Annual Reports

 
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  • 10-Q (Nov 6, 2009)
  • 10-Q (Aug 13, 2009)
  • 10-Q (May 14, 2009)
  • 10-Q (Nov 6, 2008)
  • 10-Q (Aug 7, 2008)
  • 10-Q (May 8, 2008)

 
8-K

 
Other

Aspect Medical Systems 10-Q 2008

Documents found in this filing:

  1. 10-Q
  2. Ex-31.1
  3. Ex-31.2
  4. Ex-32.1
  5. Ex-32.2
  6. Ex-32.2
e10vq
Table of Contents

 
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 10-Q
(Mark One)
     
þ   QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended September 27, 2008
     
o   TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from                      to                     
Commission file number: 0-24663
 
ASPECT MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC.
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)
     
Delaware   04-2985553
(State or Other Jurisdiction of   (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
Incorporation or Organization)    
     
One Upland Road, Norwood, Massachusetts   02062
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)   (Zip Code)
(617) 559-7000
(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. YES þ NO o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
             
Large accelerated filer o   Accelerated filer þ  Non-accelerated filer o  Smaller reporting company o
        (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)    
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). YES o NO þ
The Registrant had 17,328,884 shares of Common Stock, $0.01 par value per share, outstanding as of November 1, 2008.
 
 

 


 

ASPECT MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
             
       
Page
PART I       1  
   
 
       
Item 1.       1  
   
 
       
        1  
   
 
       
        2  
   
 
       
        3  
   
 
       
        4  
   
 
       
Item 2.       19  
   
 
       
Item 3.       32  
   
 
       
Item 4.       32  
   
 
       
PART II       33  
   
 
       
Item 1.          
   
 
       
Item 1A.       33  
   
 
       
Item 6.       51  
   
 
       
SIGNATURES        
   
 
       
EXHIBIT INDEX        
 EX-31.1 SECTION 302 CERTIFICATION OF CEO
 EX-31.2 SECTION 302 CERTIFICATION OF CFO
 EX-32.1 SECTION 906 CERTIFICATION OF CEO
 EX-32.2 SECTION 906 CERTIFICATION OF CFO

 


Table of Contents

PART I — FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Item 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS.
ASPECT MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(in thousands, except share data and per share amounts)
(unaudited)
                 
    September 27,     December 31,  
    2008     2007  
ASSETS
               
Current assets:
               
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 36,065     $ 19,828  
Short-term investments
    49,220       82,134  
Accounts receivable, net of allowance of $210 at September 27, 2008 and $322 at December 31, 2007
    13,252       12,544  
Current portion of investment in sales-type leases
    1,169       1,473  
Inventory
    7,529       7,113  
Deferred tax assets
    4,729       4,729  
Other current assets
    3,231       2,677  
 
           
Total current assets
    115,195       130,498  
Property and equipment, net
    8,121       8,455  
Long-term restricted cash
    849       1,004  
Long-term investments
    13,405       6,518  
Long-term investment in sales-type leases
    1,703       2,618  
Deferred financing fees
    2,979       4,213  
Long-term deferred tax assets
    17,049       20,171  
 
           
Total assets
  $ 159,301     $ 173,477  
 
           
 
               
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
               
Current liabilities:
               
Accounts payable
  $ 1,820     $ 1,836  
Accrued liabilities
    12,137       9,723  
Current portion of obligation under capital lease
    68       28  
Deferred revenue
    115       87  
 
           
Total current liabilities
    14,140       11,674  
Long-term portion of obligation under capital lease
    104       89  
Long-term portion of deferred revenue
    89       39  
Long-term debt
    100,000       125,000  
Commitments and contingencies
               
Stockholders’ equity:
               
Preferred stock, $.01 par value; 5,000,000 shares authorized, no shares issued or outstanding
           
Common stock, $.01 par value; 60,000,000 shares authorized, 17,326,968 and 17,118,037 shares issued and outstanding at September 27, 2008 and December 31, 2007, respectively
    175       174  
Treasury stock, at cost; 276,493 shares
    (5,008 )     (5,008 )
Additional paid-in capital
    185,459       178,837  
Accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income
    (854 )     180  
Accumulated deficit
    (134,804 )     (137,508 )
 
           
Total stockholders’ equity
    44,968       36,675  
 
           
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
  $ 159,301     $ 173,477  
 
           
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

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ASPECT MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(in thousands, except per share amounts)
(unaudited)
                                 
    Three Months Ended     Nine Months Ended  
    September 27,     September 29,     September 27,     September 29,  
    2008     2007     2008     2007  
Product revenue
  $ 24,758     $ 22,632     $ 74,371     $ 68,146  
Strategic alliance revenue
                      5,246  
 
                       
Total revenue
    24,758       22,632       74,371       73,392  
 
                       
 
                               
Costs of revenue (1)
    6,104       5,533       18,943       17,379  
 
                       
Gross profit
    18,654       17,099       55,428       56,013  
 
                       
 
                               
Operating expenses: (1)
                               
Research and development
    4,183       3,820       12,056       12,234  
Sales and marketing
    12,687       9,669       34,561       29,913  
General and administrative
    3,920       3,656       12,034       11,336  
 
                       
Total operating expenses
    20,790       17,145       58,651       53,483  
 
                       
 
                               
(Loss) income from operations
    (2,136 )     (46 )     (3,223 )     2,530  
 
                               
Other income (expense):
                               
Interest income
    867       1,517       3,248       3,519  
Interest expense
    (849 )     (944 )     (2,725 )     (1,059 )
Other-than-temporary impairment of investments
    (840 )           (840 )      
Gain on repurchase of debt
    5,881             9,821        
 
                       
Income before income taxes
    2,923       527       6,281       4,990  
 
                       
 
                               
Provision for income taxes
    1,883       683       3,577       3,142 3,142  
 
                       
Net income (loss)
  $ 1,040     $ (156 )   $ 2,704     $ 1,848  
 
                       
 
                               
Net income (loss) per share:
                               
Basic
  $ 0.06     $ (0.01 )   $ 0.16     $ 0.09  
Diluted
  $ 0.06     $ (0.01 )   $ 0.16     $ 0.09  
 
                               
Weighted average shares used in computing net income (loss) per share:
                               
Basic
    17,317       17,230       17,228       20,485  
Diluted
    23,254       17,230       17,373       21,137  
 
                               
(1) Stock-based compensation included in costs and operating expenses:
                               
Costs of revenue
  $ 127     $ 145     $ 370     $ 430  
Research and development
    489       502       1,445       1,516  
Sales and marketing
    627       805       1,972       2,402  
General and administrative
    647       727       1,975       2,184  
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

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ASPECT MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC.
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(in thousands)
(unaudited)
                 
    Nine Months Ended  
    September 27,     September 29,  
    2008     2007  
Cash flows from operating activities:
               
Net income
    $       2,704       $       1,848  
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities –
               
Depreciation and amortization
    2,251       1,856  
Gain on repurchase of debt
    (9,821 )      
Loss on other-than-temporary impairment of investments
    840        
Provision for doubtful accounts
    (102 )     91  
Stock-based compensation expense
    5,688       6,461  
Tax benefit for stock option exercises
    90        
Deferred taxes
    3,122       3,152  
Changes in assets and liabilities –
               
(Increase) decrease in accounts receivable
    (606 )     1,238  
Increase in inventory
    (416 )     (1,042 )
Increase in other current assets
    (554 )     (476 )
Decrease (increase) in investment in sales-type leases
    1,219       (54 )
Increase in other long-term assets
          (371 )
Decrease in accounts payable
    (16 )     (318 )
Increase in accrued liabilities
    2,414       2,105  
Increase (decrease) in deferred revenue
    78       (5,215 )
 
             
Net cash provided by operating activities
    6,891       9,275  
 
             
 
               
Cash flows from investing activities:
               
Decrease in restricted cash
    155       40  
Acquisitions of property and equipment
    (1,336 )     (2,400 )
Purchases of investments
    (66,072 )     (115,102 )
Proceeds from sales and maturities of investments
    90,275       80,131  
 
             
Net cash provided by (used for) investing activities
    23,022       (37,331 )
 
             
 
               
Cash flows from financing activities:
               
Repurchases of common stock
          (85,041 )
Payment on deferred financing fees
          (4,556 )
Proceeds from issuance of common stock
    846       1,042  
Proceeds from long-term debt
          125,000  
Repayment of long-term debt
    (14,413 )      
Repayment of capital lease
    (59 )      
 
             
Net cash (used for) provided by financing activities
    (13,626 )     36,445  
 
             
 
               
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash
    (50 )      
 
             
 
               
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents
    16,237       8,389  
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period
    19,828       9,724  
 
             
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period
    $     36,065       $     18,113  
 
             
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these condensed consolidated financial statements.

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ASPECT MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(tabular amounts in thousands, except percentages and per share amounts)
(unaudited)
(1) Basis of Presentation
     The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements of Aspect Medical Systems, Inc. (the “Company”) have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States for interim financial information and with the instructions to Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and Regulation S-X promulgated pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States for complete financial statements. In the opinion of management, all normal, recurring adjustments considered necessary for a fair presentation have been included. The unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and notes included herein should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes thereto for the year ended December 31, 2007 included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). Interim results of operations are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full year or any other interim period.
     The Company follows a system of fiscal quarters as opposed to calendar quarters. Therefore, the first three quarters of each fiscal year end on the Saturday closest to the end of the calendar quarter and the last quarter of the fiscal year always ends on December 31.
(2) Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
     A summary of the significant accounting policies used by the Company in the preparation of its financial statements follows:
Principles of Consolidation
     The condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries. All intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated.
Foreign Currency
     During the quarter ended September 27, 2008, the Company determined that the functional currency of its international subsidiaries had changed from the U.S. dollar to the local currency of the international subsidiaries. Translation adjustments have been included as part of accumulated other comprehensive income and are not material.
Cash, Cash Equivalents and Investments
     The Company invests its excess cash in money market accounts, certificates of deposit, high-grade commercial paper, high grade corporate bonds and debt obligations of various government agencies. The Company considers all highly liquid debt instruments purchased with an original maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents.
     The Company accounts for its investments in marketable securities in accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (“SFAS”) No. 115, Accounting for Certain Investments in Debt and Equity Securities. In accordance with SFAS No. 115, the Company has classified all of its investments in marketable securities as available-for-sale at September 27, 2008 and December 31, 2007. The investments are reported at fair value, with any unrealized gains or losses excluded from earnings and reported as a separate component of stockholders’ equity as accumulated other comprehensive income in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets. Investments that have contractual maturity dates of more than twelve months from the balance sheet date are included in long-term investments in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets.
     At September 27, 2008, the Company evaluated its investments with unrealized losses for other-than-temporary impairment. When assessing investments for other-than-temporary declines in value, the Company considers such factors as, among other things, how significant the decline in value is as a percentage of the original cost, how long the market value of the investment has been less than its original cost, the Company’s ability and intent to retain the investment for a period of time sufficient to allow for any anticipated recovery in fair value and market conditions in general. Based upon

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ASPECT MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(tabular amounts in thousands, except percentages and per share amounts)
(unaudited)
this evaluation, the Company determined that one of its investments was deemed to be other-than-temporarily impaired, resulting in a write down to fair value of this investment. As a result, for the three months ended September 27, 2008, the Company recorded an impairment loss on investments of approximately $840,000.
     Additionally, subsequent to September 27, 2008, the Company decided to dispose of the investment that was impaired as of September 27, 2008 and four additional commercial paper securities that had significant unrealized losses but which were not determined to be other-than-temporarily impaired at September 27, 2008. The Company will record a loss related to the disposition of these securities of approximately $488,000 in the fourth quarter of 2008, which is the period in which the decision to dispose of these securities was made.
Revenue Recognition
     The Company primarily sells its BIS monitors through a combination of a direct sales force and distributors. The Company sells its BIS Module Kits to original equipment manufacturers who in turn sell them to the end user. BIS Sensors are sold through a combination of a direct sales force, distributors and original equipment manufacturers. Direct product sales are structured as sales, sales-type lease arrangements or sales under the Company’s Equipment Placement (“EP”) program. Sales, sales-type lease agreements and sales under the EP program are subject to the Company’s standard terms and conditions of sale and do not include any customer acceptance criteria, installation or other post shipment obligations (other than warranty) or any rights of return. The Company’s BIS monitor is a standard product and does not require installation as it can be operated with the instructions included in the operator’s manual.
     The Company recognizes revenue when earned in accordance with Staff Accounting Bulletin (“SAB”) No. 104, Revenue Recognition, and Emerging Issues Task Force (“EITF”) 00-21, Revenue Arrangements with Multiple Deliverables. Revenue is recognized when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, product delivery has occurred or services have been rendered, the price is fixed or determinable and collectibility is reasonably assured. For product sales, revenue is not recognized until title and risk of loss have transferred to the customer. The Company’s revenue arrangements with multiple elements are divided into separate units of accounting if specified criteria are met, including whether the delivered element has stand-alone value to the customer and whether there is objective and reliable evidence of the fair value of the undelivered items. The consideration received is allocated among the separate units based on their respective fair values, and the applicable revenue recognition criteria are applied to each of the separate units.
     The Company follows SFAS No. 13, Accounting For Leases, for its sales-type lease agreements. Under the Company’s sales-type leases, customers purchase BIS Sensors and the BIS monitor for the purchase price of the BIS Sensors plus an additional charge per BIS Sensor to pay for the purchase price of the BIS monitor and related financing costs over the term of the agreement. In accordance with SFAS No. 13, the minimum lease payment, consisting of the additional charge per BIS Sensor, less the unearned interest income, which is computed at the interest rate implicit in the lease agreement, is recorded as the net investment in sales-type leases. The Company recognizes equipment revenue under sales-type lease agreements either at shipment or delivery in accordance with the agreed upon contract terms with interest income recognized over the life of the sales-type lease. The cost of the BIS monitor acquired by the customer is recorded as costs of revenue in the same period.
     In addition, the Company reviews and assesses the net realizability of its investment in sales-type leases at each reporting period. This review includes determining, on a customer specific basis, if a customer is significantly underperforming relative to the customer’s cumulative level of committed BIS Sensor purchases as required by the sales-type lease agreement. If a customer is underperforming, the Company records an allowance for lease payments as a charge to revenue to reflect the lower estimate of the net realizable investment in sales-type lease balance.
     As of September 27, 2008, the Company has determined that no sales-type lease agreement, against which an allowance for lease payments has been established, constitutes an impaired asset.

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ASPECT MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(tabular amounts in thousands, except percentages and per share amounts)
(unaudited)
     Under the Company’s EP program, the customer is granted the right to use the BIS monitors for a mutually agreed upon period of time. During this period, the customer purchases BIS Sensors at a price that may include a premium above the list price of the BIS Sensors to cover the rental of the equipment, but without any binding minimum purchase commitments. At the end of the agreed upon period, the customer has the option of purchasing the BIS monitors, continuing to use them under the EP program or returning them to the Company. Under the EP program, no equipment revenue is recognized as the equipment remains the Company’s property and title does not pass to the customer, and the criteria for sales-type leases under SFAS No. 13 are not met. The BIS monitors under the EP program are depreciated over two years and the depreciation is charged to costs of revenue. BIS Sensor revenue is recognized either at shipment or delivery of the BIS Sensors in accordance with the agreed upon contract terms.
     The Company’s obligations under warranty are limited to repair or replacement of any product that the Company reasonably determines to be covered by the warranty. The Company records an estimate for its total warranty obligation in accordance with SFAS No. 5, Accounting for Contingencies, as discussed below.
Research and Development Costs
     The Company charges research and development costs to operations as incurred. Research and development costs include costs associated with new product development, product improvements and extensions, clinical studies and project consulting expenses.
Allowance for Doubtful Accounts
     The Company makes estimates and judgments in determining its allowance for doubtful accounts based on the Company’s historical collections experience, historical write-offs of its receivables, current trends, credit policies and a percentage of the Company’s accounts receivable by aging category. The Company also reviews the credit quality of its customer base as well as changes in its credit policies. The Company continually monitors collections and payments from its customers and adjusts the allowance for doubtful accounts as needed.
Inventory
     The Company values inventory at the lower of cost or estimated market value, and determines cost on a first-in, first-out basis. The Company regularly reviews inventory quantities on hand and records a provision for excess or obsolete inventory primarily based on production history and on its estimated forecast of product demand. The medical device industry in which the Company markets its products is characterized by rapid product development and technological advances that could result in obsolescence of inventory. Additionally, the Company’s estimates of future product demand may prove to be inaccurate, in which case it would need to change its estimate of the provision required for excess and obsolete inventory. If revisions are deemed necessary, the Company would recognize the adjustments in the form of a charge to its costs of revenue at the time of the determination.
Warranty
     Equipment that the Company sells is generally covered by a warranty period of one year. The Company accrues a warranty reserve for estimated costs to provide warranty services. The Company’s estimate of costs to service its warranty obligations is based on historical experience and an expectation of future conditions. Warranty expense, included in costs of revenue in the condensed consolidated statements of operations for the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008 and September 29, 2007, and accrued warranty cost, included in accrued liabilities in the condensed consolidated balance sheet at September 27, 2008, were as follows:
                                 
    Three Months Ended     Nine Months Ended  
    September 27,     September 29,     September 27,     September 29,  
    2008     2007     2008     2007  
Beginning balance
  $ 254     $ 223     $ 250     $ 220  
Warranty expense
    12       14       42       33  
Deductions and other
    (11 )     (10 )     (37 )     (26 )
 
                       
Ending balance
  $ 255     $ 227     $ 255     $ 227  
 
                       

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ASPECT MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(tabular amounts in thousands, except percentages and per share amounts)
(unaudited)
Shipping and Handling Costs
     Shipping and handling costs are included in costs of revenue in the condensed consolidated statements of operations.
Advertising Costs
     Advertising costs are expensed as incurred. These costs are included in sales and marketing expense in the condensed consolidated statements of operations.
Property and Equipment
     Property and equipment is recorded at cost and depreciated using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the related property and equipment. The costs of improvements to the Company’s leased building are capitalized as leasehold improvements and amortized on the straight-line method over the shorter of the life of the lease or the useful life of the asset. Repair and maintenance expenditures are charged to expense as incurred. The Company does not develop software for internal use and the costs of software acquired for internal use are accounted for in accordance with the American Institute of Certified Public Accountant’s Statement of Position 98-1, Accounting for the Costs of Computer Software Developed or Obtained for Internal Use.
     During the first quarter of 2008, the Company changed its depreciation period for its furniture and fixtures and business systems from 3 years to 5 years in order to better reflect the useful lives of these assets. This change in accounting estimate was applied prospectively from January 1, 2008 in accordance with SFAS No. 154, Accounting For Changes and Error Corrections. As a result of the change in estimated life of these assets, income from operations for the nine months ended September 27, 2008 was $126,000 higher and net income after tax for the nine months ended September 27, 2008 was $49,000 higher. No material effect on net income per share, basic and diluted, resulted from this change.
Income Taxes
     The Company accounts for income taxes in accordance with SFAS No. 109, Accounting for Income Taxes. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the expected future tax consequences, utilizing currently enacted tax rates of temporary differences between the carrying amounts and the tax basis of assets and liabilities. Deferred tax assets are recognized, net of any valuation allowance, for the estimated future tax effects of deductible temporary differences and tax operating loss and credit carryforwards. See Note 6 for additional disclosure relating to income taxes and the adoption and application of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Interpretation No. (“FIN”) 48, Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes – an Interpretation of FASB Statement No. 109.
Concentration of Credit Risk
     Financial instruments that potentially expose the Company to concentrations of credit risk primarily consist of cash, cash equivalents, investments, accounts receivable and investment in sales-type lease receivables. The Company does not require collateral or other security to support financial instruments subject to credit risk. To minimize the financial statement risk with respect to accounts receivable and investment in sales-type lease receivables, the Company maintains reserves for potential credit losses and such losses, in the aggregate, have not exceeded the reserves established by management. The Company maintains cash, cash equivalents and investments with various financial institutions. The Company performs periodic evaluations of the relative credit quality of its investments and the Company’s policy is designed to limit exposure to any one institution or type of investment. The primary objective of the Company’s investment strategy is the safety of the principal invested. The Company does not maintain foreign exchange contracts or other off-balance sheet financial investments.

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ASPECT MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(tabular amounts in thousands, except percentages and per share amounts)
(unaudited)
Single or Limited Source Suppliers
     The Company currently obtains certain key components of its products from single or limited sources. The Company purchases components pursuant to purchase orders, and in select cases, long-term supply agreements, and generally does not maintain large volumes of inventory. The Company has experienced shortages and delays in obtaining certain components of its products in the past. The Company may experience similar shortages and delays in the future. The disruption or termination of the supply of components or a significant increase in the costs of these components from these sources could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial position and results of operations and cash flows.
Net Income (Loss) Per Share
     In accordance with SFAS No. 128, Earnings Per Share, basic net income (loss) per share amounts for the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008 and September 29, 2007, were computed by dividing net income (loss) by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during those periods and diluted net income (loss) per share was computed using the weighted average number of common shares outstanding and other dilutive securities, including stock options and unvested restricted stock, and convertible debt during those periods.
     For the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008, approximately 4,602,000 and 10,757,000, respectively, of potentially dilutive instruments, consisting of common stock options, unvested restricted stock and convertible debt have been excluded from the computation of diluted weighted average shares outstanding as their effect would be antidilutive.
     Basic and diluted net income (loss) per share amounts for the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008 and September 29, 2007 were determined as follows:
                                 
    Three Months Ended     Nine Months Ended  
    September 27,     September 29,     September 27,     September 29,  
    2008     2007     2008     2007  
Basic:
                               
Net income (loss)
  $ 1,040     $ (156 )   $ 2,704     $ 1,848  
 
                       
Weighted average shares outstanding
    17,317       17,230       17,228       20,485  
 
                       
 
                               
Basic net income (loss) per share
  $ 0.06     $ (0.01 )   $ 0.16     $ 0.09  
 
                       
 
                               
Diluted:
                               
Net income (loss)
  $ 1,040     $ (156 )   $ 2,704     $ 1,848  
Interest expense on convertible debt, net
    306                    
 
                       
Net income (loss) as adjusted
  $ 1,346     $ (156 )   $ 2,704     $ 1,848  
 
                       
Weighted average shares outstanding
    17,317       17,230       17,228       20,485  
Effect of dilutive stock options and restricted stock
    36             145       652  
Conversion of convertible notes
    5,901                    
 
                       
Weighted average shares assuming dilution
    23,254       17,230       17,373       21,137  
 
                       
 
Diluted net income (loss) per share
  $ 0.06     $ (0.01     $ 0.16     $ 0.09  
 
                       
Comprehensive Income (Loss)
     Comprehensive income (loss) is defined as the change in equity of a business enterprise during a period from transactions and other events and circumstances from non-owner sources. Other than the Company’s net income (loss),

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ASPECT MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(tabular amounts in thousands, except percentages and per share amounts)
(unaudited)
the only other elements of comprehensive income (loss) impacting the Company are the unrealized gains (losses) on its investments for all periods presented and cumulative currency translation adjustments.
Stock-Based Compensation
     The Company has three stock-based employee compensation plans, one stock-based non-employee director compensation plan and an employee stock purchase plan. Stock options and restricted common stock generally vest over three to four years and provide, in certain instances, for the acceleration of vesting upon a change of control of the Company. Options under these plans terminate ten years from the date of grant. The Company’s stock option plans provide for the grant, at the discretion of the Board of Directors, of options for the purchase of up to 12,110,000 shares of common stock to employees, directors, consultants and advisors.
     Effective January 1, 2006, the Company adopted SFAS No. 123R (revised 2004), Share Based Payment, or SFAS No. 123R, using the modified prospective transition method. Under this transition method, compensation expense recognized during the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008 and September 29, 2007 included: (a) compensation expense for all share-based awards granted prior to, but not yet vested, as of December 31, 2005, based on the grant date fair value estimated in accordance with the original provisions of SFAS No. 123, Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation, and (b) compensation expense for all share-based awards granted subsequent to December 31, 2005, based on the grant date fair value estimated in accordance with the provisions of SFAS No. 123R.
Stock Option Activity:
     A summary of stock option activity for the nine months ended September 27, 2008 is as follows:
                                 
            Weighted     Weighted        
    Number of     Average     Average Remaining     Aggregate Intrinsic  
    Shares     Exercise Price     Contractual Life     Value  
Outstanding at December 31, 2007
    4,266     $ 17.31                  
Granted
    455       9.18                  
Exercised
    (176 )     4.30                  
Canceled
    (171 )     16.96                  
 
                           
Outstanding at September 27, 2008
    4,374     $ 17.00       5.69     $ 298  
 
                       
Vested or expected to vest at September 27, 2008
    4,322     $ 17.02       5.66     $ 298  
 
                       
Exercisable at September 27, 2008
    3,391     $ 17.33       4.92     $ 284  
 
                       
     Cash received from stock option exercises under all stock-based compensation plans for the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008 was approximately $235,000 and $846,000, respectively, and was approximately $136,000 and $1,042,000 for the three and nine months ended September 29, 2007, respectively. The intrinsic value of options exercised during the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008 was approximately $86,000 and $580,000, respectively, and was approximately $616,000 and $1,597,000 for the three and nine months ended September 29, 2007, respectively. The estimated fair value of options that vested during the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008 was approximately $1,264,000 and $3,998,000, respectively, and was approximately $1,726,000 and $5,196,000 for the three and nine months ended September 29, 2007, respectively.
     A summary of unvested restricted stock activity for the nine months ended September 27, 2008 is as follows:
                 
            Weighted Average  
    Number of     Grant Date Fair  
    Shares     Value  
Unvested at December 31, 2007
    275     $ 16.90  
Granted
    306       11.30  
Vested and cancelled
    (151 )     15.20  
 
           
Unvested at September 27, 2008
    430     $ 13.51  
 
           

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ASPECT MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(tabular amounts in thousands, except percentages and per share amounts)
(unaudited)
          As of September 27, 2008, total compensation cost related to unvested restricted stock not yet recognized was $5,800,000, which is expected to be recognized in the statement of operations over a weighted-average period of 32 months. The fair value of shares that vested for the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008 was approximately $626,000 and $1,763,000, respectively, and was approximately $449,000 and $1,323,000, respectively, for the three and nine months ended September 29, 2007.
          Grant-date fair value:
          The Company uses the Black-Scholes option pricing model to calculate the grant-date fair value of an award. During the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008 and September 29, 2007, the Company calculated the grant-date fair value using the following assumptions:
                                 
    Three Months Ended   Nine Months Ended
    September 27,   September 29,   September 27,   September 29,
    2008   2007   2008   2007
Options granted
    157       153,387       455       3,393,949  
Weighted average exercise price
  $ 5.20     $ 13.29     $ 9.18     $ 15.98  
Weighted average grant date fair value
  $ 2.93     $ 5.93     $ 4.49     $ 7.51  
 
                               
Assumptions:
                               
Risk-free interest rate
    3.64 %     4.69 %     3.22 %     4.55 %
Expected term
  5.76 years     5.2 years     5.76 years     5.2 years  
Expected volatility
    58 %     42 %     51 %     46 %
     Risk-free interest rate: the implied yield currently available on U.S. Treasury zero-coupon issues with a remaining term equal to the expected term used as the assumption in the model.
     Expected term: the expected term of an employee option is the period of time for which the option is expected to be outstanding. The Company uses a Monte Carlo simulation model to estimate the expected term assumption in connection with determining the grant date valuation as it believes that this information is currently the best estimate of the expected term of a new option.
     Expected volatility: in estimating its expected volatility, the Company considers both trends in historical volatility and the implied volatility of its publicly traded options. The Company has used a combination of its implied volatility and historical volatility to estimate expected volatility for the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008. The Company believes that in addition to the relevance of historical volatility, consideration of implied volatility achieves the objectives of SFAS No. 123R since it represents the expected volatility that marketplace participants would likely use in determining an exchange price for an option, and is therefore an appropriate assumption to use in the calculation of grant date fair value.
     Expected dividend yield: this assumption is not applicable in the Company’s calculation as the Company has not declared, nor does it expect to declare in the foreseeable future, any dividends.
     Expense:
     The Company uses the straight-line attribution method to recognize expense for all options and restricted stock granted prior to the adoption of SFAS No. 123R and for all options and restricted stock granted after January 1, 2006, the adoption date of SFAS No. 123R. The amount of stock-based compensation expense recognized during a period is based on the value of the portion of the awards that is ultimately expected to vest. Stock-based compensation expense is recorded on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period, which is generally the vesting period. SFAS No. 123R requires forfeitures to be estimated at the time of grant and revised, if necessary, in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from those estimates. The term “forfeitures” is distinct from “cancellations” or “expirations” and represents only the unvested portion of the surrendered option. For the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008, the Company applied a forfeiture rate of approximately 5.3%. The Company re-evaluates its forfeiture rate on a quarterly basis and adjusts the rate as necessary.

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ASPECT MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(tabular amounts in thousands, except percentages and per share amounts)
(unaudited)
Prior to the adoption of SFAS No. 123R, the Company recorded forfeitures on an actual basis as they occurred. The Company’s results for the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008 include stock-based compensation expense of approximately $1,890,000 and $5,762,000, respectively, and approximately $2,179,000 and $6,532,000 in the three and nine months ended September 29, 2007, respectively. For the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008, approximately $23,000 and $74,000, respectively, of the stock-based compensation expense relates to tax on deferred compensation which is included in the condensed consolidated statement of operations within the applicable operating expense where the Company reports the option holders’ and restricted stock holders’ compensation cost. For the three and nine months ended September 29, 2007, approximately $23,000 and $71,000, respectively, of the stock-based compensation expense relates to tax on deferred compensation.
     As of September 27, 2008, total compensation cost related to unvested stock options not yet recognized was $6,810,000, which is expected to be recognized in the statement of operations over a weighted-average period of approximately 25 months.
     For the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008, the Company recorded stock-based compensation expense for non-employees of approximately $1,000 and $7,000, respectively, resulting from the grant of 500 shares of restricted common stock and 500 stock options to a consultant.
     For the three and nine months ended September 29, 2007, the Company recorded stock-based compensation expense for non-employees of approximately $4,000 and $19,000, respectively, resulting from the grant of stock options to purchase 800 shares of common stock to one consultant and awards of 900 shares of common stock to another consultant.
Use of Estimates
     The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.
Reclassifications
     Certain amounts in the prior year’s financial statements have been reclassified to conform with the current year presentation.
Fair Value of Financial Instruments
     The estimated fair market values of the Company’s financial instruments, which include cash equivalents, investments, accounts receivable, investment in sales-type leases, accounts payable and long-term debt, approximate their carrying values.
Recent Accounting Pronouncements
     In March 2008, the FASB issued SFAS No. 161, Disclosures about Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities, an Amendment of FASB Statement No. 133. The objective of this statement is to require enhanced disclosures about an entity’s derivative and hedging activities to improve the transparency of financial reporting. This statement is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years and interim periods beginning after November 15, 2008 with early application encouraged. The Company does not believe that the adoption of SFAS No. 161 will have a material impact on its results of operations, financial position or cash flow.
     In May 2008, the FASB issued SFAS No. 162, The Hierarchy of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. The current hierarchy under Generally Accepted Accounting Principles in the United States (“GAAP”), as set forth in the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (“AICPA”) Statement on Auditing Standards No. 69, The Meaning of Present Fairly in Conformity With Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, has been criticized because (1) it is directed to the auditor rather than the entity, (2) it is complex, and (3) it ranks FASB Statements of Financial Accounting Concepts. The FASB believes that the GAAP hierarchy should be directed to entities because it is the entity (not its auditor) that is responsible for selecting accounting principles for financial statements that are presented in conformity with GAAP. Accordingly, the FASB

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ASPECT MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(tabular amounts in thousands, except percentages and per share amounts)
(unaudited)
concluded that the GAAP hierarchy should reside in the accounting literature established by the FASB and is issuing this Statement to achieve that result. This Statement is effective 60 days following the SEC’s approval of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board amendments to AU Section 411, The Meaning of Present Fairly in Conformity With Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. The Company does not believe that the adoption of SFAS No. 162 will have a material impact on its results of operations, financial position or cash flow.
(3) Comprehensive Income (Loss)
     The Company’s total comprehensive income (loss) is as follows:
                                 
    Three Months Ended     Nine Months Ended  
    September 27,     September 29,     September 27,     September 29,  
    2008     2007     2008     2007  
Net income (loss)
  $ 1,040     $ (156 )   $ 2,704     $ 1,848  
Other comprehensive income (loss):
                               
Foreign currency translation adjustments
    (50 )           (50 )      
Unrealized (loss) gain on investments, net of reclassification adjustment for unrealized loss on marketable security recognized during the period
    (760 )     127       (984 )     164  
 
                       
Comprehensive income (loss)
  $ 230     $ (29 )   $ 1,670     $ 2,012  
 
                       
(4) Investment in Sales-Type Leases
     The components of the Company’s net investment in sales-type leases are as follows:
                 
    September 27,     December 31,  
    2008     2007  
Total minimum lease payments receivable
  $ 4,263     $ 5,655  
Less:
               
Unearned interest income
    589       849  
Allowance for lease payments
    802       715  
 
           
Net investment in sales-type leases
    2,872       4,091  
Less: current portion
    1,169       1,473  
 
           
 
  $ 1,703     $ 2,618  
 
           
(5) Inventory
     Inventory consists of the following:
                 
    September 27,     December 31,  
    2008     2007  
Raw materials
  $ 4,421     $ 4,027  
Work-in-progress
    7       52  
Finished goods
    3,101       3,034  
 
           
 
  $ 7,529     $ 7,113  
 
           

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ASPECT MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(tabular amounts in thousands, except percentages and per share amounts)
(unaudited)
(6) Income Taxes
     The Company is subject to income tax in numerous jurisdictions and at various rates worldwide and the use of estimates is required in determining the provision for income taxes. For the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008, the Company recorded a tax provision of $1,883,000 and $3,577,000, respectively. Income before income taxes for the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008 was $2,923,000 and $6,281,000, respectively. The provision for income taxes was the result of applying an effective income tax rate of 64% and 57% to income before tax for the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008, respectively. For the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008, the difference between the effective tax rate and the U.S. federal statutory income tax rate of 34% was due mainly to the impact of state income taxes, the disallowance for tax purposes of certain stock-based compensation deductions in accordance with SFAS No. 123R, and a taxable gain on the repurchase of the Company’s convertible debt. In addition, there was an increase in the valuation allowance on a portion of the Company’s federal research and development credits and on a capital loss on its commercial paper investments. The federal research and development credit was reenacted on October 3, 2008 as part of “The Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008.” The impact of this law change will be accounted for in the fourth quarter of 2008. This act extends the federal research and development credit until December 31, 2009 (tax years 2008 and 2009). The Company anticipates that the credit will provide an 8% reduction to its 2008 effective tax rate. Because SFAS No. 109 requires companies to recognize tax law changes in the period in which new legislation is enacted, a reinstatement of the research credit in a later period, even retroactively, requires the Company to wait until that time before factoring the credit into its effective tax rate calculations. Therefore, the impact of the reinstated R&D credit is not included in the Company’s operating results for the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008, but will be included in the calculation of the Company’s annual 2008 tax provision. For the three and nine months ended September 29, 2007, the Company recorded a tax provision of $683,000 and $3,142,000, respectively.
     Through the third quarter of 2006, the Company maintained a full valuation allowance on its deferred tax assets. Upon achieving three years of cumulative profitability, the Company began to weigh the positive and negative evidence included in SFAS No. 109, Accounting for Income Taxes, on a quarterly basis to determine, whether, in its view, it was more likely than not that some or all of its deferred tax assets would be realized. In connection with this analysis, the Company reviewed its cumulative history of earnings before taxes over a three-year period and its projections of future taxable income. As of December 31, 2006, after finalizing the 2007 forecast, the Company concluded that these projections support taxable income for the foreseeable future, and therefore, the Company reversed $28.2 million of its valuation allowance. The projections of future taxable income include significant judgment and estimation. If the Company is not able to achieve sufficient taxable income in future periods, it might need to record additional valuation allowances on its deferred tax assets in future periods that could be material to the Company’s consolidated financial statements. In the first and third quarters of 2008, the Company re-established a valuation allowance for a portion of its federal research and development credits since these credits are expected to expire unused based on current projections. In addition, in the third quarter of 2008, the Company recorded a valuation allowance on a capital loss related to its commercial paper investments since it does not anticipate that it will be able to benefit this loss in the near future.
     The Company adopted the provisions of FIN 48, Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes – an Interpretation of FASB Statement No. 109, on January 1, 2007. As of January 1, 2008, the Company had gross unrecognized tax benefits of $661,500 (net of the federal benefit on state issues) which represents the amount of unrecognized tax benefits that, if recognized, would favorably affect the effective income tax rate in any future periods. Also as of the adoption date, the Company had not accrued interest expense related to these unrecognized tax benefits. When appropriate, the Company will recognize interest accrued and penalties incurred related to unrecognized tax benefits as a component of income tax expense. There were no significant changes to any of these amounts during the third quarter of 2008. The Company does not reasonably estimate that the unrecognized tax benefit will change significantly within the next twelve months.
     The Company or one of its subsidiaries files income tax returns in the U.S. federal jurisdiction and various states and foreign jurisdictions. The Company is generally no longer subject to income tax examinations by U.S. federal, state and local or non-U.S. income tax examinations by tax authorities for years before 1992.
(7) Fair Value Measurements
     The Company adopted SFAS No. 157, Fair Value Measurements, on January 1, 2008. SFAS No. 157 defines and establishes a framework for measuring fair value and expands disclosure about fair value measurements. The standard

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ASPECT MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(tabular amounts in thousands, except percentages and per share amounts)
(unaudited)
creates a fair value hierarchy which prioritizes the inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value into three broad levels as follows: Level 1 inputs are quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities; Level 2 inputs are inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly; and Level 3 inputs are unobservable inputs that reflect the Company’s own assumptions about the assumptions market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability.
     Financial assets and liabilities are classified in their entirety based on the lowest level of input that is significant to the fair value measurement. In accordance with SFAS No. 157, the Company has classified its financial assets and liabilities that are required to be measured at fair value as of September 27, 2008 as follows:
                                 
    Balance at    
    September   Fair Value Measurements at September 27, 2008
    27, 2008   Level 1   Level 2   Level 3
Cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash
  $ 36,914     $ 36,914     $     $      —  
Available for sale securities
  $ 62,625     $     $ 62,625     $      —  
(8) Segment Information and Enterprise Reporting
     The Company operates in one reportable segment as it markets and sells one family of anesthesia monitoring systems. The Company does not disaggregate financial information by product or geographically, other than sales by region and sales by product, for management purposes. Substantially all of the Company’s assets are located within the United States. All of the Company’s products are manufactured in the United States.
     Revenue by geographic region and as a percentage of total revenue by geographic region is as follows:
                                 
    Three Months Ended     Nine Months Ended  
    September 27,     September 29,     September 27,     September 29,  
    2008     2007     2008     2007  
Geographic Area by Region
                               
Domestic
  $ 17,337     $ 16,655     $ 51,747     $ 55,737  
International
    7,421       5,977       22,624       17,655  
 
                       
Total
  $ 24,758     $ 22,632     $ 74,371     $ 73,392  
 
                       
                                 
    Three Months Ended   Nine months ended
    September 27,   September 29,   September 27,   September 29,
    2008   2007   2008   2007
Geographic Area by Region
                               
Domestic
    70 %     74 %     70 %     76 %
International
    30       26       30       24  
 
                               
Total
    100 %     100 %     100 %     100 %
 
                               
     The Company did not have sales in any individual country, other than the United States, or to any individual customer, that accounted for more than 10% of the Company’s total revenue or accounts receivable for the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008 and September 29, 2007.

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ASPECT MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(tabular amounts in thousands, except percentages and per share amounts)
(unaudited)
(9) Commitments and Contingencies
     Leases
     In February 2006, the Company entered into a lease agreement pursuant to which the Company agreed to lease approximately 137,000 square feet of research and development, sales and marketing, production and general and administrative space in Norwood, Massachusetts. The lease expires in December 2016, and the Company has been granted the option to extend the term for three additional five-year periods. In connection with this lease, the Company provided a security deposit in the amount of $911,000 to the lessor in accordance with the terms of the lease agreement. During the third quarter of 2008, this amount was reduced to approximately $759,000 due to an amendment to the agreement. This lease is classified as an operating lease. The lease contains a rent escalation clause that requires additional rental amounts in the later years of the lease term. Rent expense is being recognized on a straight-line basis over the minimum lease term.
     Effective January 1, 2007, the Company entered into an operating lease of approximately 9,000 square feet of office space in De Meern, The Netherlands for the Company’s international organization. This lease expires in December 2011.
     In July 2007, the Company entered into an equipment lease with a term of 48 months. The lease contains a bargain purchase option and is classified as a capital lease. In April 2008, the Company entered into a software lease agreement with a term of 36 months. The lease results in ownership at the end of the lease term and is classified as a capital lease. As of September 27, 2008, gross assets under capital lease totaled approximately $240,000 and related accumulated depreciation was approximately $49,000.
     Legal Proceedings
     On October 10, 2007, a purported holder of the Company’s common stock (the plaintiff), filed suit in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington against Morgan Stanley and Deutsche Bank AG, the lead underwriters of the Company’s 2000 initial public offering, alleging violations of Section 16(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”). The complaint alleges that the combined number of shares of the Company’s common stock beneficially owned by the lead underwriters and certain of the Company’s unnamed officers, directors and principal stockholders exceeded ten percent of the Company’s outstanding common stock from the date of its initial public offering on January 28, 2000, through at least January 27, 2001. The complaint further alleges that those entities and individuals were subject to the reporting requirements of Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act and the short-swing trading prohibition of Section 16(b) of the Exchange Act, and failed to comply with those provisions. The complaint seeks to recover from the lead underwriters any “short-swing profits” obtained by them in violation of Section 16(b) of the Exchange Act. The Company was named as a nominal defendant in the action, but has no liability for the asserted claims. None of its directors or officers serving in such capacities at the time of its initial public offering (many of whom still serve as officers or directors of the Company) are currently named as defendants in this action, but there can be no guarantee that the complaint will not be amended, or a new complaint or suit filed, naming such directors or officers as defendants in this action or another action alleging a violation of the same provisions of the Exchange Act. On February 27, 2008, the plaintiff filed an amended complaint asserting substantially similar claims as those set forth in the initial complaint. On July 25, 2008, the Company joined with 29 other issuers to file the Issuer Defendants’ Joint Motion to Dismiss. The plaintiff filed her opposition on September 8, 2008, and the Company and the other Issuer Defendants filed their Reply in Support of Their Joint Motion to Dismiss on October 23, 2008. Oral argument on the Joint Motion to Dismiss is set for January 16, 2009. The Judge has stayed discovery until he rules on all motions to dismiss. The Company currently believes that the outcome of this litigation will not have a material adverse impact on its consolidated financial position and results of operations.
     The underwriters of the Company’s initial public offering are named as defendants in several class action complaints which have been filed allegedly on behalf of certain persons who purchased shares of the Company’s common stock between January 28, 2000 and December 6, 2000. These complaints allege violations of the Securities Act and the Exchange Act. Primarily, the complaints allege that there was undisclosed compensation received by the Company’s underwriters in connection with the Company’s initial public offering. While the Company and its officers and directors have not been named as defendants in these suits, based on comparable lawsuits filed against other companies there can be no assurance that the Company and its officers and directors will not be named in similar complaints in the future.

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ASPECT MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(tabular amounts in thousands, except percentages and per share amounts)
(unaudited)
(10) Loan Agreements
     In May 2008, the Company renewed its revolving line of credit agreement with a commercial bank. The Company is entitled to borrow up to $5,000,000 under the revolving line of credit, which expires in May 2009. The line of credit may be extended on an annual basis at the discretion of the commercial bank. Interest on any borrowings under the revolving line of credit is, at the election of the Company, either the prime rate or at the London Inter-Bank Offer Rate, or LIBOR, plus 2.25%. Up to $1,500,000 of the $5,000,000 revolving line of credit is available for standby letters of credit. At September 27, 2008, the Company had outstanding standby letters of credit with the commercial bank of approximately $832,000. At September 27, 2008, there was no outstanding balance under this revolving line of credit.
     The revolving line of credit agreement contains restrictive covenants that require the Company to maintain liquidity and net worth ratios and is secured by certain investments of the Company, which are shown as restricted cash in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets. The Company is required to maintain restricted cash in an amount equal to 102% of the outstanding amounts under the revolving line of credit agreement. At September 27, 2008, the Company had $849,000 classified as restricted cash on the condensed consolidated balance sheet relating to standby letters of credit issued in connection with the Company’s leased building in Norwood, Massachusetts and an international service provider. At September 27, 2008, the Company was in compliance with all covenants contained in the revolving line of credit agreement.
(11) Termination and Repurchase Agreement with Boston Scientific Corporation
     On June 11, 2007, the Company entered into a Termination and Repurchase Agreement with Boston Scientific Corporation. Under the terms of the agreement, the Company and Boston Scientific Corporation agreed to terminate the following agreements:
  the OEM Product Development Agreement dated as of August 7, 2002 (as amended January 31, 2005 and February 5, 2007, the “2002 Agreement”), pursuant to which the Company was to develop certain products that Boston Scientific Corporation would then commercialize in the area of monitoring patients under sedation in a range of less invasive medical specialties, and pursuant to which the Company granted Boston Scientific Corporation an exclusive option to become the distributor for a period of time of certain products;
 
  the Product Development and Distribution Agreement dated as of May 23, 2005 (the “2005 Agreement”), pursuant to which the Company was to develop new applications of its brain-monitoring technology in the area of the diagnosis and treatment of neurological, psychiatric and pain disorders and Boston Scientific was appointed the exclusive distributor of such products; and
 
  the Letter Agreement dated August 7, 2002, and Security Agreement dated August 7, 2002, pursuant to which Boston Scientific Corporation agreed to make revolving interest-bearing loans to Aspect from time to time at the request of Aspect, such revolving loans being evidenced by a promissory note in the original principal amount of $5,000,000 dated August 7, 2002.
     In addition to the termination of the agreements referenced above, on June 13, 2007, the Company repurchased 2,000,000 shares of its common stock held by Boston Scientific Corporation at a price of approximately $15.91 per share, for an aggregate repurchase price of $31,816,000. The per share price represents the average of the closing prices of the Company’s common stock as reported on the NASDAQ Global Market for the 20 consecutive trading days up to and including the date of the Termination and Repurchase Agreement. These shares have been cancelled and retired. In accordance with the agreement, for a period of 180 days following the date of the agreement, the Company had the right to purchase any or all of the balance of its shares of common stock held by Boston Scientific Corporation at a price of $15.00 per share or the average of the closing prices for the Company’s common stock over the 10 trading days prior to the Company’s exercising its right to repurchase, whichever is higher. Additionally, Boston Scientific Corporation had agreed that for a period of 180 days after the effective date of the agreement that it would not sell, contract to sell, grant any option to purchase or dispose of any of the shares of the Company’s common stock held of record by Boston Scientific Corporation on the effective date. On July 10, 2007, the Company exercised its right under the Termination and Repurchase Agreement and repurchased an additional 2,500,000 shares of common stock from Boston Scientific Corporation for $37,655,000. The repurchased shares were cancelled and retired. On November 7, 2007, the Company

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ASPECT MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(tabular amounts in thousands, except percentages and per share amounts)
(unaudited)
agreed to waive the lock-up and the call option set forth in the Termination and Repurchase Agreement with respect to the remaining 1,513,239 shares of the Company’s common stock held by Boston Scientific Corporation because Boston Scientific Corporation and a third party reached an agreement pursuant to which that third party agreed to purchase all of such shares.
     Additionally, in connection with the termination of the 2002 Agreement and the 2005 Agreement, the Company recognized approximately $3,550,000 of strategic alliance revenue in June 2007. Approximately $3,835,000 had been recorded previously as deferred revenue relating to the 2002 Agreement, which represented the unamortized portion of the purchase price of $7.00 per share in excess of the closing price of the Company’s common stock on August 7, 2002 of $2.59 per share. The $3,835,000 of deferred revenue was offset by approximately $285,000 for a receivable from Boston Scientific Corporation which had been recognized by the Company during the quarter ended March 31, 2007 relating to the 2005 Agreement with Boston Scientific Corporation. Upon the termination of the 2005 Agreement, the Company reversed the receivable against strategic alliance revenue where it was originally recorded in the statement of operations.
(12) Convertible Debt
     In June 2007, the Company completed a private placement of $125,000,000 aggregate principal amount of 2.5% convertible notes due 2014 (the “notes”). The notes are senior unsecured obligations and will rank equally with all of the Company’s existing and future senior debt and to all of the Company’s subordinated debt. Interest on the notes is payable semiannually in cash on June 15th and December 15th of each year with the first payment being made on December 15, 2007. The notes will mature on June 15, 2014. Net proceeds received from the issuance of the notes were approximately $121,000,000, which is net of the underwriter’s discount of approximately $4,000,000. In connection with the notes offering, the Company incurred total offering costs of approximately $4,559,000 which have been recorded as deferred financing fees in the consolidated balance sheet and are being amortized on a straight-line basis over the term of the notes. During the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008, approximately $146,000 and $469,000, respectively, of the offering costs have been amortized to interest expense.
     Holders may convert notes at their option on any day prior to the close of business on the scheduled trading day immediately preceding March 15, 2014 only under the following circumstances:
    during the five business day period after any five consecutive trading day period (the “measurement period”) in which the price per note for each trading day of that measurement period was less than 97% of the product of the last reported sale price of the Company’s common stock and the conversion rate on each such day;
 
    during any calendar quarter (and only during such quarter) after the calendar quarter ending September 30, 2007, if the last reported sale price of the Company’s common stock for 20 or more trading days in a period of 30 consecutive trading days ending on the last trading day of the immediately preceding calendar quarter exceeds 120% of the applicable conversion price in effect on the last trading day of the immediately preceding calendar quarter; or
 
    upon the occurrence of specified corporate events.
     The notes will be convertible, regardless of the foregoing circumstances, at any time from, and including, March 15, 2014 through the scheduled trading day immediately preceding the maturity date of the notes.
     The initial conversion rate for the notes is 52.4294 shares of common stock per $1,000 in principal amount of notes, which is equivalent to an initial conversion price of approximately $19.07 per share of common stock. The conversion rate will be subject to adjustment in some events but will not be adjusted for accrued interest. In addition, if a “make-whole fundamental change” (as defined in the indenture dated as of June 20, 2007 between the Company and U.S. Bank National Association, (the “Indenture”)) occurs prior to the maturity date of the notes, the Company will in some cases increase the conversion rate for a holder that elects to convert its notes in connection with such “make-whole fundamental change”. No adjustment to the conversion rate will be made if the Company’s stock price is less than $15.57 per share or if the stock price exceeds $50.00 (in each case subject to adjustment).
     Unless the Company obtains stockholder authorization to utilize the net share settlement feature of the notes and the Company irrevocably elects such settlement method at any time on or prior to the 45th scheduled trading day preceding the maturity date of the notes, upon conversion the Company will deliver a number of shares of its common stock equal to

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ASPECT MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC.
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(tabular amounts in thousands, except percentages and per share amounts)
(unaudited)
the conversion rate on the related conversion date for each $1,000 principal amount of notes. The Company will deliver cash in lieu of any fractional shares of its common stock based on the last reported sale price of its common stock on the related conversion date (or, if the conversion date is not a trading day, on the next succeeding trading day). If the Company obtains stockholder approval of the net share settlement feature in connection with the potential conversion of the notes, then upon conversion of the notes the Company would (1) pay cash in an amount equal to the lesser of one-fortieth of the principal amount of the notes being converted and the daily conversion value (the product of the conversion rate and the current trading price) of the notes being converted and (2) issue shares of its common stock only to the extent that the daily conversion value of the notes exceeded one-fortieth of the principal amount of the notes being converted for each trading day of the relevant 40 trading day observation period.
     The Company will not make any sinking fund payments in connection with the notes and the notes may not be redeemed by the Company prior to maturity date.
     In connection with the offering of the notes, the Company repurchased an additional 1,000,000 shares of its common stock for $15,570,000 in privately negotiated transactions. These shares have been cancelled and retired.
     In June 2008, the Company repurchased $10,000,000 of its 2.5% convertible notes for a total consideration of $5,700,000, plus accrued interest of $120,000 to the date of repurchase. As a result of this transaction, the Company recorded a gain on debt repurchase of $3,940,000 in the second quarter of 2008, which is net of the write-off of the ratable portion of unamortized deferred financing fees.
     In September 2008, the Company repurchased $15,000,000 of its 2.5% convertible notes for a total consideration of $8,550,000, plus accrued interest of approximately $91,000 to the date of repurchase. As a result of this transaction, the Company recorded a gain on debt repurchase of $5,881,000 in the third quarter of 2008, which is net of the write-off of the ratable portion of unamortized deferred financing fees.
(13) Stock Repurchase Program
     On August 3, 2006, the Company’s Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to 2,000,000 shares of the Company’s common stock through the open market or in privately negotiated transactions. The repurchase program may be suspended or discontinued at any time. There were no repurchases under this plan in 2007 or during the nine months ended September 27, 2008. As of September 27, 2008, the Company has repurchased a total of 276,493 shares of common stock under this repurchase program for $5,008,000. Repurchased shares are held in treasury pending use for general corporate purposes, including issuances under various employee stock plans. As of September 27, 2008, the Company is authorized to repurchase an additional 1,723,507 shares of common stock in the future.

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Item 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.
Overview
     We develop, manufacture and market an anesthesia monitoring system that we call the BIS® system. The BIS system is based on our patented core technology, the Bispectral Index, which we refer to as the BIS index. The BIS system provides information that allows clinicians to assess and manage a patient’s level of consciousness in the operating room and intensive care and procedural sedation settings and is intended to assist the clinician in better determining the amount of anesthesia or sedation needed by each patient. Our proprietary BIS system includes our BIS monitor, BIS Module Kit or BISx system, which allows original equipment manufacturers to incorporate the BIS index into their monitoring products, and our group of sensor products, which we collectively refer to as BIS Sensors.
     The following chart summarizes our principal product offerings:
         
    Initial    
    Commercial    
Product   Shipment   Description
 
EQUIPMENT
       
 
       
BIS VIEW
  2007   Basic-featured standalone monitor which has fewer optional user configurations compared with the BIS VISTA monitor.
 
       
BIS VISTA
  2006   Monitor that offers an enhanced display and user interface as well as greater processing capability compared to our other monitors.
 
       
BISx system
  2004   BIS monitoring solution that provides the processing technology required to obtain BIS information from a single device the approximate size of a hockey puck. The BISx system is designed to integrate with a wide range of patient monitoring platforms sold by original equipment manufacturers.
 
       
BIS XP System
  2001   BIS system offering enhanced performance capabilities and expanded benefits as compared to the previous version of the BIS system, designed to enable more precise measurement of brain activity to assess the level of consciousness.
 
       
BIS Module Kit
  2001   Same as standard BIS Module Kit plus 4 channel EEG monitoring capability.
— 4 Channel
       
Support
       
 
       
A-2000 BIS Monitor
  1998   Compact, lightweight, portable third-generation BIS monitor.
 
       
BIS Module Kit
  1998   Components of BIS monitoring technology that are integrated into equipment sold by original equipment manufacturers.
 
       
SENSORS
       
 
       
Semi-Reusable
(SRS) Sensor
  2005   Semi-reusable version of a BIS Sensor that uses the same algorithm and hardware as our disposable sensors. Currently available only in markets outside the United States, excluding Japan.
 
       
BIS Extend Sensor
  2002   Disposable sensor with electronic memory device for use with our BIS Monitors, BIS Module Kit and BISx System that was designed for patients who are typically monitored for extended periods.

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    Initial    
    Commercial    
Product   Shipment   Description
 
BIS Pediatric Sensor
  2001   Disposable sensor with electronic memory device for use with our BIS Monitors, BIS Module Kit and BISx System that is smaller and easier to apply to children.
       
 
       
BIS Quatro Sensor
  2001   Disposable sensor with electronic memory device for use with our BIS Monitors, BIS Module Kit and BISx System that is designed to offer enhanced performance in deep anesthetic states and enhanced resistance to interference from noise sources.
 
       
BIS Sensor Plus
  2001   Second-generation disposable sensor for use with our BIS Monitors and BIS Module Kit.
 
       
BIS Standard Sensor
  1997   Disposable sensor for use with our BIS Monitors and BIS Module Kit.
          We derive our revenue primarily from sales of BIS Sensors, our original equipment manufacturer products (including BIS Module Kits and the BISx system) and related accessories, which we collectively refer to as Equipment, and sales of BIS monitors. We have also historically derived a portion of our revenue from strategic alliances, primarily our alliance with Boston Scientific Corporation, which we terminated in June 2007. To assist management in assessing and managing our business, we segregate our revenue by sales by region, sales by products and revenue derived from our strategic alliance, as shown in the following table:
                                 
    Three Months Ended   Nine Months Ended
    September 27,   September 29,   September 27,   September 29,
    2008   2007   2008   2007
         (dollars in thousands)        
Domestic revenue
  $ 17,337     $ 16,655     $ 51,747     $ 55,737  
Percent of total revenue
    70 %     74 %     70 %     76 %
 
                               
International revenue
  $ 7,421     $ 5,977     $ 22,624     $ 17,655  
Percent of total revenue
    30 %     26 %     30 %     24 %
 
                               
Total revenue
  $ 24,758     $ 22,632     $ 74,371     $ 73,392  
 
                               
BIS Sensor revenue
  $ 20,788     $ 19,031     $ 62,819     $ 55,148  
Percent of total revenue
    84 %     84 %     84 %     75 %
 
                               
Equipment revenue
  $ 3,970     $ 3,601     $ 11,552     $ 12,998  
Percent of total revenue
    16 %     16 %     16 %     18 %
 
                               
Strategic alliance revenue
  $     $     $     $ 5,246  
Percent of total revenue
                      7 %
 
                               
Total revenue
  $ 24,758     $ 22,632     $ 74,371     $ 73,392  
     At September 27, 2008, we had cash, cash equivalents, restricted cash and investments of approximately $99.5 million and working capital of approximately $101.1 million.
     We follow a system of fiscal quarters as opposed to calendar quarters. Under this system, the first three quarters of each fiscal year end on the Saturday closest to the end of the calendar quarter and the last quarter of the fiscal year always ends on December 31.
     We believe our ability to grow our revenue is directly related to whether our customers continue to purchase and use our BIS Sensors after they purchase our Equipment. We believe the primary reason for the growth in product revenue is a direct result of continuing to shift our sales and marketing emphasis from expanding our customer base to seeking to deepen our relationships with our existing customers and increasing their sensor utilization and procedure penetration. As we seek to continue to achieve this growth, we are expanding our sales forces and implementing new sales and marketing programs. We expect that as we seek to grow our business, revenue from the sale of BIS Sensors will contribute an increasing percentage of product revenue. Additionally, we believe that, over time, revenue from the sale of BIS Module Kits and our BISx system will increase as a percentage of total Equipment revenue as healthcare organizations purchase our technology as part of an integrated solution offered by our original equipment manufacturers.

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     In order to sustain profitability, we believe that we need to continue to maintain our gross profit and control the growth of our operating expenses. To maintain our gross profit, we believe we must continue to focus on maintaining our average unit sales prices of our BIS Sensors, increasing revenue from the sale of BIS Sensors as a percentage of total revenue, as BIS Sensors have a higher gross margin than Equipment, and continuing to reduce the costs of manufacturing our products.
     For those healthcare organizations desiring to acquire our BIS monitors directly from us, we offer two primary options. Our customers have the option either to purchase BIS monitors outright or to acquire BIS monitors pursuant to a sales-type lease agreement whereby the customer contractually commits to purchase a minimum number of BIS Sensors per BIS monitor per year. Under our sales-type leases, customers purchase BIS Sensors and the BIS monitor for the purchase price of the BIS Sensors plus an additional charge per BIS Sensor to pay for the purchase price of the BIS monitor and related financing costs over the term of the agreement. We also grant these customers an option to purchase the BIS monitors at the end of the term of the agreement, which is typically three to five years. We recognize Equipment revenue under sales-type lease agreements either at shipment or delivery in accordance with the agreed upon contract terms with interest income recognized over the life of the sales-type lease. The cost of the BIS monitor acquired by the customer is recorded as costs of revenue in the same period.
     Under certain limited circumstances, we also offer customers the opportunity to use the BIS monitors under our Equipment Placement program, which we refer to as the EP program. Under the EP program, the customer is granted the right to use the BIS monitors for a mutually agreed upon period of time. During this period, the customer purchases BIS Sensors at a price that may include a premium above the list price of the BIS Sensors to cover the rental of the equipment, but without any binding minimum purchase commitments. At the end of the agreed upon period, the customer has the option of purchasing the BIS monitors, continuing to use them under the EP program or returning them to us.
     We have subsidiaries in The Netherlands, United Kingdom, Germany and France to facilitate the sale of our products into the international market. We are continuing to develop our international sales and distribution program through a combination of distributors and marketing partners, including companies with which we have entered into original equipment manufacturer relationships.
     We are party to a distribution agreement with Nihon Kohden Corporation to distribute BIS monitors in Japan. Nihon Kohden has received approval from the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare to market in Japan our A-1050 EEG Monitor with BIS, our A-2000 BIS Monitor, our BIS module (our product that integrates BIS monitoring technology into equipment sold by original equipment manufacturers), our BIS XP system and, most recently in December 2007, our BISx and the BIS VISTA monitor. In January 2002, the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare granted reimbursement approval for use of our BIS monitors. With this approval, healthcare providers in Japan are eligible to receive partial reimbursement of 1,000 Yen each time BIS monitoring is used. Sales to Nihon Kohden represented approximately 15% of international revenue in both the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008 and approximately 14% of international revenue in both the three and nine months ended September 29, 2007.
     During the first quarter of 2006, we adopted the Financial Accounting Standards Board’s, or FASB’s, Statement of Financial Accounting Standard 123 (revised 2004), Share-Based Payment, or SFAS No. 123R, using the modified prospective transition method. Prior to the adoption of SFAS No. 123R, we accounted for share-based payments to employees using the intrinsic value method under Accounting Principles Bulletin, or APB, Opinion No. 25, Accounting for Stock Issued to Employees, and, as such, generally recognized no compensation expense for employee stock options. For the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008, we recognized approximately $1.9 million and $5.8 million, respectively, of stock-based compensation expense in our condensed consolidated statements of operations and in the three and nine months ended September 29, 2007, we recognized approximately $2.2 million and $6.5 million, respectively, of stock-based compensation expense. See Note 2 of the Notes to our Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements contained in Part I, Item 1 of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for further information regarding our adoption of SFAS No. 123R.
     Various factors may adversely affect our quarterly operating results through the fourth quarter of 2008 and beyond. For example, a third party study that was published in March 2008 in the New England Journal of Medicine compared BIS monitoring with a protocol based on end-tidal gas anesthetic in a patient population considered to be at high risk of awareness and concluded that, based upon a similar occurrence of awareness in both groups, no benefit of BIS monitoring was demonstrated. While the study results were consistent with earlier studies that showed a low incidence of awareness using BIS, we believe the conclusions drawn by the authors are not supported by their data and that there were several flaws in the design and execution of the trial. However, we believe that the publication of this study has had, and may continue to have an adverse effect on the rate at which existing or potential new customers purchase and use our products. We are also currently expanding our sales force and expect that such expansion will increase our operating expenses in future periods and that the resulting increase in operating expenses would not be offset at least initially by an increase in revenue. We also are continuing to shift the focus of our sales and marketing efforts from expanding our customer base

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to deepening our relationships with our existing customers and increasing their sensor utilization and procedure penetration. As a result of this shift in focus, we expect our revenue from the sale of equipment to decrease. Additionally, we have recently repurchased a portion of our 2.5% notes, and may make additional repurchases in the future. If any such repurchases are made at a discount to the face value of the notes, we expect to record a gain on such transaction, which could affect our operating results in the quarter in which any such repurchase is made. Finally, we may not realize expected benefits of favorable industry pronouncements on anesthesia awareness, including the position statements issued by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, the American Society of Anesthesiologists House of Delegates, and the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists. We also face risks beyond our control with respect to the continued challenges of the U.S. and worldwide economies.
Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
     Management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations is based upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. Note 2 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q includes a summary of our significant accounting policies and methods used in the preparation of our financial statements. In preparing these financial statements, we have made estimates and judgments in determining certain amounts included in the financial statements. The application of these accounting policies involves the exercise of judgment and use of assumptions as to future uncertainties and, as a result, actual results could differ from these estimates. We do not believe there is a significant likelihood that materially different amounts would be reported under different conditions or using different assumptions. We believe that our critical accounting policies and estimates are as follows:
Revenue Recognition
     We sell our BIS monitors primarily through a combination of a direct sales force and distributors. Our original equipment manufacturer products are sold to original equipment manufacturers who in turn sell them to the end-user. BIS Sensors are sold through a combination of a direct sales force, distributors and original equipment manufacturers. Direct product sales are structured as sales, sales-type lease arrangements or sales under our EP program. We recognize revenue when earned in accordance with Staff Accounting Bulletin, or SAB, No. 104, Revenue Recognition, and Emerging Issues Task Force, or EITF, 00-21, Revenue Arrangements with Multiple Deliverables. Revenue is recognized when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, product delivery has occurred or services have been rendered, the price is fixed or determinable and collectibility is reasonably assured. For product sales, revenue is not recognized until title and risk of loss have transferred to the customer.
     We follow SFAS No. 13, Accounting For Leases, in connection with our sales-type lease agreements. Under our sales-type leases, customers purchase BIS Sensors and the BIS monitor for the purchase price of the BIS Sensors plus an additional charge per BIS Sensor to pay for the purchase price of the BIS monitor and related financing costs over the term of the agreement. The minimum lease payment, consisting of the additional charge per BIS Sensor, less the unearned interest income, which is computed at the interest rate implicit in the lease, is recorded as the net investment in sales-type leases. We recognize Equipment revenue under sales-type lease agreements either at shipment or delivery in accordance with the agreed upon contract terms with interest income recognized over the life of the sales-type lease. The cost of the BIS monitor acquired by the customer is recorded as costs of revenue in the same period it is acquired. We review and assess the net realizability of our investment in sales-type leases at each reporting period. This review includes determining, on a customer specific basis, if a customer is significantly underperforming relative to the customer’s cumulative level of committed BIS Sensor purchases as required by the sales-type lease agreement. If a customer is underperforming, we record an allowance for lease payments as a charge to revenue to reflect the lower estimate of the net realizable investment in sales-type lease balance. Changes in the extent of underperformance in the agreements could increase or decrease the amount of revenue recorded in future periods.
     We recognize revenue either at shipment or delivery in accordance with the agreed upon contract terms with distributors and original equipment manufacturers in accordance with SAB No. 104. Contracts executed for sales to distributors and original equipment manufacturers include a clause that indicates that customer acceptance is limited to confirmation that our products function in accordance with our applicable product specifications in effect at the time of delivery. Formal acceptance by the distributor or original equipment manufacturer is not necessary to recognize revenue provided that we objectively demonstrate that the criteria specified in the acceptance provisions are satisfied. Each product is tested prior to shipment to ensure that it meets the applicable product specifications in effect at the time of delivery. Additionally, we have historically had a minimal number of defective products shipped to distributors and original equipment manufacturers, and any defective products are subject to repair or replacement under warranty as distributors and original equipment manufacturers do not have a right of return.

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     We exercise judgment in determining the specific time periods in which we can recognize revenue in connection with sales of our products and with respect to our strategic alliances. To the extent that actual facts and circumstances differ from our initial judgments, our revenue recognition could change accordingly and any such change could affect our reported results.
     Stock-Based Compensation
     SFAS No. 123R, which we adopted in the first quarter of fiscal 2006, requires that stock-based compensation expense associated with equity instruments be recognized in the condensed consolidated statement of operations, rather than being disclosed in a pro forma footnote to the condensed consolidated financial statements. Determining the amount of stock-based compensation to be recorded requires us to develop estimates to be used in calculating the grant-date fair value of stock options. We calculate the grant-date fair value using the Black-Scholes valuation model. The use of valuation models requires us to make estimates with respect to the following assumptions:
Risk-free interest rate: the implied yield currently available on U.S. Treasury zero-coupon issues with a remaining term equal to the expected term used as the assumption in the model.
Expected term: the expected term of an employee option is the period of time for which the option is expected to be outstanding. We use a Monte Carlo simulation model to estimate the expected term assumption for the grant date valuation as we believe that this information is currently the best estimate of the expected term of a new option.
Expected volatility: in estimating expected volatility, we consider both trends in historical volatility and the implied volatility of our publicly traded options. We used a combination of our implied volatility and historical volatility to estimate expected volatility for the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008. We believe that in addition to the relevance of historical volatility, consideration of implied volatility achieves the objectives of SFAS No. 123R since it represents the expected volatility that marketplace participants would likely use in determining an exchange price for an option, and is therefore an appropriate assumption to use in the calculation of grant date fair value.
     Additionally, we are required to make assumptions regarding the forfeiture rate. SFAS No. 123R requires forfeitures to be estimated at the time of grant and revised, if necessary, in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from those estimates. We used a forfeiture rate of approximately 5.3% in our calculation at September 27, 2008. We re-evaluate this forfeiture rate on a quarterly basis and adjust the rate as necessary.
     These assumptions involve significant judgment and estimates. Future stock-based compensation expense could vary significantly from the amount recorded in the current period due to changes in assumptions and due to the extent of stock option activity and restricted stock issued in future periods.
     As of September 27, 2008, the total unrecognized compensation cost related to unvested stock options and unvested restricted stock awards was $6.8 million and $5.8 million, respectively, which will be amortized over the weighted average remaining requisite service periods of 25 months and 32 months, respectively.
     Allowance for Doubtful Accounts
     We determine our allowance for doubtful accounts by making estimates and judgments based on our historical collections experience, current trends, historical write-offs of our receivables, credit policy and a percentage of our accounts receivable by aging category. We also review the credit quality of our customer base as well as changes in our credit policies. We continuously monitor collections and payments from our customers. While credit losses have historically been within our expectations and the provisions established, our credit loss rates in the future may not be consistent with our historical experience. To the extent that we experience a deterioration in our historical collections experience or increased credit losses, bad debt expense would likely increase in future periods.
     Inventories
     We value inventory at the lower of cost or estimated market value, and determine cost on a first-in, first-out basis. We regularly review inventory quantities on hand and record a provision for excess or obsolete inventory primarily based on production history and on our estimated forecast of product demand. The medical device industry in which we market our products is characterized by rapid product development and technological advances that could result in obsolescence of inventory. Additionally, our estimates of future product demand may prove to be inaccurate, in which case we would need to change our estimate of the provision required for excess or obsolete inventory. If revisions are deemed necessary, we would recognize the

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adjustments in the form of a charge to costs of revenue at the time of the determination. Therefore, although we continually update our forecasts of future product demand, any significant unanticipated declines in demand or technological developments, such as the introduction of new products by our competitors, could have a significant negative impact on the value of our inventory, results of operations and cash flows in future periods.
     Warranty
     Equipment that we sell generally is covered by a warranty period of one year. We accrue a warranty reserve for estimated costs to provide warranty services. Our estimate of costs to service our warranty obligations is based on our historical experience and expectation of future conditions. While our warranty costs have historically been within our expectations and the provisions established, to the extent we experience an increased number of warranty claims or increased costs associated with servicing those claims, our warranty expenses will increase, and we may experience decreased gross profit margin and cash flow.
     Income Taxes
     Our provision for income taxes is composed of a current and a deferred portion. The current income tax provision is calculated as the estimated taxes payable or refundable on tax returns for the current year. The deferred income tax provision is calculated for the estimated future tax effects attributable to temporary differences and carryforwards using expected tax rates in effect in the years during which the differences are expected to reverse.
     Effective January 1, 2007, we adopted the provisions of the Financial Accounting Standards Board Interpretation No. 48, Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes – an Interpretation of FASB Statement No. 109, or FIN 48. FIN 48 clarifies the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in an enterprise’s financial statements in accordance with SFAS No. 109 and prescribes a recognition threshold of more-likely-than-not to be sustained upon examination. Upon adoption of FIN 48, our policy to include interest and penalties related to gross unrecognized tax benefits within our provision for income taxes did not change. We did not accrue interest expense related to these unrecognized tax benefits due to our historical carryforward loss position, the uncertain benefits have not yet reduced taxes payable and, accordingly, no interest expense has been accrued. The net adjustment to retained earnings upon adoption to FIN 48 on January 1, 2007 was $371,000.
Results of Operations
     The following tables present, for the periods indicated, financial information expressed as a percentage of revenue and a summary of our total revenue. This information has been derived from our condensed consolidated statements of income included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. You should not draw any conclusions about our future results from the results of operations for any period.
                                 
    Three Months Ended   Nine Months Ended
    September 27,   September 29,   September 27,   September 29,
    2008   2007   2008   2007
Revenue
    100 %     100 %     100 %     100 %
Costs of revenue
    25       24       25       24  
 
                               
Gross margin
    75       76       75       76  
 
                               
Operating expenses:
                               
Research and development
    17       17       16       17  
Sales and marketing
    51       43       46       41  
General and administrative
    16       16       16       15  
 
                               
Total operating expenses
    84       76       78       73  
 
                               
 
                               
(Loss) income from operations
    (9 )           (3 )     3  
Interest income, net
          2             3  
Impairment loss on investments
    (3 )           (1 )      
Gain on repurchase of debt
    24             13        
 
                               
Income before income taxes
    12       2       9       6  
Provision for incomes taxes
    8       3       5       4  
 
                               
Net income (loss)
    4 %     (1 )%     4 %     2 %
 
                               

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Three and Nine Months Ended September 27, 2008 Compared with the Three and Nine Months Ended September 29, 2007
                                                 
    Three Months Ended     Nine Months Ended  
                    Percentage                     Percentage  
    September 27,     September 29,     Increase     September 27,     September 29,     Increase  
    2008     2007     (Decrease)     2008     2007     (Decrease)  
    (in thousands, except             (in thousands, except          
    unit amounts)             unit amounts)          
Revenue — Worldwide
                                               
BIS Sensors
  $ 20,788     $ 19,031       9 %   $ 62,819     $ 55,148       14 %
 
                                               
BIS monitors
    1,847       2,090       (12 )%     5,888       7,969       (26 )%
Original equipment manufacturer products
    1,227       833       47 %     3,194       2,806       14 %
Other equipment and accessories
    896       678       32 %     2,470       2,223       11 %
 
                                       
 
                                               
Total Equipment
    3,970       3,601       10 %     11,552       12,998       (11 )%
 
                                       
 
                                               
Total product revenue
    24,758       22,632       9 %     74,371       68,146       9 %
Strategic alliance
                %           5,246       (100 )%
 
                                       
Total revenue
  $ 24,758     $ 22,632       9 %   $ 74,371     $ 73,392       1 %
 
                                       
 
                                               
Unit Analysis — Worldwide
                                               
BIS Sensors
    1,514,000       1,377,000       10 %     4,575,000       3,945,000       16 %
BIS monitors
    599       741       (19 )%     1,986       2,548       (22 )%
Original equipment manufacturer BIS products
    1,510       1,017       48 %     4,294       3,547       21 %
Installed base
    53,630       45,344       18 %     53,630       45,344       18 %
     Revenue. Revenue from the sale of BIS Sensors increased approximately 9% in the three months ended September 27, 2008 compared with the three months ended September 29, 2007. We believe the increase in revenue from the sale of BIS Sensors during this period was primarily attributable to the continued shift of the focus of our sales and marketing efforts from expanding our customer base to seeking to deepen our relationships with our existing customers and increasing their sensor utilization and procedure penetration. During this period, we experienced an increase of approximately 10% in the number of BIS Sensors sold, which we believe was a result of the change in the focus of our sales and marketing strategy and growth in the installed base of BIS monitors. The number of domestic sensors sold was approximately 903,000 during the third quarter of 2007 and increased to approximately 945,000 during the third quarter of 2008, an increase of approximately 5%, while the number of international sensors sold increased approximately 20%, from approximately 474,000 during the third quarter of 2007 to approximately 569,000 during the third quarter of 2008. Additionally, the average domestic and international selling price of our BIS Sensors was slightly higher than the same period in the prior year. Our installed base of BIS monitors and original equipment manufacturer products increased 18% to approximately 53,000 units at September 27, 2008 compared with approximately 45,000 units at September 29, 2007.
     In the nine months ended September 27, 2008, revenue from the sale of BIS Sensors increased approximately 14% compared with the nine months ended September 29, 2007. The increase in revenue from the sale of BIS Sensors was primarily attributable to an increase in the number of BIS Sensors sold, from approximately 3.9 million BIS Sensors sold during the nine months ended September 29, 2007 to approximately 4.6 million sold during the nine months ended September 27, 2008. BIS Sensor sales domestically increased 9%, from approximately 2.6 million BIS Sensors sold in the nine months ended September 29, 2007 to approximately 2.9 million sold in the nine months ended September 27, 2008. Average selling prices remained relatively stable with a slight increase in international selling prices during this period. We believe the slower rate of growth in domestic sensor revenue, particularly over the last four weeks of the third quarter, is partly due to the impact of an unfavorable study of BIS monitoring that was published in the New England Journal of Medicine in the first quarter of 2008 and partly due to the impact of the deteriorating economic climate on hospital finances. The number of BIS Sensors sold internationally increased approximately 30%, from approximately 1.3 million BIS Sensors sold during the nine months ended September 29, 2007 to approximately 1.7 million sold during the nine months ended September 27, 2008. International pricing increased slightly in the current period which reflects small changes in the regional mix.
     During the three months ended September 27, 2008 compared with the three months ended September 29, 2007, total Equipment revenue increased by approximately 10%. The increase in Equipment revenue during this period was a result of an increase of approximately 47% in original equipment manufacturer product revenue and an increase of approximately 32% in other equipment revenue offset by a decrease of approximately 12% in BIS monitor revenue. The decrease in monitor revenue was a result of a decrease of approximately 19% in the number of monitors sold offset by an increase in the average selling price

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of approximately 9%. In the third quarter of 2008, we sold 599 monitors compared with 741 sold in the third quarter of 2007. Domestically, we sold 204 monitors in the third quarter of 2008 compared with 345 monitors sold in the third quarter of 2007. The increase in original equipment manufacturer product revenue was a result of an increase of approximately 48% in the number of products sold to our original equipment manufacturers.
     In the nine months ended September 27, 2008, total Equipment revenue decreased approximately 11% compared with the nine months ended September 29, 2007. The decrease in Equipment revenue during the 2008 period was primarily driven by a decrease in BIS monitor revenue of approximately 26% offset by an increase in original equipment manufacturer product revenue of approximately 14%. The decrease in BIS monitor revenue was the result of a decrease of approximately 22% in the number of monitors sold combined with a decrease in the average selling price of approximately 5%. In the first nine months of 2008, we sold 1,986 monitors compared with 2,548 monitors sold in the first nine months of 2007. The increase in original equipment manufacturer product revenue was a result of an increase of approximately 21% in the number of products sold to our original equipment manufacturers.
     In the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008, we recorded no strategic alliance revenue compared with strategic alliance revenue of approximately $5.2 million in the nine months ended September 29, 2007. The strategic alliance revenue in the prior year is primarily attributable to the revenue we recognized from our agreements with Boston Scientific Corporation. In June 2007, we entered into a termination and repurchase agreement with Boston Scientific Corporation pursuant to which all agreements with Boston Scientific Corporation, including the 2002 OEM product development and distribution agreement and the 2005 product development and distribution agreement were terminated.
     Our gross profit was approximately 75.3% and 74.5% of revenue in the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008, respectively, compared with a gross profit of approximately 75.6% and 76.3% of revenue in the three and nine months ended September 29, 2007, respectively. The decrease in the gross profit in the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008 compared with the same periods in the prior year is primarily the result of two factors. First, we recognized $5.2 million of strategic alliance revenue in the nine months ended September 29, 2007, compared with no strategic alliance revenue recognized in 2008. Second, growth in sales of our high margin sensors was offset by growth in the sales of low margin OEM products.

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Expense Overview
                                                   
    Three Months Ended   Percentage   Nine Months Ended     Percentage
    September 27,   September 29,   Increase   September 27,   September 29,   Increase
    2008   2007   (Decrease)   2008   2007   (Decrease)
    (in thousands)           (in thousands)        
Expenses
                                               
Research and development
  $ 4,183     $ 3,820       10 %   $ 12,056     $ 12,234       (1 )%
Sales and marketing
  $ 12,687     $ 9,669       31 %   $ 34,561     $ 29,913       16 %
General and administrative
  $ 3,920     $ 3,656       7 %   $ 12,034     $ 11,336       6 %
     Research and Development. The increase in research and development expenses in the three months ended September 27, 2008 compared with the three months ended September 29, 2007 was primarily attributable to an increase of approximately $211,000 in compensation and benefits which is primarily related to open positions that were filled during the third quarter, and an increase of approximately $126,000 in clinical trial expenses related to trials which began during 2008.
     For the nine months ended September 27, 2008 compared with the nine months ended September 29, 2007, the decrease in research and development expenses was due primarily to a decrease of approximately $367,000 in clinical study expenses, offset by an increase in compensation and benefits of approximately $118,000, and an increase in temporary help expense of approximately $127,000. The decrease in clinical study expenses is primarily related to our BRITE trial for which we completed enrollment in March 2007. We expect research and development expenses in the fourth quarter of 2008 to increase compared to the level of research and development expenses in the third quarter of 2008 as we continue to invest in spending for our ongoing clinical trials.
     Sales and Marketing. The increase in sales and marketing expenses in the three months ended September 27, 2008 compared with the three months ended September 29, 2007 was primarily attributable to an increase of approximately $1.5 million in compensation and benefits, an increase of approximately $385,000 in recruiting expenses, an increase of approximately $311,000 in travel expenses, an increase of approximately $265,000 in realized and unrealized foreign exchange losses due to changes in foreign exchange rates, an increase of approximately $193,000 in market research expenses and an increase of approximately $87,000 in training expenses. The increase in expenses was primarily the result of a sales retention program implemented in April 2008 and the sales force expansion which we initiated during the second quarter of 2008.
     For the nine months ended September 27, 2008 compared with the nine months ended September 29, 2007, the increase in sales and marketing expenses was driven by an increase of approximately $2.5 million in compensation and benefits, approximately $522,000 in travel expenses and an increase of approximately $1.6 million in other operating expenses. The overall increase in sales and marketing expenses is principally the result of a sales retention program implemented in April 2008 and the sales force expansion which we initiated during the second quarter of 2008. The increase in other operating expenses was driven by an increase of approximately $396,000 in recruiting expenses, an increase of approximately $293,000 in temporary help expenses, an increase of approximately $250,000 in market research, an increase of approximately $377,000 in meeting and honorarium expenses, an increase of approximately $235,000 in unrealized and realized losses on exchange and an increase of approximately $159,000 in training expenses. We expect the level of sales and marketing expenses in the fourth quarter of 2008 to increase compared to the level of sales and marketing expenses in the third quarter of 2008 primarily as a result of the ongoing sales force expansion program.
     General and Administrative. The increase in general and administrative expenses in the three months ended September 27, 2008 compared with the three months ended September 29, 2007 was primarily attributable to an increase of approximately $178,000 in compensation and benefits to general and administrative personnel, an increase of approximately $55,000 in accounting and tax service and an increase of approximately $45,000 in meeting expenses. The increase in compensation and benefits is primarily due to an increase in head count.
     For the nine months ended September 27, 2008 compared with the nine months ended September 29, 2007, the increase in general and administrative expenses was driven by an increase of approximately $380,000 in compensation and benefits to general and administrative personnel, an increase in accounting and tax services of approximately $140,000 and an increase in consulting expenses of approximately $133,000. We expect the level of general and administrative expenses in the fourth quarter of 2008 will increase compared with the level of general and administrative expenses in the third quarter of 2008.

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     Interest Income. Interest income decreased to approximately $867,000 in the three months ended September 27, 2008 from approximately $1.5 million in the three months ended September 29, 2007, a decrease of approximately 43%. Interest income decreased to approximately $3.2 million in the nine months ended September 27, 2008 from approximately $3.5 million in the nine months ended September 29, 2007, a decrease of approximately 8%. The decrease in interest income in the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008 compared with the three and nine months ended September 29, 2007 was primarily attributable to a lower cash and investment balance resulting from the repurchase of a portion of our convertible debt combined with a decrease in investment return rates. We expect interest income in the fourth quarter of 2008 to decrease compared to interest income in the third quarter of 2008.
     Interest Expense. Interest expense decreased to approximately $849,000 in the three months ended September 27, 2008 compared with $944,000 in the three months ended September 29, 2007, a decrease of approximately 10%. The decrease in interest expense is primarily due to the repurchase of a portion of our convertible debt during the third quarter of 2008. Interest expense increased to approximately $2.7 million in the nine months ended September 27, 2008 from approximately $1.1 million in the nine months ended September 29, 2007, an increase of approximately 157%. The increase in interest expense in the nine months ended September 27, 2008 was the result of our issuance in June 2007 of 2.5% convertible senior notes due 2014. We expect interest expense in the fourth quarter of 2008 to be below the level of interest expense in the third quarter of 2008 due to the repurchase of $15.0 million of our 2.5% convertible senior notes due 2014 during the third quarter of 2008.
     Other Income (expense). Other income (expense), excluding interest income and interest expense, was approximately $5.0 million and $9.0 million in the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008, respectively, compared with no other income (expense) in the three and nine months ended September 29, 2007. The increase in other income is primarily due to aggregate gains of approximately $9.8 million resulting from repurchases of portions of our convertible debt in June and September 2008. This increase is offset by an other-than-temporary impairment loss on investment of approximately $840,000 during the third quarter of 2008. We expect other income in the fourth quarter of 2008 to be below the level of other income in the third quarter of 2008.
     Income Taxes. We are subject to income tax in numerous jurisdictions and at various rates worldwide and the use of estimates is required in determining the provision for income taxes. For the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008, we recorded a tax provision of $1,883,000 and $3,577,000, respectively. Income before income taxes for the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008 was $2,923,000 and $6,281,000, respectively. The provision for income taxes was the result of applying an effective income tax rate of 64% and 57% to income before tax for the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008, respectively. For the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008, the difference between the effective tax rate and the U.S. federal statutory income tax rate of 34% was due mainly to the impact of state income taxes, the disallowance for tax purposes of certain stock-based compensation deductions in accordance with SFAS No. 123R, and a taxable gain on the repurchase of our convertible debt. In addition, there was an increase in the valuation allowance on a portion of our federal research and development credits and on a capital loss on our commercial paper investments. The federal research and development credit was reenacted on October 3, 2008 as part of “The Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008.” The impact of this law change will be accounted for in the fourth quarter of 2008. This act extends the federal research and development credit until December 31, 2009 (tax years 2008 and 2009). We anticipate that the credit will provide an 8% reduction to our 2008 effective tax rate. Because SFAS No. 109 requires companies to recognize tax law changes in the period in which new legislation is enacted, a reinstatement of the research credit in a later period, even retroactively, requires us to wait until that time before factoring the credit into our effective tax rate calculations. Therefore, the impact of the reinstated R&D credit is not included in our operating results for the three and nine months ended September 27, 2008, but will be included in the calculation of our annual 2008 tax provision. For the three and nine months ended September 29, 2007, we recorded a tax provision of $683,000 and $3,142,000, respectively.
     Through the third quarter of 2006, we maintained a full valuation allowance on our deferred tax assets. Upon achieving three-year cumulative profitability, we began to weigh the positive and negative evidence included in SFAS No. 109, Accounting for Income Taxes, on a quarterly basis to determine whether, in our view, it was more likely than not that some or all of our deferred tax assets would be realized. In connection with this analysis, we reviewed our cumulative history of earnings before taxes over a three-year period and our projections of future taxable income. As of December 31, 2006, after finalizing our 2007 forecast, we concluded that our projections support future taxable income for the foreseeable future, and therefore, we reversed $28.2 million of our valuation allowance. Our projections of future taxable income include significant judgment and estimation. If we are not able to achieve sufficient taxable income in future periods, we might need to record additional valuation allowances on our deferred tax assets in future periods that could be material to the consolidated financial statements. In the first and third quarters of 2008, we re-established a valuation allowance for a portion of our federal research and development credits since these credits are expected to expire unused based on current projections. In addition, in the third quarter of 2008, we recorded a valuation allowance on a capital loss related to our commercial paper investments since we do not anticipate that it will be able to benefit from this loss in the near future.

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     We adopted the provisions of FIN 48 on January 1, 2007. As of January 1, 2008, we had gross unrecognized tax benefits of $661,500 (net of the federal benefit on state issues) which represents the amount of unrecognized tax benefits that, if recognized, would favorably affect the effective income tax rate in any future periods. Also as of the adoption date, we had not accrued interest expense related to these unrecognized tax benefits. When appropriate, we will recognize interest accrued and penalties, if incurred, related to unrecognized tax benefits as a component of income tax expense. There were no significant changes to any of these amounts during the third quarter of 2008. We do not reasonably estimate that the unrecognized tax benefit will change significantly within the next twelve months.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
     Our liquidity requirements have historically consisted of research and development expenses, sales and marketing expenses, capital expenditures, working capital and general corporate and administrative expenses. From our inception through September 27, 2008, we have raised approximately $212.2 million from equity and debt financings and strategic alliances, including the following:
    net proceeds of approximately $54.6 million from our initial public offering of common stock in February 2000;
 
    approximately $3.4 million in equipment financing;
 
    approximately $5.1 million related to our investment in sales-type leases;
 
    proceeds of approximately $10.0 million related to our 2002 OEM product development and distribution agreement with Boston Scientific Corporation;
 
    proceeds of approximately $8.1 million from the sale of our common stock to Boston Scientific Corporation in 2004;
 
    $10.0 million in installment payments from Boston Scientific Corporation received in May 2005 and May 2006 pursuant to the 2005 product development and distribution agreement with Boston Scientific Corporation; and
 
    net proceeds of $121.0 million received from the issuance of our 2.5% convertible senior notes in June 2007.
     In May 2001, we entered into an agreement with Bank of America for a $5.0 million revolving line of credit which was renewed in May 2008 and as a result of such renewal it currently expires in May 2009. The line of credit may be extended on an annual basis at the discretion of the bank and contains restrictive covenants that require us to maintain liquidity and net worth ratios and is secured by certain investments, which are shown as restricted cash on our consolidated balance sheets. In connection with this revolving line of credit agreement, we are required to maintain restricted cash in an amount equal to 102% of the outstanding amounts under the revolving line of credit. At September 27, 2008, we were in compliance with all covenants contained in the revolving line of credit agreement. Interest on any borrowings under the revolving line of credit is, at our election, either the prime rate or the London Inter-Bank Offer Rate, or LIBOR, plus 2.25%. Up to $1.5 million of the $5.0 million revolving line of credit is available for standby letters of credit. At September 27, 2008, the interest rate on the line of credit was 5.0%, there was no amount outstanding under this line of credit and we had standby letters of credit outstanding relating to our leased facility and an international service provider in the amount of approximately $1.0 million which is shown on our consolidated balance sheet as restricted cash.
     In June 2007, we completed a private placement of $125.0 million aggregate principal amount of 2.5% convertible notes due 2014. Net proceeds received from the issuance of the notes were $121.0 million, which is net of the initial purchasers’ discount of $4.0 million. As of September 27, 2008, we have used approximately $85.0 million of these proceeds to repurchase 5.5 million shares of our common stock, of which 4.5 million shares were repurchased from Boston Scientific Corporation and 1.0 million shares were repurchased in connection with our 2.5% convertible senior note offering that we completed in June 2007.
     On August 3, 2006, our Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to 2,000,000 shares of our common stock from time to time on the open market or in privately negotiated transactions. As of September 27, 2008, we had repurchased 276,493 shares of our common stock for approximately $5.0 million under this plan.
     We expect to meet our near-term liquidity needs through the use of cash and short-term investments on hand at September 27, 2008 and cash generated from operations. We believe that the financial resources available to us, including our current working capital, our long-term investments and available revolving line of credit will be sufficient to finance our planned operations and capital expenditures for at least the next 12 months. However, our future liquidity and capital requirements will depend upon numerous factors, including the resources required to further develop our marketing and sales organization domestically and internationally, to finance our research and development programs, to implement new marketing programs, to finance our sales-type lease program, to meet market demand for our products and to repay our convertible notes.

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     We expect to fund the growth of our business over the long term through cash flow from operations and through issuances of capital stock, promissory notes or other securities. Any sale of additional equity or debt securities may result in dilution to our stockholders, and we cannot be certain that additional public or private financing will be available in amounts or on terms acceptable to us, or at all. If we are unable to obtain this additional financing, we may be required to delay, reduce the scope of, or eliminate one or more aspects of our business development activities, which could harm the growth of our business.
     Currently, our 2.5% convertible senior notes due 2014 are convertible, under certain circumstance, solely into shares of our common stock. However, under the terms of the Indenture and such notes, we have the option to settle potential conversions of these notes with cash and, if applicable, shares of our common stock, commonly referred to as “net share settlement”, if we first obtain stockholder approval of this net share settlement feature, and we irrevocably elect to use such settlement method. If we obtain stockholder approval of the net share settlement feature in connection with the potential conversion of such notes and we irrevocably elect to use such settlement method, then upon conversion of such notes we would (1) pay cash in an amount equal to the lesser of one-fortieth of the principal amount of the notes being converted and the daily conversion value (the product of the conversion rate and the current trading price) of the notes being converted and (2) issue shares of our common stock only to the extent that the daily conversion value of the notes exceeded one-fortieth of the principal amount of the notes being converted for each trading day of the relevant 40 trading day observation period. In order to fund the cash payments due upon conversion, we may be required to use a significant portion or all of our existing cash or raise the cash for such payments through the sale of shares of our common stock or additional debt securities or through one or more other financing transactions. We may not have sufficient cash on hand or be able to acquire the necessary funds via financing on terms favorable to us or our stockholders, or at all, which would result in an event of default under the notes. Moreover, the use of a substantial portion of our existing cash may adversely affect our liquidity and cash available to fund the growth of our business.
     In June 2008, we repurchased $10.0 million of our 2.5% convertible notes for total consideration of $5.7 million, plus accrued interest of $120,000 to the date of repurchase. As a result of this transaction, we recorded a gain on debt repurchase of $3.9 million in the second quarter of 2008, which is net of the write-off of the ratable portion of unamortized deferred financing fees. In September 2008, we repurchased $15.0 million of our 2.5% convertible notes for a total consideration of $8.6 million, plus accrued interest of approximately $91,000 to the date of repurchase. As a result of this transaction, we recorded a gain on debt repurchase of $5.9 million in the third quarter of 2008, which is net of the write-off of the ratable portion of unamortized deferred financing fees. We may, from time to time, depending on market conditions, including without limitation whether our 2.5% notes are then trading at discounts to their respective face amounts, repurchase additional outstanding convertible debt for cash and/or in exchange for shares of our common stock, warrants, preferred stock, debt, or other consideration, in each case in open market purchases and/or privately negotiated transactions. The amounts involved in any such transactions, individually or in the aggregate, may be material.
     Working capital at September 27, 2008 was approximately $100.9 million compared with approximately $118.8 million at December 31, 2007.
     Cash provided by operations. We received approximately $6.9 million of cash from operations in the nine months ended September 27, 2008 compared with cash received from operations of approximately $9.3 million in the nine months ended September 29, 2007. The cash received in the nine months ended September 27, 2008 was primarily attributable to our net income of approximately $2.7 million, non-cash stock-based compensation expense of approximately $5.7 million, deferred taxes of approximately $3.1 million, an increase in accrued liabilities of approximately $2.4 million and depreciation and amortization of approximately $2.3 million. These were offset by non-cash gains of approximately $9.8 million resulting from the repurchase of an aggregate of $25.0 million of our 2.5% convertible notes during the period. The cash received in the nine months ended September 29, 2007 was primarily attributable to our net income of approximately $1.8 million, approximately $6.5 million of non-cash stock-based compensation expense, approximately $3.2 million of deferred taxes and an increase of approximately $2.1 million in accrued liabilities. These were offset by a decrease in deferred revenue of approximately $5.2 million primarily related to the termination of the 2002 OEM product development and distribution agreement and the 2005 product development and distribution agreement with Boston Scientific Corporation.
     Cash used for investing activities. We received approximately $23.0 million of cash in investing activities in the nine months ended September 27, 2008 compared with the use of cash of approximately $37.3 million in the nine months ended September 29, 2007. The cash received in the nine months ended September 27, 2008 was primarily the result of net proceeds from sales and maturities of investments of approximately $24.2 million offset by approximately $1.3 million in capital expenditures. The cash used in the nine months ended September 29, 2007 was primarily the result of net purchases of investments of approximately $35.0 million and approximately $2.4 million in capital expenditures primarily due to spending related to our new facility and the purchase of components for our automated sensor manufacturing lines. We anticipate the level of capital expenditures in the fourth quarter of 2008 will increase compared with the level of capital expenditures in the third quarter of 2008.

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     Cash provided by financing activities. We used approximately $13.6 million of cash from financing activities in the nine months ended September 27, 2008 compared with receiving approximately $36.4 million of cash in the nine months ended September 29, 2007. The cash used in the nine months ended September 27, 2008 was primarily the result of the repurchase of an aggregate of $25.0 million of our 2.5% convertible notes during the period for approximately $14.4 million. The cash received in the nine months ended September 29, 2007 was primarily the result of proceeds from the issuance of $125.0 million of 2.5% convertible senior notes due 2014 in June 2007 offset by our repurchase of approximately $85.0 million of our common stock.
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
     We do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements or relationships with unconsolidated entities or financial partnerships, such as entities often referred to as structured finance or special purpose entities, which are typically established for the purpose of facilitating off-balance sheet arrangements or other contractually narrow or limited purposes.
Effects of Inflation
     We believe that inflation and changing prices over the past three years have not had a significant impact on our net sales and revenue or on our income from continuing operations.
Recent Accounting Pronouncements
     In March 2008, the FASB issued SFAS No. 161, Disclosures about Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities, an Amendment of FASB Statement No. 133. The objective of this statement is to require enhanced disclosures about an entity’s derivative and hedging activities to improve the transparency of financial reporting. This statement is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years and interim periods beginning after November 15, 2008 with early application encouraged. We do not believe that the adoption of SFAS No. 161 will have a material impact on our results of operations, financial position or cash flow.
     In May 2008, the FASB issued SFAS No. 162, The Hierarchy of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. The current hierarchy under Generally Accepted Accounting Principles in the United States (“GAAP”), as set forth in the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (“AICPA”) Statement on Auditing Standards No. 69, The Meaning of Present Fairly in Conformity With Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, has been criticized because (1) it is directed to the auditor rather than the entity, (2) it is complex, and (3) it ranks FASB Statements of Financial Accounting Concepts. The FASB believes that the GAAP hierarchy should be directed to entities because it is the entity (not its auditor) that is responsible for selecting accounting principles for financial statements that are presented in conformity with GAAP. Accordingly, the FASB concluded that the GAAP hierarchy should reside in the accounting literature established by the FASB and is issuing this Statement to achieve that result. This Statement is effective 60 days following the SEC’s approval of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board amendments to AU Section 411, The Meaning of Present Fairly in Conformity With Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. We do not believe that the adoption of SFAS No. 162 will have a material impact on our results of operations, financial position or cash flow.
Forward-Looking Statements
     This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains, in addition to historical information, forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, including information relating to our ability to maintain profitability, information with respect to market acceptance of our BIS system, continued growth in sales of our BIS monitors, original equipment manufacturer products and BIS Sensors, our dependence on the BIS system, regulatory approvals for our products, our ability to remain competitive and achieve future growth, information with respect to other plans and strategies for our business and factors that may influence our revenue for the fiscal quarter ending December 31, 2008 and thereafter. These forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties and are not guarantees of future performance. Words such as “expect,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “believe,” “seek,” “estimate” and variations of these words and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Our actual results could differ significantly from the results discussed in these forward-looking statements. The important factors discussed under Part II – Item 1A. “Risk Factors” below represent some of the current challenges to us that create risk and uncertainty. In addition, subsequent events and developments may cause our expectations to change. While we may elect to update these forward-looking statements we specifically disclaim any obligation to do so, even if our expectations change.

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Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.
     Interest Rate Exposure
     Our investment portfolio consists primarily of money market accounts, certificates of deposit, high-grade commercial paper, high grade corporate bonds and debt obligations of various governmental agencies. We manage our investment portfolio in accordance with our investment policy. The primary objectives of our investment policy are to preserve principal, maintain a high degree of liquidity to meet operating needs, and obtain competitive returns subject to prevailing market conditions. Investments are made with an average maturity of 12 months or less and a maximum maturity of 24 months. These investments are subject to risk of default, changes in credit rating and changes in market value. These investments are also subject to interest rate risk and will decrease in value if market interest rates increase. Due to the conservative nature of our investments and relatively short effective maturities of the debt instruments, we believe interest rate risk is mitigated. Our investment policy specifies the credit quality standards for our investments and limits the amount of exposure from any single issue, issuer or type of investment.
     During the third quarter of 2008, we recorded an impairment charge of $840,000 million due to an other-than-temporary decline in the value of our investment portfolio resulting from the bankruptcy of an investment banking institution whose securities were held in our investment portfolio. We do not expect the loss related to these securities to have a material impact on our financial condition or results of operations during 2008.
     Our investment in sales-type leases and line of credit agreement are also subject to market risk. The interest rates implicit in our sales-type leases are fixed and not subject to interest rate risk. In addition, the interest rate on the 2.5% convertible senior notes due 2014 is fixed and not subject to interest rate risk. The interest rate on our line of credit agreement is variable and subject to interest rate risk. The interest rate risk experienced to date related to the line of credit has been mitigated primarily by the fact that the line of credit, when drawn on, is generally outstanding for short periods of time in order to fund short-term cash requirements.
     Foreign Currency Exposure
     Most of our revenue, expenses and capital spending are transacted in U.S. dollars. The expenses and capital spending of our two international subsidiaries are transacted in the respective country’s local currency and subject to foreign currency exchange rate risk. Our foreign currency transactions are translated into U.S. dollars at prevailing currency rates. Gains or losses resulting from foreign currency transactions are included in current period income or loss as incurred and translation adjustments have been included as part of accumulated other comprehensive income. Currently, all material transactions are denominated in U.S. dollars, and we have not entered into any material transactions that are denominated in foreign currencies.
Item 4. Controls and Procedures.
     (a) Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures.
Our management, with the participation of our chief executive officer and chief financial officer evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as of September 27, 2008. The term “disclosure controls and procedures,” as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act, means controls and other procedures of a company that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by a company in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by a company in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to the company’s management, including its principal executive and principal financial officers, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Management recognizes that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving their objectives and management necessarily applies its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible controls and procedures. Based on the evaluation of our disclosure controls and procedures as of September 27, 2008, our chief executive officer and chief financial officer concluded that, as of such date, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective at the reasonable assurance level.
     (b) Changes in Internal Controls.
No change in our internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Exchange Act) occurred during the fiscal quarter ended September 27, 2008 that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

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PART II — OTHER INFORMATION
Item 1. Legal Proceedings
     On October 10, 2007, a purported holder of our common stock (the plaintiff), filed suit in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington against Morgan Stanley and Deutsche Bank AG, the lead underwriters of our 2000 initial public offering, alleging violations of Section 16(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”). The complaint alleges that the combined number of shares of our common stock beneficially owned by the lead underwriters and certain of our unnamed officers, directors and principal stockholders exceeded ten percent of our outstanding common stock from the date of our initial public offering on January 28, 2000, through at least January 27, 2001. The complaint further alleges that those entities and individuals were subject to the reporting requirements of Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act and the short-swing trading prohibition of Section 16(b) of the Exchange Act, and failed to comply with those provisions. The complaint seeks to recover from the lead underwriters any “short-swing profits” obtained by them in violation of Section 16(b) of the Exchange Act. We were named as a nominal defendant in the action, but have no liability for the asserted claims. None of our directors or officers serving in such capacities at the time of our initial public offering (many of whom still serve as our officers or directors) are currently named as defendants in this action, but there can be no guarantee that the complaint will not be amended, or a new complaint or suit filed, naming such directors or officers as defendants in this action or another action alleging a violation of the same provisions of the Exchange Act. On February 27, 2008, the plaintiff filed an amended complaint asserting substantially similar claims as those set forth in the initial complaint. On July 25, 2008, we joined with 29 other issuers to file the Issuer Defendants’ Joint Motion to Dismiss. The plaintiff filed her opposition on September 8, 2008, and we and the other Issuer Defendants filed our Reply in support of Their Joint Motion to Dismiss on October 23, 2008. Oral argument on the Joint Motion to Dismiss is set for January 16, 2009. The Judge has stayed discovery until he rules on all motions to dismiss. We currently believe that the outcome of this litigation will not have a material adverse impact on our consolidated financial position and results of operations.
Item 1A. Risk Factors
     You should carefully consider the following risk factors, in addition to other information included in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, in evaluating our business. Failure to adequately overcome or address any of the following challenges could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, business or financial condition. The following risk factors amend and supersede the risk factors previously disclosed in Item 1A. of our 2007 Annual Report on Form 10-K.
We will not continue to be profitable if hospitals and anesthesia providers do not buy and use our BIS system and purchase our BIS Sensors in sufficient quantities.
     Although we were profitable for the years ended December 31, 2007 and 2006, we will not continue to be profitable or increase our level of profitability if hospitals and anesthesia providers do not buy and use our BIS system in sufficient quantities. Our customers may determine that the cost of the BIS system exceeds cost savings in drugs, personnel and post-anesthesia care recovery that may result from use of the BIS system. Also, if third party reimbursement is based on charges or costs, patient monitoring with the BIS system may have the effect of reducing reimbursement because the charges or costs for surgical procedures may decline as a result of monitoring with the BIS system. In addition, hospitals and anesthesia providers may not accept the BIS system as an accurate or superior means of assessing a patient’s level of consciousness during surgery or in the intensive care unit. If extensive or frequent malfunctions occur, healthcare providers may also conclude that the BIS system is unreliable. If hospitals and anesthesia providers do not accept the BIS system as cost-effective, accurate and reliable, they will not buy and use the BIS system in sufficient quantities to enable us to continue to be profitable.
     Moreover, additional clinical research we or third parties undertake may fail to support the benefit of our products, including failing to support evidence of a link between the use of BIS monitoring and a reduction in the incidence of awareness. For example, a third-party study recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine compared BIS monitoring with a protocol based on end-tidal gas anesthetic in a patient population considered to be at high risk of awareness and concluded that, based upon a similar occurrence of awareness in both groups, no benefit of BIS monitoring was demonstrated. We believe that the rate of growth of our domestic sensor revenue was, in part, adversely affected in the third quarter of 2008, and may be adversely affected in future periods as a result of this publication. If the patient safety benefits of BIS monitoring are not persuasive enough to lead to a wider adoption of our BIS technology, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.     
     The success of our business depends in a large part on continued use of the BIS system by our customers and, accordingly, sales by us of BIS Sensors. We expect that over time, sales of BIS Sensors will increase as a percentage of our revenue as compared to sales of Equipment as we build our installed base of

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monitors and modules. If use of our BIS system, and accordingly, sales of our BIS Sensors, do not increase, our ability to grow our revenue and maintain profitability could be adversely affected.
We depend on our BIS system for substantially all of our revenue, and if the BIS system does not gain widespread market acceptance, then our revenue will not grow.
     To date, we have not achieved widespread market acceptance of the BIS system for use in the operating room or in the intensive care unit from healthcare providers or professional anesthesia organizations. Because we depend on our BIS system for substantially all of our revenue and we have no other significant products, if we fail to achieve widespread market acceptance for the BIS system, we will not be able to sustain or grow our product revenue.
Various factors may adversely affect our quarterly operating results through the fourth fiscal quarter of 2008 and beyond.
     Various factors may adversely affect our quarterly operating results through the fourth fiscal quarter of 2008 and beyond. Among these factors are the following:
    a third party study published in March 2008 in the New England Journal of Medicine compared BIS monitoring with a protocol based on end-tidal gas anesthetic in a patient population considered to be at high risk of awareness and concluded that, based upon a similar occurrence of awareness in both groups, no benefit of BIS monitoring was demonstrated. We believe that the publication of this study has had, and may continue to have an adverse effect on the rate at which existing or potential new customers purchase and use our products, which could adversely affect our operating results;
 
    we are expanding our sales force and expect that such expansion will continue to increase our operating expenses in future periods and that such an increase would not be offset at least initially by an increase in revenue; as a result our operating results in such periods could be adversely affected;
 
    we continue to shift the focus of our sales and marketing efforts from expanding our customer base to deepening our relationships with our existing customers and increasing their sensor utilization and procedure penetration. As a result of this shift in focus, we expect our revenue from the sale of equipment to continue to decrease. As such, if we do not increase revenue from sales of our BIS Sensors as quickly as we plan, or at all, our operating results could be adversely affected;
 
    we may not realize expected benefits of favorable industry pronouncements on anesthesia awareness, including the position statements issued by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations, the American Society of Anesthesiologists House of Delegates, and the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists;
 
    we have recently repurchased a portion of our 2.5% convertible senior notes due 2014, referred to as our notes, and we may make additional repurchases in the future. If any such repurchases are made at a discount to the face value of the note, we expect to record a gain on such transaction, which could affect our operating results in the quarter in which any such repurchase is made; and
 
    we face risks beyond our control with respect to the continued challenges of the U.S. and worldwide economies including without limitation the effects of domestic inflation, declines in the value of our investments and the global rise in energy costs.
     If these or any other adverse factors cause a decline in our operating results, or if the market perceives that any such adverse factors could cause a decline in our operating results, in the fourth quarter of 2008 or beyond, then the trading price of our common stock may decline and your investment may loose value.
Fluctuations in our quarterly operating results could cause our stock price to decrease.
     Our operating results have fluctuated significantly from quarter to quarter in the past and are likely to vary in the future. These fluctuations are due to several factors relating to the sale of our products, including:
    the timing and volume of customer orders for our BIS system;
 
    market acceptance of our BIS VISTA monitor;

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    use of and demand for our BIS Sensors;
 
    transition of sales focus from expanding our customer base to developing our existing customers and increasing their sensor utilization and procedure penetration;
 
    customer cancellations;
 
    introduction of competitive products;
 
    regulatory approvals;
 
    changes in management;
 
    turnover in our direct sales force;
 
    we are expanding our sales force and expect that such expansion will increase our operating expenses in future periods and that such an increase would not be offset at least initially by an increase in revenue;
 
    effectiveness of new marketing and sales programs;
 
    communications published by industry organizations or other professional entities in the anesthesia community that are unfavorable to our business, including publications of the results of clinical studies;
 
    trading in our convertible debt instruments;
 
    repurchases of shares of our common stock or our 2.5% notes;
 
    the amount of our outstanding indebtedness and interest payments under debt obligations;
 
    reductions in orders by our distributors and original equipment manufacturers; and
 
    the timing and amount of our expenses.
     Because of these factors, it is likely that in some future quarter or quarters our operating results could fall below the expectations of securities analysts or investors. If our quarterly operating results are below expectations in the future, the market price of our common stock would likely decrease. In addition, because we do not have a substantial backlog of customer orders for our BIS system or our BIS Sensors, revenue in any quarter depends on orders received in that quarter. Our quarterly results may also be adversely affected because some customers may have inadequate financial resources to purchase our products or may fail to pay for our products after receiving them. In particular, hospitals continue to experience financial constraints, consolidations and reorganizations as a result of cost containment measures and declining third-party reimbursement for services, which may result in decreased product orders or an increase in bad debt allowances in any quarter.
If the estimates we make, and the assumptions on which we rely, in preparing our financial statements prove inaccurate, our actual results may vary from those reflected in our financial statements.      
     Our financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of our assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, the amounts of charges accrued by us and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. This includes estimates and judgments regarding revenue recognition, warranty reserves, inventory valuations, valuation allowances for deferred tax assets, allowances for doubtful accounts and share-based compensation expense. We base our estimates and judgments on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances at the time such estimates and judgments were made. There can be no assurance, however, that our estimates and judgments, or the assumptions underlying them, will be correct.

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Compliance with changing regulation of corporate governance and public disclosure as well as potential new accounting pronouncements are likely to impact our future financial position or results of operations.
     Changing laws, regulations and standards relating to corporate governance and public disclosure, new SEC regulations and NASDAQ Global Market rules are creating uncertainty for companies such as ours. These new or changed laws, regulations and standards are subject to varying interpretations in many cases due to their lack of specificity, and as a result, their application in practice may evolve over time as new guidance is provided by regulatory and governing bodies, which could result in continuing uncertainty regarding compliance matters and higher costs necessitated by ongoing revisions to disclosure and governance practices. In addition, future changes in financial accounting standards may cause adverse, unexpected revenue fluctuations and affect our financial position or results of operations. New accounting pronouncements and varying interpretations of pronouncements have occurred with frequency in the past and may occur again in the future and as a result we may be required to make changes in our accounting policies, for example the 2006 requirement under Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 123(R), Share-Based Payment, to expense stock options.
     Our efforts to comply with evolving laws, regulations and standards have resulted in, and are likely to continue to result in, increased general and administrative expenses and management time related to compliance activities. We expect these efforts to require the continued commitment of significant resources. If our efforts to comply with new or changed laws, regulations and standards differ from the activities intended by regulatory or governing bodies due to ambiguities related to practice, our reputation may be harmed and we might be subject to sanctions or investigation by regulatory authorities, such as the SEC. Any such action could adversely affect our financial results and the market price of our common stock.
Failure to maintain effective internal controls in accordance with section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley act could have a material adverse effect on our business and stock price.
     Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 requires management’s annual review and evaluation of our internal controls, and attestations of the effectiveness of our internal controls by our independent auditors. Our failure to maintain the effectiveness of our internal controls in accordance with the requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, as such standards are modified, supplemented or amended from time to time, could have an adverse effect on our business, operating results and stock price.
We may need additional financing for our future capital needs and may not be able to raise additional funds on terms acceptable to us, or at all.
     We believe that the financial resources available to us, including our current working capital and available revolving line of credit, will be sufficient to finance our planned operations and capital expenditures through at least the next 12 months. If we are unable to increase our revenue and continue to maintain positive cash flow, we will need to raise additional funds. We may also need additional financing if:
    the research and development costs of our products or technology currently under development, including costs to fund our neuroscience program following termination in June 2007 of our alliance with Boston Scientific Corporation, increase beyond current estimates;
 
    we decide to expand faster than currently planned;
 
    we develop new or enhanced services or products ahead of schedule;
 
    we decide to undertake new sales and/or marketing initiatives;
 
    we are required to defend or enforce our intellectual property rights, or respond to other legal challenges with respect to our products, including product liability claims;
 
    sales of our products do not meet our expectations domestically or internationally, including sales of our BIS Sensors;
 
    we are required or elect to pay the principal under our 2.5% notes in cash at or prior to maturity or we determine to repurchase any portion of our 2.5% notes;
 
    we experience unexpected losses in our cash investments or are otherwise unable to liquidate these investments due to unfavorable conditions in the capital markets;

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    we need to respond to competitive pressures; or
 
    we decide to acquire complementary products, businesses or technologies.
          
     We can provide no assurance that we will be able to raise additional funds on terms acceptable to us, if at all. If future financing is not available or is not available on acceptable terms, we may not be able to fund our future operations which would significantly limit our ability to implement our business plan and could result in a default under our 2.5% convertible senior notes due 2014. In addition, we may have to issue equity securities that may have rights, preferences and privileges senior to our common stock or issue debt securities that may contain limitations or restrictions on our ability to engage in certain transactions in the future.
Cases of awareness with recall during monitoring with the BIS system could limit market acceptance of the BIS system and could expose us to product liability claims.
     Clinicians have reported to us cases of possible awareness with recall during surgical procedures monitored with the BIS system. In most of the cases that were reported to us, when BIS index values were recorded at the time of awareness, high BIS index values were noted, indicating that the BIS index correctly identified the increased risk of awareness with recall in these patients. However, in a small number of these reported cases, awareness with recall may not have been detected by monitoring with the BIS system. We have not systematically solicited reports of awareness with recall. It is possible that additional cases of awareness with recall during surgical procedures monitored with the BIS system have not been reported to us. Anesthesia providers and hospitals may elect not to purchase and use the BIS system if there is adverse publicity resulting from the report of cases of awareness with recall that were not detected during procedures monitored with the BIS system. If anesthesia providers and hospitals do not purchase and use the BIS system, then we may not sustain or grow our product revenue. Although our multi-center, multinational clinical studies have demonstrated that the use of BIS monitoring to help guide anesthetic administration may be associated with the reduction of the incidence of awareness with recall in adults using general anesthesia and sedation, we may be subject to product liability claims for cases of awareness with recall during surgical procedures monitored with the BIS system. Any of these claims could require us to spend significant time and money in litigation or to pay significant damages.
We may not be able to compete with new products or alternative techniques developed by others, which could impair our ability to remain competitive and achieve future growth.
     The medical device industry in which we market our products is characterized by rapid product development and technological advances. Our competitors have received clearance by the United States Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, for, and have introduced commercially, anesthesia monitoring products. If we do not compete effectively with these monitoring products, our revenue could be adversely affected. Our current and planned products are at risk of obsolescence from:
    other new monitoring products, based on new or improved technologies;
 
    new products or technologies used on patients or in the operating room during surgery in lieu of monitoring devices;
 
    electrical or mechanical interference from new or existing products or technologies;
 
    alternative techniques for evaluating the effects of anesthesia;
 
    significant changes in the methods of delivering anesthesia; and
 
    the development of new anesthetic agents.
     We may not be able to improve our products or develop new products or technologies quickly enough to maintain a competitive position in our markets and to grow our business.

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If we do not maintain our relationships with the anesthesia community and if anesthesiologists and other healthcare providers do not recommend and endorse our products, our sales may decline or we may be unable to increase our sales and profits.
     Physicians typically influence the medical device purchasing decisions of the hospitals and other healthcare institutions in which they practice. Consequently, our relationships with anesthesiologists are critical to our growth. We believe that these relationships are based on the quality of our products, our long-standing commitment to the consciousness monitoring market, our marketing efforts and our presence at medical society and trade association meetings. Any actual or perceived diminution in our reputation or the quality of our products, or our failure or inability to maintain our commitment to the consciousness monitoring market and our other marketing and product promotion efforts could damage our current relationships, or prevent us from forming new relationships, with anesthesiologists and other anesthesia professionals and cause our growth to be limited or decline and our business to be harmed.
     In order for us to sell our products, anesthesia professionals must recommend and endorse them. We may not obtain the necessary recommendations or endorsements from this community. Acceptance of our products depends on educating the medical community as to the distinctive characteristics, perceived benefits, safety, clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of our products compared to traditional methods of consciousness monitoring and the products of our competitors, and on training healthcare professionals in the proper application of our products. For example, we believe that the publication in March 2008 of a study in the New England Journal of Medicine that concluded that no benefit of BIS monitoring was demonstrated when compared to an alternative protocol for consciousness monitoring has, and could continue to adversely affect market perceptions of the benefits of our BIS monitoring products and, accordingly, the degree to which anesthesia professionals and other healthcare providers endorse those products. If we are not successful in obtaining and maintaining the recommendations or endorsements of anesthesiologists and other healthcare professionals for our products, our sales may decline or we may be unable to increase our sales and profits.
Negative publicity or unfavorable media coverage could damage our reputation and harm our operations.
     Certain companies that manufacture medical devices have received significant negative publicity in the past when their products did not perform as the medical community or patients expected. This publicity, and the perception such products may not have functioned properly, may result in increased litigation, including large jury awards, legislative activity, increased regulation and governmental review of company and industry practices. If we were to receive such negative publicity or unfavorable media attention, whether warranted or unwarranted, our reputation would suffer, our ability to market our products would be adversely affected, we may be required to change our products and become subject to increased regulatory burdens and we may be required to pay large judgments or fines. Any combination of these factors could further increase our cost of doing business and adversely affect our financial position, results of operations and cash flows.
If we do not successfully develop or acquire and introduce enhanced or new products we could lose revenue opportunities and customers.
     Our success in developing or acquiring and commercializing new products and enhancements of current products is affected by our ability to:
    identify and respond, in a timely manner, to new market trends or opportunities;
 
    assess customer needs;
 
    successfully develop or acquire competitive products;
 
    complete regulatory clearance in a timely manner;
 
    successfully develop cost effective manufacturing processes;
 
    introduce such products to our customers in a timely manner; and
 
    achieve market acceptance of the BIS system.
     If we are unable to continue to develop or acquire and market new products and technologies, we may experience a decrease in demand for our products, and a loss of market share and our business would suffer. As the market for our BIS system matures, we need to develop or acquire and introduce new products for anesthesia monitoring or other applications. Additionally, we have begun to research the use of BIS monitoring to diagnose, track and manage neurological diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and depression. We face at least the following two risks with respect to our planned development of new products and our entrance into potential new markets:

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    we may not successfully adapt the BIS system to function properly for procedural sedation, when used with anesthetics we have not tested or with patient populations we have not studied, such as infants; and
 
    our technology is complex, and we may not be able to develop it further for applications outside anesthesia monitoring, such as the diagnosis and tracking of neurological diseases.
     We are focused on the market for brain monitoring products. The projected demand for our products could materially differ from actual demand if our assumptions regarding this market and its trends and acceptance of our products by the medical community prove to be incorrect or do not materialize or if other products or technologies gain more widespread acceptance, which in each case would adversely affect our business prospects and profitability.
     If we do not successfully adapt the BIS system for new products and applications both within and outside the field of anesthesia monitoring, or if such products and applications are developed but not successfully commercialized, then we could lose revenue opportunities and customers.
If our clinical trials are delayed or unsuccessful, our business could be adversely affected.
     We are conducting several clinical studies, including studies in the areas of interoperative awareness in children, depression and Alzheimer’s disease, and the association between deep anesthesia and long-term patient outcomes. Clinical trials require sufficient patient enrollment, which is a function of many factors, including the size of the patient population, the nature of the protocol and the eligibility criteria for the clinical trial. Delays in patient enrollment can result in increased costs and longer development times.
     We cannot predict whether we will encounter problems with respect to any of our completed, ongoing or planned clinical trials that will cause us or regulatory authorities to delay or suspend our clinical trials or delay the analysis of data from our completed or ongoing clinical trials. Moreover, the final results of our clinical trials may not support or confirm any preliminary or interim results and we may not successfully reach the endpoints in these trials. Even if we successfully complete our clinical trials the FDA or other regulatory agencies may not accept the results.
     Any of the following could delay the completion of our ongoing and planned clinical trials, or result in a failure of these trials to support our business:
    delays or the inability to obtain required approvals from institutional review boards or other governing entities at clinical sites selected for participation in our clinical trials;
 
    delays in enrolling patients and volunteers into clinical trials;
 
    lower than anticipated retention rates of patients and volunteers in clinical trials;
 
    negative results from clinical trials for any of our potential products, including those involving the management of depression and the early diagnosis and tracking of Alzheimer’s disease; and
 
    failure of our clinical trials to demonstrate the efficacy or clinical utility of our potential products.
     If we determine that the costs associated with attaining regulatory approval of a product exceed the potential financial benefits or if the projected development timeline is inconsistent with our determination of when we need to get the product to market, we may choose to stop a clinical trial and/or development of a product.
If we do not develop and implement a successful sales and marketing strategy, we will not expand our business.
     In the past, we have experienced high turnover in our direct sales force. It is possible that high turnover may occur in the future. If new sales representatives do not acquire the technological skills to sell our products in a timely and successful manner or we experience high turnover in our direct sales force, we may not be able to sustain and grow our product revenue. In addition, in order to increase our sales, we need to continue to strengthen our relationships with our international distributors and continue to add international distributors. Also, we need to continue to strengthen our relationships with our original equipment manufacturers and other sales channels and increase sales through these channels. On an ongoing basis, we need to develop and introduce new sales and marketing programs and clinical education programs to promote the use of the BIS system by our customers. We are currently shifting the focus of our sales and marketing emphasis from expanding our customer base to deepening our relationships with our existing customers and increasing their sensor utilization and procedure penetration. We are also currently seeking to expand our sales force. If we do not implement these new sales and marketing and education programs in a timely and successful

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manner, we may not be able to achieve the level of market awareness and sales required to expand our business. We have only limited sales and marketing experience both in the United States and internationally and may not be successful in developing and implementing our strategy. Among other things, we need to:
    provide or assure that distributors and original equipment manufacturers provide the technical and educational support customers need to use the BIS system successfully;
 
    promote frequent use of the BIS system so that sales of our disposable BIS Sensors increase;
 
    establish and implement successful sales and marketing and education programs that encourage our customers to purchase our products or the products that are made by original equipment manufacturers incorporating our technology;
 
    manage geographically dispersed operations; and
 
    modify our products and marketing and sales programs for foreign markets.
We encourage our direct sales force, distributors and original equipment manufacturers to maximize the amount of our products they sell and they may engage in aggressive sales practices that may harm our reputation.
      We sell our products through a combination of a direct sales force, third party distributors and original equipment manufacturers. As a means to incentivize the sales force, distributors and original equipment manufacturers, the compensation we pay increases with the amount of our products they sell. For example, the compensation paid to the members of our direct sales force consists, in part, of commissions and, the greater the amount of sales, the higher the commission we pay. The participants in our sales channels may engage in sales practices that are aggressive or considered to be inappropriate by existing or potential customers. In addition, we do not exercise control over, and may not be able to provide sufficient oversight of, the sales practices and techniques used by third party distributors and original equipment manufacturers. Negative public opinion resulting from these sales practices can adversely affect our ability to keep and attract customers and could expose us to litigation.
Our third-party distribution and original equipment manufacturer relationships could negatively affect our profitability, cause sales of our products to decline and be difficult to terminate if we are dissatisfied.
     Sales through distributors could be less profitable than direct sales. Sales of our products through multiple channels could also confuse customers and cause the sale of our products to decline. We do not control our original equipment manufacturers and distribution partners. Our partners could sell competing products, may not incorporate our technology into their products in a timely manner and may devote insufficient sales efforts to our products. In addition, our partners are generally not required to purchase minimum quantities. As a result, even if we are dissatisfied with the performance of our partners, we may be unable to terminate our agreements with these partners or enter into alternative arrangements.
We may not be able to generate enough additional revenue from our international expansion to offset the costs associated with establishing and maintaining foreign operations.
     A component of our growth strategy is to expand our presence in international markets. We conduct international business primarily in Europe and Japan, and we are attempting to increase the number of countries in which we do business. It is costly to establish international facilities and operations and to promote the BIS system in international markets. We have encountered barriers to the sale of our BIS system outside the United States, including less acceptance by anesthesia providers for use of disposable products, such as BIS Sensors, delays in regulatory approvals outside of the United States, particularly in Japan, and difficulties selling through indirect sales channels. In addition, we have little experience in marketing and distributing products in international markets. Revenue from international activities may not offset the expense of establishing and maintaining these international operations.

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We may not be able to meet the unique operational, legal and financial challenges that we encounter in our international operations, which may limit the growth of our business.
     We are increasingly subject to a number of challenges which specifically relate to our international business activities. These challenges include:
    failure of local laws to provide adequate protection against infringement of our intellectual property;
 
    protectionist laws and business practices that favor local competitors, which could slow or prohibit our growth in international markets;
 
    difficulties in terminating or modifying distributor arrangements because of restrictions in markets outside the United States;
 
    less acceptance by foreign anesthesia providers of the use of disposable products, such as BIS Sensors;
 
    delays in regulatory approval of our products;
 
    currency conversion issues arising from sales denominated in currencies other than the United States dollar;
 
    foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations;
 
    longer sales cycles to sell products like the BIS system to hospitals and outpatient surgical centers, which could slow our revenue growth from international sales; and
 
    longer accounts receivable payment cycles and difficulties in collecting accounts receivable.
     If we are unable to meet and overcome these challenges, our international operations may not be successful, which would limit the growth of our business and could adversely impact our results of operations.
We may experience customer dissatisfaction and our reputation could suffer if we fail to manufacture enough products to meet our customers’ demands.
     We rely on third-party manufacturers to assemble and manufacture the components of our BIS monitors, original equipment manufacturer products and a portion of our BIS Sensors. We manufacture substantially all BIS Sensors in our own manufacturing facility. We have only one manufacturing facility. If we fail to produce enough products at our own manufacturing facility or at a third-party manufacturing facility for any reason, including damage or destruction of the facility, or experience a termination or modification of any manufacturing arrangement with a third party, we may be unable to deliver products to our customers on a timely basis. Even if we are able to identify alternative facilities to manufacture our products, if necessary, we may experience disruption in the supply of our products until such facilities are available. Although we believe we possess adequate insurance for damage to our property and the disruption of our business from casualties, such insurance may not be sufficient to cover all of our potential losses and may not be available to us on acceptable terms or at all. Additionally, failure to deliver products on a timely basis could lead to customer dissatisfaction and damage our reputation.
Our reliance on sole-source suppliers could adversely affect our ability to meet our customers’ demands for our products in a timely manner or within budget.
     Some of the components that are necessary for the assembly of our BIS system, including some of the components used in our BIS Sensors, are currently provided to us by sole-source suppliers or a limited group of suppliers. We purchase components through purchase orders, and in select cases, long-term supply agreements, and generally do not maintain large volumes of inventory. We have experienced shortages and delays in obtaining some of the components of our BIS systems in the past, and we may experience similar shortages or delays in the future. The disruption or termination of the supply of components could cause a significant increase in the costs of these components, which could affect our profitability. A disruption or termination in the supply of components could also result in our inability to meet demand for our products, which could lead to customer dissatisfaction and damage our reputation. If a supplier is no longer willing or able to manufacture components that we purchase and integrate into the BIS system, we may attempt to design replacement components ourselves that would be compatible with our existing technology. In doing so, we would incur additional research and development expenses, and there can be no assurance that we would be

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successful in designing or manufacturing any replacement components. Furthermore, if we are required to change the manufacturer of a key component of the BIS system, we may be required to verify that the new manufacturer maintains facilities and procedures that comply with quality standards and with all applicable regulations and guidelines. The delays associated with the verification of a new manufacturer could delay our ability to manufacture BIS system products in a timely manner or within budget.
We may be required to bring litigation to enforce our intellectual property rights, which may result in substantial expense and may divert our attention from the implementation of our business strategy.
     We believe that the success of our business depends, in part, on obtaining patent protection for our products, defending our patents once obtained and preserving our trade secrets. We rely on a combination of contractual provisions, confidentiality procedures and patent, trademark and trade secret laws to protect the proprietary aspects of our technology. These legal measures afford only limited protection, and competitors may gain access to our intellectual property and proprietary information. Any patents we have obtained or will obtain in the future might also be invalidated or circumvented by third parties. Our pending patent applications may not issue as patents or, if issued, may not provide commercially meaningful protection, as competitors may be able to design around our patents or produce alternative, non-infringing designs. Litigation may be necessary to enforce our intellectual property rights, to protect our trade secrets and to determine the validity and scope of our proprietary rights. Any litigation could result in substantial expense and diversion of our attention from the business and may not be adequate to protect our intellectual property rights.
We may be sued by third parties which claim that our products infringe on their intellectual property rights, particularly because there is substantial uncertainty about the validity and breadth of medical device patents.
     We may be subject to litigation by third parties based on claims that our products infringe the intellectual property rights of others. This risk is exacerbated by the fact that the validity and breadth of claims covered in medical technology patents involve complex legal and factual questions for which important legal principles are unresolved. Any litigation or claims against us, whether or not valid, could result in substantial costs, could place a significant strain on our financial resources and could harm our reputation. In addition, intellectual property litigation or claims could force us to do one or more of the following:
    cease selling, incorporating or using any of our products that incorporate the challenged intellectual property, which would adversely affect our revenue;
 
    obtain a license from the holder of the infringed intellectual property right, which license may not be available on reasonable terms, if at all; and
 
    redesign our products, which may be costly, time-consuming and may not be successful.
We could be exposed to significant product liability claims which could divert management attention and adversely affect our cash balances, our ability to obtain and maintain insurance coverage at satisfactory rates or in adequate amounts and our reputation.
     The manufacture and sale of our products expose us to product liability claims and product recalls, including those which may arise from misuse or malfunction of, or design flaws in, our products or use of our products with components or systems not manufactured or sold by us. There may be increased risk of misuse of our products if persons not skilled in consciousness monitoring attempt to use our BIS monitoring products. Product liability claims or product recalls, regardless of their ultimate outcome, could require us to spend significant time and money in litigation or to pay significant damages. We currently maintain product liability insurance; however, it may not cover the costs of any product liability claims made against us. Furthermore, we may not be able to obtain insurance in the future at satisfactory rates or in adequate amounts. In addition, publicity pertaining to the misuse or malfunction of, or design flaws in, our products could impair our ability to successfully market and sell our products and could lead to product recalls.

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Several class action lawsuits have been filed against the underwriters of our initial public offering which may result in negative publicity and potential litigation against us that would be costly to defend and the outcome of which is uncertain and may harm our business.
      The underwriters of our initial public offering are named as defendants in several class action complaints which have been filed allegedly on behalf of certain persons who purchased shares of our common stock between January 28, 2000 and December 6, 2000. These complaints allege violations of the Securities Act and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Securities Exchange Act. Primarily they allege that there was undisclosed compensation received by our underwriters in connection with our initial public offering. While we and our officers and directors have not been named as defendants in these suits, based on comparable lawsuits filed against other companies, there can be no assurance that we and our officers and directors will not be named in similar complaints in the future. In addition, the underwriters may assert that we are liable for some or all of any liability that they are found to have to the plaintiffs, pursuant to the indemnification provisions of the underwriting agreement we entered into as part of the initial public offering, or otherwise.
     We can provide no assurance as to the outcome of these complaints or any potential suit against us or our officers and directors. Any conclusion of these matters in a manner adverse to us could have a material adverse affect on our financial position and results of operations. In addition, the costs to us of defending any litigation or other proceeding, even if resolved in our favor, could be substantial. Such litigation could also substantially divert the attention of our management and our resources in general. Even if we are not named as defendants in these lawsuits, we may also be required to incur significant costs and our management may be distracted by being required to provide information, documents or testimony in connection with the actions against our underwriters. Uncertainties resulting from the initiation and continuation of any litigation or other proceedings and the negative publicity associated with this litigation could harm our ability to compete in the marketplace.
We and Boston Scientific recently jointly terminated our strategic alliance and other agreements and, as a result, we may not have sufficient funding to finance our neuroscience programs.
     On June 11, 2007, we and Boston Scientific Corporation entered into a termination and repurchase agreement under which we jointly agreed to terminate the following agreements between the parties:
    the original equipment manufacturer product development agreement dated as of August 7, 2002, pursuant to which we were seeking to develop certain products that Boston Scientific Corporation would then commercialize in the area of monitoring patients under sedation in a range of less invasive medical specialties, and pursuant to which we granted Boston Scientific Corporation an exclusive option to become the distributor for a period of time of certain of our products;
 
    the product development and distribution agreement dated as of May 23, 2005, pursuant to which we were seeking to develop new applications of its brain-monitoring technology in the area of the diagnosis and treatment of neurological, psychiatric and pain disorders and Boston Scientific Corporation was appointed the exclusive distributor of such products. Under this agreement, which we refer to as the neuroscience alliance, Boston Scientific Corporation had agreed to provide $25.0 million of funding over a five year period. We received $10.0 million under this agreement; and
 
    the letter agreement dated August 7, 2002, and the security agreement dated August 7, 2002, pursuant to which Boston Scientific Corporation agreed to make revolving interest-bearing loans to us from time to time at our request, such revolving loans being evidenced by a promissory note in the original principal amount of $5.0 million dated August 7, 2002 made by us in favor of Boston Scientific Corporation.
     As a result of the termination of our alliance with Boston Scientific Corporation, we have regained the commercial rights to products subject to the alliance that we previously shared, but we have lost the support that Boston Scientific Corporation would have provided under the alliance to develop and market products for monitoring patients under sedation and for neuroscience applications. Specifically, we will lose funding and distribution support from Boston Scientific Corporation for these products. Consequently, we may need to find alternative sources of funds, which may not be available, and we may need to develop our own distribution capabilities or use a third-party distributor. There can be no guarantee that we will be able to develop these new products successfully on our own or that we will be able to reach any agreement with a third-party distributor on terms acceptable to us, or at all.

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We may not reserve amounts adequate to cover product obsolescence, claims and returns, which could result in unanticipated expenses and fluctuations in operating results.
     Depending on factors such as the timing of our introduction of new products which utilize our BIS technology, as well as warranty claims and product returns, we may need to reserve amounts in excess of those currently reserved for product obsolescence, excess inventory, warranty claims and product returns. These reserves may not be adequate to cover all costs associated with these items. If these reserves are inadequate, we would be required to incur unanticipated expenses which could result in unexpected fluctuations in quarterly operating results.
We may not be able to compete effectively, which could result in price reductions and decreased demand for our products.
     We are facing increased competition in the domestic level of consciousness monitoring market as a result of a number of competitors’ monitoring systems which have been cleared for marketing by the FDA. These products are marketed by well-established medical products companies with significant resources. We may not be able to compete effectively with these and other potential competitors. We may also face substantial competition from companies which may develop sensor products that compete with our proprietary BIS Sensors for use with our BIS monitors or with third-party monitoring systems or anesthesia delivery systems that incorporate the BIS index. We also expect to face competition from companies currently marketing conventional electroencephalogram, or EEG, monitors using standard and novel signal-processing techniques. Other companies may develop anesthesia-monitoring systems that perform better than the BIS system and/or sell for less. In addition, one or more of our competitors may develop products that are substantially equivalent to our FDA-approved products, in which case they may be able to use our products as predicate devices to more quickly obtain FDA approval of their competing products. Medical device companies developing these and other competitive products may have greater financial, technical, marketing and other resources than we do. Competition in the sale of anesthesia-monitoring systems could result in price reductions, fewer orders, reduced gross margins and loss of market share. We are seeking to develop new products and technologies in the areas of depression and Alzheimer’s disease. If we are not successful in developing new products or technologies, or if we experience delays in development or release of such products, we may not be able to compete successfully.
Our ability to market and sell our products and generate revenue depends upon receipt of domestic and foreign regulatory approval of our products and manufacturing operations.
     Our products are classified as medical devices and are subject to extensive regulation in the United Sates by the FDA and other federal, state, and local authorities. These regulations relate to the manufacturing, labeling, sale, promotion, distribution, importing, exporting and shipping of our products. Before we can market new products or a new use of, or claim for, an existing product in the United States, we must obtain clearance or approval from the FDA. If the FDA concludes that any of our products do not meet the requirements to obtain clearance of a premarket notification under Section 510(k) of the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, then we would be required to file a premarket approval application. For example, there can be no guarantee that the FDA will accept the results from our depression clinical trial as supportive of a 510(k) notification without requiring additional studies and/or a premarket approval application. Both of these processes can be lengthy, expensive, may require extensive data from preclinical studies and clinical trials and may require significant user fees. The premarket approval process typically is more burdensome, expensive, time-consuming and uncertain than the premarket notification process. We may not obtain clearance of a 510(k) notification or approval of a premakret approval application with respect to any of our products on a timely basis, if at all. If we fail to obtain timely clearance or approval for our products, we will not be able to market and sell our products, which will limit our ability to generate revenue. We may also be required to obtain clearance of a 510(k) notification from the FDA before we can market certain previously marketed products which we modify after they have been cleared. We have made certain enhancements to our currently marketed products which we have determined do not necessitate the filing of a new 510(k) notification. However, if the FDA does not agree with our determinations, it will require us to file a new 510(k) notification for the modification, and we may be prohibited from marketing the modified devices until we obtain FDA clearance, or be required to recall devices that may be on the market, or be subject to other sanctions.
     Medical devices may be marketed only for the indications for which they are approved or cleared. The FDA may fail to approve or clear indications that are necessary or desirable for successful commercialization of our products. The FDA also may refuse our request for 510(k) clearance or premarket approval of new products, new intended uses, or modification to products once they are approved or cleared. Our approvals or clearance can be revoked if safety or effectiveness problems develop.   
     Our promotional materials and training methods must comply with the FDA and other applicable laws and regulations. If the FDA determines that our promotional materials or training constitute promotion of an unapproved use, it could request that we modify our training or promotional materials or subject us to regulatory or enforcement actions, including the issuance of an

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untitled letter, a warning letter, injunction, seizure, civil monetary penalties, or criminal prosecution. It also is possible that other federal, state, or foreign enforcement authorities might take action if they consider our promotional or training materials to constitute promotion of an unapproved use, which could result in significant fines or penalties under other statutory authorities, such as laws prohibiting false claims for reimbursement. In that event, our reputation could be damaged, adoption of the products could be impaired, and we might not be able to promote the products for certain uses for which we had expected to promote them.  
     The FDA also requires us to adhere to current Good Manufacturing Practices regulations, also known as the Quality System Regulation (QSR) in the case of medical devices, which include production controls, design controls, testing, quality control, documentation procedures, verification and validation of the design and of the production process, purchasing controls for materials and components, implementation of corrective and preventive actions, and servicing, among other requirements. The FDA may at any time inspect our facilities to determine whether adequate compliance with QSR requirements has been achieved. Compliance with the QSR regulations for medical devices is difficult and costly. In addition, we may not continue to be compliant as a result of future changes in, or interpretations of, regulations by the FDA or other regulatory agencies. If we do not achieve continued compliance, the FDA may issue a warning letter, withdraw marketing clearance, require product recall, seize products, seek an injunction or consent decree, or seek criminal prosecution, among other possible remedies. When any change or modification is made to a device or its intended use, the manufacturer may be required to reassess compliance with the QSR regulations, which may cause interruptions or delays in the marketing and sale of our products.
     Sales of our products outside the United States are subject to foreign regulatory requirements that vary from country to country. The time required to obtain approvals from foreign countries may be longer than that required for FDA approval, and requirements for foreign licensing may differ from FDA requirements.
     The federal, state and foreign laws and regulations regarding the manufacture and sale of our products are subject to future changes, as are administrative interpretations of regulatory agencies. If we fail to comply with applicable federal, state or foreign laws or regulations, we could be subject to enforcement actions, including product seizures, recalls, withdrawal of clearances or approvals and civil and criminal penalties.
Even if we obtain the necessary FDA clearances or approvals, if we or our suppliers fail to comply with ongoing regulatory requirements our products could be subject to restrictions or withdrawal from the market.
     We are subject to the Medical Device Reporting, or MDR, regulations that require us to report to the FDA if our products may have caused or contributed to patient death or serious injury, or if our device malfunctions and a recurrence of the malfunction would likely result in a death or serious injury. We must also file reports of device corrections and removals and adhere to the FDA’s rules on labeling and promotion. Our failure to comply with these or other applicable regulatory requirements could result in enforcement action by the FDA, which may include any of the following:
    untitled letters, warning letters, fines, injunctions and civil penalties;
 
    administrative detention, which is the detention by the FDA of medical devices believed to be adulterated or misbranded;
 
    customer notification, or orders for repair, replacement or refund;
 
    voluntary or mandatory recall or seizure of our products;
 
    operating restrictions, partial suspension or total shutdown of production;
 
    refusal to review pre-market notification or pre-market approval submissions;
 
    rescission of a substantial equivalence order or suspension or withdrawal of a pre-market approval; and
 
    criminal prosecution.
     Any of the foregoing actions by the FDA could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

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We may be subject, directly or indirectly, to federal and state healthcare fraud and abuse laws and regulations and, if we are unable to fully comply with such laws, could face substantial penalties.
          Our operations may be directly or indirectly affected by various state and federal healthcare fraud and abuse laws, including the federal Anti-Kickback Statute, which prohibits any person from knowingly and willfully offering, paying, soliciting or receiving remuneration, directly or indirectly, to induce or reward either the referral of an individual, or the furnishing or arranging for an item or service, for which payment may be made under federal healthcare programs, such as the Medicare and Medicaid programs. If our past or present operations are found to be in violation of these laws, we or our officers may be subject to civil or criminal penalties, including large monetary penalties, damages, fines, imprisonment and exclusion from Medicare and Medicaid program participation. If enforcement action were to occur, our business and financial condition would be harmed.
If we do not retain our senior management and other key employees, we may not be able to successfully implement our business strategy.
          Our president and chief executive officer, Nassib Chamoun, joined us at our inception in 1987. Our chairman, J. Breckenridge Eagle, began serving as a director in 1988. Many other members of our management and key employees have extensive experience with us and other companies in the medical device industry. Our success is substantially dependent on the ability, experience and performance of these members of our senior management and other key employees. Because of their ability and experience, if we lose one or more of the members of our senior management or other key employees, our ability to successfully implement our business strategy could be seriously harmed.
If we do not attract and retain skilled personnel, or if we do not maintain good relationships with our employees, we will not be able to expand our business.
          Our products are based on complex signal-processing technology. Accordingly, we require skilled personnel to develop, manufacture, sell and support our products. Our future success will depend largely on our ability to continue to hire, train, retain and motivate additional skilled personnel, particularly sales representatives who are responsible for customer education and training and post-installation customer support. In order to hire and train skilled personnel, we believe that we will need to provide compensation arrangements including incentive-based programs, that are competitive with programs offered by comparable medical device companies. Factors may prevent us from implementing or maintaining such programs, including business and general market conditions and fluctuations in our stock price. If we are not able to attract and retain skilled personnel, we will not be able to manage and expand our business.
          In addition, we may be subject to claims that we engage in discriminatory or other unlawful practices with respect to our hiring, termination, promotion and compensation processes for our employees. Such claims, with or without merit, could be time consuming, distracting and expensive to defend, could divert attention of our management from other tasks important to the success of our business and could adversely affect our reputation as an employer.
If we make any acquisitions, we will incur a variety of costs and may never successfully integrate the acquired business into ours.
         We may attempt to acquire businesses, technologies, services or products that we believe are a strategic complement to our business. We may encounter operating difficulties and expenditures relating to integrating an acquired business, technology, service or product. These acquisitions may also absorb significant management attention that would otherwise be available for ongoing development of our business. Moreover, we may never realize the anticipated benefits of any acquisition. We may also make dilutive issuances of equity securities, incur debt or experience a decrease in the cash available for our operations, or incur contingent liabilities in connection with any future acquisitions, all of which could have a material adverse affect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Our employees may engage in misconduct or other improper activities, including insider trading.
          We are exposed to the risk that employee fraud or other misconduct could occur. Misconduct by employees could include intentional failures to comply with FDA regulations, to provide accurate information to the FDA, to comply with manufacturing standards we have established, to comply with federal and state healthcare fraud and abuse laws and regulations, to accurately report financial information or data or to disclose unauthorized activities to us. Employee misconduct could also involve the improper use of customer information or information obtained in the course of clinical trials, which could result in regulatory sanctions and serious harm to our reputation. We have adopted a Code of Business Conduct and Ethics, but it is not always possible to identify and deter employee misconduct, and the precautions we take to detect and prevent this activity may not be effective in controlling unknown or unmanaged risks or losses.

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       In addition, during the course of our operations, our directors, executives and employees may have access to material, non-public information regarding our business, our results of operations or potential transactions we are considering. Despite our adoption of an Insider Trading Policy, we may not be able to prevent a director or employee from trading in our common stock on the basis of, or while in possession of, material, non-public information. If a director or employee was to be investigated, or an action was to be brought against a director or employee, for insider trading, it could have a negative impact on our reputation and our stock price. Such a claim, with or without merit, could also result in substantial expenditures of time and money, and divert attention of our management team from other tasks important to the success of our business.
Failure of users of the BIS system, or users of future products we may develop, to obtain adequate reimbursement from third-party payors could limit market acceptance of the BIS system and other products, which could prevent us from sustaining profitability.
     Anesthesia providers are generally not reimbursed separately for patient monitoring activities utilizing the BIS system. For hospitals and outpatient surgical centers, when reimbursement is based on charges or costs, patient monitoring with the BIS system may reduce reimbursements for surgical procedures, because charges or costs may decline as a result of monitoring with the BIS system. Failure by hospitals and other users of the BIS system to obtain adequate reimbursement from third-party payors, or any reduction in the reimbursement by third-party payors to hospitals and other users as a result of using the BIS system, could limit market acceptance of the BIS system, which could prevent us from sustaining profitability.
     In addition, market acceptance of future products serving the depression and Alzheimer’s disease markets could depend upon adequate reimbursement from third-party payors. The ability and willingness of third-party payors to authorize coverage and sufficient reimbursement to compensate and encourage physicians to use such products is uncertain.
The market price of our stock is highly volatile, and this volatility could cause your investment in our stock to suffer a decline in value and cause us to incur significant costs from class action litigation.
       
     The market price of our stock is highly volatile. For example, from January 1, 2008 through November 1, 2008, the price of our common stock has ranged from a high of $14.25 to a low of $3.01. As a result of this volatility, your investment in our stock could rapidly lose its value. Our stock price could fluctuate for many reasons, including without limitation:
    variations in our quarterly operating results or those of companies that are perceived to be similar to us;
 
    third-party sales of large blocks of our common stock;
 
    rumors relating to us or our competitors;
 
    changes to our research and development plans and/or announcements regarding new technologies by us or our competitors;
 
    adverse results in clinical trials of our BIS monitoring system products and products under development;
 
    lawsuits involving us;
 
    sales by us of equity or debt to fund our operations;
 
    the loss of any of our key scientific or management personnel;
 
    FDA or international regulatory actions or lawsuits concerning the safety of our products; and
 
    market conditions, both in the medical device sector and generally.
     In addition, the stock markets in general have been extremely volatile, and have experienced fluctuations that have often been unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of the companies whose stock is trading. These broad market fluctuations could result in extreme fluctuations in the price of our common stock, which could cause a decline in the value of our shares.

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Transactions engaged in by our largest stockholders, our directors or executives involving our common stock may have an adverse effect on the price of our stock.
      Sales of our shares by our largest stockholders could have the effect of lowering our stock price. The perceived risk associated with the possible sale of a large number of shares by these stockholders, or the adoption of significant short positions by hedge funds or other significant investors, could cause some of our stockholders to sell their stock, thus causing the price of our stock to decline. In addition, actual or anticipated downward pressure on our stock price due to actual or anticipated sales of stock by directors or officers of Aspect could cause other institutions or individuals to engage in short sales of our common stock, which may further cause the price of our stock to decline.
     From time to time our directors and executive officers sell shares of our common stock on the open market. These sales are publicly disclosed in filings made with the SEC. In the future, our directors and executive officers may sell a significant number of shares for a variety of reasons unrelated to the performance of our business. Our stockholders may perceive these sales as a reflection on management’s view of the business and result in some stockholders selling their shares of our common stock. These sales could cause the price of our stock to drop.
We have various mechanisms in place to discourage takeover attempts, which may reduce or eliminate our stockholders’ ability to sell their shares for a premium in a change of control transaction.
     Various provisions of our certificate of incorporation and by-laws and of Delaware corporate law may discourage, delay or prevent a change in control or takeover attempt of our company by a third party that is opposed by our management and board of directors. Public stockholders who might desire to participate in such a transaction may not have the opportunity to do so. These anti-takeover provisions could substantially impede the ability of public stockholders to benefit from a change of control or change in our management and board of directors. These provisions include:
    preferred stock that could be issued by our board of directors to make it more difficult for a third party to acquire, or to discourage a third party from acquiring, a majority of our outstanding voting stock;
 
    classification of our directors into three classes with respect to the time for which they hold office;
 
    non-cumulative voting for directors;
 
    control by our board of directors of the size of our board of directors;
 
    limitations on the ability of stockholders to call special meetings of stockholders;
 
    inability of our stockholders to take any action by written consent; and
 
    advance notice requirements for nominations of candidates for election to our board of directors or for proposing matters that can be acted upon by our stockholders at stockholder meetings.
Risks Related to our Issuance of $125 Million Principal Amount of
2.5% Convertible Senior Notes due 2014
Our increased indebtedness as a result of the issuance of $125 million principal amount of 2.5% convertible senior notes, or the notes, may harm our financial condition and results of operations.
     Our level of indebtedness could have important consequences to investors, because:
    it could adversely affect our ability to satisfy our obligations under the notes;
 
    a substantial portion of our cash flows from operations will have to be dedicated to interest payments, principal payments and, if we irrevocably elect to net share settle the notes, conversion payments and may not be available for operations, working capital, capital expenditures, expansion, acquisitions or general corporate or other purposes;
 
    it may impair our ability to obtain additional financing in the future;
 
    it may limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and industry; and

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    it may make us more vulnerable to downturns in our business, our industry or the economy in general.
     Our operations may not generate sufficient cash to enable us to service our debt. If we fail to make a payment on the notes, we could be in default on the notes, and this default could cause us to be in default on our other indebtedness outstanding at that time. Conversely, a default on our other outstanding indebtedness may cause a default under the notes.
We may not have the cash necessary to pay interest on the notes, to settle conversions of the notes (if we have obtained stockholder approval to elect net share settlement of the notes, and we irrevocably elect such settlement method) or to repurchase the notes upon a fundamental change.
     The notes bear interest semi-annually at a rate of 2.5% per annum. In addition, we may in certain circumstances be obligated to pay additional interest. If at any time on or prior to the 45th scheduled trading day preceding the maturity date of the notes we obtain stockholder approval of the net share settlement feature in connection with the potential conversion of the notes, and if we irrevocably elect to use such feature, then upon conversion of the notes we would:
    pay cash in an amount equal to the lesser of one-fortieth of the principal amount of the notes being converted and the daily conversion value (the product of the conversion rate and the current trading price) of the notes being converted; and
 
    issue shares of our common stock only to the extent that the daily conversion value of the notes exceeded one-fortieth of the principal amount of the notes being converted for each trading day of the relevant 40 trading day observation period.
     Holders of notes also have the right to require us to repurchase all or a portion of their notes for cash upon the occurrence of a fundamental change. Any of our future debt agreements or securities may contain similar provisions. We may not have sufficient funds to pay interest, pay any such cash amounts to the note holders upon conversion or make the required repurchase of the notes at the applicable time and, in such circumstances, may not be able to arrange the necessary financing on favorable terms, if at all. In addition, our ability to pay interest, pay cash to the note holders upon conversion or make the required repurchase, as the case may be, may be limited by law or the terms of other debt agreements or securities. Our failure to pay such cash amounts to holders of notes or make the required repurchase, as the case may be, however, would constitute an event of default under the indenture governing the notes which, in turn, could constitute an event of default under other debt agreements or securities, thereby resulting in their acceleration and required prepayment and further restrict our ability to make such payments and repurchases.
The net share settlement feature of the notes, if available, may have adverse consequences.
     If we have obtained stockholder approval to elect net share settlement of the notes, the net share settlement feature of the notes may:
    result in holders receiving no shares of our common stock upon conversion or fewer shares of our common stock relative to the conversion value of the notes;
 
    reduce our liquidity because we will be required to pay the principal portion in cash;
 
    delay holders’ receipt of the proceeds upon conversion; and
 
    subject holders to market risk before receiving any shares upon conversion.
     If we obtain stockholder approval of the net share settlement feature in connection with the potential conversion of the notes, and if we irrevocably elect to use such feature, then upon conversion of the notes we would (1) pay cash in an amount equal to the lesser of one-fortieth of the principal amount of the notes being converted and the daily conversion value (the product of the conversion rate and the current trading price) of the notes being converted and (2) issue shares of our common stock only to the extent that the daily conversion value of the notes exceeded one-fortieth of the principal amount of the notes being converted for each trading day of the relevant 40 trading day observation period.
     Because the consideration due upon conversion of notes is based in part on the trading prices of our common stock, any decrease in the price of our common stock after notes are tendered for conversion may significantly decrease the value of the consideration received upon conversion. Furthermore, because under net share settlement we must settle at least a portion of our conversion obligation in cash, the conversion of notes may significantly reduce our liquidity.

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If we repurchase any portion of the notes, such repurchases could adversely affect the holders of the notes and our common stock and could also adversely affect our financial condition and operating results.
     In June 2008, we repurchased $10.0 million of the notes for a total consideration of $5.7 million, plus accrued interest of $120,000 to the date of repurchase. In September 2008, we repurchased $15.0 million of the notes for total consideration of $8.6 million plus accrued interest of $90,000. As a result of these transactions, for the nine months ended September 27, 2008, we have recorded a net gain on debt repurchases of $9.8 million. We may, from time to time, depending on market conditions, including without limitation whether our notes are then trading at discounts to their respective face amounts, repurchase additional outstanding notes for cash and/or in exchange for shares of our common stock, warrants, preferred stock, debt, or other consideration, in each case in open market purchases and/or privately negotiated transactions. The amounts involved in any such transactions, individually or in the aggregate, may be material. In addition, if we exchange shares of our capital stock, or securities convertible into or exercisable for our capital stock, such exchanges could result in material dilution to holders of our common stock. Moreover, any such repurchase could result in a tax liability if made at a discount to the face amount of the notes, and/or could otherwise adversely affect our financial condition or results of operations. Repurchases of the notes could also adversely affect the trading market for such notes if, for example, the public float on such notes is materially reduced. There can be no assurance that we will repurchase or exchange any additional outstanding notes and even if, in the future, we elect to repurchase a portion of the outstanding notes, any such repurchase may not be successfully completed or, if completed, may not be on terms that are favorable to us or that result in expected benefits for us.
Future sales of our common stock in the public market or the issuance of securities senior to our common stock could adversely affect the trading price of our common stock and the value of the notes and our ability to raise funds in new securities offerings.
     Future sales of our common stock, the perception that such sales could occur or the availability for future sale of shares of our common stock or securities convertible into or exercisable for our common stock could adversely affect the market prices of our common stock and the value of the notes prevailing from time to time and could impair our ability to raise capital through future offerings of equity or equity-related securities. In addition, we may issue common stock or equity securities senior to our common stock in the future for a number of reasons, including to finance our operations and business strategy, to adjust our ratio of debt to equity, to satisfy our obligations upon the exercise of options or for other reasons.
     As of September 27, 2008, we had outstanding options to purchase 4,372,772 shares of our common stock at a weighted average exercise price of $17.00 per share (980,629 of which have not yet vested) issued to employees, directors and consultants pursuant to our 1991 Amended and Restated Stock Option Plan, 1998 Stock Incentive Plan, Amended and Restated 1998 Director Equity Incentive Plan and 2001 Stock Incentive Plan, as amended. In order to attract and retain key personnel, we may issue additional securities, including stock options, restricted stock grants and shares of common stock, in connection with our employee benefit plans, or may lower the price of existing stock options. No prediction can be made as to the effect, if any, that the sale, or the availability for sale, of substantial amounts of common stock by our existing stockholders pursuant to an effective registration statement or under Rule 144, through the exercise of registration rights or the issuance of shares of common stock upon the exercise of stock options, or the perception that such sales or issuances could occur, could adversely affect the prevailing market prices for our common stock and the value of the notes.
Conversion of the notes will dilute the ownership interest of existing stockholders, including holders who had previously converted their notes.
     To the extent we issue any shares of our common stock upon conversion of the notes, the conversion of some or all of the notes will dilute the ownership interests of existing stockholders, including holders who have received shares of our common stock upon prior conversion of the notes. Any sales in the public market of the common stock issuable upon such conversion could adversely affect prevailing market prices of our common stock. In addition, the existence of the notes may encourage short selling by market participants because the conversion of the notes could depress the price or our common stock.
Provisions in the indenture for the notes may deter or prevent a business combination that may be favorable to note holders.
     If a fundamental change occurs prior to the maturity date of the notes, holders of the notes will, have the right, at their option, to require us to repurchase all or a portion of their notes. In addition, if a make-whole fundamental change occurs prior to the maturity date of the notes, we will in some cases increase the conversion rate for a holder that elects to convert its notes in connection with such make-whole fundamental change. In addition, the indenture governing the notes prohibits us from engaging in certain mergers or acquisitions unless, among other things, the surviving entity assumes our obligations under the notes. These and other provisions could prevent or deter a third party from acquiring us.

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The notes may not be rated or may receive a lower rating than anticipated.
     We do not intend to seek a rating on the notes. However, if one or more rating agencies rates the notes and assigns the notes a rating lower than the rating expected by investors, or reduces or indicates that they may reduce their rating in the future, the market price of the notes and our common stock could be harmed.
The effective subordination of the notes to our secured indebtedness to the extent of the collateral securing such indebtedness may limit our ability to satisfy our obligations under the notes.
     The notes will be our senior unsecured obligations and rank equally with any senior debt and senior to any subordinated debt. However, the notes will be effectively subordinated to our secured indebtedness to the extent of the value of the collateral securing such indebtedness. As of September 27, 2008, we did not have any secured indebtedness outstanding. The provisions of the indenture governing the notes do not prohibit us from incurring secured indebtedness in the future. Consequently, in the event of a bankruptcy, liquidation, dissolution, reorganization or similar proceeding with respect to us, the holders of any secured indebtedness will be entitled to proceed directly against the collateral that secures such secured indebtedness. Therefore, such collateral will not be available for satisfaction of any amounts owed under our unsecured indebtedness, including the notes, until such secured indebtedness is satisfied in full.
The structural subordination of the notes to our secured liabilities and all liabilities and preferred equity of our subsidiaries may limit our ability to satisfy our obligations under the notes.
     The notes will be effectively subordinated to all unsecured and secured liabilities and preferred equity of our subsidiaries. In the event of a bankruptcy, liquidation, dissolution, reorganization or similar proceeding with respect to any such subsidiary, we, as a common equity owner of such subsidiary, and, therefore, holders of our debt, including holders of the notes, will be subject to the prior claims of such subsidiary’s creditors, including trade and other payables, but excluding intercompany indebtedness. As of September 27, 2008, our subsidiaries had an accounts payable and accrued liabilities balance of approximately $1.4 million. The provisions of the indenture governing the notes do not prohibit our subsidiaries from incurring additional liabilities or issuing preferred equity in the future.
Item 6. Exhibits.
                  The exhibits listed in the Exhibit Index immediately preceding the exhibits are filed as part of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

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SIGNATURE
     Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.
         
  ASPECT MEDICAL SYSTEMS, INC.
 
 
Date: November 6, 2008  By:   /s/ Michael Falvey    
    Michael Falvey   
    Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
(Principal Financial and Accounting Officer) 
 
 

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EXHIBIT INDEX
     
EXHIBIT    
NUMBER   EXHIBIT
 
10.1
  Key Employee Change in Control Severance Benefits Plan is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated September 18, 2008.
 
   
31.1
  Certification by Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.
 
   
31.2
  Certification by Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.
 
   
32.1
  Certification by Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
 
   
32.2
  Certification by Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

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