BP » Topics » Maritime Oil Spill Regulations

This excerpt taken from the BP 20-F filed Mar 4, 2008.
Maritime oil spill regulations
Within the US, the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA 90) imposes oil spill prevention requirements, spill response planning obligations and spill liability for tankers and barges transporting oil and for offshore facilities such as platforms and onshore terminals. To ensure adequate funding for response to oil spills and compensation for damages, when not fully covered by a responsible party, OPA 90 created a $1-billion fund that is financed by a tax on imported and domestic oil. This has recently been amended by the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act 2006 to increase the size of the fund from $1 billion to $2.7 billion, through the previously-mentioned tax, together with an increase in the liability of double-hulled tankers from $1,200 per gross ton to $1,900 per gross ton. In addition to OPA 90, which imposes liability for oil spills on the owners



Back to Contents

42  

 

and operators of the carrying vessel, some states implemented statutes also imposing liability on the shippers or owners of oil spilled from such vessels. Alaska, Washington, Oregon and California are among these states. The exposure of BP to such liability is mitigated by the vessels’ marine liability insurance, which has a maximum limit of $1 billion for each accident or occurrence. OPA 90 also provides that all new tank vessels operating in US waters must have double hulls and existing tank vessels without double hulls must be phased out by 2015. BP contracted with National Steel and Ship Building Company (NASSCO) for the construction of four double-hulled tankers in San Diego, California. The first of these new vessels began service in 2004, demise-chartered to and operated by Alaska Tanker Company (ATC), which transports BP Alaskan crude oil from Valdez. NASSCO delivered two more in 2005 and the fourth was delivered in 2006. At the end of 2007, the ATC fleet consisted of five tankers, all double-hulled.
     Outside the US, the BP-operated fleet of tankers is subject to international spill response and preparedness regulations that are typically promulgated through the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and implemented by the relevant flag state authorities. The International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (Marpol 73/78) requires vessels to have detailed ship-board emergency and spill prevention plans. The International Convention on Oil Pollution, Preparedness, Response and Co-operation requires vessels to have adequate spill response plans and resources for response anywhere the vessel travels. These conventions and separate Marine Environmental Protection Circulars also stipulate the relevant state authorities around the globe that require engagement in the event of a spill. All these requirements together are addressed by the vessel owners in Shipboard Oil Pollution Emergency Plans. BP Shipping’s liabilities for oil pollution damage under the OPA 90 and outside the US under the 1969/1992 International Convention on Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage (CLC) are covered by marine liability insurance, having a maximum limit of $1 billion for each accident or occurrence. This insurance cover is provided by three mutual insurance associations (P&I Clubs): The United Kingdom Steam Ship Assurance Association (Bermuda) Limited; The Britannia Steam Ship Insurance Association Limited; and The Standard Steamship Owners’ Protection and Indemnity Association (Bermuda) Limited. With effect from 20 February 2006, two new complementary voluntary oil pollution compensation schemes were introduced by tanker owners, supported by their P&I Clubs, with the agreement of the International Oil Pollution Compensation Fund at the IMO. Pursuant to both these schemes, tanker owners will voluntarily assume a greater liability for oil pollution compensation in the event of a spill of persistent oil than is provided for in CLC. The first scheme, the Small Tanker Owners’ Pollution Indemnification Agreement (STOPIA), provides for a minimum liability of 20 million Special Drawing Rights (around $30 million) for a ship at or below 29,548 gross tons, while the second scheme, the Tanker Owners’ Pollution Indemnification Agreement (TOPIA), provides for the tanker owner to take a 50% stake in the 2003 Supplementary Fund, that is, an additional liability of up to 273.5 million Special Drawing Rights (around $430 million). Both STOPIA and TOPIA will only apply to tankers whose owners are party to these agreements and who have entered their ships with P&I Clubs in the International Group of P&I Clubs, so benefiting from those clubs’ pooling and reinsurance arrangements. All BP Shipping’s managed and time-chartered vessels participate in STOPIA and TOPIA.
     At the end of 2007, we had 53 international vessels (39 medium-size crude and product carriers, four very large crude carriers, one North Sea shuttle tanker, five LNG carriers and four LPG carriers). All these ships are double-hulled. Of the five LNG carriers, BP manages one on behalf of a joint venture in which it is a participant and operates four LNG carriers. Three further LNG carriers are on order for delivery in 2008. In addition to its own fleet, BP will continue to charter quality ships; all vessels will continue to be vetted prior to each use in accordance with the BP group ship vetting policy.

This excerpt taken from the BP 20-F filed Jun 13, 2006.

Maritime Oil Spill Regulations

        Within the United States, the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 significantly increased oil spill prevention requirements. Details of this legislation are provided in the United States Regional Review in this Item on page 75. Outside the United States, the BP operated fleet of tankers is subject to international spill response and preparedness regulations that are typically promulgated through the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and implemented by the relevant flag state authorities. The International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution From Ships (Marpol 73/78) requires vessels to have detailed shipboard emergency and spill prevention plans. The International Convention on Oil Pollution, Preparedness, Response and Co-Operation (OPRC) requires vessels to have adequate spill response plans and resources for response anywhere the vessel travels to. These conventions and separate Marine Environmental Protection Circulars also stipulate the relevant state authorities around the globe that require engagement in the event of a spill. All of these requirements together are addressed by the vessel owners in Shipboard Oil Pollution Emergency Plans. BP Shipping's liabilities for oil pollution damage under the United States Oil Pollution Act 1990 and outside the United States under the 1969/1992 International Convention on Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage are covered by marine liability insurance having a maximum limit of $1 billion for each accident or occurrence. This insurance cover is provided by two mutual insurance associations, The United Kingdom Steam Ship Assurance Association (Bermuda) Limited and The Britannia Steam Ship Insurance Association Limited.

        At the end of 2004, the international fleet we managed numbered 34 oil tankers, all double hulled with an average age of less than two years and eight LNG ships with an average age of seven years. The international fleet renewal programme will continue into the future and should see 13 new double hulled oil tankers, four new very large liquefied petroleum gas carriers and four new liquefied natural gas carriers delivered between 2005 and 2008. In addition to its own fleet, BP will continue to charter quality ships; currently these vessels include both single- and double-hulled designs but all are vetted prior to each use to ensure they are operated and maintained to meet BP's standards.

This excerpt taken from the BP 20-F filed Jun 30, 2005.

Maritime Oil Spill Regulations

        Within the United States, the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 significantly increased oil spill prevention requirements. Details of this legislation are provided in the United States Regional Review in this Item on page 69. Outside the United States, the BP operated fleet of tankers is subject to international spill response and preparedness regulations that are typically promulgated through the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and implemented by the relevant flag state authorities. The International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution From Ships (Marpol 73/78) requires vessels to have detailed shipboard emergency and spill prevention plans. The International Convention on Oil Pollution, Preparedness, Response and Co-Operation (OPRC) requires vessels to have adequate spill response plans and resources for response anywhere the vessel travels to. These conventions and separate Marine Environmental Protection Circulars also stipulate the relevant state authorities around the globe that require engagement in the event of a spill. All of these requirements together are addressed by the vessel owners in Shipboard Oil Pollution Emergency Plans. BP Shipping's liabilities for oil pollution damage under the United States Oil Pollution Act 1990 and outside the United States under the 1969/1992 International Convention on Civil Liability for Oil Pollution Damage are covered by marine liability insurance having a maximum limit of $1 billion for each accident or occurrence. This insurance cover is provided by two mutual insurance associations, The United Kingdom Steam Ship Assurance Association (Bermuda) Limited and The Britannia Steam Ship Insurance Association Limited.

        At the end of 2004, the international fleet we managed numbered 34 oil tankers, all double hulled with an average age of less than two years and eight LNG ships with an average age of seven years. The international fleet renewal programme will continue into the future and should see 13 new double hulled oil tankers, four new very large liquefied petroleum gas carriers and four new liquefied natural gas carriers delivered between 2005 and 2008. In addition to its own fleet, BP will continue to charter quality ships; currently these vessels include both single- and double-hulled designs but all are vetted prior to each use to ensure they are operated and maintained to meet BP's standards.

Wikinvest © 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012. Use of this site is subject to express Terms of Service, Privacy Policy, and Disclaimer. By continuing past this page, you agree to abide by these terms. Any information provided by Wikinvest, including but not limited to company data, competitors, business analysis, market share, sales revenues and other operating metrics, earnings call analysis, conference call transcripts, industry information, or price targets should not be construed as research, trading tips or recommendations, or investment advice and is provided with no warrants as to its accuracy. Stock market data, including US and International equity symbols, stock quotes, share prices, earnings ratios, and other fundamental data is provided by data partners. Stock market quotes delayed at least 15 minutes for NASDAQ, 20 mins for NYSE and AMEX. Market data by Xignite. See data providers for more details. Company names, products, services and branding cited herein may be trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners. The use of trademarks or service marks of another is not a representation that the other is affiliated with, sponsors, is sponsored by, endorses, or is endorsed by Wikinvest.
Powered by MediaWiki