Our worldwide operations could be subject to natural disasters and other business disruptions, which could harm our future revenue and financial condition and increase our costs and expenses.

 

Our worldwide operations could be subject to natural disasters and other business disruptions, which could harm our future revenue and financial condition and increase our costs and expenses. For example, our corporate headquarters are located near major earthquake fault lines in California and manufacturing facilities for Spansion Flash memory products are located near major earthquake fault lines in Japan. In the event of a major earthquake, or other natural or manmade disaster, we could experience business interruptions, destruction of facilities and/or loss of life, all of which could materially adversely affect us.

 

ITEM 7A.    QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURE ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

Interest Rate Risk.    Our exposure to market risk for changes in interest rates relates primarily to our investment portfolio. In order to reduce this interest rate risk, we usually invest our cash in investments with short maturities. As of December 26, 2004, substantially all of our investments in our portfolio were short-term investments and consisted primarily of bank notes, short-term corporate notes, short-term money market auction rate preferred stocks and short-term federal agency notes.

 

The majority of our debt obligations are fixed rate and long term. We continually monitor market conditions and enter into hedges when appropriate. We do not currently have any hedges of interest rate risk in place. We do not use derivative financial instruments for speculative or trading purposes.

 

Default Risk.    We mitigate default risk by investing in only the highest credit quality securities and by constantly positioning our portfolio to respond appropriately to a significant reduction in a credit rating of any investment issuer or guarantor. The portfolio includes only marketable securities with active secondary or resale markets to ensure portfolio liquidity. We are averse to principal loss and ensure the safety and preservation of our invested funds by limiting default risk and market risk.

 

We use proceeds from debt obligations primarily to support general corporate purposes, including capital expenditures and working capital needs. However, we used the net proceeds from the sale of our 7.75% Notes along with existing cash, to prepay the full amount owed by AMD Saxony under the Dresden Term Loan, including accrued and unpaid interest through the prepayment date and a prepayment premium.

 

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The following table presents the cost basis, fair value and related weighted-average interest rates by year of maturity for our investment portfolio and debt obligations as of December 26, 2004 and comparable fair values as of December 28, 2003:

 

    2005   2006   2007   2008   2009   Thereafter   Total  

2004

Fair value

 

2003

Fair value

    (Dollars in Thousands)

Investment Portfolio

                                                     

Cash equivalents:

                                                     

Fixed rate amounts

  $ 511,566   $ —     $ —     $ —     $ —     $ —     $ 511,566   $ 511,566   $ 256,515

Weighted-average rate

    2.19%     —       —       —       —       —       2.19%     2.19%      

Variable rate amounts

  $ 281,000     —       —       —       —       —     $ 281,000   $ 281,000   $ 576,204

Weighted-average rate

    2.21%     —       —       —       —       —       2.21%     2.21%      

Short-term investments:

                                                     

Fixed rate amounts

  $ 2,879   $     $     $     $     $     $ 2,879   $ 2,557   $ 26,703

Weighted-average rate

    2.50%     —       —       —       —       —       2.50%     2.50%      

Variable rate amounts

  $ 274,625     —     $ —     $ —     $ —     $ —     $ 274,625   $ 274,625   $ 100,860

Weighted-average rate

    2.35%     —       —       —       —       —       2.35%     2.35%      

Long-term investments:

                                                     

Equity investments

  $ —     $ —     $ —     $ —     $ —     $ 3,492   $ 3,492   $ 6,653   $ 16,845

Fixed rate amounts

  $ 13,676   $ —     $ —     $ —     $ —     $ —     $ 13,676   $ 13,676   $ 12,163

Weighted-average rate

    2.26%     —       —       —       —       —       2.26%     2.26%      

Total Investment Portfolio

  $ 1,083,746   $ —     $ —     $ —     $ —     $ 3,492   $ 1,087,238   $ 1,090,077   $ 989,290

Debt Obligations

                                                     

Debt—fixed rate amounts

  $ 17,760   $ 27,940   $ 229,440   $ 27,940   $ 26,676   $ 1,100,000   $ 1,429,756   $ 1,927,626   $ 902,500

Weighted-average rate

    6.15%     6.19%     6.19%     6.49%     6.49%     6.39%     6.51%     6.51%     4.64%

Debt—variable rate amounts

  $ 116,322   $ 93,423   $ 34,742   $ —     $ —     $ —     $ 244,487   $ 244,487   $ 944,482

Weighted-average rate