Annual Reports

 
Quarterly Reports

 
8-K

 
Other

Atmel 10-K 2010
e10vk
Table of Contents

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
 
 
 
 
     
þ
  ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
    For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2009
or
o
  TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
Commission file number: 0-19032
 
     
Delaware
  77-0051991
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)   (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 
2325 Orchard Parkway, San Jose, California 95131
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code:
(408) 441-0311
 
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
     
Title of Each Class
 
Name of Exchange on Which Registered
 
Common Stock, par value $0.001 per share
  The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC
(NASDAQ Global Select Market)
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
None
 
 
Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act of 1933.  Yes þ     No o
 
Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”).  Yes o     No þ
 
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes þ     No o
 
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes o     No o
 
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of Registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  o
 
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
 
             
Large accelerated filer þ
       Accelerated filer o   Non-accelerated filer o   Smaller reporting company o
    (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)     
 
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  Yes o     No þ
 
As of June 30, 2009, the last business day of the Registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter, there were 451,048,799 shares of the Registrant’s Common Stock outstanding, and the aggregate market value of such shares held by non-affiliates of the Registrant (based on the closing sale price of such shares on the NASDAQ Global Select Market on June 30, 2009) was approximately $1,650,391,611. Shares of Common Stock held by each officer and director have been excluded in that such persons may be deemed to be affiliates. This determination of affiliate status is not necessarily a conclusive determination for other purposes.
 
As of January 31, 2010, Registrant had 455,660,430 outstanding shares of Common Stock.
 
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
 
Portions of the Registrant’s definitive proxy statement for the Registrant’s 2010 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated by reference in Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K to the extent stated herein. The Proxy Statement will be filed within 120 days of the Registrant’s fiscal year ended December 31, 2009.
 


 

 
 
             
PART I
ITEM 1.   BUSINESS     2  
ITEM 1A.   RISK FACTORS     12  
ITEM 1B.   UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS     28  
ITEM 2.   PROPERTIES     28  
ITEM 3.   LEGAL PROCEEDINGS     29  
ITEM 4.   RESERVED     31  
 
PART II
ITEM 5.   MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES     31  
ITEM 6.   SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA     32  
ITEM 7.   MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS     33  
ITEM 7A.   QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK     57  
ITEM 8.   CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA     60  
ITEM 9.   CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE     112  
ITEM 9A.   CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES     112  
ITEM 9B.   OTHER INFORMATION     113  
 
PART III
ITEM 10.   DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE REGISTRANT AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE MATTERS     113  
ITEM 11.   EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION     114  
ITEM 12.   SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS     114  
ITEM 13.   CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE     115  
ITEM 14.   PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES     115  
 
PART IV
ITEM 15.   EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES     115  
SIGNATURES     116  
EXHIBIT INDEX     117  
 EX-10.16
 EX-21.1
 EX-23.1
 EX-31.1
 EX-31.2
 EX-32.1
 EX-32.2


1


Table of Contents

 
PART I
 
ITEM 1.   BUSINESS
 
 
You should read the following discussion in conjunction with our Consolidated Financial Statements and the related “Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements”, and “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. This discussion contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, particularly statements regarding our outlook for fiscal 2010, our gross margins, anticipated revenues by geographic area, operating expenses and capital expenditures, cash flow and liquidity measures including the anticipated sale of auction rate securities to UBS Financial Services, Inc., factory utilization, charges related to and the effect of our strategic transactions, restructuring, performance restricted stock units, and other strategic efforts, particularly the potential sale of portions of our ASIC business, and our expectations regarding tax matters and the effects of exchange rates and efforts to manage exposure to exchange rate fluctuation. Our actual results could differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements as a result of a number of factors, risks and uncertainties, including the risk factors set forth in this discussion and in Item 1A — Risk Factors, and elsewhere in this Form 10-K. Generally, the words “may,” “will,” “could,” “would,” “anticipate,” “expect,” “intend,” “believe,” “seek,” “estimate,” “plan,” “view,” “continue,” the plural of such terms, the negatives of such terms, or other comparable terminology and similar expressions identify forward-looking statements. The information included in this Form 10-K is provided as of the filing date with the Securities and Exchange Commission and future events or circumstances could differ significantly from the forward-looking statements included herein. Accordingly, we caution readers not to place undue reliance on such statements. Atmel undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statements in this Form 10-K.
 
BUSINESS
 
 
We design, develop, manufacture and sell a wide range of semiconductor integrated circuit (“IC”) products and capacitive touch solutions, including microcontrollers, advanced logic, mixed-signal, nonvolatile memory and radio frequency (“RF”) components. Leveraging a broad intellectual property (“IP”) portfolio, we supply our customers complete system solutions, with particular emphasis on solutions incorporating microcontrollers. These complex system-on-a-chip solutions are manufactured using our leading-edge process technologies, including complementary metal oxide semiconductor (“CMOS”), double-diffused metal oxide semiconductor (“DMOS”), logic, CMOS logic, bipolar, bipolar CMOS (“BiCMOS”), silicon germanium (“SiGe”), SiGe BiCMOS, analog, bipolar double diffused CMOS and radiation tolerant process technologies. We develop these process technologies ourselves to ensure they provide the maximum possible performance. In 2009, we fabricated approximately 88% of our products in our own wafer fabrication facilities, or “fabs.” We believe our ICs enable our customers to rapidly introduce leading edge electronic products that are differentiated by higher performance, advanced security features, lower cost, smaller size, longer battery life and more memory. Our products are used primarily in the following markets: industrial, consumer electronics, automotive, wireless communications, computing, storage, printing, security, military and aerospace.
 
We were originally incorporated in California in December 1984. In October 1999, we were reincorporated in Delaware. Our principal offices are located at 2325 Orchard Parkway, San Jose, California 95131, and our telephone number is (408) 441-0311. Our website is located at: www.atmel.com; however, the information in, or that can be accessed through, our website is not part of this report. Our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to such reports are available, free of charge, through the “Investors” section of our website as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the SEC.


2


Table of Contents

 
Our products consist primarily of microcontrollers, advanced logic, mixed-signal, nonvolatile memory, radio frequency and system-level integration semiconductor solutions.
 
Our business is organized into four operating segments (see Note 14 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussion). Each of our business units offer products that compete in one or more of the end markets described below under the caption “Principal Markets and Customers.”
 
  •  Microcontrollers segment includes a variety of proprietary and standard microcontrollers, the majority of which contain embedded nonvolatile memory, integrated analog peripherals and capacitive touch sensing libraries. This segment also includes products with military and aerospace applications. In March 2008, we acquired Quantum Research Group Ltd. (“Quantum”), a supplier of capacitive sensing IP solutions. Results from the acquired operations are considered complementary to sales of microcontroller products and are included in this segment. Our Microcontroller segment comprised 38% of net revenues in the year ended December 31, 2009.
 
  •  Nonvolatile Memories segment consists predominantly of serial interface electrically erasable programmable read-only memory (“SEEPROM”) and serial interface Flash memory products. This segment also includes parallel interface Flash memories as well as mature parallel interface electrically erasable programmable read-only memory (“EEPROM”) and erasable programmable read-only memory (“EPROM”) devices. This segment also includes products with military and aerospace applications. Our Nonvolatile Memories segment comprised 24% of net revenues in the year ended December 31, 2009.
 
  •  Radio Frequency (“RF”) and Automotive segment includes products designed for the automotive industry. This segment produces and sells wireless and wired devices for industrial, consumer and automotive applications and it also provides foundry services which produce radio frequency products for the mobile telecommunications market. Our RF and Automotive segment comprised 12% of net revenues in the year ended December 31, 2009.
 
  •  Application Specific Integrated Circuit (“ASIC”) segment includes customer and application specific integrated circuits designed to meet specialized single-customer requirements for their high performance devices in a broad variety of specific applications. This segment also encompasses a range of products which provide security for digital data transactions, including smart cards for mobile phones, set top boxes, banking and national identity cards. We also develop application specific standard products (“ASSP”) for high reliability space applications, power management and secure crypto memory products. Our ASIC segment comprised 26% of net revenues in the year ended December 31, 2009.
 
Within each operating segment, we offer our customers products with a range of speed, density, power usage, specialty packaging, security and other features.
 
 
Our Microcontroller segment offers customers a full range of products to serve the consumer, automotive, industrial, telecom and PC peripheral end markets for embedded controls. Our product portfolio has four major Flash based microcontroller architectures targeted at the high volume embedded control market: our proprietary 8-bit and 32-bit AVR® platforms, our embedded 32-bit ARM-based product family and older 8051 8-bit based industry standard microcontroller products.
 
Embedded control systems typically incorporate a microcontroller as the principal active component. A microcontroller is a self-contained computer-on-a-chip consisting of a CPU, non-volatile program memory (Flash and EEPROM), random access memory (“RAM”) for data storage and various input/output peripheral capabilities. In addition to the microcontroller, a complete embedded control system incorporates application-specific software and may include specialized peripheral device controllers and internal or external non-volatile memory components, such as Flash and EEPROMs, to store additional program software and various analog and interface products.
 
Atmel AVR.  Our largest microcontroller product offering is based on the 8-bit AVR architecture. The tinyAVR®, megaAVR®, XMEGAtm AVR, AVR Wireless products, AVR USB products, AVR Smart Battery


3


Table of Contents

products and the AVR Touch User Interface products are all product families using the AVR 8-bit RISC CPU which allow customers to minimize power consumption while obtaining maximum performance and ease of programming. Our AVR XMEGAtm picoPower® microcontroller family consumes the least power in the industry, enabling longer operating times in hand-held and battery powered applications. AVR32 is our proprietary microcontroller architecture which provides customers with higher, 32-bit performance when 8-bit power is no longer sufficient. The AVR32 product offering is targeted at the industrial, automotive and ultra low power segments of the 32-bit market. AVR microcontroller products include embedded non-volatile memory and are available with a complete selection of analog and digital interfaces. We offer over 100 different products in the AVR family.
 
Atmel QTouch® and maXTouchtm.  With the acquisition of Quantum in 2008, we have become a leading supplier of robust, capacitive sensing solutions for touch screens and other touch controls.
 
User interfaces are the critical factor in making electronic products appealing to consumers. Our touch screen devices include ICs for creating economical, elegant, and easy to use touch screens that respond to a wide variety of touch types and gestures. They are capable of differentiating between single and multiple-finger touch, and support tap, press, flick, pinch (zoom in), stretch (zoom out), rotate, press and tap, press and double tap, press and flick, press and drag, and multiple-finger drag. We offer a comprehensive range of touch screen controllers for use by customers, such as touch buttons, keyboards, sliders and wheels as well as single-chip unlimited touch screen solutions.
 
QTouch and maXTouch devices are digital charge-transfer ICs designed to detect touch using a single connection between the sensor chip and a simple key electrode. The maXTouch family of touchscreen controllers offer exceptional performance and low power consumption in a single IC. The maXTouch devices support an unlimited number of touches enhancing the user interface and the way users interact with electronic products. Built in gestures and the ability to ignore unintentional touches result in a user interface that is intuitive and reliable. The QTouch chips are best suited for low key count applications up to 10 keys. QMatrix® devices are digital share-transfer (QT) ICs designed to detect touch using a scanned, passive matrix or electrode sets to achieve a large number of touch keys driven by a single chip. QWheel® and QSlide® devices are QT ICs based on Quantum’s QTouch technology to implement scrolling functionality. QFieldtm and QTwotm devices are QT ICs enabling Single and Two Touchtm touch screens.
 
ARM.  Our ARM-based microcontrollers are designed utilizing on the standard 32-bit ARM7tm, ARM9tm, ARM 11tm and ARM Cortextm architectures, where we offer a range of products with and without embedded nonvolatile memories. Our SAM7 and SAM9 (Smart Arm Micro) products offer high performance 32-bit microcontrollers with a variety of complex analog and digital peripherals integrated on the same chip. For customers demanding the highest performance products, we offer an ARM 11 product family. Our ARM customers save significant development time by using standard ARM software and the other development tools widely available.
 
8051.  Our 8051 8-bit microcontroller product offering is based on the standard 8051 CPU and ranges from products containing 2 Kbytes of embedded Flash memory to the largest products offering 128 Kbytes of embedded Flash memory. The 8051 products address a significant portion of the 8-bit microcontroller market in which the customer already has an installed software and application base using the standard 8051 architecture.
 
Increased demand for reliable, flexible and low cost controls in the electronics industry is being met by microcontrollers which replace mechanical and other passive controls in a wide range of applications such as lighting, automobile control functions, home automation, wireless communications, white goods and user interfaces in all products requiring human interaction.
 
 
Serial Interface Products.  Our serial interface products evolved from our EEPROM and Flash memory technology expertise and were developed to meet the market demand for delivery of nonvolatile memory content through specialized, low pin-count interfaces and packages. Our serial interface product portfolio encompasses the industry’s largest offering of Serial EEPROMs and two complete families of Serial Flash memories. From a system cost and silicon area perspective, it is generally more economical to employ Flash memory technology for densities


4


Table of Contents

of 512-Kbits and above, and the similarity of the feature sets for our Serial EEPROM and Serial Flash memories allows our customers to easily upgrade from densities as low as 1-Kbits to as high as 64-Mbits.
 
Serial EEPROMs.  We currently offer three complete families of Serial EEPROMs supporting industry standard 2-wire, 3-wire and SPI protocols. Primarily used to store personal preference data and configuration/setup data, our Serial EEPROM products can be found in a multitude of consumer, industrial and automotive applications ranging from everything such as WLAN adapters and LCD TVs to video game systems and GPS devices. Because of our advanced process technology, diverse package options and broad density offerings, we have maintained the market leadership position for the last several years.
 
Atmel DataFlash®.  The DataFlash® family of Serial Flash memories delivers proven, reliable solutions to store varying amounts of granular data or to store both embedded program code and data while utilizing very small, low pin-count packages. DataFlash devices are the industry’s most sophisticated and feature-rich Serial Flash memories and are designed to enable advanced features and functionality in a variety of high-volume products and applications. By using DataFlash memories, customers can minimize pin counts, simplify circuit boards, and reduce power consumption, all of which contribute to higher performance and lower system costs. DataFlash products are used in a wide variety of applications such as digital answering machines, fax machines, personal computers, printers, radar detectors, security systems and energy meters.
 
Small size is important to our customers and we are continuously developing smaller packages for our serial Flash memories using, for example, a cost-effective ball grid array and a variety of dual footprint non-leaded packages to help our customers produce smaller products. We also offer the full range of industry standard SOIC, PDIP and TSSOP packages.
 
SPI Flash.  Our newest Serial Flash family offers pin-compatible devices to our entire family of SPI Serial EEPROMs and provides customers with one of the highest performance serial memory solutions in the industry. Our SPI Flash family’s enhanced architecture and features allow the devices to be used in a wider array of applications compared to devices from competing suppliers while also providing customers with a more flexible, easier-to-implement solution. Like our Serial EEPROMs and DataFlash devices, our SPI Flash products utilize ultra-small packages like DFNs (dual flat no-lead) and CSPs (chip-scale packages) in addition to industry standard SOICs. SPI Flash is primarily used for code storage in a diverse set of consumer and industrial applications including high-volume products such as desktop and notebook computers, hard disk drives, CD/DVD Read/Write drives, Blu-ray and DVD players, MP3 players, digital picture frames, set-top boxes (STBs) and LCD TVs.
 
Parallel Flash Memory Products.  Flash represents a prevailing technology used in nonvolatile memory devices that can be reprogrammed within a system. We currently manufacture Parallel Flash products utilizing 0.18- and 0.13-micron process technologies.
 
The flexibility and ease of use of our Parallel Flash memories make them attractive solutions in systems where program information stored in memory must be rewritten after the system leaves its manufacturing environment. The reprogrammability of Flash memories also serves to support later system upgrades, field diagnostic routines and in-system reconfiguration, as well as capturing voice and data messages for later review. These products are generally used in handsets, personal computers, cable modems, set-top boxes and DVD players.
 
Parallel EEPROMs.  We are a leading supplier of high performance, in-system programmable Parallel EEPROMs. We believe that our Parallel EEPROM products represent the industry’s most complete offering, and we are the sole-source supplier for several customers for certain Parallel EEPROM devices. In the design of this product family, we have emphasized high reliability achieved through the incorporation of on-chip error detection and correction features. Parallel EEPROMs offer high endurance programmability and are highly flexible, offering faster data transfer rates and higher memory densities when compared to some serial interface architectures. These products are generally used to store frequently updated data in communications infrastructure equipment and avionics navigation systems.
 
EPROMs.  The worldwide one-time programmable (OTP) EPROM market is intensely competitive and characterized by commodity pricing. Our strategy is to target the high-performance end of this market by offering faster speed, higher density and lower power usage devices. These products are generally used to store the operating


5


Table of Contents

programs of embedded microcontroller or DSP-based systems, such as hard disk drives, CD-ROM drives and modems.
 
 
Automotive RF.  With our automotive RF products we are one of the leading suppliers for automobile access solutions. Our products include complete keyless entry solutions for wireless passive entry go systems, and the corresponding discrete ICs for the receivers and transceivers for the access control unit and tire pressure monitoring systems built into cars. Our innovative immobilizer ICs, which incorporate the widely accepted advanced encryption standard (“AES”), offer car theft protection. In addition, we offer a wide portfolio of products targeted at keyless automobile starting systems.
 
High Voltage.  Our high voltage products ICs are manufactured utilizing mixed signal high voltage technology, providing analog-bipolar, high voltage DMOS power and CMOS logic function on a single chip. These ICs withstand and operate at high voltages and can be connected directly to the battery of a car, with a focus on intelligent load drivers, local interconnect network (“LIN”) in-vehicle networking and battery management hybrid cars products. The applications for the load drivers are primarily motor and actuator drivers and smart valve controls. The new line of battery management ICs target Li-ion battery systems that are becoming the standard for full electric and hybrid cars. Our popular and rugged LIN in-vehicle networking product line helps car makers to simplify the wire harness by using the LIN bus which is rapidly gaining popularity. Many body electronic applications can be connected and controlled via the LIN network bus, including switches, actuators and sensors. Our LIN devices currently are the benchmark for robustness in the automotive industry, which we attribute to innovative design techniques as well as to our proprietary silicon on-insulator (“SOI”) process technology.
 
RF.  The RF product line includes our low frequency RF identification tag ICs which are targeted towards the access control market and the livestock and pet tagging markets. These ICs are used in combination with a reader IC to make possible contactless identification for a wide variety of applications. Our RF products also target the industrial, scientific, medical (ISM) RF market, including wireless remote control applications such as home alarm systems, garage door openers, remote controlled toys, wireless game consoles and many others.
 
DVD.  Our laser diode drivers power the laser diodes used in CD and DVD drives for computer and consumer applications. We offer drivers for read only and read-write optical drives, including the new high density Blu-Ray standards. Our proprietary process technology has enabled us to develop photo diodes that are sensitive to blue as well as to red laser light. Our patent pending “open QFN” packaging technology enables cost efficient production of the photo detector ICs for the DVD and Blu-Ray standard.
 
Mixed Signal.  Our broadcast radio products cater primarily for the automotive market. They include high performance receivers for AM/FM and HD car radio, an industry leading portfolio of highly integrated antenna drivers, which enable small form factor car antennas and a complete chipset for the developing digital audio broadcasting/digital multimedia broadcasting radio market. In addition, our infrared (“IR”) receivers are among the leaders in the highly competitive market for IR remote control systems.
 
 
Custom ASICs.  We design, manufacture and market ASICs to meet customer requirements for high-performance logic devices in a broad variety of customer-specific applications. Our SiliconCity® design platform utilizes our extensive libraries of qualified analog and digital IP blocks. This approach integrates system functionality into a single chip based on this unique architecture platform combined with one of the richest libraries of qualified IP blocks in the industry. By combining a variety of logic functions on a single chip, costs are reduced, design risk is minimized, time-to-market is accelerated and performance can be optimized.
 
We design and manufacture ASICs in a range of products that includes standard digital and analog functions, as well as nonvolatile memory elements and large pre-designed macro functions all integrated on a single chip. We work closely with customers to develop and manufacture custom ASIC products so that we can provide them with IC solutions on a sole-source basis. Our ASIC products are targeted primarily at high-volume customers whose


6


Table of Contents

applications require high-speed, high-density or low and mixed-voltage devices such as in the medical, consumer and security markets.
 
Atmel CAP®.  Our CAP customizable microcontroller combines, on a single IC, an ARM-based microcontroller system-on-chip with a high-density Metal Programmable Block that enables customers to add application-specific logic. This hybrid device significantly reduces design time and cost compared to an equivalent ASIC, but commands a comparable unit price. CAP is aimed at medium-to high-volume customers, many of who are replacing a field programmable gate array (“FPGA”)-plus-microcontroller combination.
 
Secure Microcontrollers.  Our advanced design capability expertise in non-volatile memory technology and experience in security products positions us as one of the world’s pre-eminent suppliers of secure microcontroller-based ICs. Our Smart Card ICs primarily serve the cellular phone, banking, health card, national ID card and set-top box markets.
 
We also produce a broad portfolio of secure ICs, including CryptoMemory® and CryptoRF® and smart card reader chips. Our secure microcontrollers feature dual contact/contactless products that comply with the ISO-14443, Universal Serial Bus (“USB”) Full-Speed interface and Serial Peripheral Interface (“SPI”) Protocols.
 
We combine dense nonvolatile memory technology and high performance AVR and ARM microcontroller cores to offer cost-effective solutions for demanding applications such as global system for mobile computing (“GSM”) subscriber identity module (“SIM”) cards and multi-application smart cards running on open platforms like Java®.
 
We have also introduced solutions with multimedia and wireless communications devices targeting home entertainment, security and automotive applications where information security is a primary objective.
 
FPGAs.  Our FPGAs (field programmable gate arrays), with FreeRAM and Cache Logic®, provide efficient memory management and a reconfigurable solution for adaptive digital signal processing and other computationally intensive applications. We also offer a family of radiation hardened FPGAs for space applications. Our family of reconfigurable FPGA Serial Configuration EEPROMs can replace one-time-programmable devices for FPGAs from other vendors. In addition we offer FPGA-to-gate array conversions for both military and commercial applications.
 
In January 2010, we announced that following a comprehensive review of alternatives for our ASIC business, we would continue to explore the potential sale of our Smart Card (SMS) business located in Rousset, France and East Kilbride, UK and that we intended to discontinue potential sale discussions for our Customer Specific Products (CSP) and Aerospace businesses. See Item 1A — Risk Factors.
 
 
From inception, we have focused our efforts on developing advanced CMOS processes that can be used to manufacture reliable nonvolatile elements for memory and advanced logic integrated circuits. We believe that our experience in single and multiple-layer metal CMOS processing gives us a competitive advantage in developing and delivering high-density, high-speed and low-power logic and memory and logic products.
 
We meet customers’ demands for constantly increasing functionality on ever-smaller ICs by increasing the number of layers we use to build the circuits on a wafer and by reducing the size of the transistors and other components in the circuit. To accomplish this we develop and introduce new wafer processing techniques as necessary. We also provide our fabrication facilities with state-of-the-art manufacturing equipment and development resources that allow us to produce ICs with increasingly sophisticated features. Our current ICs incorporate effective feature sizes as small as 0.13-micron. We are developing processes that will support effective feature sizes smaller than 0.13-micron, which we expect to produce at outside wafer foundries in the future.
 
 
Communications.  Communications, including wireless and wireline telecommunications and data networking, is currently one of our large end user markets. For the wireless market, we provide touch screen controllers, nonvolatile memory, standard and secure microcontrollers, and baseband and RF ASICs that are used for GSM and


7


Table of Contents

code-division multiple access (“CDMA”) mobile phones and their base stations, as well as two-way pagers, mobile radios, and cordless phones and their base stations. We also have a range of products based on the IEEE 802.11 wireless LAN standard, Zigbee, and on Bluetooth, a short-range wireless protocol that enables instant connectivity between electronic devices. Our principal customers in the wireless market include Ericsson, Motorola, Nokia, Philips, Qualcomm, Samsung and Siemens.
 
We also serve the data networking and wireline telecommunications markets, which continue to evolve due to the rapid adoption of new technologies. For these markets, we provide ASIC, nonvolatile memory and programmable logic products that are used in the switches, routers, cable modem termination systems and digital subscriber line (“DSL”) access multiplexers, which are currently being used to build internet infrastructure. Our principal data networking and wireline telecommunications customers include Alcatel Lucent, Cisco and Siemens.
 
Consumer Electronics.  Our products are also used in a broad variety of consumer electronics products. We provide microcontrollers for batteries and battery chargers that minimize the power usage by being “turned on” only when necessary. Microcontrollers are also offered for lighting controls and touchscreen user interface applications. We provide multimode audio processors and MPEG2-based decoders with programmable transport for complex digital audio streams used in digital TVs, set top boxes and DVD players. We provide ASIC demodulators and decoders for cable modems. We also offer media access controllers for wireless local area networks (“WLANs”) and baseband controllers. In addition, we provide secure, encryption enabled, tamper resistant circuits for smart cards and embedded personal computer security applications. Our principal consumer electronics customers include Honeywell, Hosiden Corporation, Invensys, LG Electronics, Matsushita, Microsoft, Philips, Samsung, Sony and Toshiba.
 
Computing, Storage and Printing.  The computing and computing-peripherals markets are growing as a result of increasing Internet use, network connectivity and digital imaging requirements. For computing applications, we provide Flash memory, serial memory, USB hubs and ASICs for personal computers, servers and USB drives. We offer Trusted Platform Module (“TPM”) products that perform platform authentication and security for computing systems. Our biometric security IC verifies a user’s identity by scanning a finger. In today’s security conscious environment we believe TPM and biometry are finding applications where access to information, equipment and similar resources needs to be controlled or monitored. We provide ASICs, nonvolatile memory and microcontrollers for laser printers, inkjet printers, copy machines and scanners. Our principal customers in these markets include Dell, Hewlett-Packard, IBM, Intel, M-Systems, Seagate and Western Digital.
 
Security.  Security for electronic applications is a key concern for the development of computing and communications equipment. Our Smart Card and Smart Card reader IC’s are targeted towards established European markets and rapidly emerging applications requiring security in the United States of America and throughout Asia. Smart Card technology is used for mobile communications, credit cards, drivers’ licenses, identity cards, health cards, TV set top boxes, internet commerce and related applications where data security is essential. Our principal customers in these markets include Gemalto (formerly GemPlus and Axalto), NDS, Oberthur, Sagem and SCM.
 
Automotive.  The automotive electronics market has grown modestly, driven by demand for more sophisticated electronic systems, yet it remains stable during times when other sectors fluctuate. For automotive applications, we provide body electronics for passenger comfort and convenience; safety related subsystems such as air-bag drivers, anti-lock brake control and tire pressure monitors; keyless entry transmitters and receivers and in-vehicle entertainment components. With our introduction of high-voltage and high-temperature capable ICs we are broadening the automotive reach to systems and controls in the engine compartment. Virtually all of these are application-specific mixed signal ICs. Our principal customers in these markets include Continental-Temic, Daimler-Chrysler, Delphi, Hella, Marelli, Robert Bosch, Siemens-VDO and TRW.
 
Military and Aerospace.  The military and aerospace industries require products that will operate under extreme conditions and are tested to higher standards than commercial products. Our circuits are available in radiation-hardened (RAD) versions that meet stringent requirements (cumulative dose, latch-up and transient phenomena) of space, avionic and industrial applications. For these applications, we provide RAD ASICs, FPGAs, non-volatile memories and microcontrollers. Our principal customers in these markets include BAE Systems, Honeywell, Litton, Lockheed-Martin, Northrop, Raytheon and Roche.


8


Table of Contents

Industrial.  While the industrial electronics market has been considered a slow growth end-market compared to communications or computing sectors, the electronic content in industrial applications is growing at a faster rate than the industry as a whole-driven by the increasing reach of electronic content. The demand for energy efficiency and productivity gains of electronic enabled systems is driving the switch from mechanical to digital solutions for products such as temperature sensors, motor controls, factory lighting, smart energy meters and commercial appliances. Atmel provides microcontrollers, non-volatile memory, high-voltage and mixed-signal products that are designed to work effectively in harsh environments. Our principal customers include Honeywell, Siemens, Samsung, Itron and Textron,
 
 
Once we have fabricated the wafers, we probe and test the individual circuits on them to identify those that do not function. This saves us the cost of putting mechanical packages around circuits whose failure can be determined in advance. After probe, we send all of our wafers to one of our independent assembly contractors, located in China, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, South Korea, Taiwan or Thailand where they are cut into individual chips and assembled into packages. Most of the finished products are given a final test at the assembly contractors although some are shipped to our test facilities in the United States where we perform electrical testing and visual inspection before delivery to customers.
 
The raw materials and equipment we use to produce our integrated circuits are available from several suppliers and we are not dependent upon any single source of supply. However, some materials have been in short supply in the past and lead times on occasion have lengthened, especially during semiconductor expansion cycles.
 
If market demand for our products increases during 2010, we believe that we will be able to substantially meet our production needs from our remaining wafer fabrication facilities through at least the end of 2010; however, capacity requirements may vary depending on, among other things, our rate of growth and our ability to increase production levels. During 2009, we manufactured approximately 88% of our products at our wafer fabrication facilities located in Colorado Springs, Colorado and Rousset, France. In September 2008, we announced that we entered into an agreement with Tejas Silicon Holding Limited (“TSI”) for the sale of our wafer fabrication operations in Heilbronn, Germany. On October 8, 2007, we announced that we entered into separate agreements with Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Ltd. (“TSMC”) and Highbridge Business Park Limited (“Highbridge”) for the sale of the wafer fabrication equipment and related property located in North Tyneside, United Kingdom. We ceased manufacturing operations at our Heilbronn wafer fabrication facility in October 2008 and in our North Tyneside, UK wafer fabrication facility in February 2008 and have subsequently increased production at our Colorado Springs and Rousset wafer fabs to provide the necessary output to meet demand. In December 2009, we announced we signed an exclusivity agreement for the sale of our Rousset, France wafer fabrication facility to LFoundry GmbH.
 
Much of the $32 million of manufacturing equipment we paid for during 2009 was related to increasing test capacity. It is anticipated that capital equipment purchases for 2010, estimated at $60 million to $65 million, will be focused on maintaining existing equipment, providing additional testing capacity and, to a limited extent, on developing advanced process technologies.
 
 
We are subject to a variety of international, federal, state and local governmental regulations related to the discharge or disposal of toxic, volatile or otherwise hazardous chemicals used in our manufacturing processes.
 
Increasing public attention has been focused on the environmental impact of semiconductor operations. Although we have not experienced any material adverse effect on our operations from environmental regulations, any changes in such regulations or in their enforcement may impose the need for additional capital equipment or other requirements. If for any reason we fail to control the use of, or to restrict adequately the discharge of, hazardous substances under present or future regulations, we could be subject to substantial liability or our manufacturing operations could be suspended.


9


Table of Contents

 
We generate our revenue by selling our products directly to original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”) and indirectly to OEMs through distributors. We market our products worldwide to a diverse base of OEMs serving primarily commercial markets. In the United States and Canada, we sell our products to large OEM accounts primarily by using manufacturers’ representatives or through national and regional distributors. Our agreements with our representatives and distributors are generally terminable by either party on short notice, subject to local laws. Direct sales to OEMs as a percentage of net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2009 totaled 45% while sales to distributors totaled 55% of net revenues.
 
Sales to U.S. OEMs, as a percentage of net revenues totaled 9%, 8% and 10% for the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. Sales to U.S. distributors, as a percentage of net revenues, totaled 9%, 7% and 6% for the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. We support this sales network from our headquarters in San Jose, California and through U.S. regional offices in California, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Texas and Washington.
 
We sell to customers outside of the U.S. primarily by using international sales representatives and through distributors, who are managed from our foreign sales offices. We maintain sales offices in China, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan and the United Kingdom. Our sales outside the U.S. represented 83%, 86% and 87% of net revenues in 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. We expect revenues from our international sales and sales to distributors will continue to represent a significant portion of our net revenues. International sales and sales to distributors are subject to a variety of risks, including those arising from currency fluctuations, tariffs, trade barriers, taxes, export license requirements, and foreign government regulations and risk of payment by distributors. See Item 1A — Risk Factors.
 
We allow certain distributors, primarily based in the United States and Europe, rights of return and credits for price protection. Given the uncertainties associated with the levels of returns and other credits to these distributors based on contractual terms we defer recognition of revenue from sales to these distributors until they have resold our products. Sales to certain other primarily Asia based distributors carry either no or very limited rights of return. We have historically been able to estimate returns and other credits from these distributors and accordingly have historically recognized revenue from sales to these distributors upon shipment, with a related allowance for potential returns established at the time of our sale.
 
Effective July 1, 2008, we entered into revised agreements with certain European distributors that allow additional rights, including future price concessions at the time of resale, price protection, and the right to return products upon termination of the distributor agreement. As a result of uncertainties over finalization of pricing for shipments to these distributors, we consider that the sale prices are not “fixed or determinable” at the time of shipment to these distributors. Revenues and related costs will be deferred until the products are sold by the distributor to their end customers.
 
 
We believe significant investment in research and development is vital to our success, growth and profitability, and we will continue to devote substantial resources, including management time, to this activity. Our primary objectives are to increase performance of our existing products, to develop new wafer processing and design technologies and to draw upon these technologies and our experience in embedded applications to create new products.
 
In the years ended December 31 2009, 2008 and 2007, we spent $212 million, $260 million and $272 million, respectively, on research and development. Research and development expenses are charged to operations as incurred. We expect these expenditures will increase in the future as we continue to invest in new products and new processing technology.


10


Table of Contents

 
We operate in markets that are intensely competitive and characterized by rapid technological change, product obsolescence and price decline. Throughout our product line, we compete with a number of large semiconductor manufacturers, such as AMD, Cypress, Freescale, Fujitsu, Hitachi, IBM, Infineon, Intel, LSI Logic, Microchip, Philips, Renesas, Samsung, Sharp, Spansion, STMicroelectronics, Synaptics, Texas Instruments and Toshiba. Some of these competitors have substantially greater financial, technical, marketing and management resources than we do. We also compete with emerging companies that are attempting to sell products in specialized markets that our products address. We compete principally on the basis of the technical innovation and performance of our products, including their speed, density, power usage, reliability and specialty packaging alternatives, as well as on price and product availability. During the last three years, we have experienced significant price competition in several business segments, especially in our Nonvolatile Memory segment for EPROM, Serial EEPROM, and Flash memory products, in our ASIC segment for smart cards, and in our Microcontroller segment for commodity microcontrollers. We expect continuing competitive pressures in our markets from existing competitors and new entrants, new technology and cyclical demand, which, among other factors, will likely maintain the recent trend of declining average selling prices for our products.
 
 
We maintain a portfolio of United States patents and we have numerous patent applications on file with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. We also operate an internal program to identify patentable developments and we file patent applications wherever necessary to protect our proprietary technologies. However, because technology changes very rapidly in the semiconductor industry, we believe our continued success depends primarily on the technological and innovative skills of our employees and their abilities to rapidly commercialize discoveries.
 
The semiconductor industry is characterized by vigorous protection and pursuit of IP rights or positions, which have on occasion resulted in significant and often protracted and expensive litigation. We from time to time receive communications from third parties asserting patent or other IP rights covering our products or processes. In order to avoid the significant costs associated with our defense in litigation involving such claims, we may license the use of the technologies that are the subject of these claims from such companies and be required to make corresponding royalty payments, which may harm our operating results.
 
We have in the past been involved in IP infringement lawsuits which harmed our operating results. Although we intend to vigorously defend against any such lawsuits, we may not prevail given the complex technical issues and inherent uncertainties in patent and IP litigation. Moreover, the cost of defending against such litigation, in terms of management time and attention, legal fees and product delays, could be substantial, regardless of the outcome. If any patent or other IP claims against us are successful, we may be prohibited from using the technologies subject to these claims, and if we are unable to obtain a license on acceptable terms, license a substitute technology, or design new technology to avoid infringement, our business and operating results may be significantly harmed. See Item 1A — Risk Factors.
 
We have several cross-license agreements with other companies. In the future, it may be necessary or advantageous for us to obtain additional patent licenses from existing or other parties, but these license agreements may not be available to us on acceptable terms, if at all.
 
 
At December 31, 2009, we employed approximately 5,600 employees compared to approximately 6,400 employees at December 31, 2008. Our future success depends in large part on the continued service of our key technical and management personnel and on our ability to continue to attract and retain qualified employees, particularly highly skilled design, process and test engineers necessary for the manufacture of existing products and the development of new products and processes. The competition for such personnel is intense, and the loss of key employees, most of who are not subject to an employment agreement for a specified term or a post-employment non-competition agreement, could harm our business.


11


Table of Contents

 
We accept purchase orders for deliveries covering periods from one day up to approximately one year. However, purchase orders can generally be revised or cancelled by the customer without penalty. In addition, significant portions of our sales are ordered with relatively short lead times, often referred to as “turns business.” Considering these industry practices and our experience, we do not believe the total of customer purchase orders outstanding (backlog) provides meaningful information that can be relied on to predict actual sales for future periods.
 
 
In 2009, 17% of our net revenues were derived from customers in the United States, 50% from customers in Asia, 31% from customers in Europe and 2% from customers in other regions. This disclosure is determined based on the destination of our products when they are shipped.
 
As of December 31, 2009, we owned long-lived assets in the United States amounting to $105 million, in France amounting to $36 million, in Germany amounting to $21 million, and in the United Kingdom amounting to $5 million. See Note 14 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussion.
 
 
The semiconductor industry is increasingly characterized by annual seasonality and wide fluctuations of supply and demand. A significant portion of our revenue comes from sales to customers supplying consumer markets and international sales. As a result, our business may be subject to seasonally lower revenues in particular quarters of our fiscal year. The industry has also been impacted by significant shifts in consumer demand due to economic downturns or other factors, which may result in diminished product demand and production over-capacity. We have experienced substantial quarter-to-quarter fluctuations in revenues and operating results and expect, in the future, to continue to experience short term period-to-period fluctuations in operating results due to general industry or economic conditions.
 
ITEM 1A.   RISK FACTORS
 
In addition to the other information contained in this Form 10-K, we have identified the following risks and uncertainties that may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations. Investors should carefully consider the risks described below before making an investment decision. The trading price of our common stock could decline due to any of these risks, and investors may lose all or part of their investment. In addition, these risks and uncertainties may impact the “forward-looking” statements described elsewhere in this Form 10-K and in the documents incorporated herein by reference. They could also affect our actual results of operations, causing them to differ materially from those expressed in “forward-looking” statements.
 
 
Our future operating results will be subject to quarterly variations based upon a wide variety of factors, many of which are not within our control. These factors include:
 
  •  the nature of both the semiconductor industry and the markets addressed by our products;
 
  •  our transition to a fab-lite strategy;
 
  •  our dependence on selling through distributors;
 
  •  our increased dependence on outside foundries and their ability to meet our volume, quality and delivery objectives, particularly during times of increasing demand along with inventory excesses or shortages due to reliance on third party manufacturers;


12


Table of Contents

 
  •  global economic and political conditions;
 
  •  compliance with U.S. and international antitrust trade and export laws and regulations by us and our distributors;
 
  •  fluctuations in currency exchange rates and revenues and costs denominated in foreign currencies;
 
  •  ability of independent assembly contractors to meet our volume, quality and delivery objectives;
 
  •  success with disposal or restructuring activities;
 
  •  fluctuations in manufacturing yields;
 
  •  the average margin of the mix of products we sell;
 
  •  third party intellectual property infringement claims;
 
  •  the highly competitive nature of our markets;
 
  •  the pace of technological change;
 
  •  natural disasters or terrorist acts;
 
  •  assessment of internal controls over financial reporting;
 
  •  ability to meet our debt obligations;
 
  •  our ability to maintain good relationships with our customers;
 
  •  long-term contracts with our customers;
 
  •  our compliance with international, federal and state, environmental, privacy and other regulations;
 
  •  personnel changes;
 
  •  performance-based restricted stock units;
 
  •  business interruptions;
 
  •  system integration disruptions;
 
  •  anti-takeover effects in our certificate of incorporation and bylaws;
 
  •  the unfunded nature of our foreign pension plans and that any requirement to fund these plans could negatively impact our cash position;
 
  •  the effects of our acquisition strategy, such as unanticipated accounting charges, which may adversely affect our results of operations;
 
  •  utilization of our manufacturing capacity;
 
  •  disruptions to the availability of raw materials which could impact our ability to supply products to our customers;
 
  •  costs associated with, and the outcome of, any litigation to which we are, or may become, a party;
 
  •  product liability claims that may arise, which could result in significant costs and damage to our reputation;
 
  •  audits of our income tax returns, both in the U.S. and in foreign jurisdictions;
 
  •  complexity of our legal entity organizational structure; and
 
  •  compliance with economic incentive terms in certain government grants.
 
Any unfavorable changes in any of these factors could harm our operating results and may result in volatility or a decline in our stock price.


13


Table of Contents

We believe that our future sales will depend substantially on the success of our new products. Our new products are generally incorporated into our customers’ products or systems at their design stage. However, design wins can precede volume sales by a year or more. We may not be successful in achieving design wins or design wins may not result in future revenues, which depend in large part on the success of the customer’s end product or system. The average selling price of each of our products usually declines as individual products mature and competitors enter the market. To offset average selling price decreases, we rely primarily on reducing costs to manufacture those products, increasing unit sales to absorb fixed costs and introducing new, higher priced products which incorporate advanced features or integrated technologies to address new or emerging markets. Our operating results could be harmed if such cost reductions and new product introductions do not occur in a timely manner. From time to time, our quarterly revenues and operating results can become more dependent upon orders booked and shipped within a given quarter and, accordingly, our quarterly results can become less predictable and subject to greater variability.
 
In addition, our future success will depend in large part on the recovery of global economic growth generally and on growth in various electronics industries that use semiconductors specifically, including manufacturers of computers, telecommunications equipment, automotive electronics, industrial controls, consumer electronics, data networking equipment and military equipment. The semiconductor industry has the ability to supply more products than demand requires. Our ability to be profitable will depend heavily upon a better supply and demand balance within the semiconductor industry.
 
 
The semiconductor industry has historically been cyclical, characterized by wide fluctuations in product supply and demand. The industry has also experienced significant downturns, often in connection with, or in anticipation of, maturing product cycles and declines in general economic conditions. Global semiconductor sales increased 9% to $248 billion in 2006, and 3% to $256 billion in 2007. Global semiconductor sales decreased by 3% to $249 billion in 2008, and 9% to $226 billion in 2009. The Semiconductor Industry Association predicts that the semiconductor industry is well positioned for growth in 2010.
 
Our operating results have been harmed by industry-wide fluctuations in the demand for semiconductors, which resulted in under-utilization of our manufacturing capacity and declining gross margins. In the past we have recorded significant charges to recognize impairment in the value of our manufacturing equipment, the cost to reduce workforce, and other restructuring costs. Our business may be harmed in the future not only by cyclical conditions in the semiconductor industry as a whole but also by slower growth in any of the markets served by our products.
 
The semiconductor industry is increasingly characterized by annual seasonality and wide fluctuations of supply and demand. A significant portion of our revenue comes from sales to customers supplying consumer markets and international sales. As a result, our business may be subject to seasonally lower revenues in particular quarters of our fiscal year. The industry has also been impacted by significant shifts in consumer demand due to economic downturns or other factors, which may result in diminished product demand and production over-capacity. We have experienced substantial quarter-to-quarter fluctuations in revenues and operating results and expect, in the future, to continue to experience short term period-to-period fluctuations in operating results due to general industry or economic conditions.
 
 
The current global recessionary macroeconomic environment has impacted levels of consumer spending, caused disruptions and extreme volatility in global financial markets and increased rates of default and bankruptcy. These macroeconomic developments could continue to negatively affect our business, operating results, or financial condition in a number of ways. For example, current or potential customers or distributors may not pay us or may delay paying us for previously purchased products. In addition, if consumer spending continues to decrease, we could experience diminished demand for our products. Finally, if the banking system or the financial markets continue to deteriorate or remain volatile, our investment portfolio may be impacted and the values and liquidity of our investments could be adversely affected.


14


Table of Contents

WE COULD EXPERIENCE DISRUPTION OF OUR BUSINESS AS WE TRANSITION TO A FAB-LITE STRATEGY AND INCREASE DEPENDENCE ON OUTSIDE FOUNDRIES, WHERE SUCH FOUNDRIES MAY NOT HAVE ADEQUATE CAPACITY TO FULFILL OUR NEEDS AND MAY NOT MEET OUR QUALITY AND DELIVERY OBJECTIVES OR MAY ABANDON FABRICATION PROCESSES THAT WE REQUIRE.
 
As part of our fab-lite strategy, we have reduced the number of manufacturing facilities we own. In May 2008, we completed the sale of our North Tyneside, United Kingdom wafer fabrication facility. In December 2008, we sold our wafer fabrication operation in Heilbronn, Germany. In December 2009, we announced that we had entered into an exclusivity agreement with LFoundry GmbH for the potential sale of our Rousset, France manufacturing operations. In the future, we will be increasingly relying on the utilization of third-party foundry manufacturing partners. As part of this transition we have expanded and will continue to expand our foundry relationships by entering into new agreements with third-party foundries. If these agreements are not completed on a timely basis, or the transfer of production is delayed for other reasons, the supply of certain of our products could be disrupted, which could harm our business. In addition, difficulties in production yields can often occur when transitioning to a new third-party manufacturer. If such foundries fail to deliver quality products and components on a timely basis, our business could be harmed.
 
Implementation of our new fab-lite strategy will expose us to the following risks:
 
  •  reduced control over delivery schedules and product costs;
 
  •  manufacturing costs that are higher than anticipated;
 
  •  inability of our manufacturing subcontractors to develop manufacturing methods appropriate for our products and their unwillingness to devote adequate capacity to produce our products;
 
  •  possible abandonment of fabrication processes by our manufacturing subcontractors for products that are strategically important to us;
 
  •  decline in product quality and reliability;
 
  •  inability to maintain continuing relationships with our suppliers;
 
  •  restricted ability to meet customer demand when faced with product shortages; and
 
  •  increased opportunities for potential misappropriation of our intellectual property.
 
If any of the above risks are realized, we could experience an interruption in our supply chain or an increase in costs, which could delay or decrease our revenue or harm our business.
 
We hope to mitigate these risks with a strategy of qualifying multiple subcontractors. However, there can be no guarantee that any strategy will eliminate these risks. Additionally, since most outside foundries are located in foreign countries, we are subject to certain risks generally associated with contracting with foreign manufacturers, including currency exchange fluctuations, political and economic instability, trade restrictions and changes in tariff and freight rates. Accordingly, we may experience problems in timelines and the adequacy or quality of product deliveries, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.
 
The terms on which we will be able to obtain wafer production for our products, and the timing and volume of such production will be substantially dependent on future agreements to be negotiated with semiconductor foundries. We cannot be certain that the agreements we reach with such foundries will be on terms reasonable to us. Therefore, any agreements reached with semiconductor foundries may be short-term and possibly non-renewable, and hence provide less certainty regarding the supply and pricing of wafers for our products.
 
During economic upturns in the semiconductor industry we will not be able to guarantee that our third party foundries will be able to increase manufacturing capacity to a level that meets demand for our products, which would prevent us from meeting increased customer demand and harm our business. Also during times of increased demand for our products, if such foundries are able to meet such demand, it may be at higher wafer prices, which would reduce our gross margins on such products or require us to offset the increased price by increasing prices for our customers, either of which would harm our business and operating results.


15


Table of Contents

 
Sales through distributors accounted for 55%, 48% and 44% of our net revenues for the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. We market and sell our products through third-party distributors pursuant to agreements that can generally be terminated for convenience by either party upon relatively short notice to the other party. These agreements are non-exclusive and also permit our distributors to offer our competitors’ products.
 
Our revenue reporting is highly dependent on receiving pertinent, accurate and timely data from our distributors. Distributors provide us periodic data regarding the product, price, quantity, and end customer when products are resold as well as the quantities of our products they still have in stock. Because the data set is large and complex and because there may be errors in the reported data, we must use estimates and apply judgments to reconcile distributors’ reported inventories to their activities. Actual results could vary from those estimates.
 
We are dependent on our distributors to supplement our direct marketing and sales efforts. If any significant distributor or a substantial number of our distributors terminated their relationship with us, decided to market our competitors’ products over our products, were unable to sell our products or were unable to pay us for products sold for any reason, our ability to bring our products to market would be negatively impacted, we may have difficulty in collecting outstanding receivable balances, and we may incur other charges or adjustments resulting in a material adverse impact to our revenues and operating results. For example, in the three months ended December 31, 2008, we recorded a one time bad debt charge of $12 million related to an Asian distributor whose business was extraordinarily impacted following their addition to the U.S. Department of Commerce Entity List, which prohibits us from shipping products to the distributor.
 
Additionally, distributors typically maintain an inventory of our products. For certain distributors, we have signed agreements that protect the value of their inventory of our products against price reductions, as well as provide for rights of return under specific conditions. In addition, certain agreements with our distributors also contain standard stock rotation provisions permitting limited levels of product returns. We defer the gross margins on our sales to these distributors until the applicable products are re-sold by the distributors. However, in the event of an unexpected significant decline in the price of our products or significant return of unsold inventory, we may experience inventory write-downs, charges to reimburse costs incurred by distributors, or other charges or adjustments which could harm our revenues and operating results.
 
 
We schedule production and build semiconductor devices based primarily on our internal forecasts, as well as non-binding forecasts from customers for orders that may be cancelled or rescheduled with short notice. Our customers frequently place orders requesting product delivery in a much shorter period than our lead time to fully fabricate and test devices. Because the markets we serve are volatile and subject to rapid technological, price and end user demand changes, our forecasts of unit quantities to build may be significantly incorrect. Changes to forecasted demand from actual demand may result in us producing unit quantities in excess of orders from customers, which could result in the need to record additional expense for the write-down of inventory, negatively affecting gross margins and results of operations.
 
As we transition to increased dependence on outside foundries, we will have less control over modifying production schedules to match changes in forecasted demand. If we commit to obtaining foundry wafers and cannot cancel or reschedule commitments without material costs or cancellation penalties, we may be forced to purchase inventory in excess of demand, which could result in a write-down of inventories negatively affecting gross margins and results of operations.
 
Conversely, failure to produce or obtain sufficient wafers for increased demand could cause us to miss revenue opportunities and, if significant, could impact our customers’ ability to sell products, which could adversely affect our customer relationships and thereby materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.


16


Table of Contents

 
For hardware, software or technology exported from the U.S. or otherwise subject to U.S. jurisdiction, we are subject to U.S. laws and regulations governing international trade and exports, including, but not limited to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (“ITAR”), the Export Administration Regulations (“EAR”) and trade sanctions against embargoed countries and destinations administered by the U.S. Department of the Treasury, Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”). Hardware, software and technology exported from other countries may also be subject to local laws and regulations governing international trade. Under these laws and regulations, we are responsible for obtaining all necessary licenses or other approvals, if required, for exports of hardware, software and technology, as well as the provision of technical assistance. We are also required to obtain export licenses, if required, prior to transferring technical data or software to foreign persons. In addition, we are required to obtain necessary export licenses prior to the export or re-export of hardware, software and technology (i) to any person, entity, organization or other party identified on the U.S. Department of Commerce Denied Persons or Entity List, the U.S. Department of Treasury’s Specially Designated Nationals or Blocked Persons List or the Department of State’s Debarred List; or (ii) for use in nuclear, chemical/biological weapons, rocket systems or unmanned air vehicle applications. We are enhancing our export compliance program, including analyzing product shipments and technology transfers, working with U.S. government officials to ensure compliance with applicable U.S. export laws and regulations and developing additional operational procedures. A determination by the U.S. or local government that we have failed to comply with one or more of these export control laws or trade sanctions, including failure to properly restrict an export to the persons, entities or countries set forth on the government restricted party lists, could result in civil or criminal penalties, including the imposition of significant fines, denial of export privileges, loss of revenues from certain customers, and debarment from participation in U.S. government contracts. Further, a change in these laws and regulations could restrict our ability to export to previously permitted countries, customers, distributors or other third parties. Any one or more of these sanctions or a change in law or regulations could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
 
Because a significant portion of our business is conducted outside the United States, we face exposure to adverse movements in foreign currency exchange rates. These exposures may change over time as business practices evolve and could have a material adverse impact on our financial results and cash flows. Our primary exposure relates to operating expenses in Europe, where a significant amount of our manufacturing is located.
 
When we take an order denominated in a foreign currency we will receive fewer dollars than we initially anticipated if that local currency weakens against the dollar before we ship our product, which will reduce revenue. Conversely, revenues will be positively impacted if the local currency strengthens against the dollar. In Europe, where we have significant operations and costs denominated in European currencies, our costs will decrease if the local currency weakens. Conversely, our costs will increase if the local currency strengthens against the dollar. The net effect of average exchange rates in the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to the average exchange rates in the years ended December 31, 2008, resulted in a favorable impact to operating results of $21 million in 2009. This impact is determined assuming that all foreign currency denominated transactions that occurred in the year ended December 31, 2009 were recorded using the average foreign currency exchange rates in the same period in 2008. Net revenues denominated in foreign currencies, were 24%, 23% and 22% of total net revenues in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. Costs denominated in foreign currencies, were 39%, 47% and 51% of total costs in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively.
 
We also face the risk that our accounts receivables denominated in foreign currencies will be devalued if such foreign currencies weaken quickly and significantly against the dollar. Approximately 29% and 30% of our accounts receivable were denominated in foreign currencies as of December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively.


17


Table of Contents

We also face the risk that our accounts payable and debt obligations denominated in foreign currencies will increase if such foreign currencies strengthen quickly and significantly against the dollar. Approximately 27% and 36% of our accounts payables were denominated in foreign currencies as of December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively. Approximately 15% and 12% of our debt obligations were denominated in foreign currencies as of December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively.
 
 
We currently manufacture a majority of the wafers for our products at our fabrication facilities. The wafers are then sorted and tested at our facilities. After wafer testing, we ship the wafers to one of our independent assembly contractors located in China, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, South Korea, Taiwan or Thailand where the wafers are separated into die, packaged and, in some cases, tested. Our reliance on independent contractors to assemble, package and test our products involves significant risks, including reduced control over quality and delivery schedules, the potential lack of adequate capacity and discontinuance or phase-out of the contractors’ assembly processes. These independent contractors may not continue to assemble, package and test our products for a variety of reasons. Moreover, because our assembly contractors are located in foreign countries, we are subject to certain risks generally associated with contracting with foreign suppliers, including currency exchange fluctuations, political and economic instability, trade restrictions, including export controls, and changes in tariff and freight rates. Accordingly, we may experience problems in timelines and the adequacy or quality of product deliveries, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.
 
 
In the first quarter of 2009, we announced our intention to pursue strategic alternatives for our ASIC business and related manufacturing assets as part of our transformation plan, which is aimed at focusing on our high-growth and high-margin businesses. In December 2009, we announced that we had entered into an exclusivity agreement with LFoundry GmbH for the potential sale of our Rousset, France manufacturing operations. In January 2010, we announced that following a comprehensive review of alternatives for our ASIC business, we would continue to explore the potential sale of our Smart Card (SMS) business located in Rousset, France and East Kilbride, UK and that we intended to discontinue potential sale discussions for our Customer Specific Products (CSP) and Aerospace businesses. We are continually reviewing potential changes in our business and asset portfolio throughout our worldwide operations, including those located in Europe in order to enhance our overall competitiveness and viability. However, reducing our wafer fabrication capacity involves significant potential costs and delays, particularly in Europe, where the extensive statutory protection of employees imposes substantial restrictions on employers when the market requires downsizing. We may incur additional costs including compensation to employees and the potential requirement to repay governmental subsidies. We may experience further delays to completing the sale of the Rousset manufacturing operations due to local government agencies and requirements and approvals of governmental and judicial bodies. We have in the past and may in the future experience labor union or workers council objections, or labor unrest actions (including possible strikes), which could result in reduced production output. Significant reductions to output or increases in cost could harm our business and operating results.
 
We continue to evaluate the existing restructuring accruals related to previously implemented restructuring plans. As a result, there may be additional restructuring charges or reversals or recoveries of previous charges. However, we may incur additional restructuring and asset impairment charges in connection with additional restructuring plans adopted in the future. Any such restructuring or asset impairment charges recorded in the future could significantly harm our business and operating results.


18


Table of Contents

 
On December 17, 2009, we announced that we entered into an exclusivity agreement with LFoundry GmbH for the purchase of our manufacturing operations in Rousset, France. As a result of this agreement, we determined that certain assets and liabilities were no longer included in the disposal group as they were not being acquired or assumed by the buyer, and as result, we reclassified these assets and liabilities back to held and used as of December 31, 2009 and recorded an asset impairment charge of $80 million. The assets and liabilities that remain in the disposal group are classified as held for sale and are carried on the consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2009, at the lower of their carrying amount or fair value less cost to sell. In determining any potential write down of these assets and liabilities, we considered both the net book value of the disposal group, which was $83 million and also a credit balance of $129 million related to foreign currency translation adjustments (“CTA balance”) that is recorded within stockholders’ equity. As a result, no impairment charge was recorded for the disposal group as its carrying value, net of the CTA balance, cannot be reduced to below zero. The CTA balance remaining in stockholders’ equity at the date of sale will be released to the statement of operations at that date.
 
 
Whether demand for semiconductors is rising or falling, we are constantly required by competitive pressures in the industry to successfully implement new manufacturing technologies in order to reduce the geometries of our semiconductors and produce more integrated circuits per wafer. We are developing processes that support effective feature sizes as small as 0.13-microns, and we are studying how to implement advanced manufacturing processes with even smaller feature sizes such as 0.065-microns.
 
Fabrication of our integrated circuits is a highly complex and precise process, requiring production in a tightly controlled, clean environment. Minute impurities, difficulties in the fabrication process, defects in the masks used to print circuits on a wafer or other factors can cause a substantial percentage of wafers to be rejected or numerous die on each wafer to be nonfunctional. Whether through the use of our foundries or third-party manufacturers, we may experience problems in achieving acceptable yields in the manufacture of wafers, particularly during a transition in the manufacturing process technology for our products.
 
We have previously experienced production delays and yield difficulties in connection with earlier expansions of our wafer fabrication capacity or transitions in manufacturing process technology. Production delays or difficulties in achieving acceptable yields at any of our fabrication facilities or at the fabrication facilities of our third-party manufacturers could materially and adversely affect our operating results. We may not be able to obtain the additional cash from operations or external financing necessary to fund the implementation of new manufacturing technologies.
 
 
The semiconductor industry is characterized by vigorous protection and pursuit of IP rights or positions, which have on occasion resulted in significant and often protracted and expensive litigation. We from time to time receive communications from third parties asserting patent or other IP rights covering our products or processes. In order to avoid the significant costs associated with our defense in litigation involving such claims, we may license the use of the technologies that are the subject of these claims from such companies and be required to make corresponding royalty payments, which may harm our operating results.
 
We have in the past been involved in intellectual property infringement lawsuits, which harmed our operating results. It is possible that we will be involved in other intellectual property infringement lawsuits in the future. The cost of defending against such lawsuits, in terms of management time and attention, legal fees and product delays, can be substantial. Moreover, if such infringement lawsuits are successful, we may be prohibited from using the


19


Table of Contents

technologies at issue in the lawsuits, and if we are unable to (1) obtain a license on acceptable terms, (2) license a substitute technology or (3) design new technology to avoid infringement, our business and operating results may be significantly harmed.
 
We have several cross-license agreements with other companies. In the future, it may be necessary or advantageous for us to obtain additional patent licenses from existing or other parties, but these license agreements may not be available to us on acceptable terms, if at all.
 
 
We compete in markets that are intensely competitive and characterized by rapid technological change, product obsolescence and price decline. Throughout our product line, we compete with a number of large semiconductor manufacturers, such as AMD, Cypress, Freescale, Fujitsu, Hitachi, IBM, Infineon, Intel, LSI Logic, Microchip, Philips, Renesas, Samsung, Sharp, Spansion, STMicroelectronics, Synaptics, Texas Instruments and Toshiba. Some of these competitors have substantially greater financial, technical, marketing and management resources than we do. As we have introduced new products we are increasingly competing directly with these companies, and we may not be able to compete effectively. We also compete with emerging companies that are attempting to sell products in specialized markets that our products address. We compete principally on the basis of the technical innovation and performance of our products, including their speed, density, power usage, reliability and specialty packaging alternatives, as well as on price and product availability. During the last several years, we have experienced significant price competition in several business segments, especially in our nonvolatile memory segment for EPROM, Serial EEPROM and Flash memory products, as well as in our commodity microcontrollers and smart cards. We expect continuing competitive pressures in our markets from existing competitors, new entrants, new technology and cyclical demand, among other factors, will likely maintain the recent trend of declining average selling prices for our products.
 
In addition to the factors described above, our ability to compete successfully depends on a number of factors, including the following:
 
  •  our success in designing and manufacturing new products that implement new technologies and processes;
 
  •  our ability to offer integrated solutions using our advanced nonvolatile memory process with other technologies;
 
  •  the rate at which customers incorporate our products into their systems;
 
  •  product introductions by our competitors;
 
  •  the number and nature of our competitors in a given market;
 
  •  the incumbency of our competitors as potential new customers;
 
  •  our ability to minimize production costs by outsourcing our manufacturing, assembly and testing functions; and
 
  •  general market and economic conditions.
 
Many of these factors are outside of our control, and may cause us to be unable to compete successfully in the future.
 
 
The average selling prices of our products historically have decreased over the products’ lives and are expected to continue to do so. As a result, our future success depends on our ability to develop and introduce new products which compete effectively on the basis of price and performance and which address customer requirements. We are continually designing and commercializing new and improved products to maintain our competitive position. These new products typically are more technologically complex than their predecessors, and thus have increased potential for delays in their introduction.


20


Table of Contents

The success of new product introductions is dependent upon several factors, including timely completion and introduction of new product designs, achievement of acceptable fabrication yields and market acceptance. Our development of new products and our customers’ decisions to design them into their systems can take as long as three years, depending upon the complexity of the device and the application. Accordingly, new product development requires a long-term forecast of market trends and customer needs, and the successful introduction of our products may be adversely affected by competing products or by technologies serving the markets addressed by our products. Our qualification process involves multiple cycles of testing and improving a product’s functionality to ensure that our products operate in accordance with design specifications. If we experience delays in the introduction of new products, our future operating results could be harmed.
 
In addition, new product introductions frequently depend on our development and implementation of new process technologies, and our future growth will depend in part upon the successful development and market acceptance of these process technologies. Our integrated solution products require more technically sophisticated sales and marketing personnel to market these products successfully to customers. We are developing new products with smaller feature sizes, the fabrication of which will be substantially more complex than fabrication of our current products. If we are unable to design, develop, manufacture, market and sell new products successfully, our operating results will be harmed. Our new product development, process development or marketing and sales efforts may not be successful, our new products may not achieve market acceptance and price expectations for our new products may not be achieved, any of which could harm our business.
 
 
Net revenues outside the United States accounted for 83%, 86% and 87% of our net revenues in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. We expect that revenues derived from international sales will continue to represent a significant portion of net revenues. International sales and operations are subject to a variety of risks, including:
 
  •  greater difficulty in protecting intellectual property;
 
  •  reduced flexibility and increased cost of staffing adjustments, particularly in France;
 
  •  longer collection cycles;
 
  •  legal and regulatory requirements, including antitrust laws, export license requirements, trade barriers, tariffs and tax laws, and environmental and privacy regulations and changes to those laws and regulations; and
 
  •  general economic and political conditions in these foreign markets.
 
Some of our distributors, third-party foundries and other business partners also have international operations and are subject to the risks described above. Even if we are able to manage the risks of international operations successfully, our business may be materially adversely affected if our distributors, third-party foundries and other business partners are not able to manage these risks successfully.
 
Further, we purchase a significant portion of our raw materials and equipment from foreign suppliers, and we incur labor and other operating costs in foreign currencies, particularly at our French manufacturing facility. As a result, our costs will fluctuate along with the currencies and general economic conditions in the countries in which we do business, which could harm our operating results.
 
Approximately 24%, 23% and 22% of our net revenues in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively, were denominated in foreign currencies. Operating costs denominated in foreign currencies, were approximately 39%, 47% and 51% of our total operating costs in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively.


21


Table of Contents

 
Since the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon in 2001, certain insurance coverage has either been reduced or made subject to additional conditions by our insurance carriers, and we have not been able to maintain all necessary insurance coverage at a reasonable cost. Instead, we have relied to a greater degree on self-insurance. For example, we now self-insure property losses up to $10 million per event. Our headquarters, some of our manufacturing facilities, the manufacturing facilities of third party foundries and some of our major vendors’ and customers’ facilities are located near major earthquake faults and in potential terrorist target areas. If a major earthquake, other disaster or a terrorist act impacts us and insurance coverage is unavailable for any reason, we may need to spend significant amounts to repair or replace our facilities and equipment, we may suffer a temporary halt in our ability to manufacture and transport products and we could suffer damages of an amount sufficient to harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
 
Effective internal controls are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports. If we cannot provide reliable financial reports or prevent fraud, our business and operating results could be harmed. We have in the past discovered, and may in the future discover, deficiencies in our internal controls. Evaluations of the effectiveness of our internal controls in the future may lead our management to determine that internal control over financial reporting is no longer effective. Such conclusions may result from our failure to implement controls for changes in our business, or deterioration in the degree of compliance with our policies or procedures.
 
A failure to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting, including a failure to implement effective new controls to address changes to our business, could result in a material misstatement of our consolidated financial statements or cause us to fail to meet our financial reporting obligations. This, in turn, could result in a loss of investor confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports, which could have an adverse effect on our stock price.
 
 
As of December 31, 2009, our total debt was $95 million, compared to $145 million at December 31, 2008. Our debt-to-equity ratio was 0.82 and 0.91 at December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively. Increases in our debt-to-equity ratio could adversely affect our ability to obtain additional financing for working capital, acquisitions or other purposes and make us more vulnerable to industry downturns and competitive pressures.
 
From time to time our ability to meet our debt obligations will depend upon our ability to raise additional financing and on our future performance and ability to generate substantial cash flow from operations, which will be subject to financial, business and other factors affecting our operations, many of which are beyond our control. If we are unable to meet debt obligations or otherwise are obliged to repay any debt prior to its due date, our available cash would be depleted, perhaps seriously, and our ability to fund operations harmed. In addition, our ability to service long-term debt in the U.S. or to obtain cash for other needs from our foreign subsidiaries may be structurally impeded, as a substantial portion of our operations are conducted through our foreign subsidiaries. Our cash flow and ability to service debt are partially dependent upon the liquidity and earnings of our subsidiaries as well as the distribution of those earnings, or repayment of loans or other payments of funds by those subsidiaries, to the U.S. parent corporation. These foreign subsidiaries are separate and distinct legal entities and may have limited or no obligation, contingent or otherwise, to pay any amount to us, whether by dividends, distributions, loans or any other form.
 
We intend to continue to make capital investments to support new products and manufacturing processes that achieve manufacturing cost reductions and improved yields. We may seek additional equity or debt financing to


22


Table of Contents

fund operations, strategic transactions, or other projects. The timing and amount of such capital requirements cannot be precisely determined at this time and will depend on a number of factors, including demand for products, product mix, changes in semiconductor industry conditions and competitive factors. Additional debt or equity financing may not be available when needed or, if available, may not be available on satisfactory terms.
 
 
Our ability to maintain close, satisfactory relationships with large customers is important to our business. A reduction, delay, or cancellation of orders from our large customers would harm our business. The loss of one or more of our key customers, or reduced orders by any of our key customers, could harm our business and results of operations. Moreover, our customers may vary order levels significantly from period to period, and customers may not continue to place orders with us in the future at the same levels as in prior periods.
 
We sell many of our products through distributors. Our distributors could experience financial difficulties, including lack of access to credit, or otherwise reduce or discontinue sales of our products. Our distributors could commence or increase sales of our competitors’ products. Distributors typically are not highly capitalized and may experience difficulties during times of economic contraction. If our distributors were to become insolvent, their inability to maintain their business and sales could negatively impact our business and revenue. Also, one or more of our distributors or their affiliates may be identified in the future on the U.S. Department of Commerce Denied Persons or Entity List, the U.S. Department of Treasury’s Specially Designated Nationals or Blocked Persons Lists, or the Department of State’s Debarred Parties List, in which case we would not be permitted to sell our products through such distributors. In any of these cases, our business or results from operations could be materially harmed. For example, in the three months ended December 31, 2008, we took a one-time charge for a bad debt provision of $12 million related to an Asian distributor whose business was impacted following their addition to the U.S. Department of Commerce Entity List, which prohibits us from shipping products to the distributor.
 
Our sales terms for Asian distributors generally include no rights of return and no stock rotation privileges. However, as we evaluate how to refine our distribution strategy, we may need to modify our sales terms or make changes to our distributor base, which may impact our future revenues in this region. It may take time for us to convert systems and processes to support modified sales terms. It may also take time for us to identify financially viable distributors and help them develop high quality support services. There can be no assurances that we will be able to manage these changes in an efficient and timely manner, or that our net revenues, result of operations and financial position will not be negatively impacted as a result.
 
 
We do not typically enter into long-term contracts with our customers, and we cannot be certain as to future order levels from our customers. When we do enter into a long-term contract, the contract is generally terminable at the convenience of the customer. In the event of an early termination by one of our major customers, it is unlikely that we will be able to rapidly replace that revenue source, which would harm our financial results.
 
 
We are subject to a variety of international, federal, state and local governmental regulations related to the discharge or disposal of toxic, volatile or otherwise hazardous chemicals used in our manufacturing processes. Increasing public attention has been focused on the environmental impact of semiconductor operations. Although we have not experienced any material adverse effect on our operations from environmental regulations, any changes in such regulations or in their enforcement may impose the need for additional capital equipment or other requirements. If for any reason we fail to control the use of, or to restrict adequately the discharge of, hazardous substances under present or future regulations, we could be subject to substantial liability or our manufacturing operations could be suspended.


23


Table of Contents

We also could face significant costs and liabilities in connection with product take-back legislation. We record a liability for environmental remediation and other environmental costs when we consider the costs to be probable and the amount of the costs can be reasonably estimated. The European Union (“EU”) has enacted the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment Directive, which makes producers of electrical goods, including computers and printers, financially responsible for specified collection, recycling, treatment and disposal of past and future covered products. The deadline for the individual member states of the EU to enact the directive in their respective countries was August 13, 2004 (such legislation, together with the directive, the “WEEE Legislation”). Producers participating in the market became financially responsible for implementing these responsibilities beginning in August 2005. Our potential liability resulting from the WEEE Legislation may be substantial. Similar legislation has been or may be enacted in other jurisdictions, including in the United States, Canada, Mexico, China and Japan, the cumulative impact of which could be significant.
 
 
Our future success depends in large part on the continued service of our key technical and management personnel, and on our ability to continue to attract and retain qualified employees, particularly those highly skilled design, process and test engineers involved in the manufacture of existing products and in the development of new products and processes. The competition for such personnel is intense, and the loss of key employees, none of whom is subject to an employment agreement for a specified term or a post-employment non-competition agreement, could harm our business.
 
 
We have issued performance-based restricted stock units to eligible employees payable to a maximum of 10 million shares of our common stock under the 2005 Stock Plan. These restricted stock units vest only if we achieve certain quarterly operating margin performance criteria over the performance period of July 1, 2008 to December 31, 2012. Until restricted stock units are vested, they do not have the voting rights of common stock and the shares underlying the awards are not considered issued and outstanding. We recognize the stock-based compensation expense for performance-based restricted stock units when we believe it is probable that we will achieve certain future quarterly operating margin performance criteria. If achieved, the award vests over a specified remaining performance period. If the performance goals are not met, no compensation expense is recognized and any previously recognized compensation expense is reversed. The expected cost of each award is reflected over the performance period and is reduced for estimated forfeitures.
 
In the fourth quarter of 2009, after significant improvement to operating results and customer order rates, we recorded stock-based compensation expense of $3 million, as we re-assessed the probability of achieving the performance criteria and estimated that it is probable that a portion of the performance criteria will be achieved by December 31, 2012. We are required to reassess this probability at each reporting date, and any change in our forecasts may result in an increase or decrease to the expense recognized.
 
 
Our operations are vulnerable to interruption by fire, earthquake, power loss, telecommunications failure and other events beyond our control. We do not have a detailed disaster recovery plan. In addition, business interruption insurance may not be enough to compensate us for losses that may occur and any losses or damages incurred by us as a result of business interruptions could significantly harm our business.
 
 
We periodically make enhancements to our integrated financial and supply chain management systems. This process is complex, time-consuming and expensive. Operational disruptions during the course of this process or delays in the implementation of these enhancements could impact our operations. Our ability to forecast sales demand, ship products, manage our product inventory and record and report financial and management information on a timely and accurate basis could be impaired while we are making these enhancements.


24


Table of Contents

 
Certain provisions of our Restated Certificate of Incorporation, our Bylaws and Delaware law could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire us, even if doing so would benefit our stockholders. Our board of directors has the authority to issue up to 5 million shares of preferred stock and to determine the price, voting rights, preferences and privileges and restrictions of those shares without the approval of our stockholders. The rights of the holders of common stock will be subject to, and may be harmed by, the rights of the holders of any shares of preferred stock that may be issued in the future. The issuance of preferred stock may delay, defer or prevent a change in control, by making it more difficult for a third party to acquire a majority of our stock. In addition, the issuance of preferred stock could have a dilutive effect on our stockholders. We have no present plans to issue shares of preferred stock.
 
 
We sponsor defined benefit pension plans that cover substantially all of our French and German employees. Plan benefits are managed in accordance with local statutory requirements. Benefits are based on years of service and employee compensation levels. Pension benefits payable totaled $29 million and $27 million at December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively. The plans are non-funded, in compliance with local statutory regulations, and we have no immediate intention of funding these plans. Benefits are paid when amounts become due, commencing when participants retire. Cash funding for benefits paid in was $1 million in 2009, and we expect to pay approximately $1 million in 2010. Should legislative regulations require complete or partial funding of these plans in the future, it could negatively impact our cash position and operating capital.
 
FUTURE ACQUISITIONS MAY RESULT IN UNANTICIPATED ACCOUNTING CHARGES OR OTHERWISE ADVERSELY AFFECT OUR RESULTS OF OPERATIONS AND RESULT IN DIFFICULTIES IN ASSIMILATING AND INTEGRATING THE OPERATIONS, PERSONNEL, TECHNOLOGIES, PRODUCTS AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS OF ACQUIRED COMPANIES OR BUSINESSES, OR BE DILUTIVE TO EXISTING STOCKHOLDERS.
 
A key element of our business strategy includes expansion through the acquisition of businesses, assets, products or technologies that allow us to complement our existing product offerings, expand our market coverage, increase our skilled engineering workforce or enhance our technological capabilities. Between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2009, we acquired four companies and certain assets of three other businesses. We continually evaluate and explore strategic opportunities as they arise, including business combination transactions, strategic partnerships, and the purchase or sale of assets, including tangible and intangible assets such as intellectual property. For example, on March 6, 2008, we completed the purchase of Quantum, a developer of capacitive sensing IP and solutions for user interfaces.
 
Acquisitions may require significant capital infusions, typically entail many risks and could result in difficulties in assimilating and integrating the operations, personnel, technologies, products and information systems of acquired companies or businesses. We have in the past experienced and may in the future experience, delays in the timing and successful integration of an acquired company’s technologies and product development through volume production, unanticipated costs and expenditures, changing relationships with customers, suppliers and strategic partners, or contractual, intellectual property or employment issues. In addition, key personnel of an acquired company may decide not to work for us. The acquisition of another company or its products and technologies may also require us to enter into a geographic or business market in which we have little or no prior experience. These challenges could disrupt our ongoing business, distract our management and employees, harm our reputation and increase our expenses. These challenges are magnified as the size of the acquisition increases. Furthermore, these challenges would be even greater if we acquired a business or entered into a business combination transaction with a company that was larger and more difficult to integrate than the companies we have historically acquired.


25


Table of Contents

Acquisitions may require large one-time charges and can result in increased debt or contingent liabilities, adverse tax consequences, additional stock-based compensation expense and the recording and later amortization of amounts related to certain purchased intangible assets, any of which items could negatively impact our results of operations. In addition, we may record goodwill in connection with an acquisition and incur goodwill impairment charges in the future. Any of these charges could cause the price of our common stock to decline. Effective January 1, 2009, we adopted an amendment to the accounting standard on business combinations. The accounting standard will have an impact on our consolidated financial statements, depending upon the nature, terms and size of the acquisitions we consummate in the future.
 
Acquisitions or asset purchases made entirely or partially for cash may reduce our cash reserves. We may seek to obtain additional cash to fund an acquisition by selling equity or debt securities. Any issuance of equity or convertible debt securities may be dilutive to our existing stockholders.
 
We cannot assure you that we will be able to consummate any pending or future acquisitions or that we will realize any anticipated benefits from these acquisitions. We may not be able to find suitable acquisition opportunities that are available at attractive valuations, if at all. Even if we do find suitable acquisition opportunities, we may not be able to consummate the acquisitions on commercially acceptable terms, and any decline in the price of our common stock may make it significantly more difficult and expensive to initiate or consummate additional acquisitions.
 
We are required under U.S. GAAP to test goodwill for possible impairment on an annual basis and at any other time that circumstances arise indicating the carrying value may not be recoverable. At December 31, 2009, we had $56 million of goodwill. We completed our annual test of goodwill impairment in the fourth quarter of 2009 and concluded that we did not have any impairment at that time. However, if we continue to see deterioration in the global economy and the current market conditions in the semiconductor industry worsen, the carrying amount of our goodwill may no longer be recoverable, and we may be required to record a material impairment charge, which would have a negative impact on our results of operations.
 
 
The manufacture and assembly of semiconductor devices requires significant fixed investment in manufacturing facilities, specialized equipment, and a skilled workforce. If we are unable to fully utilize our own fabrication facilities due to decreased demand, significant shift in product mix, obsolescence of the manufacturing equipment installed, lower than anticipated manufacturing yields, or other reasons, our operating results will suffer. Our inability to produce at anticipated output levels could include delays in the recognition of revenue, loss of revenue or future orders or customer-imposed penalties for failure to meet contractual shipment deadlines.
 
Our operating results are also adversely affected when we operate at production levels below optimal capacity. Lower capacity utilization results in certain costs being charged directly to expense and lower gross margins. During 2007, we lowered production levels significantly at our North Tyneside, United Kingdom manufacturing facility to avoid building more inventory than we were forecasting orders for. As a result, operating costs for these periods were higher than in prior periods negatively impacting gross margins. We closed our North Tyneside manufacturing facility in the first quarter of 2008. In addition, our other manufacturing facilities could experience conditions requiring production levels to be reduced below optimal capacity levels. If we are unable to operate our manufacturing facilities at optimal production levels, our operating costs will increase and gross margin and results from operations will be negatively impacted. Gross margins were negatively impacted in the year ended December 31, 2009 primarily due to factory under utilization costs, as well as higher per-unit costs, resulting from reduced factory loading at our wafer fabrication and test facilities.
 
Our manufacturing facilities could experience conditions in the future requiring production levels to be reduced below optimal capacity levels. If we are unable to operate our manufacturing facilities at optimal production levels, our operating costs will increase and gross margin and results from operations will be negatively impacted.


26


Table of Contents

 
The manufacture of semiconductor devices requires specialized raw materials, primarily certain types of silicon wafers. We generally utilize more than one source to acquire these wafers, but there are only a limited number of qualified suppliers capable of producing these wafers in the market. The raw materials and equipment necessary for our business could become more difficult to obtain as worldwide use of semiconductors in product applications increases. We have experienced supply shortages from time to time in the past, and on occasion our suppliers have told us they need more time than expected to fill our orders. Any significant interruption of the supply of raw materials could harm our business.
 
 
All of our products are sold with a limited warranty. However, we could incur costs not covered by our warranties, including additional labor costs, costs for replacing defective parts, reimbursement to customers for damages incurred in correcting their defective products, costs for product recalls or other damages. These costs could be disproportionately higher than the revenue and profits we receive from the sales of these devices.
 
Our products have previously experienced, and may in the future experience, manufacturing defects, software or firmware bugs, or other similar defects. If any of our products contain defects or bugs, or have reliability, quality or compatibility problems, our reputation may be damaged and customers may be reluctant to buy our products, which could materially and adversely affect our ability to retain existing customers and attract new customers. In addition, these defects or bugs could interrupt or delay sales or shipment of our products to our customers.
 
We have implemented significant quality control measures to mitigate this risk; however, it is possible that products shipped to our customers will contain defects or bugs. In addition, these problems may divert our technical and other resources from other development efforts. If any of these problems are not found until after we have commenced commercial production of a new product, we may be required to incur additional costs or delay shipments for revenue, which would negatively affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
 
 
We are subject to continued examination of our income tax returns by the Internal Revenue Service and other foreign/domestic tax authorities. We regularly assess the likelihood of adverse outcomes resulting from these examinations to determine the adequacy of our provision for income taxes. While we believe that the resolution of these audits will not have a material adverse impact on our results of operations, the outcome is subject to significant uncertainties. If we are unable to obtain agreements with the tax authority on the various proposed adjustments, there could be an adverse material impact on our results of operations, cash flows and financial position.
 
OUR LEGAL ENTITY ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE IS COMPLEX, WHICH COULD RESULT IN UNANTICIPATED UNFAVORABLE TAX OR OTHER CONSEQUENCES, WHICH COULD HAVE AN ADVERSE AFFECT ON OUR NET INCOME(LOSS) AND FINANCIAL CONDITION. WE CURRENTLY HAVE OVER 40 ENTITIES GLOBALLY AND SIGNIFICANT INTERCOMPANY LOANS BETWEEN ENTITIES.
 
We currently operate legal entities in countries where we conduct manufacturing, design, and sales operations around the world. In some countries, we maintain multiple entities for tax or other purposes. Certain entities have significant unsettled intercompany balances that could result in adverse tax or other consequences related to capital structure, loan interest rates and legal entity structure changes. We expect to reduce the level of complexity of our legal entity structure over time, as well as reduce intercompany loan balances. However, we may incur additional income tax or other expense related to loan settlement or loan restructuring actions, or incur additional costs related to legal entity restructuring or dissolution efforts.


27


Table of Contents

IF WE ARE UNABLE TO COMPLY WITH ECONOMIC INCENTIVE TERMS IN CERTAIN GOVERNMENT GRANTS, WE MAY NOT BE ABLE TO RECEIVE OR RECOGNIZE GRANT BENEFITS OR WE MAY BE REQUIRED TO REPAY GRANT BENEFITS PREVIOUSLY PAID TO US AND RECOGNIZE RELATED CHARGES, WHICH WOULD ADVERSELY AFFECT OUR OPERATING RESULTS AND FINANCIAL POSITION.
 
We receive economic incentive grants and allowances from European governments targeted at increasing employment at specific locations. The subsidy grant agreements typically contain economic incentive and other covenants that must be met to receive and retain grant benefits. Noncompliance with the conditions of the grants could result in the forfeiture of all or a portion of any future amounts to be received, as well as the repayment of all or a portion of amounts received to date. For example, in the three months ended March 31, 2008, we repaid $40 million of government grants as a result of closing our North Tyneside manufacturing facility. In addition, we may need to record charges to reverse grant benefits recorded in prior periods as a result of changes to our plans for headcount, project spending, or capital investment relative to target levels agreed with government agencies at any of these specific locations. If we are unable to comply with any of the covenants in the grant agreements, our results of operations and financial position could be materially adversely affected.
 
 
We are subject to legal proceedings and claims that arise in the ordinary course of business. See Item 3 of this Form 10-K. Litigation may result in substantial costs and may divert management’s attention and resources, which may seriously harm our business, results of operations, financial condition and liquidity.
 
For example, in October 2008, officials of the EU Commission (the “Commission”) conducted an inspection at the offices of one of our French subsidiaries. We have been informed that the Commission was seeking evidence of potential violations by us or our subsidiaries of the EU’s competition laws in connection with the Commission’s investigation of suppliers of integrated circuits for smart cards. We have responded to the Commission’s September and October 2009 requests for information. We continue to cooperate with the Commission’s investigation and have not received any specific findings, monetary demand or judgment through the date of filing this Form 10-K.
 
ITEM 1B.   UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
 
Not applicable.
 
ITEM 2.   PROPERTIES
 
At December 31, 2009, we owned the major facilities described below:
 
                     
Number of
           
Buildings
 
Location
 
Total Square Feet
 
Use
 
 
1
    San Jose, California     291,000     Headquarters offices, research and development, sales and marketing, product design, final product testing
 
6
    Colorado Springs, Colorado     603,000     Wafer fabrication, research and development, marketing, product design, final product testing
 
5
    Rousset, France     815,000     Wafer fabrication, research and development, marketing, product design, final product testing
 
4
    Heilbronn, Germany     778,000     Research and development, marketing and product design, primarily leased to other semiconductor companies.
 
2
    Calamba City, Philippines     338,000     Final product testing
 
In addition to the facilities we own, we lease numerous research and development facilities and sales offices in North America, Europe and Asia. We believe that existing facilities are adequate for our current requirements.


28


Table of Contents

We do not identify facilities or other assets by operating segment. Each facility serves or supports multiple products and our product mix changes frequently.
 
ITEM 3.   LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
 
The Company is party to various legal proceedings. While management currently believes that the ultimate outcome of these proceedings, individually and in the aggregate, will not have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial position or overall trends in results of operations, litigation is subject to inherent uncertainties. If an unfavorable ruling were to occur, there exists the possibility of a material adverse impact on the results of operations, cash flows and financial position of Atmel. The estimate of the potential impact on the Company’s financial position or overall results of operations or cash flows for the legal proceedings described below could change in the future. The Company has accrued for losses related to litigation that the Company considers probable and for which the loss can be reasonably estimated.
 
From July through September 2006, six stockholder derivative lawsuits were filed (three in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California and three in Santa Clara County Superior Court) by persons claiming to be Company stockholders and purporting to act on Atmel’s behalf, naming Atmel as a nominal defendant and some of its current and former officers and directors as defendants. Additional derivative actions were filed in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California (later consolidated with the previously-filed federal derivative actions) and the Delaware Chancery Court. All the suits contain various causes of action relating to the timing of stock option grants awarded by Atmel. In June 2008, the federal district court denied the Company’s motion to dismiss for failure to make a demand on the board, and granted in part and denied in part motions to dismiss filed by the individual defendants. On December 18, 2009, the federal district court preliminarily approved a partial global settlement of these actions, and several other actions seeking to compel inspection of Company books and records. The settlement remains subject to final court approval and, among other things, resolves all claims against all defendants, except Atmel’s former general counsel James Michael Ross, related to the allegations and/or matters set forth in all the derivative actions. The terms of the settlement — previously disclosed in a January 29, 2010 Form 8-K (incorporated herein by reference) — provide for: (1) a direct financial benefit to Atmel of $9.7 million; (2) the adoption and/or implementation of a variety of corporate governance enhancements, particularly in the way Atmel grants and documents grants of employee stock option awards; (3) the payment by Atmel of plaintiffs’ counsels’ attorneys’ fees, costs, and expenses in the amount of $4.9 million; and (4) the dismissal with prejudice of all claims by and between the settling parties and releases of all claims against the settling defendants. The claims against Mr. Ross remain pending. Discovery is ongoing, and no trial date has been set.
 
On September 28, 2007, Matheson Tri-Gas (“MTG”) filed suit in Texas state court in Dallas County against the Company. Plaintiff alleges claims for: (1) breach of contract for the Company’s alleged failure to pay minimum payments under a purchase requirements contract; (2) breach of contract under a product supply agreement; and (3) breach of contract for failure to execute a process gas agreement. MTG seeks unspecified damages, pre- and post-judgment interest, attorneys’ fees and costs. In late November 2007, the Company filed its answer denying liability. In July 2008, the Company filed an amended answer, counterclaim and cross claim seeking among other things a declaratory judgment that a termination agreement cut off any claim by MTG for additional payments. In an Order entered on June 26, 2009, the Court granted the Company’s motion for partial summary judgment dismissing MTG’s breach of contract claims relating to the requirements contract and the product supply agreement. The parties dismissed the remaining claims and, on August 26, 2009, the Court entered a Summary Judgment Order and Final Judgment. MTG filed a Motion to Modify Judgment and Notice of Appeal on September 24, 2009. The Company intends to vigorously defend the appeal.
 
In October and November 2008, three purported class actions were filed in Delaware Chancery Court against the Company and/or all current members of its Board of Directors arising out of the unsolicited proposal made on October 1, 2008 by Microchip Technology Inc. (“Microchip”) and ON Semiconductor (“ON”) to acquire the Company. The three cases eventually were consolidated, with the complaint in Louisiana Municipal Employees Retirement System v. Laub designated the operative complaint. As initially filed, that complaint had only one cause of action — for breach of fiduciary duty — and asked the court to declare that the directors breached their fiduciary duty by refusing to consider the Microchip/ON offer in good faith, to invalidate any defensive measures that had


29


Table of Contents

been taken, and to award an unspecified amount of compensatory damages. Plaintiff filed an Amended Complaint on June 2, 2009 (adding a declaratory judgment claim to the breach of fiduciary duty claim). In addition, in mid-November 2008, a fourth case arising out of the Microchip/ON proposal, Zucker v. Laub, was filed in California in the Superior Court for Santa Clara County. Zucker was stayed in favor of the Delaware actions. On September 14, 2009, a Memorandum of Understanding (“MOU”) was signed setting forth an agreement-in-principle to settle all litigation arising out of the Company’s response to the Microchip/ON proposal in exchange for certain therapeutic provisions relating to the Company’s stockholder rights plan (the therapeutic provisions previously were disclosed in a September 18, 2009 Form 8-K (incorporated herein by reference)). The agreement-in-principle outlined in the MOU was subject to and conditioned upon the negotiation and execution of a settlement agreement and final court approval. On January 8, 2010, the Delaware Chancery Court entered an Order and Final Judgment (“Order”) approving the settlement. Pursuant to the Company’s pre-existing obligations to indemnify the directors, and the terms of the approved settlement agreement, the Company paid plaintiffs’ counsel $1 million for attorneys’ fees and expenses. The Company accrued for this payment during the third quarter of 2009, and all these matters now are concluded.
 
On October 9, 2008, the Air Pollution Control Division (“APCD”) of the State of Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment issued a Compliance Advisory notice to the Company’s Colorado Springs facility for purported violations of the law and non-compliance with the Company’s Colorado Construction Permit Number 91EP793-1 Initial Approval Modification 3 (“Permit”). The Compliance Advisory notice also claimed that the Company failed to meet other regulatory requirements. The APCD sought administrative penalties and compliance by the Company with applicable laws, regulations and Permit terms. Effective October 1, 2009, the Company and the APCD entered into a Compliance Order on Consent (“COC”) that resolves this matter. The COC required that the Company pay a fine of $0.1 million, 80 percent of which the Company is offsetting through the performance of a supplemental environmental project.
 
On June 3, 2009, the Company filed an action in Santa Clara County Superior Court against three of its now-terminated Asia-based distributors, NEL Group Ltd. (“NEL”), Nucleus Electronics (Hong Kong) Ltd. (“NEHK”) and TLG Electronics Ltd. (“TLG”). The Company seeks, among other things, to recover $8.5 million owed it, plus applicable interest and attorneys fees. On June 9, 2009, NEHK separately sued Atmel in Santa Clara County Superior Court, alleging that Atmel’s suspension of shipments to NEHK on September 23, 2008-one day after TLG appeared on the Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security’s Entity List-breached the parties’ International Distributor Agreement. NEHK also alleges that Atmel libeled it, intentionally interfered with contractual relations and/or prospective business advantage, and violated California Business and Professions Code Sections 17200 et seq. and 17500 et seq. NEHK alleges damages exceeding $10 million. Both matters now have been consolidated. On July 29, 2009, NEL filed a cross-complaint against Atmel that alleges claims virtually identical to those NEHK has alleged, and seeks unspecified damages. Discovery in the case is ongoing and no trial date has yet been set. The Company intends to prosecute its claims and defend the NEHK/NEL claims vigorously. TLG did not answer, and the Court entered a default judgment of $2.7 million on November 23, 2009.
 
On July 16, 2009, James M. Ross, the Company’s former General Counsel, filed a lawsuit in Santa Clara County Superior Court challenging his termination, and certain actions the Company took thereafter. The Complaint, as amended and narrowed by motion practice, contains 12 causes of action, including: (1) several claims arising out of the Company’s treatment of his post-termination attempt to exercise stock options; (2) breach of a purported oral contract to pay a bonus upon the sale of the Company’s Grenoble division; (3) defamation; (4) violation of Section 17200 of the California Business and Professions Code; and (5) violations of the California Labor Code. Discovery is ongoing and no trial date has yet been set. The Company intends to vigorously defend this action.
 
On December 18, 2009, Mr. Ross filed another lawsuit in Delaware Chancery Court seeking (pursuant to Section 145 of the Delaware General Corporation Law) to enforce certain rights granted him under his indemnification agreement with the Company, and to recover damages for any breach of that agreement. In particular, Mr. Ross alleges that the Company breached the agreement in the way it negotiated and structured the partial global settlement in the backdating cases, described above. He also seeks advancement of fees and indemnification in connection with the Delaware lawsuit. The Company intends to vigorously defend this action.


30


Table of Contents

On July 24, 2009, 56 former employees of Atmel’s Nantes facility filed claims in the First Instance labour court, Nantes, France against the Company and MHS Electronics claiming that (1) the Company’s sale of the Nantes facility to MHS (XbyBus SAS) in 2005 did not result in the transfer of their labor agreements to MHS, and (2) these employees should still be considered Atmel employees, with the right to claim related benefits from Atmel. Alternatively, each employee seeks damages of at least 0.045 million Euros and court costs. At an initial hearing on October 6, 2009, the Court set a briefing schedule and said it will issue a ruling on October 6, 2010. These claims are similar to those filed in the First Instance labour court in October 2006 by 47 other former employees of Atmel’s Nantes facility (MHS was not named a defendant in the earlier claims). On July 24, 2008, the judge hearing the earlier claims issued an oral ruling in favor of the Company, finding that there was no jurisdiction for those claims by certain “protected employees,” and denying the claims as to all other employees. Forty of those earlier plaintiffs appealed, and on February 11, 2010, the Court of Appeal of Rennes, France affirmed the lower court’s ruling. The Company intends to continue defending all these claims vigorously.
 
From time to time, the Company may be notified of claims that it may be infringing patents issued to other parties and may subsequently engage in license negotiations regarding these claims. As well, from time to time, the Company receives from customers demands for indemnification, or claims relating to the quality of our products, including claims for additional labor costs, costs for replacing defective parts, reimbursement to customers for damages incurred in correcting their defective products, costs for product recalls or other damages. The Company accrues for losses relating to such claims that the Company considers probable and for which the loss can be reasonably estimated.
 
ITEM 4.   RESERVED
 
 
ITEM 5.   MARKET FOR THE REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
 
Our common stock is traded on The NASDAQ Stock Market’s Global Select Market under the symbol “ATML.” The last reported price for our stock on January 29, 2010 was $4.64 per share. The following table presents the high and low sales prices per share for our common stock as quoted on The NASDAQ Global Select Market for the periods indicated.
 
                 
    High   Low
 
Year ended December 31, 2008:
               
First Quarter
  $ 4.32     $ 2.96  
Second Quarter
  $ 4.47     $ 3.21  
Third Quarter
  $ 4.34     $ 3.19  
Fourth Quarter
  $ 4.55     $ 2.54  
Year ended December 31, 2009:
               
First Quarter
  $ 3.92     $ 2.98  
Second Quarter
  $ 4.29     $ 3.29  
Third Quarter
  $ 4.43     $ 3.66  
Fourth Quarter
  $ 4.76     $ 3.68  
 
As of January 29, 2010, there were approximately 1,719 stockholders of record of our common stock. As many of our shares of common stock are held by brokers and other institutions on behalf of stockholders, we are unable to estimate the total number of stockholders represented by these record holders.
 
No cash dividends have been paid on our common stock, and we currently have no plans to pay cash dividends in the future.
 
During the fourth quarter ended December 31, 2009, we did not repurchase our common stock or issue unregistered securities.


31


Table of Contents

ITEM 6.   SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
 
The following tables include selected summary financial data for each of our last five years. This data is not necessarily indicative of results of future operations and should be read in conjunction with Item 8, “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data,” and Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The data for fiscal years 2009, 2008, and the consolidated statement of operations data for 2007 are derived from, and are qualified by, our audited financial statements that are included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The balance sheet data for fiscal year 2007 and all data for fiscal years 2006 and 2005 are derived from our audited consolidated financial statements that are not included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
                                         
    Years Ended December 31,  
    2009     2008     2007     2006     2005  
    (In thousands, except per share data)  
 
Net revenues
  $ 1,217,345     $ 1,566,763     $ 1,639,237     $ 1,670,887     $ 1,561,107  
                                         
(Loss) income from continuing operations before income taxes(1)(5)(6)
    (136,039 )     (20,243 )     55,709       (73,702 )     (62,690 )
                                         
(Loss) income from continuing operations
    (109,498 )     (27,209 )     47,885       (98,651 )     (49,627 )
Income from discontinued operations, net of provision for income taxes
                      12,969       16,276  
Gain on sale of discontinued operations, net of provision for income taxes(2)
                      100,332        
                                         
Net (loss) income
  $ (109,498 )   $ (27,209 )   $ 47,885     $ 14,650     $ (33,351 )
                                         
Basic net (loss) income per share:
                                       
(Loss) income from continuing operations
  $ (0.24 )   $ (0.06 )   $ 0.10     $ (0.20 )   $ (0.10 )
Income from discontinued operations, net of provision for income taxes
                      0.02       0.03  
Gain on sale of discontinued operations, net of provision for income taxes
                      0.21        
                                         
Net (loss) income
  $ (0.24 )   $ (0.06 )   $ 0.10     $ 0.03     $ (0.07 )
                                         
Weighted-average shares used in basic net (loss) income per share calculations
    451,755       446,504       477,213       487,413       481,534  
                                         
Diluted net (loss) income per share:
                                       
(Loss) income from continuing operations
  $ (0.24 )   $ (0.06 )   $ 0.10     $ (0.20 )   $ (0.10 )
Income from discontinued operations, net of provision for income taxes
                      0.02       0.03  
Gain on sale of discontinued operations, net of provision for income taxes
                      0.21        
                                         
Net (loss) income
  $ (0.24 )   $ (0.06 )   $ 0.10     $ 0.03     $ (0.07 )
                                         
Weighted-average shares used in diluted net (loss) income per share calculations
    451,755       446,504       481,737       487,413       481,534  
                                         
 
                                         
    As of December 31,
    2009   2008   2007   2006   2005
 
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 437,509     $ 408,926     $ 374,130     $ 410,480     $ 300,323  
Cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments
    476,140       440,633       429,947       466,744       348,255  
Fixed assets, net(3)
    203,219       383,107       579,566       602,290       874,618  
Total assets
    1,392,842       1,530,654       1,702,753       1,818,539       1,933,936  
Long-term debt and capital leases less current portion(4)
    9,464       13,909       20,408       60,333       133,479  
Stockholders’ equity
    764,407       802,084       823,479       953,894       937,371  


32


Table of Contents

 
(1) We recorded asset impairment charges (recovery) of $80 million, $8 million, $(1) million, $83 million and $13 million in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006 and 2005, respectively, and restructuring charges of $7 million, $71 million, $13 million, $9 million, and $4 million in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006 and 2005, respectively, related to employee termination costs, as well as industry changes and the related realignment of our businesses in response to those changes. We recorded a gain on sale of assets of $0.2 million and $33 million in the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008 and a loss on sale of assets of $13 million in the year ended December 31, 2005. We also recorded $2 million, $1 million, $1 million and $30 million in charges for grant repayments in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008, 2007 and 2006, respectively.
 
(2) On July 31, 2006, we sold our Grenoble, France, subsidiary to e2v technologies plc, a British corporation, for approximately $140 million. We recorded a gain on the sale of approximately $100 million, net of assets transferred, working capital adjustments and accrued income taxes in the year ended December 31, 2006.
 
(3) Fixed assets, net was reduced for the respective periods as a result of the asset impairment charges (recovery) discussed in (1) above. Additionally, we reclassified $83 million and $35 million in fixed assets to assets held for sale as of December 31, 2009 and 2006, respectively, relating to our fabrication facilities in Rousset, France and Irving, Texas, respectively.
 
(4) On May 23, 2006, substantially all of the convertible notes outstanding at the time were redeemed for approximately $144 million. The remaining balance of approximately $1 million was called by us in June 2006.
 
(5) On January 1, 2006, we adopted accounting guidance related to share-based payment. It required us to measure all employee stock-based compensation awards using a fair value method and record such expense in our consolidated financial statements. As a result, we recorded pre-tax, stock-based compensation expense of $30 million, $29 million, $17 million and $9 million in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008, 2007 and 2006, respectively, excluding acquisition-related stock compensation expenses.
 
(6) On March 6, 2008, we acquired Quantum Research Group Ltd. (“Quantum”) for $96 million, excluding $9 million related to adjustments for contingent considerations. We recorded $16 million and $24 million in acquisition-related charges in the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively.
 
ITEM 7.   MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
 
You should read the following discussion in conjunction with our Consolidated Financial Statements and the related “Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements”, and “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. This discussion contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, particularly statements regarding our outlook for fiscal 2010, our gross margins, anticipated revenues by geographic area, operating expenses and capital expenditures, cash flow and liquidity measures including the anticipated sale of auction rate securities to UBS Financial Services, Inc., factory utilization, charges related to and the effect of our strategic transactions, restructuring, performance restricted stock units, and other strategic efforts, particularly the potential sale of portions of our ASIC business, and our expectations regarding tax matters and the effects of exchange rates and efforts to manage exposure to exchange rate fluctuation. Our actual results could differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements as a result of a number of factors, risks and uncertainties, including the risk factors set forth in this discussion and in Item 1A — Risk Factors, and elsewhere in this Form 10-K. Generally, the words “may,” “will,” “could,” “would,” “anticipate,” “expect,” “intend,” “believe,” “seek,” “estimate,” “plan,” “view,” “continue,” the plural of such terms, the negatives of such terms, or other comparable terminology and similar expressions identify forward-looking statements. The information included in this Form 10-K is provided as of the filing date with the Securities and Exchange Commission and future events or circumstances could differ significantly from the forward-looking statements included herein. Accordingly, we caution readers not to place undue reliance on such statements. Atmel undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statements in this Form 10-K.


33


Table of Contents

 
We are a leading designer, developer and manufacturer of a wide range of semiconductor products and intellectual property (IP) products. Our diversified product portfolio includes our proprietary AVR microcontrollers, security and smart card integrated circuits, and a diverse range of advanced logic, mixed-signal, nonvolatile memory and radio frequency devices. Leveraging our broad IP portfolio, we are able to provide our customers with complete system solutions. Our solutions target a wide range of applications in the industrial, consumer electronics, automotive, wireless, communications, computing, storage, security, military and aerospace markets, and are used in products such as mobile handsets, automotive electronics, global positioning systems (GPS) and batteries. We design, develop, manufacture and sell our products.
 
Our operating segments consist of the following: (1) microcontroller products (Microcontroller); (2) nonvolatile memory products (Nonvolatile Memory); (3) radio frequency and automotive products (RF and Automotive); and (4) application specific integrated circuits (ASICs).
 
Net revenues decreased to $1,217 million in the year ended December 31, 2009 from $1,567 million in the year ended December 31, 2008, a decrease of $349 million or 22%, as a result of global economic weakness affecting all electronic markets beginning in the third quarter of 2008. Lower levels of inventory carried by our distribution partners also contributed to reduced shipments levels compared to prior periods. All of our business units were impacted by reduced demand in the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to December 31, 2008, with our RF and Automotive business unit impacted the most (declining 41% year over year) and our Microcontroller business impacted the least (declining just 12% year over year).
 
Gross margin declined to 33.9% for the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to 37.7% in the year ended December 31, 2008. Gross margin for 2009 was negatively impacted by lower factory utilization at our wafer fabrication facilities and test operations during the first half of 2009. Our internal operations have significant fixed costs that cannot be reduced as quickly as our shipment levels, which have declined over the last 12 months. In addition, gross margins have been unfavorably impacted by inventory write downs and competitive pricing pressures during the year ended December 31, 2009. As order levels have increased significantly in the second half of 2009, we began increasing production levels and factory loading. We expect gross margin levels to improve in 2010 from increased factory loading, as well as a more favorable mix of higher margin microcontroller products included in our net revenues.
 
We develop process technologies to ensure our products provide the maximum possible performance. In the year ended December 31, 2009, we manufactured approximately 88% of our products in our own wafer fabrication facilities.
 
We continue to take significant actions to improve operational efficiencies and further reduce costs. In the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, we incurred $7 million, $71 million and $13 million, respectively, in restructuring charges related to headcount reductions and facility closure costs primarily related to our manufacturing operations. During the year, these various restructuring activities resulted in headcount totals reduced to 5,600 employees as of December 31, 2009 from 6,400 as of December 31, 2008.
 
Benefit from income taxes totaled $27 million in the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to a provision for income taxes of $7 million in the year ended December 31, 2008. The tax benefit recorded for the year ended December 31, 2009 is primarily related to the recognition of foreign research and development (“R&D”) credits as well as reduced taxable income in certain foreign jurisdictions during 2009.
 
In the three months ended December 31, 2009, we recorded out-of-period adjustments totaling $9 million to record income tax expense associated with certain foreign intercompany loans and alternative minimum tax, which related to fiscal years 2003 to 2008. In addition, during the three months ended June 30, 2009, we recorded an out-of-period adjustment of $1 million to correct alternative minimum tax liabilities that were overstated in 2008. The net impact of out-of-period adjustments related to prior years totaled $8 million for the year ended December 31, 2009. We have assessed the impact of correcting these errors in the current period and do not believe that these amounts are material to any prior period financial statements, nor is the correction of these errors material to the 2009 financial statements. As a result, we have not restated any prior period amounts.


34


Table of Contents

Cash provided by operating activities totaled $122 million and $111 million in the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively. At December 31, 2009, our cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments totaled $476 million, compared to $441 million at December 31, 2008. Our total debt decreased to $95 million at December 31, 2009 from $145 million at December 31, 2008 due to debt repayments. Our current liabilities decreased to $400 million at December 31, 2009 from $496 million at December 31, 2008, primarily due to debt repayment of $51 million and a decrease in accrued and other liabilities of $49 million. As a result of lower production levels during 2009, inventory levels decreased significantly. Inventory totaled $226 million at December 31, 2009, compared to $324 million at December 31, 2008. The decline of $98 million year over year was also due, in part, to $16 million of fab work-in-process inventory reclassified to assets held for sale as of December 31, 2009.
 
On March 6, 2008, we acquired Quantum Research Group Ltd. (“Quantum”) for an initial purchase price of $96 million, subsequently increased to $105 million due to contingent consideration earned. The results of operations of Quantum are included in our Microcontroller segment from the date of acquisition.
 
In the first quarter of 2009, we announced our intention to pursue strategic alternatives for our ASIC business and related manufacturing assets as part of our transformation plan, which is aimed at focusing on our high-growth and high-margin businesses. In December 2009, we announced that we had entered into an exclusivity agreement with LFoundry GmbH for the potential sale of our Rousset, France manufacturing operations. In January 2010, we announced that following a comprehensive review of alternatives for our ASIC business, we would continue to explore the potential sale of our Smart Card (SMS) business located in Rousset, France and East Kilbride, UK and that we intended to discontinue potential sale discussions for our Customer Specific Products (CSP) and Aerospace businesses. As a result of this agreement, we have reclassified the assets and liabilities related to the manufacturing operations to held for sale as of December 31, 2009. In connection with the proposed sale of the manufacturing operations, we assessed the fair value of the real property and the equipment to be retained and concluded the fair value of the real property was lower than its carrying value; therefore, we recorded an impairment charge of $80 million in the fourth quarter of 2009.
 
 
                                                 
    Years Ended  
    December 31, 2009     December 31, 2008     December 31, 2007  
    (In thousands, except percentage of net revenues)  
 
Net revenues
  $ 1,217,345       100.0 %   $ 1,566,763       100.0 %   $ 1,639,237       100.0 %
Gross profit
    413,007       33.9 %     590,540       37.7 %     580,231       35.4 %
Research and development
    212,045       17.4 %     260,310       16.6 %     272,041       16.6 %
Selling, general and administrative
    221,334       18.2 %     273,196       17.4 %     242,811       14.8 %
Acquisition-related charges
    16,349       1.3 %     23,614       1.5 %            
Charges for grant repayments
    1,554       0.1 %     718       0.0 %     1,464       0.1 %
Restructuring charges
    6,681       0.5 %     71,324       4.6 %     13,239       0.8 %
Asset impairment charges (recovery)
    79,841       6.6 %     7,969       0.5 %     (1,057 )     (0.1 )%
Gain on sale of assets
    (164 )     0.0 %     (32,654 )     (2.1 )%            
                                                 
(Loss) income from operations
  $ (124,633 )     (10.2 )%   $ (13,937 )     (0.9 )%   $ 51,733       3.2 %
                                                 
 
 
Net revenues decreased to $1,217 million in the year ended December 31, 2009 from $1,567 million in the year ended December 31, 2008, a decrease of $349 million or 22%, as a result of global economic weakness affecting all electronic markets beginning in the third quarter of 2008. Lower levels of inventory carried by our distribution partners also contributed to reduced shipments levels compared to prior periods. All of our business units were impacted by reduced demand in the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to December 31, 2008, with our RFA business unit impacted most (declining 41% year over year) and our Microcontroller business impacted the least (declining just 12% year over year).


35


Table of Contents

Net revenues decreased to $1,567 million in the year ended December 31, 2008 from $1,639 million in the year ended December 31, 2007, a decrease of $72 million, as global economic weakness translated to customers pushing out or cancelling orders as a result of their own reduced demand. The decrease in net revenues in the year ended December 31, 2008, compared to the year ended December 31, 2007 was primarily due to a decrease of $58 million in our RF and Automotive segment net revenues primarily as a result of reduced shipments for BiCMOS foundry products related to communication chipsets for code-division multiple access (“CDMA”) phones of $48 million. ASIC segment net revenues decreased $41 million in the year ended December 31, 2008, compared to the year ended December 31, 2007, primarily due to a decrease in our custom ASIC products of $24 million. Non-volatile Memory segment net revenue decreased $37 million in the year ended December 31, 2008, compared to the year ended December 31, 2007, primarily due to reduced demand and lower pricing for Serial EEPROM and Serial Flash products. In addition, our net revenues decreased by an estimated $26 million due to the conversion of certain European distributors to a sell-through revenue model. These decreases were offset in part by an increase in Microcontroller segment net revenues of $64 million primarily due to increases in AVR net revenues of $48 million, or 15%, and our expanding 32-bit microcontroller business of $16 million, or 30%, in the year ended December 31, 2008, compared to the year ended December 31, 2007.
 
Average exchange rates utilized to translate foreign currency net revenues in Euro were approximately 1.39 and 1.48 Euro to the dollar in the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively. During the year ended December 31, 2009, changes in foreign exchange rates had an unfavorable impact on net revenues. Had average exchange rates remained the same during the year ended December 31, 2009 as the average exchange rates in effect for the year ended December 31, 2008, our reported net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2009 would have been higher by $18 million or 1.5%.
 
 
Our net revenues by operating segment are summarized as follows:
 
                                 
          % of Net
    Change
    % Change
 
Segment
  2009     Revenues     from 2008     from 2008  
    (In thousands, except percentages)  
 
Microcontroller
  $ 457,797       38 %   $ (64,838 )     (12 )%
Nonvolatile Memory
    290,936       24 %     (48,303 )     (14 )%
RF and Automotive
    147,871       12 %     (102,348 )     (41 )%
ASIC
    320,741       26 %     (133,929 )     (29 )%
                                 
Net revenues
  $ 1,217,345       100 %   $ (349,418 )     (22 )%
                                 
 
                                 
          % of Net
    Change
    % Change
 
Segment
  2008     Revenues     from 2007     from 2007  
 
Microcontroller
  $ 522,635       33 %   $ 64,407       14 %
Nonvolatile Memory
    339,239       22 %     (37,436 )     (10 )%
RF and Automotive
    250,219       16 %     (58,300 )     (19 )%
ASIC
    454,670       29 %     (41,145 )     (8 )%
                                 
Net revenues
  $ 1,566,763       100 %   $ (72,474 )     (4 )%
                                 
 
                 
          % of Net
 
Segment
  2007     Revenues  
 
Microcontroller
  $ 458,228       28 %
Nonvolatile Memory
    376,675       23 %
RF and Automotive
    308,519       19 %
ASIC
    495,815       30 %
                 
Net revenues
  $ 1,639,237       100 %
                 


36


Table of Contents

 
Microcontroller segment net revenues decreased 12% to $458 million in the year ended December 31, 2009 from $523 million in the year ended December 31, 2008. The decrease in net revenues was primarily related to reduced demand from customers in Asia as we experienced lower shipments for AVR products to the handset and consumer markets. Revenue for Quantum-related products, following the acquisition of Quantum in 2008, is included within the Microcontroller operating segment.
 
Microcontroller segment net revenues increased 14% to $523 million in the year ended December 31, 2008 from $458 million in the year ended December 31, 2007. This increase was primarily due to new customer designs utilizing our proprietary AVR microcontroller products, our new QTouch touchscreen products, and our ARM-based microcontroller products. AVR microcontroller revenue grew $48 million or 15% in the year ended December 31, 2008, compared to the year ended December 31, 2007. ARM-based microcontroller products revenue increased $15 million or 28% in the year ended December 31, 2008 from the year ended December 31, 2007. Net revenues for microcontroller products increased due to gains in the 8-bit microcontroller market and ARM-based microcontrollers, growth in the overall microcontroller market including recent high volume customer applications in the consumer and industrial markets, and improved delivery times resulting from higher inventory levels. Our 32-bit microcontroller business also grew 30% in the year ended December 2008, compared to the year ended December 31, 2007. Overall demand for microcontrollers was driven by increased use of embedded control systems in consumer, industrial and automotive products.
 
 
Nonvolatile memory segment net revenues decreased 14% to $291 million in the year ended December 31, 2009 from $339 million in the year ended December 31, 2008. The decrease in net revenues was primarily related to reduced demand from customers in Asia for Serial EEPROM and Serial Flash memory products as well as further price erosion in certain competitive commodity segments. Pricing trends in this segment have generally been steady during the second half of 2009.
 
Nonvolatile memory segment net revenues decreased 10% to $339 million in the year ended December 31, 2008 from $377 million in the year ended December 31, 2007. This decrease was primarily due to a reduction of Serial EEPROM and Serial Flash product sales due to reduced demand and increased pricing pressure. Market for our nonvolatile memory products are historically more competitive than other markets we sell in, and as a result, our memory products are subject to greater average declines in selling prices than products in our other segments.
 
 
RF and Automotive segment net revenues decreased 41% to $148 million in the year ended December 31, 2009 from $250 million in the year ended December 31, 2008. The decrease in net revenues was primarily related to the significant decline in automotive markets, with European automotive markets representing the largest market we support. In addition, net revenues for 2009 decreased $23 million when compared to 2008 as a result of exiting the CDMA and other Heilbronn-based foundry businesses in the year ended December 31, 2008. Other RF and Automotive revenues decreased $79 million in the year ended December 31, 2009 as a result of lower demand and increased pricing pressures, primarily in GPS and DVD customer end-markets.
 
RF and Automotive segment net revenues decreased 19% to $250 million in the year ended December 31, 2008 from $309 million in the year ended December 31, 2007. This decrease was primarily due to reduced shipment quantities for BiCMOS foundry products related to communication chipsets for CDMA phones and other automotive products. Net revenues for BiCMOS foundry products decreased $48 million or 51% and other automotive products decreased $10 million or 5% in the year ended December 31, 2008 from the year ended December 31, 2007. The remainder of the decrease came from our CDMA foundry business which we exited during the year ended December 31, 2008.


37


Table of Contents

 
ASIC segment net revenues decreased 29% to $321 million in the year ended December 31, 2009 from $455 million in the year ended December 31, 2008. ASIC segment net revenues decreased primarily due to reduced smart card shipments to European telecom and consumer markets of $75 million, offset in part by higher shipments to banking and pay TV end markets. We also experienced reduced demand in our CSP and APG product families, resulting in a decrease of revenue of $61 million in 2009, compared to 2008, from reduced demand for semi-custom and crypto memory products.
 
ASIC segment net revenues decreased 8% to $455 million in the year ended December 31, 2008 from $496 million in the year ended December 31, 2007. This decrease was primarily a result of lower net revenues for Crypto Memory products of $14 million, or 27%, a decrease of custom ASIC products of $24 million, or 12%, and a decrease in Smart Card products of $3 million, or 2%. These decreases were offset by an increase in our aerospace products of $6 million, or 11%. The decline in Smart card products was primarily due to reduced shipments of lower margin commodity telecommunication products.
 
 
Our net revenues by geographic areas (attributed to countries based on delivery locations) are summarized as follows: (see Note 14 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussion).
 
                                                         
          Change
    % Change
          Change
    % Change
       
Region
  2009     from 2008     from 2008     2008     from 2007     from 2007     2007  
    (In thousands, except percentages)  
 
Asia
  $ 607,300     $ (146,823 )     (19 )%   $ 754,123     $ (73,295 )     (9 )%   $ 827,418  
Europe
    380,979       (187,692 )     (33 )%     568,671       (2,805 )     0 %     571,476  
United States
    209,494       (11,857 )     (5 )%     221,351       1,810       1 %     219,541  
Other*
    19,572       (3,046 )     (13 )%     22,618       1,816       9 %     20,802  
                                                         
Total net revenues
  $ 1,217,345     $ (349,418 )     (22 )%   $ 1,566,763     $ (72,474 )     (4 )%   $ 1,639,237  
                                                         
 
 
* Primarily includes South Africa, and Central and South America
 
Net revenues outside the United States accounted for 83%, 86% and 87% of our net revenues in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively.
 
Our net revenues in Asia decreased $147 million, or 19%, in the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to the year ended December 31, 2008 and decreased $73 million or 9% in the year ended December 31, 2008, compared to the year ended December 31, 2007. The decrease in the year ended December 31, 2009 compared to the year ended December 31, 2008 for the region was primarily due to lower shipments of memory and microcontroller products as a result of the overall economic slowdown, as well as reduced demand resulting from lower OEM and distribution inventory levels. The decrease in the year ended December 31, 2008 from the year ended December 31, 2007 for the region was primarily due to reduced shipment for BiCMOS foundry products related to communication chipsets for CDMA phones of $48 million. This decrease was offset in part by increased shipments of AVR microcontrollers, as well as higher unit volumes for Serial Flash and Serial EEPROM products.
 
Our net revenues in Europe decreased $188 million, or 33% in the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to the year ended December 31, 2008 and decreased $3 million or less than 1% in the year ended December 31, 2008, compared to the year ended December 31, 2007. The decrease in the year ended December 31, 2009 compared to the year ended December 31, 2008 for the region was primarily due to reduced shipments to Smartcard telecom and consumer markets as well as lower demand and increased pricing pressures in GPS, DVD and Automotive markets. The decrease in the year ended December 31, 2008 from the year ended December 31, 2007 for the region was primarily due to lower volume shipments of Smart Card and Automotive products.
 
Our net revenues in the United States decreased by $12 million, or 5%, in the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to the year ended December 31, 2008 and increased $2 million, or 1% in the year ended December 31,


38


Table of Contents

2008, compared to the year ended December 31, 2007. The decrease in the year ended December 31, 2009 from the year ended December 31, 2008 for the region was primarily a result of the overall global economic slowdown, as well as reduced shipments to Microcontroller customers.
 
While net revenues in Asia declined year over year, we expect that Asia net revenues will grow more rapidly than other regions in the future. Net revenues in Asia may be impacted in the future as we refine our distribution strategy and optimize our distributor base in this region. It may take time for us to identify financially viable distributors and help them develop high quality support services. There can be no assurances that we will be able to manage this optimization process in an efficient and timely manner.
 
Effective July 1, 2008, we entered into revised agreements with certain European distributors that allow additional rights, including future price concessions at the time of resale, price protection, and the right to return products upon termination of the distribution agreement. As a result of uncertainties over finalization of pricing for shipments to these distributors, revenues and related costs are deferred until the products are sold by the distributors to their end customers. We consider that the sale prices are not “fixed or determinable” at the time of shipment to these distributors. During 2008, net revenues were impacted by $26 million as a result of this change.
 
 
Changes in foreign exchange rates have had a significant impact on our net revenues and operating costs. Net revenues denominated in foreign currencies were 24%, 23% and 22% of our total net revenues in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. Costs denominated in foreign currencies were 39%, 47% and 51% in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively.
 
Net revenues denominated in Euro were 23%, 22% and 21% in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. Costs denominated in Euro were 35%, 42% and 48% of our total costs in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively.
 
Net revenues included 207 million Euro, 230 million Euro and 257 million Euro in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. Operating expenses in Euro was 312 million Euro, 429 million Euro and 550 million Euro in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively.
 
Average annual exchange rates utilized to translate foreign currency revenues and expenses in euro were approximately 1.39, 1.48 and 1.36 Euro to the dollar in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively.
 
During the year ended December 31, 2009, changes in foreign exchange rates had a favorable impact on operating costs and loss from operations compared to the prior year. Had average exchange rates remained the same during the year ended December 31, 2009 as the average exchange rates in effect for the year ended December 31, 2008, our reported revenues for the year ended December 31, 2009 would have been approximately $18 million higher, while our operating expenses would also have been approximately $39 million higher (relating to cost of revenues of $19 million; research and development expenses of $13 million; and sales, general and administrative expenses of $7 million). As our foreign currency expenses exceed foreign currency revenues, the net effect, had foreign currency rates remained the same during the year, would have resulted in an increase to loss from operations of approximately $21 million in the year ended December 31, 2009 compared to the year ended December 31, 2008.
 
Had average exchange rates remained the same during the year ended December 31, 2008 as the average exchange rates in effect for the year ended December 31, 2007, our reported revenues for the year ended December 31, 2008 would have been approximately $28 million lower, while our operating expenses would have also been approximately $52 million lower (cost of revenues of $32 million; research and development expenses of $14 million; and sales, general and administrative expenses of $6 million). As our foreign currency expenses exceed foreign currency revenues, the net effect, had foreign currency rates remained the same during the year, would have resulted in a decrease to loss from operations of approximately $24 million in the year ended December 31, 2008 compared to the year ended December 31, 2007.


39


Table of Contents

 
Gross margin declined to 33.9% in the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to 37.7% in the year ended December 31, 2008. Gross margin in the year ended December 31, 2009 was negatively impacted by higher manufacturing costs resulting primarily from reduced factory utilization at our wafer fabrication facilities and test operations compared to utilization levels experienced during the prior year. Our internal operations have significant fixed costs that cannot be reduced as quickly as our shipment levels, which have declined over the last 12 months. In addition, gross margins have been unfavorably impacted by inventory write downs and competitive pricing pressures during the year ended December 31, 2009. In the fourth quarter of 2009, we began to increase production levels and factory loading in response to increased demand and expect that gross margin will improve in 2010 compared to the levels experienced during 2009.
 
Gross margin improvements in the year ended December 31, 2008, compared to the year ended December 31, 2007 was primarily due to our strategic restructuring initiatives which included the closure of our North Tyneside, UK fab, process and cost improvements in our Rousset fab and a stronger mix of higher margin microcontroller and other core products. Manufacturing utilization improvements result primarily from higher production levels at our Colorado Springs, United States and Rousset, France fabrication facilities following the closure of our North Tyneside, UK facility in the second quarter of 2008. Our gross margin for the year ended December 31, 2008 was also favorably impacted by a $4 million pension benefit adjustment, which decreased cost of revenues, related to the reduction of pension liability and the release of the related accumulated other comprehensive income as a result of the sale of our manufacturing operations in Heilbronn, Germany, which was completed in December 2008.
 
We receive economic assistance grants in some locations as an incentive to achieve certain hiring and investment goals related to manufacturing operations, the benefit for which is recognized as an offset to related costs. We recognized a reduction to cost of revenues for such grants of $0.1 million, $2 million and $2 million in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively.
 
We develop our own manufacturing process technologies to ensure our products provide the maximum possible performance. In the year ended December 31, 2009, we manufactured approximately 88% of our products in our own wafer fabrication facilities.
 
Our cost of revenues includes the costs of wafer fabrication, assembly and test operations, changes in inventory reserves, royalty expense and freight costs. Our gross margin as a percentage of net revenues fluctuates depending on product mix, manufacturing yields, utilization of manufacturing capacity, and average selling prices, among other factors.
 
 
Research and development (“R&D”) expenses decreased by 19%, or $48 million, to $212 million in the year ended December 31, 2009 from $260 million in the year ended December 31, 2008. In the year ended December 31, 2009, we continued to reduce spending on non-core product development programs and focus development spending on core high growth opportunity projects, with increasing emphasis on Microcontroller and Touchscreen related products. We have also reduced spending on proprietary process development, as we expect to utilize more industry standard processes in future periods. R&D expenses in the year ended December 31, 2009 decreased from the year ended December 31, 2008 primarily due to decreases in salaries and benefits of $20 million related to reduced headcount, deprecation expenses of $16 million and outside services of $7 million, offset in part by a decrease in grant proceeds of $10 million. R&D expenses, including the items described above, in the year ended December 31, 2009 were favorably impacted by approximately $13 million due to foreign exchange rate fluctuations in the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to rates in effect and the related expenses incurred in the year ended December 31, 2008. As a percentage of net revenues, R&D expenses totaled 17% for both the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively.
 
R&D expenses decreased by 4%, or $12 million, to $260 million in the year ended December 31, 2008 from $272 million in the year ended December 31, 2007. In the year ended December 31, 2008, we continued to reduce spending on non-core product development programs and focus on spending on fewer, higher return projects, mostly related to Microcontroller and Touchscreen related products. We have also reduced spending on proprietary


40


Table of Contents

process development, as we expect to utilize more industry standard processes in future periods. Research and development expense decreased primarily due to a decrease in spending on development wafers used in technology development of $15 million, design software costs of $5 million and increased grant proceeds of $4 million, offset in part by an increase in stock-based compensation expense of $7 million and higher mask costs for new products of $2 million. R&D expenses, including the items described above, in the year ended December 31, 2008 were unfavorably impacted by approximately $14 million due to foreign exchange rate fluctuations in the year ended December 31, 2008, compared to the rates in effect and the related expense incurred in the year ended December 31, 2007. As a percentage of net revenues, R&D expenses totaled 17% for both the years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007, respectively.
 
We receive R&D grants from various European research organizations, the benefit of which is recognized as an offset to related research and development costs. We recognized benefits of $11 million, $22 million and $18 million in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively.
 
We have continued to invest in developing a variety of product areas and process technologies, including embedded CMOS technology, logic and nonvolatile memory to be manufactured at 0.13 and 0.09 micron line widths, as well as investments in SiDe BiCMOS technology to be manufactured at 0.18 micron line widths. We have also continued to purchase or license technology when necessary in order to bring products to market in a timely fashion. We believe that continued strategic investments in process technology and product development are essential for us to remain competitive in the markets we serve. We are continuing to re-focus our R&D resources on fewer, but more profitable development projects.
 
 
Selling, general and administrative (“SG&A”) expenses decreased 19%, or $52 million, to $221 million in the year ended December 31, 2009 from $273 million in the year ended December 31, 2008, as reduced headcount and interim cost savings measures reduced employee salaries and benefits by $10 million, travel expenses by $7 million and outside services by $14 million, while lower sales volumes led to a decrease in sales commissions of $4 million. SG&A expenses were also favorably impacted in 2009 when comparing bad debt expenses in 2008 of $13 million to a related partial recovery of $3 million in 2009. SG&A expenses, including the items described above, were favorably impacted by approximately $7 million due to foreign exchange rate fluctuations, compared to rates in effect and the related expenses incurred in the year ended December 31, 2008. As a percentage of net revenues, SG&A expenses totaled 18% and 17% of net revenues in the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively.
 
SG&A expenses increased 13%, or $30 million, to $273 million in the year ended December 31, 2008 from $243 million in the year ended December 31, 2007. In the year ended December 31, 2008, we added critical resources to our sales, marketing, IT systems, and legal functions to ensure we are adequately resourced to support future growth. As a result, SG&A expenses increased in the year ended December 31, 2008 due to higher salaries and benefits of $13 million and an increase in stock-based compensation of $3 million. In addition, SG&A expenses increased due to higher legal fees and settlement costs of $6 million and an increase in bad debt expense of $13 million. The bad debt expense included $12 million related to an Asian distributor whose business was impacted following their addition to the U.S. Department of Commerce Entity List, which prohibits us from shipping products to the distributor. SG&A expenses, including the items described above, in the year ended December 31, 2008 were unfavorably impacted by approximately $6 million due to foreign exchange rate fluctuations, compared to rates in effect and the related expense incurred in the year ended December 31, 2007. As a percentage of net revenues, SG&A expenses totaled 17% and 15% for the years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007, respectively.
 
We implemented significant cost reduction measures starting in the fourth quarter of 2008 in response to the unfavorable impact of the global economic downturn. These measures included executive salary reductions, reduced employee travel, mandatory time off for substantially all employees, and reduced promotional spending. The impact of these actions further contributed to the reduction in operating expenses in the year ended December 31, 2009. We expect to eliminate these interim cost reduction measures in 2010.


41


Table of Contents

 
Stock-based compensation cost is measured at the measurement date (grant date), based on the fair value of the award which is computed using a Black-Scholes option valuation model, and is recognized as expense over the employee’s requisite service period. The fair value of a restricted stock is equivalent to the market price our common stock on the measurement date.
 
The following table summarizes the distribution of stock-based compensation expense related to employee stock options, restricted stock units and employee stock purchases in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007:
 
                         
    Years Ended  
    December 31,
    December 31,
    December 31,
 
    2009     2008     2007  
    (In thousands)  
 
Cost of revenues
  $ 4,831     $ 4,259     $ 1,966  
Research and development
    12,088       11,746       4,601  
Selling, general and administrative
    13,139       13,131       10,085  
                         
Total stock-based compensation expense, before income taxes
    30,058       29,136       16,652  
Tax benefit
                 
                         
Total stock-based compensation expense, net of income taxes
  $ 30,058     $ 29,136     $ 16,652  
                         
 
The table above excluded stock-based compensation of $7,561 and $6,301 in the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively, for former Quantum executives related to the acquisition, which are classified within acquisition-related charges in the consolidated statements of operations.
 
We issued performance-based restricted stock units to eligible employees for a maximum of 10 million shares of our common stock under the 2005 Stock Plan. These restricted stock units vest only if we achieve certain quarterly operating margin performance criteria over the performance period of July 1, 2008 to December 31, 2012. We recognize the stock-based compensation expense for our performance-based restricted stock units when we believe it is probable that we will achieve the performance criteria. If achieved, the award vests over a specified remaining performance period. If the performance goals are not met, no compensation expense is recognized and any previously recognized compensation expense is reversed. The expected cost of each award is reflected over the performance period and is reduced for estimated forfeitures. We recorded a credit of $2 million in the three months ended March 31, 2009 related to the reversal of previously recorded stock-based compensation expense, based on management’s estimate that the probability of achieving the performance criteria was highly uncertain at that time. However, in the fourth quarter of 2009, after significant improvement to operating results and customer order rates, we recorded stock-based compensation expense of $3 million, as we re-assessed the probability of achieving the performance criteria and estimated that it is probable a portion of the performance criteria will be achieved by December 31, 2012.
 
 
In the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, we recorded additional accrued interest of $2 million, $1 million and $1 million, respectively, primarily related to interest on estimated grant repayment requirements for our former Greece facility, as charges for grant repayments on the consolidated statements of operations.
 
We receive economic incentive grants and allowances from European governments targeted at increasing employment at specific locations. The subsidy grant agreements typically contain economic incentive and other covenants that must be met to receive and retain grant benefits. Noncompliance with the conditions of the grants could result in the forfeiture of all or a portion of any future amounts to be received, as well as the repayment of all or a portion of amounts received to date. In addition, we may need to record charges to reverse grant benefits recorded in prior periods as a result of changes to our plans for headcount, project spending, or capital investment at any of these specific locations. If we are unable to comply with any of the covenants in the grant agreements, our results of


42


Table of Contents

operations and financial position could be materially adversely affected. See Note 15 to Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussions.
 
 
We assess the recoverability of long-lived assets with finite useful lives whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that we may not be able to recover the asset’s carrying amount. We measure the amount of impairment of such long-lived assets by the amount by which the carrying value of the asset exceeds the fair market value of the asset, which is generally determined based on projected discounted future cash flows or appraised values. We classify long-lived assets to be disposed of other than by sale as held and used until they are disposed, including assets not available for immediate sale in their present condition. We report assets to be disposed of by sale as held for sale and recognize those assets and liabilities on the consolidated balance sheet at the lower of carrying amount or fair value, less cost to sell. Assets classified as held for sale are not depreciated.
 
The table below summarizes the asset impairment charges (recovery) for our wafer fabrication facilities by location included in the consolidated statements of operations for the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively:
 
                         
    Years Ended  
    December 31,
    December 31,
    December 31,
 
    2009     2008     2007  
    (In thousands)  
 
Rousset, France
  $ 79,841     $     $  
Heilbronn, Germany
          7,969        
North Tyneside, United Kingdom
                (1,057 )
                         
Total asset impairment charges (recovery)
  $ 79,841     $ 7,969     $ (1,057 )
                         
 
 
In the first quarter of 2009, we announced our intention to pursue strategic alternatives our ASIC business, including the wafer fabrication facility in Rousset, France and classified the related assets and liabilities as held for sale at each balance sheet date from March 31, 2009 through September 30, 2009. On December 17, 2009, we announced that we entered into an exclusivity agreement with LFoundry GmbH for the purchase of our manufacturing operations in Rousset, France. As a result of this agreement, we determined that certain assets and liabilities were no longer included in the disposal group as they were not being acquired or assumed by the buyer, and as result, we reclassified these assets and liabilities back to held and used as of December 31, 2009. In January 2010, we announced that following a comprehensive review of alternatives for our ASIC business, we would continue to explore the potential sale of our Smart Card (SMS) business located in Rousset, France and East Kilbride, UK and that we intended to discontinue potential sale discussions for our Customer Specific Products (CSP) and Aerospace businesses. The assets and liabilities that remain in the disposal group are classified as held for sale are carried on the consolidated balance sheet at December 31, 2009, at the lower of their carrying amount or fair value less cost to sell. In determining any potential write down of these assets and liabilities, we considered both the net book value of the disposal group, which was $83 million and also a credit balance of $129 million related to foreign currency translation adjustments (“CTA balance”) that are recorded within stockholders’ equity. As a result, no impairment charge was recorded for the disposal group as its carrying value, net of the CTA balance, cannot be reduced to below zero. The CTA balance remaining in stockholders’ equity at the date of sale will be released to the statement of operations at that date.
 
If we are successful in selling our French manufacturing operations, we intend to enter into a multiyear supply agreement with the buyer, on similar terms to previous fabrication facility sales. This supply agreement, and other transition agreements, may result in significant charge to us, either upon sale or to future periods.
 
Property and equipment previously included in the disposal group and reclassified to held and used in December 2009 totaled $110 million. In connection with this reclassification, we assessed the fair value of the property and the equipment to be retained and concluded that the fair value of the property was lower than its carrying value less depreciation expense that would have been recognized had the asset (disposal group) been


43


Table of Contents

continuously classified as held and used. As a result we recorded an impairment charge of $80 million in the fourth quarter of 2009. No impairment charge was recorded for the equipment that was reclassified to held and used but the depreciation expense that would have been recognized had the asset (disposal group) been continuously classified as held and used, which totaled of $5 million was included in operating results in fourth quarter of 2009.
 
The proposed sale of the manufacturing operations in Rousset, France, is not expected to qualify as discontinued operations as we expect to have continuing cash flows associated with supply agreements with the buyer in future periods.
 
 
We announced our intention to sell our fabrication facility in Heilbronn, Germany in December 2006. Subsequently, we decided to sell only the manufacturing operations related to the fabrication facility. In the three months ended September 30, 2008, we entered into an agreement to sell the manufacturing operations to Tejas Silicon Holding Limited (“TSI”). We recorded an impairment loss of $8 million in the year ended December 31, 2008, which consisted of $3 million for the net book value of the fixed assets and $5 million for selling costs related to legal, commissions and other direct incremental costs. We recorded a gain on sale of $3 million in the year ended December 31, 2008 upon closing of the sale. The sale of the Heilbronn manufacturing operations did not qualify as discontinued operations as the operations and future cash flows were not eliminated from our RF and Automotive segment. We continue to purchase wafers from the buyer of the Heilbronn fabrication facility. See Note 11.
 
 
On October 8, 2007, we entered into definitive agreements to sell certain wafer fabrication equipment and land and buildings at North Tyneside to Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (“TSMC”) and Highbridge Business Park Limited (“Highbridge”) for a total of approximately $125 million. We recorded proceeds of $82 million and recognized a gain of $30 million for the sale of the equipment in the year ended December 31, 2008. We received proceeds of $43 million from Highbridge upon closing of the real property portion of the transaction in November 2007. We vacated the facility in May 2008.
 
 
We recorded total acquisition-related charges of $16 million and $24 million in the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively, related to the acquisition of Quantum, which comprised of the following components:
 
We recorded amortization of intangible assets of $5 million and $6 million in the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively, associated with customer relationships, developed technology, trade name, non-compete agreements and backlog. These assets are amortized over three to five years. We estimate charges related to amortization of intangible assets will be approximately $4 million for the year ending December 31, 2010.
 
In the year ended December 31, 2008, we recorded a charge of $1 million associated with acquired in-process research and development (“IPR&D”), in connection with the acquisition of Quantum. Our methodology for allocating the purchase price to IPR&D involves established valuation techniques utilized in the high-technology industry.
 
We also agreed to compensate former key executives of Quantum, contingent upon continuing employment determined at various dates over a three year period. We have agreed to pay up to $15 million in cash and issue 5,319 shares of our common stock valued at $17 million, based on our closing stock price on March 4, 2008. These amounts are being accrued over the employment period on a graded vested basis. As a result, in the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008, we recorded compensation-related expenses of $11 million, which are payable in cash of $4 million and stock of $7 million, and $17 million, which is payable in cash of $11 million and stock of $6 million. We made cash payments of $11 million to the former Quantum employees in the year ended December 31, 2009.


44


Table of Contents

 
The following table summarizes the activity related to the accrual for restructuring charges detailed by event for the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007.
 
                                         
    January 1,
                Currency
    December 31,
 
    2009
                Translation
    2009
 
    Accrual     Charges     Payments     Adjustment     Accrual  
    (In thousands)  
 
Third quarter of 2002
                                       
Termination of contract with supplier
  $ 1,592     $     $     $     $ 1,592  
Fourth quarter of 2007
                                       
Other restructuring charges
    218       470       (698 )     10        
Second quarter of 2008
                                       
Employee termination costs
    235       46       (273 )     (4 )     4  
Third quarter of 2008
                                       
Employee termination costs
    17,575       87       (16,220 )     (885 )     557  
Fouth quarter of 2008
                                       
Employee termination costs
    3,438       626       (4,060 )     (4 )      
First quarter of 2009
                                       
Employee termination costs
          2,207       (2,393 )     186        
Other restructuring charges
          389       (71 )           318  
Second quarter of 2009
                                       
Employee termination costs
          2,856       (2,856 )            
                                         
Total 2009 activity
  $ 23,058     $ 6,681     $ (26,571 )   $ (697 )   $ 2,471  
                                         
 
                                         
    January 1,
                Currency
    December 31,
 
    2008
    Charges/
          Translation
    2008
 
    Accrual     (Credits)     Payments     Adjustment     Accrual  
    (In thousands)  
 
Third quarter of 2002
                                       
Termination of contract with supplier
  $ 1,592     $     $     $     $ 1,592  
Fourth quarter of 2006
                                       
Employee termination costs
    1,324       (224 )     (1,172 )     72        
Fourth quarter of 2007
                                       
Employee termination costs
    12,759       1,431       (14,749 )     559        
Termination of contract with supplier
          12,206       (13,019 )     813        
Other restructuring charges
          20,778       (21,465 )     905       218  
Second quarter of 2008
                                       
Employee termination costs
          2,990       (2,534 )     (221 )     235  
Third quarter of 2008
                                       
Employee termination costs
          28,852       (8,921 )     (2,356 )     17,575  
Fouth quarter of 2008
                                       
Employee termination costs
          5,291       (1,879 )     26       3,438  
                                         
Total 2008 activity
  $ 15,675     $ 71,324     $ (63,739 )   $ (202 )   $ 23,058  
                                         
 


45


Table of Contents

                                         
    January 1,
                Currency
    December 31,
 
    2007
    Charges/
          Translation
    2007
 
    Accrual     (Credits)     Payments     Adjustment     Accrual  
    (In thousands)  
 
Third quarter of 2002
                                       
Termination of contract with supplier
  $ 8,896     $ (3,071 )   $ (4,233 )   $     $ 1,592  
Fouth quarter of 2006
                                       
Employee termination costs
    7,490       3,305       (9,959 )     488       1,324  
Fouth quarter of 2007
                                       
Employee termination costs
          12,441             318       12,759  
Other exit related costs
          564       (564 )            
                                         
Total 2007 activity
  $ 16,386     $ 13,239     $ (14,756 )   $ 806     $ 15,675  
                                         
 
 
In the year ended December 31, 2009, we continued to implement the restructuring initiatives announced in 2008 that are discussed below and incurred restructuring charges of $7 million. The charges relating to this initiative consist of the following:
 
  •  Net charges of $6 million, related to severance costs resulting from involuntary termination of employees. Employee severance costs were recorded in accordance with the accounting standard related to costs associated with exit or disposal activities.
 
  •  Charges of $1 million related to facility closure costs.
 
We paid $26 million related to employee termination costs in the year ended December 31, 2009.
 
 
In the year ended December 31, 2008, we incurred restructuring charges of $71 million as we continued to implement additional restructuring actions to improve operational efficiencies and reduce costs.
 
We incurred restructuring charges related to the signing of definitive agreements in October 2007 to sell certain wafer fabrication equipment and real property at North Tyneside to Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company Limited (“TSMC”) and Highbridge Business Park Limited (“Highbridge”). As a result of this action, this facility was closed and all of the employees of the facility were terminated by June 30, 2008. In addition, we began implementing new initiatives, primarily focused on lowering manufacturing costs and eliminating non-core research and development programs. We recorded the following restructuring charges (credits):
 
  •  Net charges of $38 million related to severance costs resulting from involuntary termination of employees.
 
  •  Charges of $21 million related to equipment removal and facility closure costs. After production activity ceased, we utilized employees as well as outside services to disconnect fabrication equipment, fulfill equipment performance testing requirements of the buyer, and perform facility decontamination and other facility closure-related activity, Included in these costs are labor costs, facility related costs, outside service provider costs, and legal and other fees. Equipment removal, building decontamination and closure related cost activities were completed as of June 30, 2008.
 
  •  Charges of $12 million related to contract termination charges, primarily associated with a long-term gas supply contract for nitrogen gas utilized in semiconductor manufacturing. We are required to pay an early termination penalty including de-contamination and removal costs. Other contract termination costs related to semiconductor equipment support services with minimum payment clauses extending beyond the current period.
 
  •  Net charges of $1 million related to changes in estimates of termination benefits originally recorded.
 
We paid $29 million related to employee termination costs in the year ended December 31, 2008.

46


Table of Contents

 
During 2007, we implemented restructuring initiatives announced in 2006 and in 2007. We recorded a net restructuring charge of $13 million, which included restructuring charges related to the sale of certain wafer fabrication equipment and real property at North Tyneside to TSMC and Highbridge. As a result of these actions, this facility was closed and all of the employees of the facility were terminated. Related to this sale, during the fourth quarter of 2007, we recorded the following restructuring charges:
 
  •  Charges of $11 million related to one-time severance costs for involuntary termination of employees.
 
  •  Charges of $1 million related to on-going severance costs for involuntary termination of employees.
 
  •  Charges of $1 million related to other exit related costs.
 
In addition, we also incurred the following restructuring charges in 2007:
 
  •  Charges of $2 million related to severance costs for involuntary termination of employees.
 
  •  Charges of $1 million related to one-time minimum statutory termination benefits, including changes in estimates.
 
  •  A credit of $3 million related to the settlement of a long-term gas supply contract for which the accrual was $12 million, originally recorded in the third quarter of 2002. On May 1, 2007, in connection with the sale of the Irving, Texas facility, we paid $6 million to terminate this contract, of which $2 million was reimbursed by the buyer of the facility.
 
We paid $10 million related to employee termination costs in the year ended December 31, 2007.
 
 
Interest and other (expense) income, net, was $(11) million in the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to $(6) million in the year ended December 31, 2008. The increases in net expenses were primarily a result of a decrease in interest income of $9 million on our investment portfolio and an increase in foreign exchange losses of $2 million, offset by a decrease in interest expense of $6 million due to lower debt balance.
 
Interest and other (expense) income, net, was $(6) million in the year ended December 31, 2008, compared to $4 million in the year ended December 31, 2007. The net expenses in the year ended December 31, 2008 resulted primarily from an increase in interest expense related to our $100 million outstanding bank line of credit which was outstanding for all of 2008, compared to less than one month in the year ended December 31, 2007. The net expense in the year ended December 31, 2008 was also a result of a reduction of interest income of $6 million in the year ended December 31, 2008 due to lower interest rates and an increase in foreign exchange transaction losses of $5 million.
 
Interest rates on our outstanding borrowings did not change significantly in the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to the year ended December 31, 2008.
 
 
We recorded a (benefit from) provision for income taxes of $(27) million, $7 million, and $8 million in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. A significant component of these amounts in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, was a benefit of $40 million, $13 million and $22 million, respectively, due to the recognition of refundable R&D credits that related to prior years. The refundability of these credits does not depend on the existence of taxable income or a tax liability and the credits were not previously recognized due to uncertainty over the realization of these credits. The credits were realized during these years as the income tax audits were completed or the related statutes of limitation for the credits expired. In the year ended December 31, 2009, the tax benefit was partially offset by net out-of-period adjustments related to prior years of $8 million discussed below. The income tax provision in the years ended December 31, 2008 and 2007 resulted primarily from taxes incurred by the Company’s profitable foreign subsidiaries and an increase in tax reserves related to certain U.S. Federal, state and foreign tax liabilities, partially offset by the recognition of tax credits in foreign jurisdictions and the refund of unused tax credits.


47


Table of Contents

In the three months ended December 31, 2009, we recorded out-of-period adjustments totaling $9 million to record income tax expense associated with certain foreign intercompany loans and alternative minimum tax, which related to fiscal years 2003 to 2008. In addition, during the three months ended June 30, 2009, we recorded an out-of-period adjustment of $1 million to correct alternative minimum tax liabilities that were overstated in 2008. The net impact of out-of-period adjustments related to prior years totaled $8 million for the year ended December 31, 2009. We have assessed the impact of correcting these errors in the current period and do not believe that these amounts are material to any prior period financial statements, nor is the correction of these errors material to the 2009 financial statements. As a result, we have not restated any prior period amounts.
 
In the year ended December 31, 2009, we reviewed the potential U.S. tax impact of intercompany loans among foreign subsidiaries. As a result of this review, the December 31, 2008 deferred tax asset balances were adjusted to reflect the utilization of federal net operating losses from prior years, and the addition of foreign tax credit carryovers from prior years. These changes in the net operating loss and foreign tax credit carryforwards were offset by a corresponding change to the valuation allowance. See Note 12 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussion.
 
At December 31, 2009, there was no U.S. income tax provision for undistributed earnings of approximately $139 million, respectively, as it is currently our intention to reinvest these earnings indefinitely in operations outside the U.S. The determination of the tax effect of repatriating these earnings is not practicable because of the numerous assumptions associated with this hypothetical calculation. However, foreign tax credits would be available to reduce some portion of this amount.
 
At December 31, 2009, we had net operating loss carry forwards in non-U.S. jurisdictions of approximately $394 million. These loss carry forwards expire in different periods starting in 2010. We also had U.S. state net operating loss carry forwards of approximately $542 million at December 31, 2009. These loss carry forwards expire in different periods from 2010 through 2030. We also have U.S. Federal R&D credits of $14 million and state R&D tax credits of $10 million at December 31, 2009. U.S. Federal R&D credits will begin to expire beginning in 2020, and the state R&D credits carryforward indefinitely. We have foreign tax credits of $28 million which start to expire in 2018 and state investment tax credits of $27 million at December 31, 2009 that begin to expire in 2010. In addition, we have foreign R&D credits of $17 million which are refundable in the future if they are not used to offset future tax liability.
 
On January 1, 2007, we adopted the accounting standard related to uncertain income tax positions. Under the accounting standard, the impact of an uncertain income tax position on income tax expense must be recognized at the largest amount that is more-likely-than-not to be sustained. An uncertain income tax position will not be recognized if it has less than a 50% likelihood of being sustained. At December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, we had $183 million, $216 million and $189 million of unrecognized tax benefits, respectively.
 
In 2005, the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) completed its audit of our U.S. income tax returns for the years 2000 and 2001 and has proposed various adjustments to these income tax returns, including carry back adjustments to 1996 and 1999. In January 2007, after subsequent discussions with us, the IRS revised their proposed adjustments for these years. In May 2007, the IRS completed its audit of our U.S. income tax returns for the years 2002 and 2003 and has proposed various adjustments to these income tax returns. We have protested all of these proposed adjustments and are currently working through the matters with the IRS Appeals Division.
 
In 2009, the French tax authority completed its examination of tax years 2001 through 2005 for one of our French subsidiaries. The examination for these years has resulted in a reduction of deferred tax assets associated with net operating loss carryover of $54 million, for which there was a full valuation allowance. The income tax return for the 2006 tax year is currently under limited scope audit by the French tax authority.
 
In addition, we have tax audits in progress in U.S. states and other foreign jurisdictions. We have accrued taxes and related interest and penalties that may be due upon the ultimate resolution of these examinations. While we believe that the resolution of these tax credits will not have a material adverse impact on our results of operations, cash flows or financial position, the outcome is subject to significant uncertainties.


48


Table of Contents

 
At December 31, 2009, we had $476 million of cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments compared to $441 million at December 31, 2008. Our current ratio, calculated as total current assets divided by total current liabilities, improved to 2.49 at December 31, 2009, compared to 2.07 at December 31, 2008. We reduced our short-term and long-term debt obligations to $95 million at December 31, 2009 from $145 million at December 31, 2008. Working capital, calculated as total current assets less total current liabilities, increased to $596 million at December 31, 2009, compared to $531 million at December 31, 2008. Cash provided by operating activities totaled $122 million and $111 million in the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively.
 
Approximately $5 million of our investment portfolio at December 31, 2009 was invested in auction-rate securities, compared to $9 million at December 31, 2008. In the year ended December 31, 2009 approximately $4 million of auction-rate securities were redeemed at par value. Approximately $2 million and $9 million of our auction-rate securities are classified as long-term investments within other assets on the consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2009 and 2008, as they are not expected to be liquidated within the next twelve months. In October 2008, we accepted an offer from UBS Financial Services Inc. (“UBS”) to purchase our remaining eligible auction-rate securities of $3 million at par value at any time during a two-year time period from June 30, 2010 to July 2, 2012. We expect to sell the securities to UBS at par value on June 30, 2010; therefore, these securities are classified within short-term investments on the consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2009.
 
 
Net cash provided by operating activities was $122 million in the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to $111 million in the year ended December 31, 2008. Net cash provided by operating activities in the year ended December 31, 2009 was primarily due to positive operating results, adjusting the year to date net loss of $109 million to exclude asset impairment charge of $80 million, certain non-cash depreciation and amortization charges of $71 million and stock-based compensation charges of $38 million. In addition, operating cash flows were increased by reduced inventories (relating to lower production levels) of $85 million. Cash flows from operations were reduced by $49 million in payments reducing liabilities incurred in prior year, including restructuring payments of $27 million and a repayment of customer advance of $10 million, along with cash outflow of $5 million that increased current and other assets, including prepayments for insurance, product licenses and taxes.
 
Net cash provided by operating activities was $111 million in the year ended December 31, 2008 compared to $196 million in the year ended December 31, 2007. Cash flows from operations in 2008 were driven by strong operating results, adjusting the year to date net loss of $27 million to exclude depreciation and stock-based compensation of $170 million, offset by accounts payable and accrued liability cash outflows that included restructuring and grant repayment expenditures incurred in the course of closing our North Tyneside, UK manufacturing facility of approximately $104 million.
 
Accounts receivable increased by 5% or $9 million to $194 million at December 31, 2009, from $185 million at December 31, 2008. The average days of accounts receivable outstanding (“DSO”) increased to 51 days at December 31, 2009 from 50 days at December 31, 2008. Our accounts receivable and DSO are primarily impacted by shipment linearity, payment terms offered, our customers’ credit worthiness, and collection performance. Should we need to offer longer payment terms in the future due to competitive pressures or longer customer payment patterns, our DSO and cash flows from operating activities would be negatively affected.
 
Decreases in inventories provided $85 million of operating cash flows in the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to $20 million in the year ended December 31, 2008. Our days of inventory decreased to 102 days at December 31, 2009 from 146 days at December 31, 2008, primarily due to significantly reduced manufacturing activity levels and increased shipment levels experienced during the fourth quarter of the year. Inventories consist of raw wafers, purchased specialty wafers, work-in-process and finished units. We are continuing to take measures to reduce manufacturing cycle times and improve production planning efficiency. However, the strategic need to offer competitive lead times may result in an increase in inventory levels in the future.


49


Table of Contents

In the year ended December 31, 2009, we made cash payments of $11 million to former Quantum employees in connection with contingent employment arrangements resulting from the acquisition, which was completed during the first quarter of 2008.
 
 
Net cash used in investing activities was $44 million in the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to $54 million in the year ended December 31, 2008. In the year ended December 31, 2009, we paid $32 million for acquisitions of fixed assets and $11 million for intangible assets and approximately $3 million related to contingent consideration earned by a former Quantum employee. During the year ended December 31, 2008, we paid approximately $99 million for the acquisition of Quantum, net of cash acquired, and $44 million for capital expenditures, offset in part by $80 million we received from the sale of fabrication equipment from our North Tyneside, UK facility. We anticipate expenditures for capital purchases will be between $60 million and $65 million in 2010, which will be used to maintain existing manufacturing operations and provide additional testing capacity.
 
 
Net cash used in financing activities was $46 million in the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to $9 million in the year ended December 31, 2008. We continued to pay down debt, with repayments of principal balances on our bank lines of credit and capital leases totaling $51 million in the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to $18 million in the year ended December 31, 2008. Net proceeds from the issuance of common stock totaled $10 million and $11 million in the years ended December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively.
 
We believe that our existing balances of cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments, together with anticipated cash flow from operations, equipment lease financing, and other short-term and medium-term bank borrowings, will be sufficient to meet our liquidity and capital requirements over the next twelve months.
 
During the next twelve months, we expect our operations to generate positive cash flow. However, a significant portion of cash may be used to repay debt, make capital investments or satisfy restructuring commitments. We expect that we will have sufficient cash from operations and financing sources to satisfy all debt obligations. We made $32 million in cash payments for capital equipment in the year ended December 31, 2009, and we expect our cash payments for capital expenditures to be between $60 million to $65 million in 2010. Debt obligations outstanding at December 31, 2009, which are classified as short-term, totaled $85 million. We paid $27 million in restructuring payments, primarily for employee severance in the year ended December 31, 2009. We expect to pay out approximately $2 million in further restructuring payments during 2010. During 2010 and future years, our capacity to make necessary capital investments will depend on our ability to continue to generate sufficient cash flow from operations and on our ability to obtain adequate financing if necessary. In the event that we cannot obtain adequate financing due to credit market conditions or must pay down our $80 million in a line of credit, we believe we have sufficient funds due to the $476 million in cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments we held as of December 31, 2009 together with expected future cash flows from operations, which amounted to $122 million for the year ended December 31, 2009.
 
On March 15, 2006, we entered into a five-year asset-backed credit facility for up to $165 million with certain European lenders. This facility is secured by our non-U.S. trade receivables. At December 31, 2009, the amount outstanding under this facility was $80 million. In June 2009, we repaid $20 million under this line of credit as its eligible non-U.S. trade receivables declined. The eligible non-US trade receivables were $94 million at December 31, 2009. Borrowings under the facility bear interest at LIBOR plus 2% per annum (approximately 2.23% based on the one month LIBOR at December 31, 2009), while the undrawn portion is subject to a commitment fee of 0.375% per annum. The outstanding balance is subject to repayment in full on the last day of its interest period (every two months). The terms of the facility subject us to certain financial and other covenants and cross-default provisions. We were in compliance with our financial covenants as of December 31, 2009. On November 6, 2009, we reduced the credit facility to $125 million from $165 million. Commitment fees and amortization of up-front fees paid related to the facility in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007 totaled $1 million each year and are included in interest and other (expense) income, net, in the consolidated statements of operations.


50


Table of Contents

In December 2004, we established a $25 million revolving line of credit with a domestic bank, which was extended until September 2009. The interest rate on the revolving line of credit was either the lower of the domestic bank’s prime rate or LIBOR plus 2%. The revolving line of credit was secured by our U.S. trade receivables and requires us to meet certain financial ratios and to comply with other covenants on a periodic basis. In February 2009, we repaid $4 million and the remaining $21 million was repaid on September 30, 2009, when the revolving line of credit matured.
 
Contractual Obligations
 
The following table describes our commitments to settle contractual obligations in cash as of December 31, 2009. See Note 11 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussion.
 
                                         
    Payments Due by Period  
          1-3
    3-5
             
Contractual Obligations:
  Less than 1 Year     Years     Years     More than 5 Years     Total  
    (In thousands)  
 
Notes payable
  $     $     $     $ 3,484     $ 3,484  
Capital leases
    5,485       5,957                   11,442  
Lines of credit
    80,000                         80,000  
                                         
Total debt obligations
    85,485       5,957             3,484       94,926  
                                         
Capital purchase commitments
    2,925                         2,925  
Long-term supply agreement obligation(a)
    45,031       33,774                       78,805  
Long-term supply agreement obligation(b)
    5,943       6,512       716             13,171  
Estimated pension plan benefit payments (see Note 13)
    686       1,040       1,642       8,607       11,975  
Grants to be repaid
    15,058                         15,058  
Restructuring(e)
    2,471                         2,471  
Operating leases
    14,750       19,261       3,096       281       37,388  
Acquisition-related payable(c)
    4,355                         4,355  
Other long-term obligations(d)
    29,910       36,987       20,499       8,822       96,218  
                                         
Total other commitments
    121,129       97,574       25,953       17,710       262,366  
                                         
Add: interest
    817       217                   1,034  
                                         
Total
  $ 207,431     $ 103,748     $ 25,953     $ 21,194     $ 358,326  
                                         
 
 
(a) This amount relates to the contractual obligation on a supply agreement that we entered into with the buyer of our manufacturing operations in Heilbronn, Germany facility. The wafers are purchased at cost in Euros, which represents the fair value at the time of purchase. The commitment is equivalent to approximately 55 million Euros.
 
(b) This amount relates to long term gas supply agreements that we have entered into with various suppliers.
 
(c) We have an obligation to pay certain former Quantum employees $4 million in cash (see Note 3 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussion).
 
(d) Other long-term obligations consist principally of future repayments of approximately $45 million of advances from customers, and $14 million of technology license payments. Long-term advances from customers include approximately $10 million that is due within 1 year, and has been classified within current liabilities (see Note 2 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussion). The balance is due in annual installments of $10 million per year, until repaid in full. The remaining balance is primarily related to various other long-term obligations.
 
(e) Contains all restructuring liabilities as of December 31, 2009.


51


Table of Contents

 
The contractual obligation table excludes liabilities of $116 million because we cannot make a reliable estimate of the timing of cash payments. See Note 12 of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussion.
 
Approximately $80 million of our total debt requires us to meet certain financial ratios and to comply with other covenants on a periodic basis, and have cross default provisions. The financial ratio covenants include, but are not limited to, the maintenance of minimum cash balances and net worth, and debt to capitalization ratios. We were in compliance with these covenants as of December 31, 2009.
 
If we need to renegotiate any of these covenants in the future, and the lenders refuse and we are unable to comply with the covenants, then we may immediately be required to repay the loans concerned. In the event we are required to repay these loans ahead of their due dates, we believe that we have the resources to make such repayments, but such payments could adversely impact our liquidity.
 
Our ability to service long-term debt in the U.S. or to obtain cash for other needs from our foreign subsidiaries may be structurally impeded. Since a substantial portion of our operations are conducted through our foreign subsidiaries, our cash flow and ability to service debt are partially dependent upon the liquidity and earnings of our subsidiaries as well as the distribution of those earnings, or repayment of loans or other payments of funds by those subsidiaries, to the U.S. parent corporation. These foreign subsidiaries are separate and distinct legal entities and may have limited or no obligation, contingent or otherwise, to pay any amount to us, whether by dividends, distributions, loans or other payments. However, the U.S. parent corporation owes much of our consolidated long-term debt.
 
 
We sponsor defined benefit pension plans that cover substantially all French and German employees. Plan benefits are provided in accordance with local statutory requirements. Benefits are based on years of service and employee compensation levels. The plans are non-funded. Pension liabilities and charges to expense are based upon various assumptions, updated quarterly, including discount rates, future salary increases, employee turnover, and mortality rates. Retirement Plans consist of two types of plans. The first plan type provides for termination benefits paid to employees only at retirement, and consists of approximately one to five months of salary. This structure covers our French employees. The second plan type provides for defined benefit payouts for the remaining employee’s post-retirement life, and covers our German employees. Pension benefits payable totaled $29 million and $27 million at December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively. Cash funding for benefits to be paid for 2010 is expected to be approximately $1 million, and an additional $11 million thereafter over the next 10 years.
 
 
In the ordinary course of business, we have investments in privately held companies, which we review to determine if they should be considered variable interest entities. We have evaluated our investments in these privately held companies and have determined that there was no material impact on our operating results or financial condition. Certain events can require a reassessment of our investments in privately held companies to determine if they are variable interest entities and which of the stakeholders will be the primary beneficiary. As a result of such events, we may be required to make additional disclosures or consolidate these entities. We may be unable to influence these events.
 
During the ordinary course of business, we provide standby letters of credit or other guarantee instruments to certain parties as required for certain transactions initiated by either our subsidiaries or us. As of December 31, 2009, the maximum potential amount of future payments that we could be required to make under these guarantee agreements is approximately $2 million. We have not recorded any liability in connection with these guarantee arrangements. Based on historical experience and information currently available, we believe we will not be required to make any payments under these guarantee arrangements.


52


Table of Contents

 
In June 2009, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (Codification) as the source of authoritative accounting principles recognized by the FASB to be applied by nongovernmental entities in the preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP. Rules and interpretive releases of the SEC under authority of federal securities laws are also sources of authoritative U.S. GAAP for SEC registrants. All guidance contained in the Codification carries an equal level of authority. The Codification is effective for financial statements issued for interim and annual periods ending after September 15, 2009. The Codification superseded all existing non-SEC accounting and reporting standards. All other non-grandfathered, non-SEC accounting literature not included in the Codification became non-authoritative. We have updated our disclosures to conform to the Codification in this Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2009.
 
In June 2009, the FASB also issued an amendment to the accounting and disclosure requirements for the consolidation of variable interest entities (VIEs). The elimination of the concept of a QSPE, removes the exception from applying the consolidation guidance within this amendment. This amendment requires an enterprise to perform a qualitative analysis when determining whether or not it must consolidate a VIE. The amendment also requires an enterprise to continuously reassess whether it must consolidate a VIE. Additionally, the amendment requires enhanced disclosures about an enterprise’s involvement with VIEs and any significant change in risk exposure due to that involvement, as well as how its involvement with VIEs impacts the enterprise’s financial statements. Finally, an enterprise will be required to disclose significant judgments and assumptions used to determine whether or not to consolidate a VIE. This amendment is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after November 15, 2009. We are currently evaluating the potential impact, if any, of the adoption of this amendment on our consolidated results of operations and financial condition.
 
In April 2009, the FASB issued an amendment and clarification to address application issues regarding initial recognition and measurement, subsequent measurement and accounting and disclosure of assets and liabilities arising from contingencies in a business combination. The amendment is effective for assets or liabilities arising from contingencies in business combinations for which the acquisition date is on or after the beginning of the first annual reporting period beginning on or after December 15, 2008. Although we did not enter into any business combinations during 2009, we believe the amendment may have a material impact on our future consolidated financial statements depending on the size and nature of any future business combinations that we may enter into.
 
 
The preparation of financial statements and related disclosures in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires us to make judgments, assumptions, and estimates that affect the amounts reported in the Consolidated Financial Statements and accompanying notes. Note 1 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements describes the significant accounting policies and methods used in the preparation of the Consolidated Financial Statements. We consider the accounting policies described below to be our critical accounting policies. These critical accounting policies are impacted significantly by judgments, assumptions, and estimates used in the preparation of the Consolidated Financial Statements and actual results could differ materially from the amounts reported based on these policies.
 
 
We sell our products to OEMs and distributors and recognize revenue when the rights and risks of ownership have passed to the customer, when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, the product has been delivered, the price is fixed or determinable, and collection of the resulting receivable is reasonably assured. Allowances for sales returns and other credits are recorded at the time of sale.
 
Contracts and customer purchase orders are used to determine the existence of an arrangement. Shipping documents are used to verify delivery. We assess whether the price is fixed or determinable based on the payment terms associated with the transaction and whether the sales price is subject to refund or adjustment. We assess collectibility based primarily on the creditworthiness of the customer as determined by credit checks and analysis, as well as the customer’s payment history. Sales terms do not include post-shipment obligations except for product warranty, as described in Note 1 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.


53


Table of Contents

For sales to certain distributors (primarily based in the U.S. and Europe) with agreements allowing for price protection and product returns, we recognize revenue at the time the distributor sells the product to its end customer. Revenue is not recognized upon shipment since, due to price protection rights, the sales price is not substantially fixed or determinable at that time. Additionally, these distributors have contractual rights to return products, up to a specified amount for a given period of time. Revenue is recognized when the distributor sells the product to an end-user, at which time the sales price becomes fixed. At the time of shipment to these distributors, we record a trade receivable for the selling price as there is a legally enforceable right to payment, relieve inventory for the carrying value of goods shipped since legal title has passed to the distributor, and record the gross margin in deferred income on shipments to distributors on the consolidated balance sheets. This balance represents the gross margin on the sale to the distributor; however, the amount of gross margin recognized by us in future periods could be less than the deferred margin as a result of price protection concessions related to market pricing conditions. We do not reduce deferred margin by estimated price protection; instead, such price concessions are recorded when incurred, which is generally at the time the distributor sells the product to an end-user. Deferred income on shipments to distributors was $45 million and $42 million at December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively. Sales to certain other primarily non-U.S. based distributors (primarily based in Asia) carry either no or very limited rights of return. We have historically been able to estimate returns and other credits from these distributors and accordingly have historically recognized revenue from sales to these distributors upon shipment, with a related allowance for potential returns established at the time of sale.
 
Our revenue reporting is highly dependent on receiving accurate and timely data from our distributors. Distributors provide us periodic data regarding the product, price, quantity, and end customer when products are resold as well as the quantities of our products they still have in stock. Because the data set is large and complex and because there may be errors in the reported data, we must use estimates and apply judgments to reconcile distributors’ reported inventories to their activities. Actual results could vary from those estimates.
 
 
We must make estimates of potential future product returns and revenue adjustments related to current period product revenue. Management analyzes historical returns, current economic trends in the semiconductor industry, changes in customer demand and acceptance of our products when evaluating the adequacy of our allowance for sales returns. If management made different judgments or utilized different estimates, material differences in the amount of our reported revenues may result. We provide for sales returns based on our customer experience and our expectations for revenue adjustments based on economic conditions within the semiconductor industry.
 
We maintain an allowance for doubtful accounts for losses that we estimate will arise from our customers’ inability to make required payments. We make our estimates of the uncollectibility of our accounts receivable by analyzing specific customer creditworthiness, historical bad debts and current economic trends. At December 31, 2009 and 2008, the allowance for doubtful accounts was approximately $12 million and $15 million, respectively. In the three months ended December 31, 2008, we recorded a bad debt charge of $12 million related to an Asian distributor whose business was impacted following their addition to the U.S. Department of Commerce Entity List, which prohibits us from shipping products to the distributor.
 
 
In calculating our income tax expense, it is necessary to make certain estimates and judgments for financial statement purposes that affect the recognition of tax assets and liabilities.
 
We record a valuation allowance to reduce our deferred tax assets to the amount that is more likely than not to be realized. While we consider future taxable income and ongoing prudent and feasible tax planning strategies in assessing the need for the valuation allowance, in the event that we determine that we would be able to realize deferred tax assets in the future in excess of the net recorded amount, an adjustment to the net deferred tax asset would decrease income tax expense in the period such determination is made. Likewise, should we determine that we would not be able to realize all or part of the net deferred tax asset in the future, an adjustment to the net deferred tax asset would increase income tax expense in the period such determination is made.


54


Table of Contents

Our income tax calculations are based on application of the respective U.S. federal, state or foreign tax law. Our tax filings, however, are subject to audit by the respective tax authorities. Accordingly, we recognize tax liabilities based upon our estimate of whether, and the extent to which, additional taxes will be due when such estimates are more-likely-than-not to be sustained. An uncertain income tax position will not be recognized if it has less than a 50% likelihood of being sustained. To the extent the final tax liabilities are different than the amounts originally accrued, the increases or decreases are recorded as income tax expense or benefit in the consolidated statements of operations.
 
 
Our inventories are stated at the lower of cost (determined on a first-in, first-out basis for raw materials and purchased parts and an average cost basis for work in progress and finished goods) or market. Cost includes labor, including stock-based compensation costs, materials, depreciation and other overhead costs, as well as factors for estimated production yields and scrap. Determining market value of inventories involves numerous judgments, including average selling prices and sales volumes for future periods. We primarily utilize selling prices in our period ending backlog for measuring any potential declines in market value below cost. Any adjustment for market value provision is charged to cost of revenues at the point of market value decline.
 
We evaluate our ending inventories for excess quantities and obsolescence on a quarterly basis. This evaluation includes analysis of historical and forecasted sales levels by product. Inventories on hand in excess of forecasted demand are provided for. In addition, we write off inventories that are considered obsolete. Obsolescence is determined from several factors, including competitiveness of product offerings, market conditions and product life cycles when determining obsolescence. Increases to the provision for excess and obsolete inventory are charged to cost of revenues. At the point of the loss recognition, a new, lower-cost basis for that inventory is established, and subsequent changes in facts and circumstances do not result in the restoration or increase in that newly established cost basis. If this lower-cost inventory is subsequently sold, the related provision is matched to the movement of related product inventory, resulting in lower costs and higher gross margins for those products.
 
Our inventories include high-technology parts that may be subject to rapid technological obsolescence and which are sold in a highly competitive industry. If actual product demand or selling prices are less favorable than we estimate, we may be required to take additional inventory write-downs.
 
 
We review the carrying value of fixed assets for impairment when events and circumstances indicate that the carrying value of an asset or group of assets may not be recoverable from the estimated future cash flows expected to result from its use and/or disposition. Factors which could trigger an impairment review include the following: (i) significant negative industry or economic trends, (ii) exiting an activity in conjunction with a restructuring of operations, (iii) current, historical or projected losses that demonstrated continuing losses associated with an asset, (iv) significant decline in our market capitalization for an extended period of time relative to net book value, (v) recent changes in our manufacturing model, and (vi) management’s assessment of future manufacturing capacity requirements. In cases where undiscounted expected future cash flows are less than the carrying value, an impairment loss is recognized equal to the amount by which the carrying value exceeds the estimated fair value of the assets. The estimation of future cash flows involves numerous assumptions, which require our judgment, including, but not limited to, future use of the assets for our operations versus sale or disposal of the assets, future-selling prices for our products and future production and sales volumes. In addition, we must use our judgment in determining the groups of assets for which impairment tests are separately performed.
 
Our business requires heavy investment in manufacturing facilities that are technologically advanced but can quickly become significantly underutilized or rendered obsolete by rapid changes in demand for semiconductors produced in those facilities.
 
We estimate the useful life of our manufacturing equipment, which is the largest component of our fixed assets, to be five years. We base our estimate on our experience with acquiring, using and disposing of equipment over time. Depreciation expense is a major element of our manufacturing cost structure. We begin depreciation on new equipment when it is put into use for production. The aggregate amount of fixed assets under construction for which


55


Table of Contents

depreciation was not being recorded was approximately $4 million and $2 million as of December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively.
 
 
We review goodwill and intangible assets with indefinite lives for impairment annually during the fourth quarter and whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value of goodwill may not be recoverable. Purchased intangible assets with finite useful lives are amortized using the straight-line method over their estimated useful lives and are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that we may not be able to recover the asset’s carrying amount. Determining the fair value of a reporting unit is judgmental in nature and involves the use of significant estimates and assumptions. We determine the fair value of our reporting unit based on an income approach, whereby we calculate the fair value of the reporting unit based on the present value of estimated future cash flows, which are formed by evaluating operating plans. Estimates of the future cash flows associated with the businesses are critical to these assessments. The assumptions used in the fair value calculation change from year to year and include revenue growth rates, operating margins, risk adjusted discount rates and future economic and market conditions. Changes in these estimates based on changed economic conditions or business strategies could result in material impairment charges in future periods. We base our fair value estimates on assumptions we believe to be reasonable. Actual future results may differ from those estimates.
 
 
Our determination of the fair value of stock-based payment awards on the date of grant utilizes an option-pricing model, and is impacted by our common stock price as well as a change in assumptions regarding a number of highly complex and subjective variables. These variables include, but are not limited to: expected common stock price volatility over the term of the option awards, as well as the projected employee option exercise behaviors during the expected period between the stock option vesting date and the stock option exercise date. Option-pricing models were developed for use in estimating the value of traded options that have no vesting or hedging restrictions and are fully transferable. Because employee stock options have certain characteristics that are significantly different from traded options, and changes in the subjective assumptions can materially affect the estimated fair value, in our opinion, the existing Black-Scholes option-pricing model may not provide an accurate measure of the fair value of employee stock options. Although the fair value of employee stock options is determined using an option-pricing model that value may not be indicative of the fair value observed in a willing buyer/willing seller market transaction. For performance-based restricted stock units, we are required to assess the probability of achieving certain financial objectives at the end of each reporting period. Based on the assessment of this probability, which require judgment, we record stock-based compensation expense, which may be reversed in future periods if we determine that it is no longer probable that the objectives will be achieved. The fair value of a restricted stock unit is equivalent to the market price of our common stock on the measurement date.
 
 
We have recorded accruals for restructuring costs related to the restructuring of operations. The restructuring accruals include primarily payments to employees for severance, termination fees associated with leases, other contracts and other costs related to the closure of facilities. Accruals are recorded when management has approved a plan to restructure operations and a liability has been incurred. The restructuring accruals are based upon management estimates at the time they are recorded. These estimates can change depending upon changes in facts and circumstances subsequent to the date the original liability was recorded.
 
 
The semiconductor industry is characterized by frequent litigation regarding patent and other intellectual property rights. We accrue for losses related to litigation if a loss is probable and the loss can be reasonably estimated. We regularly evaluate current information available to determine whether accruals for litigation should be made. If we were to determine that such a liability was probable and could be reasonably estimated, the adjustment would be charged to income in the period such determination was made.


56


Table of Contents

 
Our marketable securities include corporate debt securities, U.S. government and municipal agency debt securities, commercial paper, guaranteed variable annuities and auction rate securities. We monitor our investments for impairment periodically and recognize an impairment charge when the decline in the fair value of these investments is judged to be other-than-temporary. Significant judgment is used to identify events or circumstances that would likely have a significant adverse effect on the future use of the investment. We consider various factors in determining whether an impairment is other-than-temporary, including the length of time and extent to which fair value has been below cost basis, the financial condition of the issuer and our ability and intent to hold the investment for a period of time which may be sufficient for anticipated recovery of market value. Our investments also include certain highly-rated auction rate securities, which are structured with short-term interest rate reset dates of either 7 or 28 days and contractual maturities that can be in excess of ten years. We evaluate our portfolio by continuing to monitor the credit rating and interest yields of these auction rate securities and successful reset at each auction date.
 
ITEM 7A.   QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
 
Interest Rate Risk
 
We maintain investment portfolio holdings of various issuers, types and maturities whose values are dependent upon short-term interest rates. We generally classify these securities as available-for-sale, and consequently record them on the consolidated balance sheet at fair value with unrealized gains and losses being recorded as a separate part of stockholders’ equity. We do not currently hedge these interest rate exposures. Given our current profile of interest rate exposures and the maturities of our investment holdings, we believe that an unfavorable change in interest rates would not have a significant negative impact on our investment portfolio or statements of operations through December 31, 2009. In addition, certain of our borrowings are at floating rates, so this would act as a natural hedge.
 
We have short-term debt, long-term debt and capital leases totaling $95 million at December 31, 2009. Approximately $5 million of these borrowings have fixed interest rates. We have approximately $90 million of floating interest rate debt, of which approximately $10 million is Euro-denominated. We do not hedge against the risk of interest rate changes for our floating rate debt and could be negatively affected should these rates increase significantly. While there can be no assurance that these rates will remain at current levels, we believe that any rate increase will not cause a significant adverse impact to our results of operations, cash flows or to our financial position.
 
The following table summarizes our variable-rate debt exposed to interest rate risk as of December 31, 2009. All fair market values are shown net of applicable premium or discount, if any:
 
                                                         
                                        Total
 
                                        Variable-Rate
 
                                        Debt
 
                                        Outstanding at
 
    Payments by Due Year     December 31,
 
    2010     2011     2012     2013     2014     Thereafter     2009  
    (In thousands)  
 
60 day USD LIBOR weighted-averageinterest rate basis(1) — Revolving lineof credit
  $ 80,000     $     $     $     $     $     $ 80,000  
                                                         
Total of 60 day USD LIBOR rate debt
  $ 80,000     $     $     $     $     $     $ 80,000  
90 day EURIBOR weighted-average
                                                       
interest rate basis(1) — Capital leases
  $ 4,623     $ 4,623     $ 1,248     $     $     $     $ 10,494  
                                                         
Total of 90 day USD EURIBOR rate debt
  $ 4,623     $ 4,623     $ 1,248     $     $     $     $ 10,494  
                                                         
Total variable-rate debt
  $ 84,623     $ 4,623     $ 1,248     $     $     $     $ 90,494  
                                                         
 
 
(1) Actual interest rates include a spread over the basis amount.


57


Table of Contents

 
The following table presents the hypothetical changes in interest expense, for the year ended December 31, 2009 related to our outstanding borrowings that are sensitive to changes in interest rates as of December 31, 2009. The modeling technique used measures the change in interest expense arising from hypothetical parallel shifts in yield, of plus or minus 50 Basis Points (“BPS”), 100 BPS and 150 BPS.
 
For the year ended December 31, 2009:
 
                                                         
    Interest Expense Given an Interest
  Interest Expense
  Interest Expense Given an Interest
    Rate Decrease by X Basis Points   with No Change in
  Rate Increase by X Basis Points
    150 BPS   100 BPS   50 BPS   Interest Rate   50 BPS   100 BPS   150 BPS
    (In thousands)
 
Interest expense
  $ 4,889     $ 5,460     $ 6,030     $ 6,600     $ 7,171     $ 7,741     $ 8,311  
 
 
When we take an order denominated in a foreign currency we will receive fewer dollars than we initially anticipated if that local currency weakens against the dollar before we ship our product, which will reduce revenue. Conversely, revenues will be positively impacted if the local currency strengthens against the dollar. In Europe, where our significant operations have costs denominated in European currencies, costs will decrease if the local currency weakens. Conversely, costs will increase if the local currency strengthens against the dollar. The net effect of average exchange rates in the year ended December 31, 2009, compared to the average exchange rates in the year ended December 31, 2008, resulted in a decrease in loss from operations of $21 million in 2009. This impact is determined assuming that all foreign currency denominated transactions that occurred in the year ended December 31, 2009 were recorded using the average foreign currency exchange rates in the same period in 2008.
 
Approximately 24%, 23% and 22% of our net revenues in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively, were denominated in foreign currencies. Operating costs denominated in foreign currencies, were approximately 39%, 47% and 51% of total operating costs in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively.
 
Average annual exchange rates utilized to translate foreign currency revenues and expenses in euro were approximately 1.39, 1.48 and 1.36 Euro to the dollar in the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively.
 
During the year ended December 31, 2009, changes in foreign exchange rates had a favorable impact on operating costs and loss from operations. Had average exchange rates remained the same during the year ended December 31, 2009 as the average exchange rates in effect for the year ended December 31, 2008, our reported revenues for the year ended December 31, 2009 would have been approximately $18 million higher. However, our foreign currency expenses exceed foreign currency revenues. Had average exchange rates for the year ended December 31, 2009 remained the same as the average exchange rates for the year ended December 31, 2008, our operating expenses would have been approximately $39 million higher (relating to cost of revenues of $19 million; research and development expenses of $13 million; and sales, general and administrative expenses of $7 million). The net effect resulted in a decrease to loss from operations of approximately $21 million in the year ended December 31, 2009 as a result of favorable exchange rates when compared to the year ended December 31, 2008. We may take actions in the future to reduce this exposure. However, there can be no assurance that we will be able to reduce the exposure to additional unfavorable changes to exchanges rates and the results on gross margin.
 
We also face the risk that our accounts receivables denominated in foreign currencies will be devalued if such foreign currencies weaken quickly and significantly against the dollar. Approximately 29% and 30% of our accounts receivables were denominated in foreign currency as of December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively.
 
We also face the risk that our accounts payable and debt obligations denominated in foreign currencies will increase if such foreign currencies strengthen quickly and significantly against the dollar. Approximately 27% and 36% of our accounts payable were denominated in foreign currency as of December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively. Approximately 15% and 12% of our debt obligations were denominated in foreign currency as of December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively.


58


Table of Contents

 
Approximately $5 million of our investment portfolio at December 31, 2009 was invested in auction-rate securities, compared to $9 million at December 31, 2008. In the year ended December 31, 2009 approximately $4 million of auction-rate securities were redeemed at par value. Approximately $2 million and $9 million of our auction-rate securities are classified as long-term investments within other assets on the consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2009 and 2008, as they are not expected to be liquidated within the next twelve months. In October 2008, we accepted an offer from UBS Financial Services Inc. (“UBS”) to purchase our remaining eligible auction-rate securities of $3 million at par value at any time during a two-year time period from June 30, 2010 to July 2, 2012. We expect to sell the securities to UBS at par value on June 30, 2010; therefore, we have classified these securities to short-term investments on the consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2009.


59


Table of Contents

ITEM 8.   CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
 
 
         
    Page
 
Consolidated Financial Statements of Atmel Corporation
       
    61  
    62  
    63  
    64  
    65  
    108  
Financial Statement Schedules
       
    109  
Schedules not listed above have been omitted because they are not applicable or are not required or the information required to be set forth therein is included in the Consolidated Financial Statements or notes thereto
       
Supplementary Financial Data
       
    110  


60


Table of Contents

Atmel Corporation
 
 
                         
    Years Ended  
    December 31,
    December 31,
    December 31,
 
    2009     2008     2007  
    (In thousands, except per share data)  
 
Net revenues
  $ 1,217,345     $ 1,566,763     $ 1,639,237  
Operating expenses
                       
Cost of revenues
    804,338       976,223       1,059,006  
Research and development
    212,045       260,310       272,041  
Selling, general and administrative
    221,334       273,196       242,811  
Acquistion-related charges
    16,349       23,614        
Charges for grant repayments
    1,554       718       1,464  
Restructuring charges
    6,681       71,324       13,239  
Asset impairment charges (recovery)
    79,841       7,969       (1,057 )
Gain on sale of assets
    (164 )     (32,654 )      
                         
Total operating expenses
    1,341,978       1,580,700       1,587,504  
                         
(Loss) income from operations
    (124,633 )     (13,937 )     51,733  
Interest and other (expense) income, net
    (11,406 )     (6,306 )     3,976  
                         
(Loss) income from operations before income taxes
    (136,039 )     (20,243 )     55,709  
Benefit from (provision for) income taxes
    26,541       (6,966 )     (7,824 )
                         
Net (loss) income
  $ (109,498 )   $ (27,209 )   $ 47,885  
                         
Basic net (loss) income per share:
                       
Net (loss) income
  $ (0.24 )   $ (0.06 )   $ 0.10  
                         
Weighted-average shares used in basic net (loss) income per share calculations
    451,755       446,504       477,213  
                         
Diluted net (loss) income per share:
                       
Net (loss) income
  $ (0.24 )   $ (0.06 )   $ 0.10  
                         
Weighted-average shares used in diluted net (loss) income per share calculations
    451,755       446,504       481,737  
                         
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Consolidated Financial Statements.


61


Table of Contents

Atmel Corporation
 
 
                 
    December 31,
    December 31,
 
    2009     2008  
    (In thousands, except par value)  
 
ASSETS
Current assets
               
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 437,509     $ 408,926  
Short-term investments
    38,631       31,707  
Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $11,930 and $14,996, respectively
    194,099       184,698  
Inventories
    226,296       324,016  
Current assets held for sale
    16,139        
Prepaids and other current assets
    83,434       77,542  
                 
Total current assets
    996,108       1,026,889  
Fixed assets, net
    203,219       383,107  
Goodwill
    56,408       51,010  
Intangible assets, net
    29,841       34,121  
Non-current assets held for sale
    83,260        
Other assets
    24,006       35,527  
                 
Total assets
  $ 1,392,842     $ 1,530,654  
                 
 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Current liabilities
               
Current portion of long-term debt and capital lease obligations
  $ 85,462     $ 131,132  
Trade accounts payable
    105,692       116,392  
Accrued and other liabilities
    152,572       207,017  
Current liabilities held for sale
    11,284        
Deferred income on shipments to distributors
    44,691       41,512  
                 
Total current liabilities
    399,701       496,053  
Long-term debt and capital lease obligations, less current portion
    9,464       13,909  
Long-term liabilities held for sale
    4,014        
Other long-term liabilities
    215,256       218,608  
                 
Total liabilities
    628,435       728,570  
                 
Commitments and contingencies (Note 11)
               
Stockholders’ equity
               
Preferred stock; par value $0.001; Authorized: 5,000 shares; no shares issued and outstanding
           
Common stock; par value $0.001; Authorized: 1,600,000 shares;
               
Shares issued and outstanding: 454,586 at December 31, 2009 and 448,872 at December 31, 2008
    455       449  
Additional paid-in capital
    1,284,140       1,238,796  
Accumulated other comprehensive income
    140,470       113,999  
Accumulated deficit
    (660,658 )     (551,160 )
                 
Total stockholders’ equity
    764,407       802,084  
                 
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
  $ 1,392,842     $ 1,530,654  
                 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Consolidated Financial Statements.


62


Table of Contents

Atmel Corporation
 
 
                         
    Years Ended  
    December 31,
    December 31,
    December 31,
 
    2009     2008     2007  
    (In thousands)  
 
Cash flows from operating activities
                       
Net (loss) income
  $ (109,498 )   $ (27,209 )   $ 47,885  
Adjustments to reconcile net (loss) income to net cash provided by operating activities
                       
Depreciation and amortization
    70,621       134,796       128,773  
Gain on sale or disposal of fixed assets and other non-cash charges
          (35,671 )     (1,102 )
Non-cash asset impairment charges (recovery)
    79,841       3,025       (1,057 )
Deferred taxes
    (15,132 )     1,130       3,039  
Other non-cash losses (gains), net
    6,563       (813 )     404  
(Recovery of) provision for doubtful accounts receivable
    (3,066 )     12,330       (212 )
Accretion of interest on long-term debt
    569       1,468       912  
In-process research and development charges
          1,047        
Stock-based compensation expense
    37,619       35,437       16,652  
Changes in operating assets and liabilities, net of acquisition
                       
Accounts receivable
    (6,680 )     15,625       17,719  
Inventories
    84,765       19,843       (14,682 )
Current and other assets
    10,175       36,266       35,994  
Trade accounts payable
    38       (102,852 )     15,689  
Accrued and other liabilities
    (49,014 )     (10,215 )     (46,728 )
Income taxes payable
    11,787       5,074       (8,261 )
Deferred income on shipments to distributors
    3,179       21,804       852  
                         
Net cash provided by operating activities
    121,767       111,085       195,877  
                         
Cash flows from investing activities
                       
Acquisitions of fixed assets
    (31,750 )     (44,365 )     (69,730 )
Proceeds from the sale of North Tyneside assets and other assets, net of selling costs
          79,543       3,000  
Proceeds from sale of manufacturing facilities, net of selling costs
                34,714  
Acquisition of Quantum Research Group, net of cash acquired
    (3,362 )     (98,585 )      
Acquisitions of intangible assets
    (10,800 )     (1,250 )     (900 )
Purchases of marketable securities
    (34,820 )     (27,120 )     (12,865 )
Sales or maturities of marketable securities
    39,001       37,823       14,420  
Increases in long-term restricted cash
    (1,850 )            
                         
Net cash used in investing activities
    (43,581 )     (53,954 )     (31,361 )
                         
Cash flows from financing activities
                       
Principal payments on debt
    (6,177 )     (18,086 )     (108,840 )
(Repayment of) proceeds from bank line of credit
    (45,000 )           100,000  
Repurchase of common stock
                (250,151 )
Proceeds from issuance of common stock
    9,746       10,520       9,160  
Tax payments related to shares withheld for vested restricted stock units
    (4,074 )     (1,764 )      
Proceeds from financing related to sale of manufacturing facilities
                42,951  
                         
Net cash used in financing activities
    (45,505 )     (9,330 )     (206,880 )
                         
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
    (4,098 )     (13,005 )     6,014  
                         
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
    28,583       34,796       (36,350 )
                         
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the year
    408,926       374,130       410,480  
                         
Cash and cash equivalents at end of year
  $ 437,509     $ 408,926     $ 374,130  
                         
Supplemental cash flow disclosures:
                       
Interest paid
  $ 4,464     $ 9,137     $ 8,176  
Income taxes paid
    7,222       18,833       34,780  
Supplemental non-cash investing and financing activities disclosures:
                       
Decreases in accounts payable related to fixed asset purchases
    (2,777 )     (6,611 )     (9,544 )
(Decreases) increases in liabilities related to intangible assets purchases
    (4,800 )     (930 )     17,778  
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Consolidated Financial Statements.


63


Table of Contents

Atmel Corporation
 
 
                                                 
                      Accumulated Other
             
    Common Stock     Additional
    Comprehensive
    Accumulated
       
    Shares     Par Value     Paid-In Capital     Income     Deficit     Total  
    (In thousands)  
 
Balances, December 31, 2006
    488,844     $ 489     $ 1,418,004     $ 107,237     $ (571,836 )     953,894  
Comprehensive income:
                                               
Net income
                            47,885       47,885  
Actuarial gain related to defined benefit pension plans
                      6,861             6,861  
Unrealized gains on investments, net of tax
                      681             681  
Foreign currency translation adjustments
                      38,361             38,361  
                                                 
Total comprehensive income
                                            93,788  
Stock-based compensation expense
                16,788                   16,788  
Exercise of stock options
    3,604       4       9,156                   9,160  
Vested restricted stock units
    312                                
Repurchase of common stock
    (48,923 )     (49 )     (250,102 )                 (250,151 )
                                                 
Balances, December 31, 2007
    443,837     $ 444     $ 1,193,846     $ 153,140     $ (523,951 )   $ 823,479  
Comprehensive loss:
                                               
Net loss
                            (27,209 )     (27,209 )
Actuarial gain related to defined benefit pension plans
                      4,079             4,079  
Pension adjustment for sale of Heilbronn manufacturing facilites (see Note 16)
                            (2,970 )             (2,970 )
Unrealized losses on investments, net of tax
                      (1,231 )           (1,231 )
Foreign currency translation adjustments
                      (39,019 )           (39,019 )
                                                 
Total comprehensive loss
                                            (66,350 )
Stock-based compensation expense
                35,793                     35,793  
Issuance of common stock for the acquisition of Quantum Research Group
    126             405                   405  
Exercise of stock options
    1,376       1       3,187                     3,188  
Issuance of common stock under employee stock purchase plan
    2,431       3       7,329                   7,332  
Vested restricted stock units
    1,558       1                         1  
Shares withheld for employee taxes related to vested restricted stock units
    (456 )           (1,764 )                 (1,764 )
                                                 
Balances, December 31, 2008
    448,872     $ 449     $ 1,238,796     $ 113,999     $ (551,160 )   $ 802,084  
Comprehensive loss:
                                               
Net loss
                            (109,498 )     (109,498 )
Actuarial gain related to defined benefit pension plans
                      413             413  
Unrealized gains on investments, net of tax
                      327             327  
Foreign currency translation adjustments
                      25,731             25,731  
                                                 
Total comprehensive loss
                                            (83,027 )
Stock-based compensation expense
                37,730                   37,730  
Exercise of stock options
    1,206       1       3,262                   3,263  
Issuance of common stock under employee stock purchase plan
    2,139       2       6,481                   6,483  
Common stock issued in lieu of 2008 bonus awards
    632       1       1,944                   1,945  
Vested restricted stock units
    3,014       3                         3  
Shares withheld for employee taxes related to vested restricted stock units
    (1,277 )     (1 )     (4,073 )                 (4,074 )
                                                 
Balances, December 31, 2009
    454,586     $ 455     $ 1,284,140     $ 140,470     $ (660,658 )   $ 764,407  
                                                 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these Consolidated Financial Statements.


64


Table of Contents

 
 
Atmel Corporation
 
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
Note 1.   SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
 
 
Atmel Corporation (“Atmel” or “the Company”) designs, develops, manufactures and markets a broad range of high-performance logic, radio frequency and nonvolatile memory integrated circuits using complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (“CMOS”) and other technologies. Atmel’s products are used in a broad range of applications in the telecommunications, computing, networking, consumer and automotive electronics and other markets. Atmel’s customers comprise a diverse group of United States of America (“U.S.”) and non-U.S. original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”) and distributors.
 
 
The Consolidated Financial Statements include the accounts of Atmel and its wholly-owned subsidiaries. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated.
 
 
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Significant estimates in these financial statements include provision for excess and obsolete inventory, sales return reserves, stock-based compensation expense, allowances for doubtful accounts receivable, warranty accruals, estimates for useful lives associated with long-lived assets, charges for grant repayments, asset impairments charges (recovery), recoverability of goodwill and intangible assets, restructuring charges, fair value of net assets held for sale and income taxes and tax valuation allowances. Actual results could differ from those estimates.
 
 
For certain of Atmel’s financial instruments, including cash and cash equivalents, short-term investments, accounts receivable, accounts payable and other current assets and current liabilities, the carrying amounts approximate their fair value due to the relatively short maturity of these items. Investments in debt securities are carried at fair value based on quoted market prices. The fair value of the Company’s debt approximates book value as of December 31, 2009 and 2008 due to its relatively short term nature as well as the variable interest rates on these debt obligations. The estimated fair value has been determined by the Company using available market information. However, considerable judgment is required in interpreting market data to develop the estimates of fair value. Accordingly, the estimates presented are not necessarily indicative of the amounts that Atmel could realize in a current market exchange. The use of different market assumptions and/or estimation methodologies could have a material effect on the estimated fair value amounts.
 
 
Investments with an original or remaining maturity of 90 days or less, as of the date of purchase, are considered cash equivalents, and consist of highly liquid money market instruments.
 
Atmel maintains its cash balances at a variety of financial institutions and has not experienced any material losses relating to such instruments. Atmel invests its excess cash in accordance with its investment policy that has been reviewed and approved by the Board of Directors.


65


Table of Contents

 
 
All of the Company’s investments in debt and equity securities in publicly-traded companies are classified as available-for-sale, including auction-rate securities for which the Company has received an offer from UBS Financial Services Inc. (“UBS”) to purchase the Company’s eligible auction-rate securities at par value at any time during a two year time period from June 30, 2010 to July 2, 2012. Available-for-sale securities with an original or remaining maturity of greater than 90 days, as of the date of purchase, are classified as short-term when they represent investments of cash that are intended for use in current operations. Investments in available-for-sale securities are reported at fair value with unrealized gains (losses), net of related tax, included as a component of accumulated other comprehensive income.
 
The Company’s marketable securities include corporate equity securities, U.S. and foreign corporate debt securities, guaranteed variable annuities and auction-rate securities. The Company monitors its investments for impairment periodically and recognizes an impairment charge when the decline in the fair value of these investments is judged to be other-than temporary. Significant judgment is used to identify events or circumstances that would likely have a significant adverse effect on the future use of the investment. The Company considers various factors in determining whether an impairment is other-than-temporary, including the length of time and extent to which fair value has been below cost basis, the financial condition of the issuer and its ability and intent to hold the investment for a period of time which may be sufficient for anticipated recovery of market value. The Company’s investments include certain highly-rated auction rate securities, totaling $5,392 and $8,795 at December 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively, which are structured with short-term interest rate reset dates of either 7 or 28 days, and contractual maturities that can be in excess of ten years. The Company evaluates its portfolio by continuing to monitor the credit rating and interest yields of these auction-rate securities and status of reset at each auction date.