Annual Reports

  • 10-K (Feb 18, 2014)
  • 10-K (Feb 20, 2013)
  • 10-K (Feb 15, 2013)
  • 10-K (Feb 17, 2012)
  • 10-K (Feb 18, 2011)
  • 10-K (Feb 12, 2010)

 
Quarterly Reports

 
8-K

 
Other

BRE Properties 10-K 2011
Form 10-K

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

Form 10-K

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTIONS 13 OR 15(d) OF THE

SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

(Mark One)

 

x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2010

OR

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Commission File No. 1-14306

 

 

BRE PROPERTIES, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Maryland   94-1722214

(State or Other Jurisdiction of

Incorporation or Organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

525 Market Street, 4th Floor

San Francisco, California

  94105-2712
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)   (Zip Code)

(415) 445-6530

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, $.01 par value

6.75% Series C Preferred Stock

6.75% Series D Preferred Stock

 

New York Stock Exchange

New York Stock Exchange

New York Stock Exchange

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  x Yes    ¨ No

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.  ¨ Yes    x No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.   x Yes    ¨ No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  x Yes    ¨ No

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer x    Accelerated filer ¨    Non-accelerated filer ¨    Smaller reporting company ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).   ¨ Yes    x No

At June 30, 2010, the aggregate market value of the registrant’s shares of Common Stock, par value $.01 per share, held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $2,364,000,000. At January 31, 2011, 64,744,981 shares of Common Stock were outstanding.

 

 

 


DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders of BRE Properties, Inc. to be filed within 120 days of December 31, 2010 are incorporated by reference in Part III of this report.

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

In addition to historical information, we have made forward-looking statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. These forward-looking statements pertain to, among other things, our capital resources, portfolio performance and results of operations. Forward-looking statements involve numerous risks and uncertainties. You should not rely on these statements as predictions of future events because we cannot assure you that the events or circumstances reflected in the statements can be achieved or will occur. Forward-looking statements are identified by words such as “believes,” “expects,” “may,” “will,” “should,” “seeks,” “approximately,” “intends,” “plans,” “pro forma,” “estimates” or “anticipates” or their negative form or other variations, or by discussions of strategy, plans or intentions. Forward-looking statements are based on assumptions, data or methods that may be incorrect or imprecise or incapable of being realized. The following factors, among others, could affect actual results and future events: defaults or non-renewal of leases, increased interest rates and operating costs, failure to obtain necessary outside financing, difficulties in identifying properties to acquire and in effecting acquisitions, failure to successfully integrate acquired properties and operations, inability to dispose of assets that no longer meet our investment criteria under acceptable terms and conditions, risks and uncertainties affecting property development and construction (including construction delays, cost overruns, inability to obtain necessary permits and public opposition to such activities), failure to qualify as a real estate investment trust under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, environmental uncertainties, risks related to natural disasters, financial market fluctuations, changes in real estate and zoning laws and increases in real property tax rates. Our success also depends on general economic trends, including interest rates, income tax laws, governmental regulation, legislation, population changes and other factors, including those risk factors discussed in the section entitled “Risk Factors” in this report as they may be updated from time to time by our subsequent filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Do not rely solely on forward-looking statements, which only reflect management’s analysis. We assume no obligation to update forward-looking statements.

 

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BRE PROPERTIES, INC.

PART I

 

Item 1. BUSINESS

References in this Annual Report on Form 10-K to “BRE,” “Company,” “we” or “us” refer to BRE Properties, Inc., a Maryland corporation.

Corporate Profile

We are a self-administered equity real estate investment trust, or REIT, focused on the development, acquisition and management of multifamily apartment communities primarily located in the major metropolitan markets within the state of California, and Seattle, Washington. We also own and operate communities in Phoenix, Arizona and Denver, Colorado. At December 31, 2010, our multifamily portfolio had real estate assets with a net book value of approximately $3.1 billion, which included: 75 wholly or majority owned stabilized multifamily communities, aggregating 21,318 units in California, Washington and Arizona; thirteen stabilized multifamily communities owned through joint ventures comprised of 4,080 apartment units; and six apartment communities in various stages of construction and development. We have been a publicly traded company since our founding in 1970 and have paid 161 consecutive quarterly dividends to our shareholders since inception.

Our business touches one of the most personal aspects of our customers’ lives—the place they call home. We believe this creates not just a responsibility, but an opportunity to set ourselves apart by seeing things from our residents’ point of view and putting them first in all we do. The power of this viewpoint is that what is good for our resident is good for our Company. As we build relationships with the people and communities we serve, we set ourselves apart in the marketplace and create long-term, income-producing investments for our shareholders. Our principal operating objective is to maximize the economic returns of our apartment communities so as to provide our shareholders with the greatest possible total return and value. To achieve this objective, we pursue the following primary strategies and goals:

 

   

Manage our business to yield a compelling combination of income and growth by achieving and maintaining high occupancy levels, dynamic pricing, and operating margin expansion through operating efficiencies and cost controls, and deploying new and recycled capital in supply-constrained markets;

 

   

Create a valuable customer experience that focuses on services from our residents’ point of view and generates increased profitability from resident retention and referrals;

 

   

Maintain balance sheet strength and maximize financial flexibility to provide continued access to attractively priced capital for strategic growth opportunities;

 

   

Communicate a clear, results-oriented strategic direction based on the long-term plan developed by Management and reviewed and approved by the Board of Directors, which is the driver behind all key decisions;

 

   

Respond openly and honestly to all investors by disclosing financial results comprehensively and efficiently, and making our business transparent to investors through our public disclosure.

We believe we can best achieve our objectives by developing, acquiring and internally managing high-quality apartment communities in high-demand, supply-constrained locations in the most attractive places to live in the Western United States, specifically coastal California. Our communities are generally near the business, transportation, employment and recreation centers essential to customers who value the convenience, service and flexibility of rental living. Recognizing that customers have many housing choices, we focus on developing and acquiring apartment homes with customer-defined amenities and providing professional management services delivered by well-trained associates. We have concentrated our investment and business focus in California and in Seattle, Washington, because of certain market characteristics that we find attractive, including the propensity

 

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to rent, and the scarcity of undeveloped land. From time to time, we dispose of assets that do not meet our long-term investment criteria, recycling the capital derived from property sales into apartment communities in supply-constrained locations that offer higher long-term return opportunities.

Events During 2010

During 2010, we acquired four communities totaling 1,037 units: Allure at Scripps Ranch, with 194 units, located in San Diego, California; Museum Park, with 117 units, located in San Jose, California; Fountains at River Oaks, with 226 units, located in San Jose, California; and Aqua at Marina Del Rey, with 500 units, located in Marina Del Rey, California. In connection with the acquisition of Fountains at River Oaks, we assumed an existing $32,500,000 secured mortgage loan, with a fixed interest rate of 5.74% that is scheduled to mature in 2019. The aggregate investment in these four communities was $292,100,000. In addition to the communities, we purchased one land parcel for future development of 280 units, in Sunnyvale, California for $19,000,000.

During 2010, we completed construction of two development communities: Belcarra, with 296 units in Bellevue, Washington, and Villa Granada, with 270 units in Santa Clara, California. The aggregate investment in the two communities totals $178,025,000.

As of December 31, 2010 we own one site under construction, located in Sunnyvale, California. The aggregate investment in the site is expected to total $110,600,000. We have an estimated cost of $81,500,000 to complete existing construction in progress, which is estimated to be completed in the first quarter of 2013.

As of December 31, 2010, we owned five parcels of land that are in the process of entitlement and predevelopment.

During 2010, we sold four communities totaling 1,530 units: Montebello, with 248 units located in Seattle, Washington; Boulder Creek, a 264 unit property located in Riverside, California; Pinnacle Riverwalk, a 714 unit property located in Riverside, California; and Parkside Village, a 304 unit property located in Riverside, California. The approximate gross proceeds from sales of the four communities were $167,327,000, resulting in a net gain of approximately $40,111,000. Three of the four properties sold were located in the Inland Empire, reducing our exposure in this market to 7.4% of total net operating income from 11.2% in 2009.

Effective February 24, 2010, we terminated the equity distribution agreement we entered into on May 14, 2009 under which we could issue and sell from time to time through or to our sales agent shares of our common stock having an aggregate offering price of up to $125,000,000. On February 24, 2010, we entered into new equity distribution agreements (EDAs) under which we may issue and sell from time to time through or to our sales agents shares of our common stock having an aggregate offering price of up to $250,000,000. During 2010, 581,055 shares were issued under the EDAs for gross proceeds of approximately $25,000,000 with an average gross share price of $43.02. Proceeds were used for general corporate purposes, which included reducing borrowings under our unsecured credit facility, the repayment of other indebtedness, the redemption or other repurchase of outstanding securities and funding for development activities.

On April 7, 2010, we completed an equity offering of 8,050,000 common shares, including shares issued to cover over-allotments, at $34.25 per share. Total net proceeds from this offering were approximately $265,000,000 after deducting the underwriting discount and other offering expenses we paid. We used the net proceeds from the offering for general corporate purposes, which included reducing borrowings under our unsecured revolving credit facility.

On April 30, 2010 we refinanced a single property mortgage loan totaling $59,500,000 at a fixed rate of 5.20%. The mortgage has a 10 year interest only term. The original mortgage note had a principal amount outstanding of $31,100,000 and was scheduled to mature on October 1, 2010, at a fixed rate of 7.38%.

 

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On September 22, 2010, we closed an offering of $300,000,000 of 10.5 year senior unsecured notes with a coupon rate of 5.20%. The notes will mature on March 15, 2021. Net proceeds from the offering, after all discounts, commissions and issuance costs, totaled approximately $297,477,000. We used the net proceeds of the 2021 Notes Offering to repay borrowings under our $750 million unsecured credit facility and used a portion of the proceeds to fund a portion of the purchase price and accrued and unpaid interest on any 4.125% convertible senior notes due 2026 validly tendered and accepted for payment pursuant to the Offer to Purchase dated September 15, 2010.

As a result of the resignation of our former Chief Operating Officer, we recognized a one-time expense during the second quarter of 2010 totaling approximately $1,300,000.

During June 2010, we repurchased $15,000,000 of our 4.125% convertible senior unsecured notes at par. We recognized a net loss on early debt extinguishment of $558,000 in connection with the repurchase. On October 13, 2010, we closed a fixed price cash tender offer for any and all of our 4.125% convertible senior unsecured notes due 2026. As a result, $321,334,000 in aggregate principal of our 4.125% convertible senior unsecured notes due 2026 were validly tendered, and we accepted, purchased and subsequently cancelled the notes for an aggregate purchase price of 104% of par, or approximately $334,187,360. We recognized a net loss of $22,949,000 in connection with the tender offer. After the tender offer an aggregate principal amount of $35,000,000 of the notes remain outstanding.

Events During 2009

During 2009, we sold two communities totaling 752 units: Overlook at Blue Ravine, with 512 units located in Folsom, California; and Arbor Pointe, a 240 unit property located in Sacramento, California. The two properties were sold for an aggregate sales price of approximately $67,000,000, resulting in a net gain on sales of approximately $21,574,000. In addition to the two communities, we sold an excess parcel of land in Santa Clara, California, classified as held for sale at December 31, 2008, for gross sales proceeds totaling $17,100,000, approximately equal to the carrying value.

During 2009, we completed construction of three development communities: Taylor 28, with 197 units in Seattle, Washington, 5600 Wilshire, with 284 units in Los Angeles, California and Park Viridian with 320 units in Anaheim, California. The aggregate investment in the three communities totaled $282,934,000.

As of December 31, 2009, we owned two sites that were under construction. The aggregate investment in these two sites is expected to total approximately $176,100,000. We had an estimated cost of $16,400,000 to complete existing construction in progress, which was completed during 2010.

As of December 31, 2009, we owned four parcels of land that were in the process of entitlement and predevelopment.

On July 30, 2009, our Board of Directors approved a reduction in quarterly common dividends to $0.3750 from $0.5625 per share for the third quarter of 2009. The quarterly common dividend payment of $0.3750 was equivalent to $1.5000 per common share on an annualized basis.

On May 14, 2009, we entered into an equity distribution agreement under which we may offer and sell shares of our common stock having an aggregate offering price of up to $125,000,000 over time through our sales agent. During 2009, 3,801,185 shares were issued for gross proceeds of approximately $104,600,000 with an average share price of $27.52. Proceeds were used for general corporate purposes, which include reducing borrowings under our unsecured credit facility, the repayment of other indebtedness, the redemption or other repurchase of outstanding securities, and funding for development activities.

On April 7, 2009, we closed a $620,000,000 secured credit facility with Deutsche Bank Berkshire Mortgage, Inc. The facility consists of two $310,000,000 tranches. The first tranche has a fixed rate term of 10 years and has a maturity date of May 1, 2019. The second tranche has a maturity date of September 1, 2020, with a fixed rate

 

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term for the first 10 years and a variable rate for the remaining one-year period. Together, the effective composite annual cost of debt is 5.6% inclusive of rate hedging transactions. Fifteen multifamily properties totaling 4,651 units with a net carrying value of $607,500,000 secured the credit facility at the time of closing. Proceeds from this facility were used to refinance near-term debt maturities, debt tenders and debt repurchases noted below.

On April 15, 2009, we closed a fixed price cash tender offer for any and all of our outstanding 5.750% senior notes due 2009 and any and all of our outstanding 4.875% senior notes due 2010. As a result, $61,407,000 and $119,421,000 in aggregate principal amount of the 5.750% senior notes due 2009 and 4.875% senior notes due 2010, respectively, were validly tendered and we accepted, purchased and subsequently cancelled the notes. After giving effect to the purchase of the tendered notes, an aggregate principal amount of $30,579,000 of the 4.875% senior notes due in 2010, were paid in full during 2010. The remaining principal balance of the 5.750% senior notes due in 2009 were paid in full during September 2009, as the note came due.

On April 1, 2009, we closed a fixed price cash tender offer for any and all of our outstanding 7.450% senior notes due 2011 and any and all of our outstanding 7.125% senior notes due 2013. As a result, $201,455,000 and $89,982,000 in aggregate principal amount of the 7.450% senior notes due 2011 and 7.125% senior notes due 2013, respectively, were validly tendered and we accepted, purchased and subsequently cancelled the notes. After giving effect to the purchase of the tendered notes, an aggregate principal amount of $48,545,000 7.450% senior notes due 2011 were paid in full in 2011, and $40,018,000 7.125% senior notes due in 2013, respectively, remain outstanding.

During the course of 2009, we repurchased $78,266,000 of our 4.125% convertible senior unsecured notes for an aggregate price of 92.98% of par, or approximately $72,776,000.

During the course of 2009, we recognized a net gain on the early extinguishment of debt totaling $1,470,000 in connection with the repurchase and tender activity.

During the fourth quarter of 2009, we incurred a charge of approximately $12,900,000 for previously capitalized costs primarily related to development rights for three land sites under option agreements that will not proceed to development. Additionally, in the fourth quarter of 2009, we incurred cash severance charges totaling approximately $600,000.

Events During 2008

During 2008, we sold six communities totaling 1,484 units: Blue Rock Village, with 560 units located in Vallejo, California; The Park at Dash Point, with 280 units located in Seattle, Washington; Pinnacle at Blue Ravine with 260 units, located in Sacramento, California; Canterbury Downs, with 173 units located in Sacramento, California; Rocklin Gold with 121 units located in Sacramento, California; and Quail Chase with 90 units located in Sacramento, California. The six communities were sold for an aggregate sales price of approximately $163,215,000, resulting in a net gain on sale of approximately $65,984,000.

During 2008, we completed construction of three development communities: Avenue 64, with 224 units in Emeryville, California; The Stuart at Sierra Madre with 188 units in Pasadena, California and Renaissance at Uptown Orange with 460 units in Orange, California. The aggregate investment in the three communities totaled $249,076,000.

As of December 31, 2008, we owned five sites that were under construction. The aggregate investment in these five sites is expected to total approximately $456,600,000. We had an estimated cost of $105,900,000 to complete existing construction in progress, with completion dates estimated from 2009 through 2010.

On December 24, 2008, we repurchased $10,400,000 of our $460,000,000 4.125% convertible senior unsecured notes, resulting in a $2,364,000 net gain on extinguishment of debt.

 

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In the fourth quarter of 2008, we recognized in other income $4,400,000 in proceeds from a legal settlement related to Pinnacle Galleria and a forfeited escrow deposit totaling $1,007,000 from a potential buyer of an asset held for sale that failed to close.

In the fourth quarter of 2008, we recorded a $5,119,000 abandonment charge included in other expenses for previously capitalized costs related to three sites under option agreements or letters of intent that did not proceed to development. The abandonment charge is associated with the deceleration of our development program due to current and expected deterioration of economic conditions and credit availability.

During the fourth quarter of 2008, we incurred cash severance charges totaling approximately $1,500,000, of which $600,000 were recorded as an expense, and $900,000 was capitalized as development cost. The reduction in force involved management and staff- level associates primarily in the development area, reducing the overall level of employees by 4%, and development personnel by 36%.

Competition

All of our communities are located in urban and suburban areas that include other multifamily communities. There are many other multifamily properties and real estate companies within these areas that compete with us for residents and development and acquisition opportunities. Such competition could have a material effect on our ability to lease apartment homes at our communities or at any newly developed or acquired communities and on the rents charged. We may be competing with others that have greater resources than us. In addition, other forms of residential properties, including single-family housing, provide housing alternatives to potential residents of upscale apartment communities.

Structure, Tax Status and Investment Policy

We were incorporated in the state of Maryland in 1970. We are organized and operate in a manner intended to enable us to qualify as a real estate investment trust, or REIT, under Sections 856-860 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. As a REIT, we generally will not be subject to federal income tax to the extent we distribute 100% of our taxable income to our shareholders. REITs are subject to a number of complex organizational and operational requirements. If we fail to qualify as a REIT, our taxable income may be subject to income tax at regular corporate rates. See “Risk Factors—Tax Risks.”

Our long-range investment policy emphasizes the development, construction and acquisition of multifamily communities located in California and other markets in the Western United States. As circumstances warrant, certain properties may be sold and the proceeds reinvested into multifamily communities that our management believes better align with our growth objectives. Among other items, this policy is intended to enable our management to monitor developments in local real estate markets and to take an active role in managing our properties and improving their performance. The policy is subject to ongoing review by our Board of Directors and may be modified in the future to take into account changes in business or economic conditions, as circumstances warrant.

Employees

As of December 31, 2010, we had 628 employees. No employee is covered by collective bargaining agreements.

Company Website

To view our current and periodic reports free of charge, please go to our website at www.breproperties.com. We make these postings as soon as reasonably practicable after our filings with the SEC. Our website contains copies of our Corporate Governance Guidelines, our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics and the charters of

 

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each of our Audit, Compensation, and Nominating and Governance Committees. This information is also available in print to any shareholder who requests it by contacting us at BRE Properties, Inc., 525 Market St., 4th Floor, San Francisco, California, 94105, attention: Investor Relations. Information contained on our website is not and should not be deemed a part of this report or a part of any other report or filing with the SEC.

Investment Portfolio

See Part I, Item 2 (“Properties”) and Part II, Item 7 (“Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations”) of this report for a description of our individual investments and certain developments during the year with respect to these investments. See Part IV, Item 15(a) 2, Schedule III (financial statement schedule), for additional information about our portfolio, including locations, costs and encumbrances.

Additionally, see Part II, Item 8 and Part IV, Item 15 of this report for our consolidated financial statements.

Executive Officers

The following persons were executive officers of BRE as of February 18, 2011:

 

Name

       Age at    
February 18,
2011
    

Position(s)

Constance B. Moore

     55       President, Chief Executive Officer and Director

Stephen C. Dominiak

     47       Executive Vice President, Chief Investment Officer

Kerry Fanwick

     55       Executive Vice President, General Counsel

Deborah J. Jones

     60       Executive Vice President, Associate Relations and Development

Scott A. Reinert

     52       Executive Vice President, Operations

John A. Schissel

     44       Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer

Ms. Moore has served as President and Chief Executive Officer since January 2005. Prior to serving as the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, she served as our Chief Operating Officer from July of 2002 through December 2004. Ms. Moore held several executive positions with Security Capital Group & Affiliates, an international real estate operating and investment management company, from 1993 to July 2002, including Co-Chairman and Chief Operating Officer of Archstone-Smith Trust, a Colorado-based multifamily REIT. Ms. Moore holds a Master of Business Administration Degree from the University of California, Berkeley and a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration from San Jose State University.

Mr. Dominiak has served as Executive Vice President, Chief Investment Officer since August 2008. Prior to joining BRE, Mr. Dominiak was the Division President and Managing Partner for JPI’s western division from 2004 to August 2008, a Division Vice President for BRE’s Southern California region from 2003 to 2004, and a Group Vice President for Archstone-Smith Trust in Southern California from 1995 to 2003. Mr. Dominiak holds a Master of Business Administration Degree from the University of California, Irvine, and both a Master’s Degree in city and regional planning and a Bachelor’s Degree in architecture from the University of Texas, Arlington.

Mr. Fanwick has served as Executive Vice President, General Counsel since July 2008. Prior to serving as the Company’s Executive Vice President, General Counsel, he served as Senior Vice President, General Counsel from February 2007 through July 2008. Mr. Fanwick was a co-founding partner of Miller & Fanwick, LLP, a law firm specializing in business and financial strategies, where he served as partner from May 1998 to December 2006. Previously, he served as general counsel for First Nationwide Bank from 1990 to 1998; an attorney at the law firm of Wilson, Sonsini, Goodrich & Rosati from 1981 to 1985; and in-house counsel and a member of senior management for various financial services and real estate companies. Mr. Fanwick received his Juris Doctor Degree from Stanford Law School .

 

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Ms. Jones has served as Executive Vice President, Associate Relations and Development since October, 2010. Ms Jones joined BRE in 2005 as Vice President, associate relations and development, and was promoted to Senior Vice President in 2007. She began her career in the apartment industry in 1984 as director, human resources for Trammell Crow Residential-West (TCR-W), which was acquired by BRE in 1997, and continued in that role as Vice President for BRE after the acquisition. From 2000 to 2005, she served as Vice President, human resources for The Irvine Company Apartment Communities. Ms. Jones is a professionally certified executive coach and holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Hertford College in Hertford, England.

Mr. Reinert has served as Executive Vice President, Operations since January 24, 2011. Prior to joining BRE, he was employed by the Irvine Company in Newport Beach, California from 1994 to 2009. Most recently, he served as Senior Vice President, property management, for the Irvine Company Apartment Communities. His first position was Vice President, asset management, Irvine Apartment Communities, then a public REIT. In 1998, he was promoted to president, Irvine Apartment Management Company. After leaving the Irvine Company, Mr. Reinert founded Axiom Multifamily Realty Advisors, Inc., to invest in and manage properties in the Southwest. He began his career in property management at GFS Northstar (now Pinnacle) in Atlanta, where he rose to Chief Operating Officer, East, in four years. Mr. Reinert holds a Bachelor’s degree in real estate and risk management from Florida State University

Mr. Schissel has served as Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer since October, 2009. Prior to joining BRE, he served as Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Board Member of Carr Properties (and predecessor affiliate), a Washington D.C. based commercial office REIT, from 2004 to 2009. Prior to joining Carr Properties, Mr. Schissel worked at Wachovia Securities (and predecessor institutions), from 1991 to 2004, serving as Senior Vice President, and later as Director in the firm’s Real Estate Corporate Finance Group. Mr. Schissel holds a Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration and Finance from Georgetown University.

There is no family relationship among any of our executive Officers or Directors.

 

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Item 1A. RISK FACTORS

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto appearing elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Risks Due to Investment in Real Estate

Decreased revenues or increased operating expenses may cause decreased yields from an investment in real property.

Real property investments are subject to varying degrees of risk. The yields available from investments in real estate depend upon the amount of revenues generated and expenses incurred. If properties do not generate revenues sufficient to meet operating expenses, including debt service and capital expenditures, our results from operations and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt will be adversely affected. The performance of the economy in each of the areas in which the properties are located affects occupancy, market rental rates and expenses. These factors consequently can have an impact on revenues from the properties and their underlying values. The financial results and labor decisions of major local employers may also have an impact on the revenues from and value of certain properties.

Other factors may further adversely affect revenues from and values of our properties. These factors include the general economic climate, local conditions in the areas in which properties are located such as an oversupply of apartment units or a reduction in the demand for apartment units, the attractiveness of the properties to residents, competition from other multifamily communities and our ability to provide adequate facilities maintenance, services and amenities. Our revenues would also be adversely affected if residents were unable to pay rent or we were unable to rent apartments on favorable terms. If we were unable to promptly relet or renew the leases for a significant number of apartment units, or if the rental rates upon renewal or reletting were significantly lower than expected rates, then our funds from operations and our ability to make expected distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt could be adversely affected. There is also a risk that, as leases on the properties expire, residents will vacate or enter into new leases on terms that are less favorable to us. Operating costs, including real estate taxes, insurance and maintenance costs, and mortgage payments, if any, do not, in general, decline when circumstances cause a reduction in income from a property. We could sustain a loss as a result of foreclosure on the property, if a property is mortgaged to secure payment of indebtedness and we were unable to meet our mortgage payments. In addition, applicable laws, including tax laws, interest rate levels and the availability of financing also affect revenues from properties and real estate values.

If we are unable to implement our growth strategy, or if we fail to identify, acquire or integrate new acquisitions, our results may suffer.

Our future growth will be dependent upon a number of factors, including our ability to identify acceptable properties for development and acquisition, complete acquisitions and developments on favorable terms, successfully integrate acquired and newly developed properties, and obtain financing to support expansion. We cannot assure you that we will be successful in implementing our growth strategy, that growth will continue at historical levels or at all, or that any expansion will improve operating results. The failure to identify, acquire and integrate new properties effectively could have a material adverse effect on us and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt.

Development and construction projects may not be completed or completed successfully.

As a general matter, property development and construction projects typically have a higher, and sometimes substantially higher, level of risk than the acquisition of existing properties. We intend to actively pursue development and construction of multifamily apartment communities. We cannot assure you that we will

 

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complete development of the properties currently under development or any other development project that we may undertake. Risks associated with our development and construction activities may include the following:

 

   

development opportunities may be abandoned;

 

   

construction costs of multifamily apartment communities may exceed original estimates, possibly making the communities uneconomical;

 

   

occupancy rates and rents at newly completed communities may not be sufficient to make the communities profitable;

 

   

financing for the construction and development of projects may not be available on favorable terms or at all;

 

   

construction and lease-up may not be completed on schedule; and

 

   

expenses of operating a completed community may be higher than anticipated.

Development and construction activities are also subject to risks relating to the inability to obtain, or delays in obtaining, all necessary zoning, land-use, building, occupancy, and other required governmental permits and authorizations.

Investments in newly acquired properties may not perform in accordance with our expectations.

In the normal course of business, we typically evaluate potential acquisitions, enter into non-binding letters of intent, and may, at any time, enter into contracts to acquire and may acquire additional properties. However, we cannot assure you that we will have the financial resources to make suitable acquisitions or that properties satisfying our investment policies will be available for acquisition. Acquisitions of properties entail risks that investments will fail to perform in accordance with expectations. Estimates of the costs of improvements to bring an acquired property up to standards established for the market position intended for that property might prove inaccurate. Other risks may include rehabilitation costs exceeding original estimates, possibly making a project uneconomical; financing not being available on favorable terms or at all; and rehabilitation and lease-up not being completed on schedule. In addition, there are general real estate investment risks associated with any new real estate investment, including environmental risks. Although we undertake an evaluation of the physical condition of each new property before it is acquired, certain defects or necessary repairs may not be detected until after the property is acquired. This could significantly increase our total acquisition costs, which could have a material adverse effect on us and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt.

Illiquidity of real estate and reinvestment risk may reduce economic returns to investors.

Real estate investments are relatively illiquid and, therefore, tend to limit our ability to adjust our portfolio in response to changes in economic or other conditions. Additionally, the Internal Revenue Code places certain limits on the number of properties a REIT may sell without adverse tax consequences. To affect our current operating strategy, we have in the past raised, and will seek to continue to raise additional funds, both through outside financing and through the orderly disposition of assets that no longer meet our investment criteria. However, we cannot assure you that we will be able to dispose of these assets, particularly during periods of decline in the real estate market, and the inability to make these dispositions may prevent us from executing our operating strategy and could have a material adverse effect on us and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt. Depending upon interest rates, current development and acquisition opportunities and other factors, generally we will reinvest the proceeds from any property dispositions in additional multifamily properties, although such funds may be employed in other uses. We cannot assure you that the proceeds realized from the disposition of assets which no longer meet our investment criteria can be reinvested to produce economic returns comparable to those being realized from the properties disposed of, or that we will be able to acquire properties meeting our investment criteria. If we are unable to reinvest

 

11


proceeds from the disposition of properties or if properties acquired with any such proceeds produce a lower rate of return than the properties disposed of, our results of operations and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt could be adversely affected. In addition, a delay in reinvestment of any such proceeds could also have a material adverse effect on us and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt.

We may seek to structure future dispositions as tax-free exchanges, where appropriate, utilizing the non-recognition provisions of Section 1031 of the Internal Revenue Code to defer income taxation on the disposition of the exchanged property. For an exchange of these properties to qualify for tax-free treatment under Section 1031 of the Internal Revenue Code, certain technical requirements must be met. Given the competition for properties meeting our investment criteria, it may be difficult for us to identify suitable properties within the applicable time frames in order to meet the requirements of Section 1031. Even if we can structure a suitable tax-deferred exchange, as noted above, we cannot assure you that we will reinvest the proceeds of any of these dispositions to produce economic returns comparable to those currently being realized from the properties which were disposed of.

Substantial competition among multifamily properties and real estate companies may adversely affect our rental revenues and development and acquisition opportunities.

All of the properties currently owned by us are located in defined urban and suburban locations. There are numerous other multifamily properties and real estate companies, many of which have greater financial and other resources than we have, within the market area of each of our properties which compete with us for residents and development and acquisition opportunities. The number of competitive multifamily properties and real estate companies in these areas could have a material effect on (1) our ability to rent the apartments and the rents charged, and (2) development and acquisition opportunities. The activities of these competitors could cause us to pay a higher price for a new property than we otherwise would have paid or may prevent us from purchasing a desired property at all, which could have a material adverse effect on us and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt.

Our operations are concentrated in the Western United States, in particular the state of California; we are subject to general economic conditions in the regions in which we operate.

Our portfolio is primarily located in the San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles, Orange County, Inland Empire, San Diego, and Seattle markets. Our performance could be adversely affected by economic conditions in, and other factors relating to, these geographic areas, including supply and demand for apartments in these areas, zoning and other regulatory conditions and competition from other properties and alternative forms of housing. In particular our performance is disproportionately influenced by job growth and unemployment. To the extent the aforementioned general economic conditions, job growth and unemployment in any of these markets deteriorate or any of these areas experiences natural disasters, the value of the portfolio, our results of operations and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt could be materially adversely affected.

Our insurance coverage is limited and may not cover all losses to our properties.

We carry comprehensive liability, fire, mold, extended coverage and rental loss insurance with respect to our properties with certain policy specifications, limits and deductibles. While as of December 31, 2010, we carried flood and earthquake insurance for our properties with an aggregate annual limit of $90,000,000, subject to substantial deductibles, we cannot assure you that this coverage will be available on acceptable terms or at an acceptable cost, or at all, in the future, or if obtained, that the limits of those policies will cover the full cost of repair or replacement of covered properties. In addition, there may be certain extraordinary losses (such as those resulting from civil unrest or terrorist acts) that are not generally insured (or fully insured against) or underinsured losses (such as those resulting from claims in connection with the occurrence of mold, asbestos, and

 

12


lead) because they are either uninsurable or not economically insurable. Should an uninsured or underinsured loss occur to a property, we could be required to use our own funds for restoration or lose all or part of our investment in, and anticipated revenues from, the property and would continue to be obligated on any mortgage indebtedness on the property. Any such loss could have a material effect on us and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt. In addition, a failure of any of our insurers to comply with their obligations to us could have a material adverse effect on us and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt.

Adverse changes in laws may affect our liability relating to our properties and our operations.

Increases in real estate taxes and income, service and transfer taxes cannot always be passed through to residents or users in the form of higher rents, and may adversely affect our cash available for distribution and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt. Similarly, changes in laws increasing the potential liability for environmental conditions existing on properties or increasing the restrictions on discharges or other conditions, as well as changes in laws affecting development, construction and safety requirements, may result in significant unanticipated expenditures, which could have a material adverse effect on us and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt. In addition, future enactment of rent control or rent stabilization laws or other laws regulating multifamily housing may reduce rental revenues or increase operating costs.

Compliance with laws benefiting disabled persons may require us to make significant unanticipated expenditures or impact our investment strategy.

A number of federal, state and local laws (including the Americans with Disabilities Act) and regulations exist that may require modifications to existing buildings or restrict certain renovations by requiring improved access to such buildings by disabled persons and may require other structural features which add to the cost of buildings under construction. Legislation or regulations adopted in the future may impose further burdens or restrictions on us with respect to improved access by disabled persons. The costs of compliance with these laws and regulations may be substantial, and limits or restrictions on construction or completion of certain renovations may limit implementation of our investment strategy in certain instances or reduce overall returns on our investments, which could have a material adverse effect on us and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt. We review our properties periodically to determine the level of compliance and, if necessary, take appropriate action to bring such properties into compliance.

The operations of BRE Property Investors LLC are limited.

Six of our properties are held by BRE Property Investors LLC, which is referred to in this Annual Report on Form 10-K as the operating company. We are the sole managing member of the operating company and, as of December 31, 2010, held approximately a 95% equity interest in it. Third parties as non-managing members hold the remaining equity interests in the operating company.

Under the terms of the limited liability company agreement governing the operations of the operating company, the operating company is required to maintain certain debt service coverage, debt-to-asset and other financial ratios intended to protect the members’ rights to receive distributions. The requirement to maintain financial ratios and the restrictions on the actions of the operating company and us as managing member could have a material adverse effect on us and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt.

Further, under the terms of the operating company’s limited liability company agreement, the operating company must obtain the consent of a majority in interest of the non-managing members in order to dissolve the operating company other than in certain limited circumstances specified in the operating company’s limited liability company agreement, such as a sale of all or substantially all of our assets, or any merger, consolidation or other combination by us with or into another person, or reclassification, recapitalization or change of our outstanding equity interests.

 

13


These restrictions on our ability to dissolve the operating company, even when such a disposition or dissolution of the operating company would be in our best interest, could have a material adverse effect on us and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt.

The operating company also must distribute all available cash (as defined in the operating company’s limited liability company agreement) on a quarterly basis as follows: first, a priority distribution to members (other than us) until each member has received, cumulatively on a per operating company unit basis, distributions equal to the cumulative dividends declared with respect to one share of BRE common stock over the corresponding period (subject to adjustment from time to time as applicable to account for stock dividends, stock splits and similar transactions affecting BRE common stock); and second, the balance to us.

If the operating company’s available cash in any quarterly period is insufficient to permit distribution of the full amount of the priority distribution described above for that quarter, we are required to make a capital contribution to the operating company in an amount equal to the lesser of:

 

   

the amount necessary to permit the full priority distribution, or

 

   

an amount equal to the sum of any capital expenditures made by the operating company plus the sum of any payments made by the operating company on account of any loans to or investments in, or any guarantees of the obligations of, BRE or our affiliates for that quarterly period.

We may not voluntarily withdraw from the operating company or transfer all or any portion of our interest in the operating company without the consent of all of the non-managing members, except in certain limited circumstances, such as a sale of all or substantially all of our assets, or any merger, consolidation or other combination by us with or into another person, or any reclassification, recapitalization or change of our outstanding equity interests. Such restrictions on our withdrawal as the managing member of the operating company, and on our ability to transfer our interest in the operating company, could have a material adverse effect on us and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt.

Survey exceptions to certain title insurance policies may result in incomplete coverage in the event of a claim.

We have not obtained updated surveys for all of the properties we have acquired or developed. Because updated surveys were not always obtained, the title insurance policies obtained by us may contain exceptions for matters that an updated survey might have disclosed. Such matters might include such things as boundary encroachments, unrecorded easements or similar matters, which would have been reflected on a survey. Moreover, because no updated surveys were prepared for some properties, we cannot assure you that the title insurance policies in fact cover the entirety of the real property, buildings, fixtures, and improvements which we believe they cover. Incomplete coverage in the event of a claim could have a material adverse effect on our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt.

Risks Due to Real Estate Financing

We anticipate that future developments and acquisitions will be financed, in whole or in part, under various construction loans, lines of credit, and other forms of secured or unsecured financing or through the issuance of additional debt or equity by us. We expect periodically to review our financing options regarding the appropriate mix of debt and equity financing. Equity, rather than debt, financing of future developments or acquisitions could have a dilutive effect on the interests of our existing shareholders. Similarly, there are certain risks involved with financing future developments and acquisitions with debt, including those described below. In addition, if new developments are financed through construction loans, there is a risk that, upon completion of construction, permanent financing for such properties may not be available or may be available only on disadvantageous terms or that the cash flow from new properties will be insufficient to cover debt service. If a newly developed or acquired property is unsuccessful, our losses may exceed our investment in the property. Any of the foregoing could have a negative impact on operations and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt.

 

14


We may be unable to renew, repay or refinance our outstanding debt.

We are subject to the normal risks associated with debt financing, including the risk that our cash flow will be insufficient to meet required payments of principal and interest, the risk that indebtedness on our properties, or unsecured indebtedness, will not be able to be renewed, repaid or refinanced when due or that the terms of any renewal or refinancing will not be as favorable as the existing terms of such indebtedness. If we were unable to refinance our indebtedness on acceptable terms, or at all, we might be forced to dispose of one or more of our properties on disadvantageous terms, which might result in losses to us. Such losses could have a material adverse effect on us and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt. Furthermore, if a property is mortgaged to secure payment of indebtedness and we are unable to meet mortgage payments, the mortgagee could foreclose upon the property, appoint a receiver and receive an assignment of rents and leases or pursue other remedies, all with a consequent loss of our revenues and asset value. Foreclosures could also create taxable income without accompanying cash proceeds, thereby hindering our ability to meet the REIT distribution requirements of the Internal Revenue Code.

Rising interest rates would increase the cost of our variable rate debt.

We have incurred and expect in the future to incur indebtedness and interest rate hedges that bear interest at variable rates. Accordingly, increases in interest rates would increase our interest costs, which could have a material adverse effect on us and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt or cause us to be in default under certain debt instruments. In addition, an increase in market interest rates may lead holders of our common shares to demand a higher yield on their shares from distributions by us, which could adversely affect the market price for our common stock.

We may incur additional debt in the future.

We currently fund the acquisition and development of multifamily communities partially through borrowings (including our lines of credit) as well as from other sources such as sales of properties which no longer meet our investment criteria or the contribution of property to joint ventures which may in turn secure debt. Our organizational documents do not contain any limitation on the amount of indebtedness that we may incur. Accordingly, subject to limitations on indebtedness set forth in various loan agreements, we could become more highly leveraged, resulting in an increase in debt service, which could have a material adverse effect on us and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt and in an increased risk of default on our obligations.

The restrictive terms of certain of our indebtedness may cause acceleration of debt payments.

At December 31, 2010, we had outstanding borrowings of approximately $1.8 billion. Our indebtedness contains financial covenants as to minimum net worth, interest coverage ratios, maximum secured debt, and total debt to capital, among others. In the event that an event of default occurs, our lenders may declare borrowings under the respective loan agreements to be due and payable immediately, which could have a material adverse effect on us and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt.

Failure to hedge effectively against interest rates may adversely affect results of operations.

We seek to manage our exposure to interest rate volatility by using interest rate hedging arrangements, such as interest rate cap agreements and interest rate swap agreements. These agreements involve risks, such as the risk that the counterparties may fail to honor their obligations under these arrangements, that these arrangements may not be effective in reducing our exposure to interest rate changes and that a court could rule that such an agreement is not legally enforceable. Hedging may reduce overall returns on our investments. Failure to hedge effectively against interest rate changes could have a material adverse effect on us and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt.

 

15


Potential Liability under Environmental Laws

Under various federal, state and local laws, ordinances and regulations, a current or previous owner or operator of real estate may be liable for the costs of removal or remediation of certain hazardous or toxic substances in, on, around or under such property. Such laws often impose such liability without regard to whether the owner or operator knew of, or was responsible for, the presence of such hazardous or toxic substances. The presence of, or failure to remediate properly, hazardous or toxic substances may adversely effect the owner’s or operator’s ability to sell or rent the affected property or to borrow using the property as collateral. Persons who arrange for the disposal or treatment of hazardous or toxic substances may also be liable for the costs of removal or remediation of hazardous or toxic substances at a disposal or treatment facility, whether or not the facility is owned or operated by the person. Certain environmental laws impose liability for release of asbestos-containing materials into the air, and third parties may also seek recovery from owners or operators of real properties for personal injury associated with asbestos-containing materials and other hazardous or toxic substances. Federal and state laws also regulate the operation and subsequent removal of certain underground storage tanks. In connection with the current or former ownership (direct or indirect), operation, management, development or control of real properties, we may be considered an owner or operator of such properties or as having arranged for the disposal or treatment of hazardous or toxic substances and, therefore, may be potentially liable for removal or remediation costs, as well as certain other costs, including governmental fines, and claims for injuries to persons and property.

Our current policy is to obtain a Phase I environmental study on each property we seek to acquire and to proceed accordingly. We cannot assure you, however, that the Phase I environmental studies or other environmental studies undertaken with respect to any of our current or future properties will reveal:

 

   

all or the full extent of potential environmental liabilities;

 

   

that any prior owner or operator of a property did not create any material environmental condition unknown to us;

 

   

that a material environmental condition does not otherwise exist as to any one or more of such properties; or

 

   

that environmental matters will not have a material adverse effect on us and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt.

Certain environmental laws impose liability on a previous owner of property to the extent that hazardous or toxic substances were present during the prior ownership period. A transfer of the property does not relieve an owner of such liability. Thus, we may have liability with respect to properties previously sold by our predecessors or by us.

There have been a number of lawsuits against owners and managers of multifamily properties alleging personal injury and property damage caused by the presence of mold in residential real estate. Some of these lawsuits have resulted in substantial monetary judgments or settlements. Insurance carriers have reacted to these liability awards by excluding mold related claims from standard policies and pricing mold endorsements separately. We have obtained a separate pollution insurance policy that covers mold-related claims and have adopted programs designed to minimize the existence of mold in any of our properties as well as guidelines for promptly addressing and resolving reports of mold. To the extent not covered by our pollution policy, the presence of significant mold could expose us to liability from residents and others if property damage, health concerns, or allegations thereof, arise.

Risks Associated with Payment of Taxable Stock Dividends

We may in the future choose to pay dividends in our own stock, in which case you may be required to pay tax in excess of the cash you receive.

We may distribute taxable dividends that are partially payable in cash and partially payable in our stock. Under recent IRS guidance, up to 90% of any such taxable dividend with respect to calendar years 2009 through

 

16


2012, and in some cases declared as late as December 31, 2013, could be payable in our stock if certain conditions are met. Taxable stockholders receiving such dividends will be required to include the full amount of the dividend as ordinary income to the extent of our current and accumulated earnings and profits for United States federal income tax purposes. As a result, a U.S. stockholder may be required to pay tax with respect to such dividends in excess of the cash received. If a U.S. stockholder sells the stock it receives as a dividend in order to pay this tax, the sales proceeds may be less than the amount included in income with respect to the dividend, depending on the market price of our stock at the time of the sale. Furthermore, with respect to non-U.S. stockholders, we may be required to withhold U.S. tax with respect to such dividends, including in respect of all or a portion of such dividend that is payable in stock. In addition, if a significant number of our stockholders determine to sell shares of our stock in order to pay taxes owed on dividends, such sales may put downward pressure on the trading price of our stock.

Risks Associated with Our Disclosure Controls and Procedures and Internal Control over Financial Reporting

Our business could be adversely impacted if we have deficiencies in our disclosure controls and procedures or internal control over financial reporting.

The design and effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting may not prevent all errors, misstatements or misrepresentations. While management continues to review the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting, we can not assure you that our disclosure controls and procedures or internal control over financial reporting will be effective in accomplishing all control objectives all of the time. Deficiencies, particularly material weaknesses, in internal control over financial reporting which may occur in the future could result in misstatements of our results of operations, restatements of our financial statements, a decline in our stock price, or otherwise materially adversely affect our business, reputation, results of operation, financial condition or liquidity.

Ranking of Securities and Subordination of Claims

A portion of our operations is conducted through our subsidiaries, including the operating company. Our cash flow and the consequent ability to make distributions and other payments on our equity securities and to service our debt will be partially dependent upon the earnings of our subsidiaries and the distribution of those earnings to us, or upon loans or other payments of funds made by our subsidiaries to us. In addition, debt or other arrangements of our subsidiaries may impose restrictions that affect, among other things, our subsidiaries’ ability to pay dividends or make other distributions or loans to us.

Likewise, a portion of our consolidated assets is owned by our subsidiaries, effectively subordinating certain of our unsecured indebtedness to all existing and future liabilities, including indebtedness, trade payables, lease obligations and guarantees of our subsidiaries. The operating company has guaranteed amounts due under our unsecured credit facility with a syndicate of banks. The operating company and other of our subsidiaries may also, from time to time, guarantee other of our indebtedness. Therefore, our rights and the rights of our creditors, including the holders of other unsecured indebtedness, to participate in the assets of any subsidiary upon the latter’s liquidation or reorganization will be subject to the prior claims of such subsidiary’s creditors, except to the extent that we may ourselves be a creditor with recognized claims against the subsidiary, in which case our claims would still be effectively subordinate to any security interests in or mortgages or other liens on the assets of such subsidiary and would be subordinate to any indebtedness of such subsidiary senior to that held by us.

Provisions in our Charter and Bylaws that Could Limit a Change in Control or Deter a Takeover

In order to maintain our qualification as a REIT, not more than 50% in value of our outstanding capital stock may be owned, actually or constructively, by five or fewer individuals (as defined in the Internal Revenue

 

17


Code to include certain entities). In order to protect us against risk of losing our status as a REIT due to a concentration of ownership among our shareholders, our charter provides that any shareholder must, upon demand, disclose to our board of directors in writing such information with respect to such shareholder’s direct and indirect ownership of the shares of our stock as we deem necessary to permit us to comply or to verify compliance with the REIT provisions of the Internal Revenue Code, or the requirements of any other taxing authority. Our charter further provides, among other things, that if our board of directors determines, in good faith, that direct or indirect ownership of BRE stock has or may become concentrated to an extent that would prevent us from qualifying as a REIT, our board of directors may prevent the transfer of BRE stock or call for redemption (by lot or other means affecting one or more shareholders selected in the sole discretion of our board of directors) a number of shares of BRE stock sufficient in the opinion of our board of directors to maintain or bring the direct or indirect ownership of BRE stock into conformity with the requirements for maintaining REIT status. These limitations may have the effect of precluding acquisition of control of us by a third party without consent of our board of directors.

In addition, certain other provisions contained in our charter and bylaws may have the effect of discouraging a third-party from making an acquisition proposal for us and may thereby inhibit a change in control. Our charter includes provisions granting our board of directors the authority to issue preferred stock from time to time and to establish the terms, preferences and rights of such preferred stock without the approval of our shareholders, restrictions on our shareholders’ ability to remove directors and fill vacancies on our board of directors, restrictions on unsolicited business combinations and restrictions on our shareholders’ ability to amend our charter. Our bylaws contain restrictions on our shareholders’ ability to call special meetings of our board of directors and to take action without a meeting, provisions granting our board of directors the power to amend our bylaws, provisions allowing our board of directors to increase its size, and restrictions on the transfer of shares of our capital stock with respect to the preservation of our REIT status. Such provisions may deter tender offers for BRE stock, which offers may be attractive to our shareholders, or deter purchases of large blocks of BRE stock, thereby limiting the opportunity for shareholders to receive a premium for their shares of BRE stock over then-prevailing market prices.

Tax Risks

Risks related to our REIT status.

We believe we have operated and intend to continue operating in a manner that will allow us to qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes under the Internal Revenue Code. However, we cannot assure you that we have in fact operated, or will be able to continue to operate, in a manner so as to qualify, or remain qualified, as a REIT. Qualification as a REIT involves the application of highly technical and complex Internal Revenue Code provisions, for which there are only limited judicial or administrative interpretations, and the determination of various factual matters and circumstances not entirely within our control. For example, in order to qualify as a REIT, we must satisfy a number of requirements, including requirements regarding the composition of our assets and a requirement that at least 95% of our gross income in any year must be derived from qualifying sources, such as “rents from real property.” Also, we must make distributions to shareholders aggregating annually at least 90% of our net taxable income, excluding net capital gains. In addition, legislation, new regulations, administrative interpretations or court decisions may materially adversely affect our investors, our ability to qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes or the desirability of an investment in a REIT relative to other investments.

Even if we qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes, we may be subject to some federal, state and local taxes on our income or property and, in certain cases, a 100% penalty tax, in the event we sell property as a dealer.

If we fail to qualify as a REIT, we will be subject to federal income tax (including any applicable alternative minimum tax) on our taxable income at corporate rates, which would likely have a material adverse effect on us,

 

18


our share price and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and pay amounts due on our debt. In addition, unless entitled to relief under certain statutory provisions, we would also be disqualified from treatment as a REIT for the four taxable years following the year during which qualification was lost. This treatment would reduce funds available for investment or distribution to our shareholders because of the additional tax liability to us for the year or years involved. In addition, we would no longer be required to make distributions to our shareholders. To the extent that distributions to our shareholders would have been made in anticipation of qualifying as a REIT, we might be required to borrow funds or to liquidate certain investments to pay the applicable tax. Finally, we cannot assure you that new legislation, new regulations, administrative interpretations or court decisions will not change the tax laws with respect to qualification as a REIT or the federal income tax consequences of such qualification.

 

Item 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

 

Item 2. PROPERTIES

General

In addition to the information in this Item 2, certain information regarding our property portfolio is contained in Schedule III (financial statement schedule) under Part IV, Item 15(a) (2).

Multifamily Property Data

Our multifamily properties represent 99% of our real estate portfolio and 99% of our total revenue.

 

Multifamily Properties

   2010     2009     2008     2007     2006  

Percentage of total portfolio at cost, as of December 31

     99     99     99     99     99

Percentage of total revenues, for the year ended December 31

     99     99     99     99     99

No single multifamily property accounted for more than 10% of total revenues in any of the five years ended December 31, 2010.

This table summarizes information about our 2010 operating multifamily properties and includes properties acquired during 2010 and properties in various phases of lease up:

 

Market

   Number of
Communities
     Units      Percentage
of
Revenue1
    Percentage
of NOI1
    Occupancy2     Market
Rent3
 

San Diego

     14         4,152         21     23     95.4   $ 1,484   

San Francisco Bay Area

     13         3,765         19     20     92.0   $ 1,629   

Orange County

     12         3,789         19     19     95.9   $ 1,501   

Los Angeles

     13         3,047         15     15     95.3   $ 1,501   

Seattle

     13         3,456         14     13     93.8   $ 1,209   

Inland Empire

     7         1,807         8     7     95.9   $ 1,237   

Sacramento

     1         400         1     1     96.4   $ 1,151   

Phoenix

     2         902         3     2     95.8   $ 858   
                                                  

Total/Weighted Average

     75         21,318         100     100     94.6   $ 1,417   

 

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The following table discloses certain operating data about our consolidated multifamily units:

 

     December 31,  
     2010     2009     2008     2007     2006  

Total number of units

     21,318        21,245        21,196        21,808        22,680   

Portfolio occupancy4

     95     95     94     94     94

Market rent per unit 3

   $ 1,417      $ 1,475      $ 1,528      $ 1,424      $ 1,363   

Total number of properties

     75        73        72        77        81   

 

 

1

Represents the aggregate revenue and net operating income (NOI) from properties in each market divided by the total revenue and net operating income of multifamily properties for the year ended December 31, 2010. Excludes revenue and NOI from properties sold in 2010 and income from unconsolidated joint ventures.

2

Represents average physical occupancy for all properties for the twelve months ended December 31, 2010. The total is a weighted average by units for all communities shown.

3

Represents average prevailing gross market rent per unit for the twelve months ended December 31, 2010. The total is a weighted average by units for all communities shown.

4

Portfolio occupancy is calculated by dividing the total occupied units by the total units in the portfolio at the end of the year. Apartment units are generally leased to residents for rental terms not exceeding one year.

The following table summarizes our “same-store” operating results. “Same-store” properties are defined as properties that have been completed, stabilized and owned by us for at least two years.

 

     December 31,  
     2010     2009     2008     2007     2006  

Number of same-store units

     18,914        19,572        19,053        19,233        19,104   

Same-store units % of total units

     89     92     90     89     84

Same-store revenue change

     (2.0 %)      (3.9 %)      3.4     5.0     6.2

Same-store expense change

     1.7     1.9     4.0     1.5     7.0

Same-store NOI change

     (3.7 %)      (6.4 %)      3.2     6.5     5.9

Our business focus is the ownership, development and operation of multifamily communities; we evaluate performance and allocate resources primarily based on the net operating income (“NOI”) of an individual multifamily community. We define NOI as the excess of all revenue generated by the community (primarily rental revenue) less direct real estate expenses. Accordingly, NOI does not take into account community-specific costs such as depreciation, capitalized expenditures and interest expense. NOI, including NOI from discontinued operations, totaled approximately $243,000,000, $243,000,000, and $268,000,000 for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009, and 2008, respectively.

A reconciliation of net income available to common shareholders to NOI for the three years ended December 31 is as follows:

 

     Years ended December 31  
(amounts in thousands)    2010     2009     2008  

Net income available to common shareholders

   $ 41,576      $ 50,642      $ 122,760   

Interest expense, including discontinued operations

     84,894        82,734        92,067   

Provision for depreciation, including discontinued operations

     94,384        88,419        81,459   

Redeemable noncontrolling interests in income

     1,446        1,885        2,291   

Net gain on sales of discontinued operations

     (40,111     (21,574     (65,984

General and administrative expense

     20,570        17,390        20,578   

Dividends attributable to preferred stock

     11,813        11,813        11,813   

Other expenses

     5,298        13,522        5,719   

Net loss/(gain) on extinguishment of debt

     23,507        (1,470     (2,364
                        

Net operating income

   $ 243,377      $ 243,361      $ 268,339   
                        

 

20


We consider community level and portfolio-wide NOI to be an appropriate supplemental measure to net income because it helps both investors and management to understand the core property operations prior to the allocation of any corporate-level property management overhead or general and administrative costs. This is more reflective of the operating performance of the real estate, and allows for an easier comparison of the operating performance of single assets or groups of assets. In addition, because prospective buyers of real estate have different overhead structures, with varying marginal impact to overhead by acquiring real estate, NOI is considered by many in the real estate industry to be a useful measure for determining the value of a real estate asset or groups of assets.

However, because NOI excludes depreciation and does not capture the change in the value of our communities resulting from operational use and market conditions, nor the level of capital expenditures required to adequately maintain the communities (all of which have real economic effect and could materially impact our results from operations), the utility of NOI as a measure of our performance is limited. Other equity REITs may not calculate NOI consistently with our definition and, accordingly, our NOI may not be comparable to such other REITs’ NOI. As a result, NOI should be considered only as a supplement to net income as a measure of our performance. NOI should not be used as a measure of our liquidity, nor is it indicative of funds available to fund our cash needs, including our ability to pay dividends or make distributions. NOI also should not be used as a supplement to or substitute for cash flow from operating activities (computed in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States “GAAP”).

Development Properties

The following table provides data on our six multifamily properties that were under various stages of development and construction at December 31, 2010. Completion of the development properties is subject to a number of risks and uncertainties, including construction delays and cost overruns. We cannot assure that these properties will be completed, or that they will be completed by the estimated dates, or for the estimated amounts, or will contain the number of proposed units shown in the table below. In addition to the properties below, we have made predevelopment investments and deposits on five potential projects totaling approximately $12,300,000. The deposits and predevelopment costs are reported in Other assets on the Consolidated Balance Sheet.

 

(Dollar amounts in millions)

Property Name

  

Location

     Proposed
Number of
Units
     Costs Incurred
to Date—
December 31,
2010
     Estimated
Total
Cost
     Estimated
Cost to
Complete
     Estimated
Completion
Date1
 

Construction in Progress

                 

Lawrence Station

     Sunnyvale, CA         336       $ 29.1       $ 110.6       $ 81.5         1Q/2013   
                                         

Total Construction in Progress

        336       $ 29.1       $ 110.6       $ 81.5      

Property Name

  

Location

     Proposed
Number of
Units
     Costs Incurred
to Date -
December 31,
2010
     Estimated
Total
Cost4
               

Land Owned2

                 

Wilshire La Brea3

     Los Angeles, CA         470       $ 108.3         TBR         

Pleasanton

     Pleasanton, CA         240         16.4         TBR         

Park Viridian II

     Anaheim, CA         250         27.1         TBR         

Town and Country

     Sunnyvale, CA         280         26.3         TBR         

Aviara5

     Mercer Island, WA         166         5.5         TBR         
                                   

Total Land Owned

        1,406       $ 183.6       $ 635.5         
                                   

 

1

“Completion” is defined as our estimate of when an entire project will have a final certificate of occupancy issued and be ready for occupancy.

 

21


2

Land owned represents projects in various stages of entitlement, pre-development, development, and initial construction, for which construction or supply contracts have not yet been finalized. As these contracts are finalized, projects are transferred to construction in progress on our consolidated balance sheet.

3

Project’s estimated cost reflects the construction of 470 units and 40,000 square feet of retail. The estimated unit count and costs reflect the current underlying entitlements associated with the site.

4

Reflects the aggregate cost estimates; specific property cost estimates to be reported (TBR) once entitlement approvals are received and the company is prepared to begin construction.

5

During the fourth quarter, the company entered into a ground lease for the Mercer Island site. The ground lease has an initial term of 60 years, two 15-year extensions followed by a 9-year extension. The annualized GAAP straight line lease expense is approximately $664,000.

Insurance, Property Taxes and Income Tax Basis

We carry comprehensive liability, fire, pollution, extended coverage and rental loss insurance on our properties with certain policy specifications, limits and deductibles. In addition, at December 31, 2010, we carried flood and earthquake coverage with an annual aggregate limit of $90,000,000 (after policy deductibles ranging from 2%-5% of damages). Management believes the properties are adequately covered by such insurance.

Property taxes on portfolio properties are assessed on asset values based on the valuation method and tax rate used by the respective jurisdictions. The gross carrying value of our direct investments in operating rental properties was $3,464,466,000 as of December 31, 2010. On the same date our assets had an underlying federal income tax basis of approximately $3,352,051,000, reflecting, among other factors, the carryover of basis on tax-deferred exchanges.

Headquarters

We lease our corporate headquarters at 525 Market Street, 4th Floor, San Francisco, California, 94105-2712, from Knickerbocker Properties, Inc., a Delaware corporation. The lease covers 28,339 rentable square feet at annual per square foot rents, which were $24.00 as of December 31, 2010. The lease term ends on February 1, 2016. We also maintain leased regional offices in: Seattle, Washington; Emeryville, Irvine and San Diego, California; Phoenix, Arizona; and Denver, Colorado.

 

Item 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

The Company is involved in various legal actions arising in the ordinary course of business. As of December 31, 2010, there were no pending legal proceedings to which we are a party or of which any of our properties is the subject, which management anticipates would have a material adverse effect upon our consolidated financial condition and results of operations. See Note 16 to the consolidated financial statements for further detail or recent legal proceedings.

 

Item 4. (REMOVED AND RESERVED)

 

22


PART II

 

Item 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED SHAREHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Our common stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “BRE”. As of January 31, 2011, there were approximately 3,216 record holders of BRE’s common stock and the last reported sales price on the NYSE was $44.65. The number of holders does not include shares held of record by a broker or clearing agency, but does include each such broker or clearing agency as one record holder. As of January 31, 2011, there were approximately 20,584 beneficial holders of BRE’s common stock.

This table shows the high and low sales prices of our common stock reported on the NYSE Composite Tape and the dividends we paid for each common share:

 

     Years ended December 31,  
     2010      2009  
     Stock Price      Dividends
Paid
     Stock Price      Dividends
Paid
 
     High      Low         High      Low     

First Quarter

   $ 37.66       $ 30.37       $ 0.3750       $ 28.70       $ 17.04       $ 0.5625   

Second Quarter

   $ 43.50       $ 34.92       $ 0.3750       $ 26.81       $ 18.92       $ 0.5625   

Third Quarter

   $ 43.47       $ 35.09       $ 0.3750       $ 32.77       $ 20.01       $ 0.3750   

Fourth Quarter

   $ 46.38       $ 41.01       $ 0.3750       $ 35.21       $ 26.77       $ 0.3750   

Since 1970, when BRE was founded, we have made regular and uninterrupted quarterly distributions to shareholders. The payment of distributions by BRE is at the discretion of the Board of Directors and depends on numerous factors, including our cash flow, financial condition and capital requirements, REIT provisions of the Internal Revenue Code and other factors.

Operating company units in BRE Property Investors LLC converted into shares of BRE common stock or redeemed for cash totaled 155,634 and 10,674 for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively. As of December 31, 2010, 615,155 operating company units remain outstanding.

Equity Compensation Plan Information

The following table sets forth information as of December 31, 2010 for all of our equity compensation plans, including our Amended and Restated 1992 Employee Stock Plan, our 1999 Stock Incentive Plan and our Fifth Amended and Restated Non-Employee Director Stock Option and Restricted Stock Plan:

 

     Number of
Securities to be Issued upon
Exercise of Outstanding
Options, Warrants

and Rights
    Weighted Average
Exercise Price of
Outstanding Options,
Warrants and Rights

($)
    Number of Securities Remaining
Available for Future Issuance  under
Equity Compensation Plans
Excluding Securities Reflected in
Column (a)
 

Plan Category

     (a)        (b)        (c)   

Equity compensation plans approved by security holders

     877,761      $ 34.62        1,716,328   

Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders

     —          —          —     

Total

     877,761      $ 34.62        1,716,328   

 

23


COMPARATIVE STOCK PERFORMANCE

The line graph below compares the cumulative total shareholder return on BRE Common Stock for the last five years with the cumulative total return on the S&P 500 Index and the Morgan Stanley REIT Index over the same period. This comparison assumes that the value of the investment in the Common Stock and in each index was $100 on December 31, 2005 and that all dividends were reinvested (1).

BRE Properties, Inc.

LOGO

 

Index

   12/31/2005      12/31/2006      12/31/2007      12/31/2008      12/31/2009      12/31/2010  

BRE Properties, Inc.

     100         148.20         96.14         70.22         89.48         122.18   

S&P 500

     100         135.06         113.87         70.91         90.76         116.12   

MSCI US REIT (RMS)

     100         115.79         122.16         76.96         97.33         111.99   

 

(1)

Common Stock performance data is provided by SNL Securities and is calculated using the ex-dividend date.

(2)

Indicates appreciation of $100 invested on December 31, 2005 in BRE Common Stock, S&P 500, and Morgan Stanley REIT Index securities, assuming reinvestment of dividends discussed above.

 

24


Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities; Use of Proceeds from Unregistered Securities

During the year ended December 31, 2010, an aggregate 79,537 limited partnership units in BRE Property Investors LLC were redeemed for cash. The redemption value was calculated by multiplying the number of units redeemed times the 10 day average closing price of BRE’s common stock prior to the redemption date. In addition, 76,097 limited partnership units were converted into shares of BRE common stock with a one to one exchange ratio.

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

    (a) Total Number  of
Shares

(or Units) Purchased1
    (b) Average Price
Paid per Share
(or Unit)2
    (c) Total Number
of Shares (or
Units) Purchased
as Part of Publicly
Announced Plans
or Programs
    (d) Maximum Number (or
Approximate Dollar Value) of

Shares (or Units) that May Yet
Be Purchased Under the Plans or
Programs
 

January 1, 2010 though
March 31, 2010

    74,277        32.27        —          —     

April 1, 2010 though
June 30, 2010

    282,989        55.05        —          —     

July 1, 2010 though

September 30, 2010

    31,068        41.40        —          —     

October 1, 2010 though December 31, 2010

    5,754,930        55.85        —          —     

Total

    6,143,264        55.45        —          —     

 

1

Includes an aggregate of 121,169 shares withheld to pay taxes and 6,022,095 shares of common stock, which represents the maximum number of shares of common stock that could be issuable upon conversion of the $336,334,000 4.125% convertible senior notes that were tendered for during 2010 at a maximum conversion rate of 17.9051 common shares per $1,000 principal amount of notes.

2

Average price paid per share owned and forfeited by shareholder.

 

25


Item 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The selected financial data below should be read in conjunction with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and the consolidated financial statements and notes. The results are affected by numerous acquisitions and dispositions as discussed in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” Therefore, the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included elsewhere in this report are not directly comparable to prior years.

 

    2010     2009     2008     2007     2006  
    (Amounts in thousands, except per share data)  

Operating Results

         

Rental and ancillary revenues

  $ 341,973      $ 326,180      $ 325,898      $ 302,788      $ 276,871   

Revenues from discontinued operations

    12,458        22,666        43,200        51,853        59,743   

Income from unconsolidated entities and other income

    5,112        5,788        10,445        7,920        27,972   

Total revenues

  $ 359,543      $ 354,634      $ 379,543      $ 362,561      $ 364,586   

Net income available to common shareholders

  $ 41,576      $ 50,642      $ 122,760      $ 103,607      $ 100,350   

Plus:

         

Net gain on sales of discontinued operations

    (40,111     (21,574     (65,984     (55,957     (38,302

Depreciation from continuing operations

    91,784        82,905        74,723        69,770        63,763   

Depreciation from discontinued operations

    2,600        5,514        6,736        10,179        11,071   

Depreciation related to unconsolidated entities

    1,991        1,841        1,715        1,285        844   

Redeemable noncontrolling interest in income convertible into common shares

    1,026        1,461        1,868        1,857        1,976   

Funds from operations (FFO)1

  $ 98,866      $ 120,789      $ 141,818      $ 130,741      $ 139,702   

Net cash flows generated by operating activities

  $ 140,719      $ 130,683      $ 167,010      $ 157,896      $ 171,641   

Net cash flows used in investing activities

  $ (197,261   $ (80,537   $ (47,820   $ (216,391   $ (97,077

Net cash flows generated by (used in) financing activities

  $ 57,243      $ (52,214   $ (118,418   $ 55,365      $ (83,025

Dividends paid to common and preferred shareholder distributions to noncontrolling interests

  $ 106,770      $ 114,379      $ 130,129      $ 128,092      $ 125,994   

Weighted average shares outstanding—basic

    61,420        52,760        51,050        50,735        50,925   

Dilutive effect of stock based awards on EPS

    —          1        390        790        1,045   

Weighted average shares outstanding—diluted (EPS)

    61,420        52,761        51,440        51,525        51,970   

Dilutive effect of stock based awards on FFO only

    175        —          —          —          —     

Plus—Operating Company Units2

    685        780        830        870        975   

Weighted average shares outstanding—diluted (FFO)

    62,280        53,541        52,270        52,395        52,945   

Operating company units outstanding at end of period

    615        771        780        845        959   

Net income per share—basic

  $ 0.67      $ 0.95      $ 2.38      $ 2.03      $ 1.96   

Net income per share—assuming dilution

  $ 0.67      $ 0.95      $ 2.36      $ 2.00      $ 1.92   

Dividends paid to common shareholders

  $ 1.50      $ 1.88      $ 2.25      $ 2.15      $ 2.05   

Balance sheet information and other data

         

Real estate portfolio, net of depreciation

  $ 3,097,528      $ 2,915,565      $ 2,911,295      $ 2,884,206      $ 2,752,913   

Total assets

  $ 3,156,247      $ 2,980,008      $ 2,992,744      $ 2,954,166      $ 2,823,023   

Total debt

  $ 1,792,918      $ 1,867,075      $ 1,902,401      $ 1,887,862      $ 1,631,132   

Redeemable noncontrolling interests

  $ 34,866      $ 33,605      $ 29,972      $ 42,357      $ 136,948   

Shareholders’ equity

  $ 1,276,393      $ 1,022,919      $ 969,204      $ 943,542      $ 977,750   

 

26


 

1

FFO is used by industry analysts and investors as a supplemental performance measure of an equity REIT. FFO is defined by the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts as net income or loss (computed in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States) excluding extraordinary items as defined under GAAP and gains or losses from sales of previously depreciated real estate assets, plus depreciation and amortization of real estate assets and adjustments for unconsolidated partnerships and joint ventures. We calculate FFO in accordance with the NAREIT definition.

We believe that FFO is a meaningful supplemental measure of our operating performance because historical cost accounting for real estate assets in accordance with GAAP assumes that the value of real estate assets diminishes predictably over time, as reflected through depreciation. Because real estate values have historically risen or fallen with market conditions, management considers FFO an appropriate supplemental performance measure because it excludes historical cost depreciation, as well as gains or losses related to sales of previously depreciated property, from GAAP net income. By excluding depreciation and gains or losses on sales of real estate, management uses FFO to measure returns on its investments in real estate assets. However, because FFO excludes depreciation and amortization and captures neither the changes in the value of our properties that result from use or market conditions nor the level of capital expenditures to maintain the operating performance of our properties, all of which have real economic effect and could materially impact our results from operations, the utility of FFO as a measure of our performance is limited. Management also believes that FFO, combined with the required GAAP presentations, is useful to investors in providing more meaningful comparisons of the operating performance of a company’s real estate between periods or as compared to other companies. FFO does not represent net income or cash flows from operations as defined by GAAP and is not intended to indicate whether cash flows will be sufficient to fund cash needs. It should not be considered an alternative to net income as an indicator of a REIT’s operating performance or to cash flows as a measure of liquidity. Our FFO may not be comparable to the FFO of other REITs due to the fact that not all REITs use the NAREIT definition or apply/interpret the definition differently.

 

2

Under earnings per share guidance, common share equivalents deemed to be anti-dilutive are excluded from the diluted per share calculations

 

27


Item 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Executive Summary

We are a self-administered equity real estate investment trust, or REIT, focused on the ownership, operation, development, and acquisition of apartment communities. Our operating and investment activities are primarily focused on the major metropolitan markets within the state of California, and Seattle, Washington. We also own and operate apartment communities in Phoenix, Arizona and Denver, Colorado. At December 31, 2010, our portfolio had real estate assets with a net book value of approximately $3.1 billion that included 75 wholly or majority owned completed apartment communities, aggregating 21,318 units; thirteen multifamily communities owned in joint ventures, comprised of 4,080 apartment units; and six apartment communities in various stages of construction and development. We earn revenue and generate operating cash flow primarily by collecting monthly rent from our apartment residents.

When compared to 2009, our 2010 annual results reflect the impact of the severe economic recession experienced by the U.S. economy from December 2007 through June 2009. During 2009, we experienced a decline in effective rental rates on leases signed throughout the year. This decline negatively impacted our results in 2010 as leases signed in 2009, but which expired in 2010, were renewed at lower effective rental rates.

Recognizing both the impact of this trend and the nascent stage of the economic recovery, we entered 2010 with a cautious outlook. Our operating results for the year exceeded our initial expectations, however, as we benefited from improving confidence among renters which resulted in lower levels of resident turnover, strong occupancy levels and the ability to raise effective rents sooner than anticipated. BRE’s 2010 same store property revenue and net operating income decreased 2.0% and 3.7%, respectively, in 2010 after declining 3.9% and 6.4%, respectively, in 2009. As the percentage decline in effective rental rates improved throughout 2010 due to a recovery in operating fundamentals, we experienced year-over-year quarterly revenue growth during the fourth quarter for the first time since the third quarter of 2008. Occupancy levels averaged 95.7% throughout 2010 compared to 94.3% in 2009 and resident turnover slowed to 61% from 65% in 2009.

During 2010, we acquired four operating communities consisting of 1,037 units and each located within California (two in San Jose, one in Los Angeles and one in San Diego) for an aggregate purchase price of $292,100,000. In addition, we acquired for a purchase price of $19,000,000 a parcel of land in Sunnyvale, California which can support the future development of approximately 280 units. We also disposed of four communities (three in the Inland Empire region of California and one in Seattle, Washington) for combined gross proceeds of approximately $167,326,000. The dispositions produced gains on the sales totaling $40,111,000. The acquisition and disposition activity in 2010 reflects the company’s strategy of concentrating its investments in coastal metropolitan areas which we believe possess stronger long-term growth prospects and reducing its exposure in the eastern portion of the Inland Empire which we believe does not retain the same long-term growth prospects as our coastal markets.

We also continued to strengthen our financial position and balance sheet flexibility during 2010. Through a combination of common equity issuance, debt financing and property dispositions, we raised over $800,000,000 in capital. The proceeds from these activities were used to fund investment activity, refinance near-term debt maturities and reduce our overall level of leverage.

Job growth and wage gains disproportionately influence our operating performance relative to other factors. Job growth typically translates into new households which in turn drives demand for apartment housing. Similarly, when job losses occur, household levels contract. During 2010, 28,400 jobs were added in our operating markets compared to a loss of 957,300 jobs in 2009. At the end of 2010, unemployment in California stood at 12.5% compared to 12.3% at year-end 2009.

As the economic environment improves, we believe our communities are well-positioned to take advantage of the favorable demographic factors that are expected to produce strong levels of revenue growth for apartment

 

28


owners in the coming years. These factors include: (1) increases in overall population levels among the age cohort with the greatest tendency to rent (age 20 to 34 years old); (2) a greater propensity to rent among all age groups as a result of the psychology and financial impact on homeownership rates coming out of this past recession; and (3) low levels of new supply of apartment communities from development activities in our core markets.

To better understand our overall results, our 75 wholly or majority owned apartment communities can be characterized as follows:

 

   

18,914 units in 66 communities were owned, completed and stabilized for all of 2010 and 2009 (“same-store”) communities;

 

   

1,367 units in five development communities were experiencing lease up and stabilization during 2010 and 2009 and as a result did not have comparable year-over-year operating results (“non same-store”); and

 

   

1,037 units in four communities acquired during 2010 and as a result did not have comparable year-over-year operating results (“non same-store”).

In addition to year-over-year economic operating performance, our results of operations for the three years ended December 31, 2010 were affected by income derived from acquisitions and completions of apartment communities, offset by the cost of capital associated with financing these transactions. Our book capitalization grew to $3.1 billion at December 31, 2010 from $3.0 billion at December 31, 2007, reflecting capital raised through offerings of debt and equity.

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Comparison of the Years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008

Revenues

Total revenues were $359,543,000 in 2010, $354,634,000 in 2009 and $379,543,000 in 2008, including revenues from discontinued operations. The increase in rental income in 2010 was derived from properties developed and acquired (non same-store properties). A summary of revenues for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008 follows:

 

     2010 Total      % of Total
Revenues
    2009 Total      % of Total
Revenues
    2008 Total      % of Total
Revenues
 

Rental income

   $ 329,280,000         92   $ 313,987,000         89   $ 313,118,000         83

Ancillary income

     12,693,000         4     12,193,000         3     12,780,000         3

Revenues from discontinued operations

     12,458,000         3     22,666,000         6     43,200,000         11
                                 

Total Rental and Ancillary income

     354,431,000           348,846,000           369,098,000      
                                 

Unconsolidated income

     2,178,000         —       2,329,000         1     2,560,000         1

Other income

     2,934,000         1     3,459,000         1     7,885,000         2
                                                   

Total revenue

   $ 359,543,000         100   $ 354,634,000         100   $ 379,543,000         100
                                                   

 

29


Rental and Ancillary Income

Non same-store communities increased rental and ancillary revenues by $22,200,000 and $12,321,000 for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively. In 2010, on a “same-store” basis, rental and ancillary revenues decreased $6,407,000, or 2.0%, primarily due to a decrease in monthly revenue earned per unit. Average monthly revenue earned per occupied unit in the “same-store” portfolio decreased to $1,423 per unit from $1,474, or 3.5%, in 2010. The decrease in monthly revenue earned per unit was offset by an increase in same-store occupancy levels from 94.3% in 2009 to 95.7% in 2010. In 2009, on a “same-store” basis, rental and ancillary revenues decreased (12,039,000), primarily due to negative market rent trends.

 

     2010
Change
    2009
Change
 

Same-store Communities

   $ (6,407,000   $ (12,039,000

Non same-store Communities

     22,200,000        12,321,000   
                

Total change in rental and ancillary revenues from continuing operations

   $ 15,793,000      $ 282,000   
                

As described above, a portion of the increase in rental and ancillary revenues relates to acquired and developed communities. The following table summarizes our multifamily property development completed and dispositions:

 

     Year Ended December 31,  
     2010      2009      2008  

Total cost of development properties completed

   $ 119,698,000       $ 282,934,000       $ 249,076,000   

# of units completed

     566         801         872   

Total cost of properties acquired

   $ 292,100,000         —           —     

# of units acquired

     1,037         —           —     

Approximate gross sales proceeds of dispositions

   $ 167,327,000       $ 67,000,000       $ 167,320,000   

# of units sold

     1,530         752         1,484   

 

     2010     2009     2008  

Number of wholly or majority owned operating properties at December 31,

     75        73        72   

Average portfolio physical occupancy rates for operating properties

     95     95     94

Portfolio occupancy is calculated by dividing the total occupied units by the total units in stabilized communities in the portfolio.

Other income

Other income totaled $2,934,000, $3,459,000 and $7,885,000 for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively, and is comprised of the following:

 

     2010      2009      2008  

Management Fees

   $ 1,715,000       $ 1,700,000       $ 1,726,000   

Interest Income

     555,000         650,000         580,000   

Legal or insurance settlements

     530,000         640,000         4,400,000 (1) 

Escrow deposit forfeiture

     —           —           1,007,000 (2) 

Other

     134,000         469,000         172,000   
                          

Total

   $ 2,934,000       $ 3,459,000       $ 7,885,000   

 

(1)

Litigation settlement proceeds related to Pinnacle Galleria.

(2)

Forfeited escrow deposit on an asset held for sale that failed to close.

 

30


Expenses

Real estate expenses

The summary of real estate expenses, excluding discontinued operations is as follows:

 

     Year ended December 31,  
     2010     2009     2008  

Real estate expenses

   $ 111,326,000      $ 102,734,000      $ 95,764,000   

Real estate expenses as a percent of rental and ancillary income from continuing operations

     33     31     29

“Same-store” expense % change

     1.7     1.9     4.0

Real estate expenses for multifamily rental properties (which include repairs and maintenance, utilities, on-site staff payroll, property taxes, insurance, advertising and other direct operating expenses) increased $8,592,000, or 8.4%, for the year ended December 31, 2010, as compared to the prior year. The primary driver of overall expense increase was non same-store properties that were acquired or recently delivered. Expenses have increased as a percentage of total revenues in recent years due to downward trends on market rents. Same-store expenses increased $1,621,000, or 1.7%, $1,831,000, or 1.9%, and $3,580,000, or 4.0%, in 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively. Real estate expenses shown in the table above exclude real estate expense from discontinued operations which totaled $4,840,000, $8,538,000 and $15,440,000 for 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively.

Provision for depreciation

The provision for depreciation totaled $91,784,000, $82,906,000 and $74,723,000 for the years ending 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively. The provision for depreciation increased $8,878,000, or 10.7%, for the year ended December 31, 2010 compared to 2009, and increased $8,182,000, or 10.9%, for the year ended December 31, 2009 compared to 2008. The increases in 2010 and 2009 resulted from higher depreciable bases on acquisitions and development properties completed.

Interest expense

During the past year, our interest expense increased primarily due to lower average debt balances to support our development activities, resulting in lower amounts of capitalized interest. Average development balances outstanding totaled $221,800,000, $307,559,000 and, $403,469,000 for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively. Weighted average cost of debt was 5.2%, 5.2% and 5.9% for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively. The summary of interest expense is as follows:

 

     Year ended December 31,  
     2010     2009     2008  

Interest on unsecured senior notes

   $ 31,440,000      $ 40,681,000      $ 66,785,000   

Interest on convertible debt

     17,661,000        24,986,000        26,885,000   

Interest on mortgage loans payable

     44,294,000        28,163,000        9,755,000   

Interest on lines of credit

     3,476,000        5,234,000        11,731,000   
                        

Total interest incurred

   $ 96,871,000      $ 99,064,000      $ 115,156,000   

Capitalized interest

     (11,977,000     (16,330,000     (23,124,000
                        

Total interest expense

   $ 84,894,000      $ 82,734,000      $ 92,032,000   
                        

 

31


Year-end debt balances at December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008 were as follows:

 

     2010     2009     2008  

Unsecured non-convertible senior notes

   $ 738,563,000      $ 469,142,000      $ 1,080,000,000   

Convertible unsecured senior notes

     34,513,000        357,776,000        425,905,000   

Mortgage loans payable

     810,842,000        752,157,000        151,496,000   

Line of credit

     209,000,000        288,000,000        245,000,000   
                        

Total debt

   $ 1,792,918,000      $ 1,867,075,000      $ 1,902,401,000   
                        

Weighted average interest rate for all
debt at end of period

     5.2     5.2     5.9
                        

General and administrative expenses

General and administrative expenses for the three years ended December 31, were as follows:

 

     2010     2009     2008  

General and administrative expenses

   $ 20,570,000      $ 17,390,000      $ 20,578,000   

Annual change as a percentage

     18.3     (15.5 )%      12.8

As a percentage of rental and ancillary revenues
(including revenues from discontinued
operations)

     5.7     5.0     5.6

The 18% increase in general and administrative expenses in 2010 is primarily related to increased levels of stock-based compensation expense during the current year. Total stock-based compensation in general and administrative expenses totaled $4,785,000, $2,596,000 and $3,530,000 during the years ending 2010, 2009, and 2008, respectively. Stock-based compensation expense during 2009 reflected the impact of decreased expectations for vesting levels of certain performance based awards due to the recessionary environment.

Office rent totaling $1,433,000, $1,405,000 and $1,164,000 for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively, is included in general and administrative expense.

Other expenses

Other expenses totaled $5,298,000, $13,522,000, and $5,719,000 for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively, and is comprised of the following:

 

     2010     2009     2008  

Acquisition costs

   $ 3,998,000 (1)      —          —     

Severance charge

     1,300,000 (2)      600,000        600,000   

Abandonment charge

     —          12,922,000 (3)      5,119,000 (4) 
                        

Total

   $ 5,298,000      $ 13,522,000      $ 5,719,000   

 

(1)

Represents costs related to acquisitions during 2010. Effective January 1, 2009, we adopted a newly issued accounting standard requiring acquisition costs be expensed as incurred. There was no acquisition activity during 2009 and 2008.

(2)

Represents one-time charge associated with the resignation of our Chief Operating Officer.

(3)

Represents an abandonment charge related to three properties under option agreements that we chose not to purchase.

(4)

Represents an abandonment charge related to three properties under option agreements that we chose not to purchase.

 

32


Redeemable noncontrolling interest in income

Redeemable noncontrolling interest in income represent the earnings attributable to the minority members of our consolidated subsidiaries and totaled $1,446,000, $1,885,000, and $2,291,000 for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively. Redeemable noncontrolling interests in income, decreased in 2010 due to a lower dividend rate, conversions of operating company units to common stock, and redemptions of operating company units for cash. Conversions and redemptions of operating company units to common shares or cash totaled 155,635, 10,674, and 63,600 units for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively.

Discontinued operations

Accounting guidance requires the results of operations for properties sold during the period or designated as held for sale at the end of the period to be classified as discontinued operations. The property-specific components of net earnings that are classified as discontinued operations include all property-related revenues and operating expenses, depreciation expense recognized prior to the classification as held for sale, and property-specific interest expense to the extent there is secured debt on the property. In addition, the net gain or loss on the eventual disposal of properties held for sale is reported as discontinued operations.

During 2010, we sold four communities totaling 1,530 units: Montebello, with 248 units located in Seattle, Washington; Boulder Creek, a 264 unit property located in Riverside, California; Pinnacle Riverwalk, a 714 unit property located in Riverside, California; and Parkside Village, a 304 unit property located in Riverside, California. The four communities were sold for gross sales proceeds of $167,327,000 resulting in a net gain on sales of approximately $40,111,000.

During 2009, we sold two communities totaling 752 units: Overlook at Blue Ravine, with 512 units located in Folsom, California; and Arbor Pointe, a 240 unit community located in Sacramento, California. The two communities were sold for an gross sales proceeds of approximately $67,000,000, resulting in a net gain on sales of approximately $21,574,000. In addition to the two communities, we sold an excess parcel of land in Santa Clara, California, classified as held for sale at December 31, 2008, for gross sales proceeds totaling $17,100,000, approximately equal to the carrying value.

During 2008, we sold six communities totaling 1,484 units: Blue Rock Village, with 560 units located in Vallejo, California; The Park at Dash Point, with 280 units located in Seattle, Washington; Pinnacle at Blue Ravine with 260 units, located in Sacramento, California; Canterbury Downs, with 173 units located in Sacramento, California; Rocklin Gold with 121 units located in Sacramento, California; and Quail Chase with 90 units located in Sacramento, California. The six communities were sold for gross sales proceeds of $167,320,000, resulting in a net gain on sale of approximately $65,984,000.

The net gain on sale and the combined results of operations for these 12 properties for each year presented are included in discontinued operations on the consolidated statements of income. These amounts totaled $45,129,000, $30,188,000, and $86,973,000 for the year ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively. There were no operating properties held for sale at December 31, 2010.

Income from unconsolidated entities

Income from unconsolidated entities totaled $2,178,000, $2,329,000 and $2,560,000 for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively. The totals for each year include our share of income from thirteen joint ventures we formed, with eight in Denver, four in Phoenix, and one in Sacramento.

 

33


Net(loss)/ gain from extinguishment of debt

Net (loss)/gain on extinguishment of debt totaled ($23,507,000), $1,470,000 and $2,364,000 for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively. The activity was driven by tender offers in 2010 and 2009, along with open market repurchases in each year. In 2009 and 2008, the repurchases were done at less than par.

During June 2010, we repurchased $15,000,000 of our 4.125% convertible senior unsecured notes at par. We recognized a net loss on early debt extinguishment of $558,000 in connection with the repurchase.

On October 13, 2010, we closed a fixed price cash tender offer for any and all of our 4.125% convertible senior unsecured notes due 2026. As a result, $321,334,000 in aggregate principal amount of our 4.125% convertible senior unsecured notes due 2026 were validly tendered, and we accepted, purchased and subsequently cancelled the notes for an aggregate purchase price of 104% of par, or approximately $334,187,360. After the tender offer an aggregate principal amount of $35,000,000 of the notes remain outstanding. We recognized a net loss on early debt extinguishment of $22,949,000 in connection with the tender offer.

On April 15, 2009, we closed a fixed price cash tender offer for any and all of our outstanding 5.750% senior notes due 2009 and any and all of our outstanding 4.875% senior notes due 2010. As a result, $61,407,000 and $119,421,000 in aggregate principal amount of the 5.750% senior notes due 2009 and 4.875% senior notes due 2010, respectively, were validly tendered and we accepted, purchased and subsequently cancelled the notes. After giving effect to the purchase of the tendered notes, an aggregate principal amount of $30,579,000 of the 4.875% senior notes due in 2010, were paid in full during the 2010. The remaining principal balance of the 5.750% senior notes due in 2009 were paid in full during September 2009, as the note came due.

On April 1, 2009, we closed a fixed price cash tender offer for any and all of our outstanding 7.450% senior notes due 2011 and any and all of our outstanding 7.125% senior notes due 2013. As a result, $201,455,000 and $89,982,000 in aggregate principal amount of the 7.450% senior notes due 2011 and 7.125% senior notes due 2013, respectively, were validly tendered and we accepted, purchased and subsequently cancelled the notes. After giving effect to the purchase of the tendered notes, an aggregate principal amount of $48,545,000 and $40,018,000 of the 7.450% senior notes due 2011 and 7.125% senior notes due 2013, respectively, remain outstanding.

During 2009, we repurchased $78,266,000 of our 4.125% convertible senior unsecured notes for an aggregate price of 92.99% of par, or approximately $72,776,000. We recognized a net gain on early extinguishment of debt of $2,870,000 in connection with the repurchase.

During 2008 we repurchased $10,400,000 of our 4.125% convertible senior unsecured notes for an aggregate price of 74.88% of par, or approximately $8,000,000. We recognized a net gain on early extinguishment of debt of $2,364,000 in connection with this repurchase.

Dividends attributable to preferred stock

Dividends for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008 attributable to preferred stock represent the dividends on our 6.75% Series C and 6.75% Series D Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Stock Dividend payments which totaled $11,813,000 for each of the years 2010, 2009 and 2008. All of our currently outstanding series of preferred stock have a $25.00 per share liquidation preference.

Net income available to common shareholders

As a result of the various factors mentioned above, net income available to common shareholders for the year ended December 31, 2010 was $41,576,000, or $0.67 per diluted share, as compared with $50,642,000, or $0.95 per diluted share, for the year ended December 31, 2009 and $122,760,000, or $2.36 per diluted share for the year ended December 31, 2008.

 

34


Liquidity and Capital Resources

Depending upon the availability and cost of external capital, we anticipate making additional investments in multifamily apartment communities. These investments are expected to be funded through a variety of sources. These sources may include internally generated cash, temporary borrowings under our revolving unsecured line of credit, proceeds from asset sales, public and private offerings of debt and equity securities, and in some cases the assumption of secured borrowings. To the extent that these additional investments are initially financed with temporary borrowings under our revolving unsecured line of credit, we anticipate that permanent financing will be provided through a combination of public and private offerings of debt and equity securities, proceeds from asset sales and secured debt. We believe our liquidity and various sources of available capital are sufficient to fund operations, meet debt service and dividend requirements, and finance future investments. Annual cash flows from operating activities exceed annual distributions to common shareholders, preferred shareholders and minority members by approximately $34,000,000, $16,000,000 and $37,000,000 for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively. Due to the timing associated with operating cash flows, there may be certain periods where cash flows generated by operating activities are less than distributions. We believe our unsecured credit facility provides adequate liquidity to address temporary cash shortfalls.

On April 7, 2010, we completed an equity offering of 8,050,000 common shares, including shares issued to cover over-allotments, at $34.25 per share. Total net proceeds from this offering were approximately $264,000,000 after deducting the underwriting discount and other offering expenses paid by the Company. The Company used the net proceeds from the offering for general corporate purposes, which included reducing borrowings under its unsecured revolving credit facility.

Effective February 24, 2010, we terminated the equity distribution agreement (EDA) we entered into on May 14, 2009 under which we could issue and sell from time to time through or to our sales agent shares of our common stock having an aggregate offering price of up to $125,000,000. During 2009, 3,801,185 shares were issued under the EDAs for gross proceeds of approximately $104,600,000 with an average gross share price of $27.52. Proceeds were used for general corporate purposes, which included reducing borrowings under our unsecured credit facility, the repayment of other indebtedness, the redemption or other repurchase of outstanding securities and funding for development activities. During 2010, there were no shares issued under the equity distribution agreement entered into on May 14, 2009.

On February 24, 2010, we entered into new Equity Distribution Agreements (EDAs) under which we may issue and sell from time to time through or to its sales agents shares of our common stock having an aggregate offering price of up to $250,000,000. During 2010, 581,055 shares were issued under the EDAs for gross proceeds of approximately $25,000,000 with an average gross share price of $43.02. Proceeds were used for general corporate purposes, which included reducing borrowings under our unsecured credit facility, the repayment of other indebtedness, the redemption or other repurchase of outstanding securities and funding for development activities.

Tender Offers and Repurchase Activity

During June 2010, we repurchased $15,000,000 of our 4.125% convertible senior unsecured notes at par. The Company recognized a net loss on early debt extinguishment of $558,000 in connection with the repurchase.

On October 13, 2010, we closed a fixed price cash tender offer for any and all of our 4.125% convertible senior unsecured notes due 2026. The convertible notes are putable to the company in February 2012, August 2013, August 2016 and August 2021. The decision to tender for and retire the majority of outstanding bonds was based on our desire to take advantage of the favorable interest rate environment for long-term debt in 2010 while also avoiding the potential put of these notes in 2012, the same year that our revolving credit facility expires. As a result of this tender offer, $321,334,000 in aggregate principal amount of our 4.125% convertible senior unsecured notes due 2026 were validly tendered, and we accepted, purchased and subsequently cancelled the notes for an aggregate purchase price of 104% of par, or approximately $334,187,360. After the tender offer an aggregate principal amount of $35,000,000 of the notes remain outstanding. We recognized a net loss on early debt extinguishment of $22,949,000 in connection with the tender offer.

 

35


2010 Debt Tender/Repurchase Summary

(Amounts in thousands)

 

Security

  Cash
Principal
Outstanding
    Bonds
Retired
    Cash
Paid
    Principal
Amount
Remaining
    % of Par     Extinguishment
loss
    Write off of
Unamortized
Discounts /
Fees
    Net
(Loss)
 

4.125% Senior Notes

  $ 371,334 (1)    $ 15,000      $ 15,000      $ 356,334        100.00     —        ($ 558   ($ 558
                                                               

Open Market Repurchase

  $ 371,334      $ 15,000      $ 15,000      $ 356,334        100.00     —        ($ 558   ($ 558

4.125% Senior Notes

  $ 356,334 (2)    $ 321,334      $ 334,187      $ 35,000        104.00   ($ 12,853   ($ 10,096   ($ 22,949
                                                               

Debt Tender Total

  $ 356,334      $ 321,334      $ 334,187      $ 35,000        104.00   ($ 12,853   ($ 10,096   ($ 22,949
                                                               

Total Tender/Repurchase

  $ 371,334      $ 336,334      $ 349,187      $ 35,000 (3)      103.82   ($ 12,853   ($ 10,654   ($ 23,507
                                                               

 

(1)

Balance as of December 31, 2009

(2)

Balance prior to October, 2010 tender offer.

(3)

Balance as of December 31, 2010.

On April 15, 2009, we closed a fixed price cash tender offer for any and all of our outstanding 5.750% senior notes due 2009 and any and all of our outstanding 4.875% senior notes due 2010. As a result, $61,407,000 and $119,421,000 in aggregate principal amount of the 5.750% senior notes due 2009 and 4.875% senior notes due 2010, respectively, were validly tendered and we accepted, purchased and subsequently cancelled the notes. After giving effect to the purchase of the tendered notes, an aggregate principal amount of $30,579,000 of the 4.875% senior notes due in 2010, respectively, were paid in full during 2010. The remaining principal balance of the 5.750% senior notes due in 2009 were paid in full during September 2009, as the note came due.

On April 1, 2009, we closed a fixed price cash tender offer for any and all of our outstanding 7.450% senior notes due 2011 and any and all of our outstanding 7.125% senior notes due 2013. As a result, $201,455,000 and $89,982,000 in aggregate principal amount of the 7.450% senior notes due 2011 and 7.125% senior notes due 2013, respectively, were validly tendered and we accepted, purchased and subsequently cancelled the notes. After giving effect to the purchase of the tendered notes, an aggregate principal amount of $48,545,000 7.450% senior notes due 2011 were paid in full in 2011, and $40,018,000 7.125% senior notes due in 2013, respectively, remain outstanding.

During 2009, we repurchased $78,266,000 of our 4.125% convertible senior unsecured notes for an aggregate price of 92.98% of par, or approximately $72,776,000.

Net gain on extinguishment of debt totaled $1,470,000 for the year ended December 31, 2009. The primary drivers of the gain are as follows:

2009 Debt Tender/Repurchase Summary

(Amounts in thousands)

 

Security

  Cash
Principal
Outstanding
    Bonds
Retired
    Cash
Paid
    Principal
Amount
Remaining
    % of Par     Extinguishment
Gain
    Write off of
Unamortized
Discounts /
Fees / Equity
    Net
Gain
(Loss)
 

2011 7.45% Senior Notes

  $ 250,000      $ 201,455      $ 201,455      $ 48,545        100.00   $ —        ($ 1,023   ($ 1,023

2013 7.125% Senior Notes

    130,000        89,982        88,182        40,018        98.00     1,800        (1,127     673   

2009 5.75% Senior Notes

    150,000        61,407        61,407        88,593        100.00     —          (294     (294

2010 4.875% Senior Notes

    150,000        119,421        119,421        30,579        100.00     —          (756     (756
                                                               

Debt tender total

  $ 680,000      $ 472,265      $ 470,465      $ 207,735        99.62   $ 1,800      ($ 3,200   ($ 1,400
                                                               

4.125% Senior Notes

    449,600        78,266        72,776        371,334        92.99     5,490        (2,620     2,870   
                                                               

Total Tender/Repurchase

  $ 1,129,600      $ 550,531      $ 543,241      $ 579,069        98.68   $ 7,290      ($ 5,820   $ 1,470   
                                                               

 

36


On December 24, 2008, we repurchased $10,400,000 of our $460,000,000 convertible senior unsecured notes with a fixed coupon rate of 4.125% for an aggregate price of 74.88%, or approximately $8,000,000, resulting in a $2,364,000 net gain on extinguishment of debt.

Fixed Rate Unsecured Notes and Unsecured line of credit

On September 15, 2010, we closed an offering of $300,000,000 of 10.5 year senior unsecured notes. The notes will mature on March 15, 2021 with a coupon rate of 5.20%. Net proceeds from the offering, after all discounts, commissions and issuance costs, totaled approximately $297,477,000. Proceeds from these offerings have been used for general corporate purposes, including the repayment of debt, redemption of equity securities, funding for development activities and financing for acquisitions. Pending these uses, we initially used the proceeds from these offerings to reduce borrowings under our revolving unsecured credit facility.

BRE maintains a revolving credit facility with a total commitment of $750,000,000. Based on our current debt ratings, the line of credit accrues interest at LIBOR plus 47.5 basis points. In addition, we pay a 0.15% annual facility fee on the capacity of the facility. Borrowings under our unsecured line of credit totaled $209,000,000 at December 31, 2010, compared to $288,000,000 at December 31, 2009. Borrowings under the unsecured line of credit are used to fund acquisition and development activities as well as for general corporate purposes. Balances on the unsecured line of credit are typically reduced with available cash balances. The facility matures on September 18, 2012.

We had a total of $773,076,000 principal amount in unsecured senior notes outstanding at December 31, 2010, consisting of the following:

 

Maturity

   Unsecured Senior
Note Balance
     Interest
Rate (Coupon)
 

January 2011(1)

   $ 48,545,000         7.45

February 2012(2)

     34,513,000         6.01

February 2013

     40,018,000         7.13

March 2014

     50,000,000         4.70

March 2017

     300,000,000         5.50

March 2021

     300,000,000         5.20
                 

Total/Weighted Average Interest Rate

   $ 773,076,000         5.56
                 

 

(1)

This unsecured senior note has been paid in full upon its maturity.

(2)

The principal amount of our 4.125% convertible senior unsecured notes debt is $35,000,000. The notes are callable by us on or after February 21, 2012. The interest rate and note balance have been adjusted in accordance with guidance on convertible debt instruments.

Secured Debt

On December 31, 2010, we had mortgage loans and a secured credit facility with a total principal amount outstanding of $810,842,000, at an effective interest rate of 5.60%, and remaining terms ranging from one year to ten years.

On August 12, 2010, we purchased an operating community totaling 226 units located in San Jose, California, for an aggregate purchase price of $50,300,000. In connection with the acquisition, we assumed an existing $32,500,000 secured mortgage loan, with a fixed interest rate of 5.74% that is scheduled to mature on September 1, 2019.

On April 30, 2010, we refinanced a single property mortgage loan totaling $59,500,000 at a fixed rate of 5.20%. The mortgage has a 10 year interest only term and is scheduled to mature on April 30, 2020. The original mortgage note had a principal amount outstanding of $31,100,000 and was scheduled to mature on October 1, 2010, at a fixed rate of 7.38%.

 

37


On April 7, 2009, we closed a $620,000,000 secured credit facility with Deutsche Bank Berkshire Mortgage, Inc. The facility consists of two $310,000,000 tranches. The first tranche has a fixed rate term of 10 years and has a maturity date of May 1, 2019. The second tranche has a maturity date of September 1, 2020, with a fixed rate term for the first 10 years and a variable rate for the remaining one-year period. Together, the effective composite annual cost of debt is 5.6% inclusive of rate hedging transactions. Fifteen multifamily properties totaling 4,651 units with a net carrying value of $607,500,000 secured the credit facility at the time of closing.

As of December 31, 2010, we had total outstanding debt balances of $1,792,918,000 and total outstanding shareholders’ equity and redeemable noncontrolling interests of $1,311,279,000, representing a debt to total book capitalization ratio of approximately 58%.

We may from time to time seek to retire or purchase our outstanding debt through cash purchases and/or exchanges for equity securities, in open market purchases or privately negotiated transactions. Such repurchases or exchanges, if any, will depend on prevailing market conditions, our liquidity requirements, contractual restrictions and other factors. The amounts involved may be material.

Our indebtedness contains financial covenants as to minimum net worth, interest coverage ratios, maximum secured debt and total debt to capital, among others. We were in compliance with all such financial covenants throughout the year ended December 31, 2010.

We anticipate that we will continue to require outside sources of financing to meet all our long-term liquidity needs beyond 2010, including scheduled debt repayments, construction funding and property acquisitions. At December 31, 2010, we had an estimated cost of $81,500,000 to complete existing construction in progress, with funding estimated to be incurred through the first quarter of 2013.

Scheduled contractual obligations required for the next five years and thereafter are as follows:

 

Contractual Obligations

   Total      Less than
1 year
     1-3 years  (1)      3-5 years      More than
5 years
 
     (amounts in thousands)  

Long-Term Debt Obligations

   $ 1,793,405       $ 50,672       $ 381,759       $ 61,801       $ 1,299,173   

Lease Obligations

     18,886         1,804         3,557         3,600         9,925   
                                            

Total

   $ 1,812,291       $ 52,476       $ 385,316       $ 65,401       $ 1,309,098   
                                            

 

(1)

4.125% 2012 convertible senior unsecured notes are presented gross. The balance sheet carrying value at December 31, 2010 reflects a debt discount of $487,000.

We manage joint venture investments that are accounted for under the equity method of accounting with total assets of approximately $485,380,000 as of December 31, 2010. These joint ventures carry debt totaling approximately $17,376,000, 50% of which is ours, none of which is guaranteed by us at December 31, 2010.

We continue to consider other sources of possible funding, including further joint ventures and additional secured construction debt. We own unencumbered real estate assets that could be sold, contributed to joint ventures or used as collateral for financing purposes (subject to certain lender restrictions) and have encumbered assets with significant equity that could be further encumbered should other sources of capital not be available.

As of December 31, 2010 we have 75 wholly or majority owned operating properties with a gross book value of approximately $3.5 billion. Nineteen of the 75 operating properties with gross book values of approximately $1.1 billion are encumbered with secured financing totaling approximately $811 million. The remaining 56 operating properties are unencumbered with an approximate gross book value of $2.4 billion. Majority owned subsidiary entities that own seven of the 56 unencumbered operating properties, with an approximate gross book value of $230 million, are guarantors of our unsecured line of credit.

 

38


We have joint venture co-investments in various properties that are unconsolidated and accounted for under the equity method of accounting. Management does not believe these investments have a materially different impact upon our liquidity, cash flows, capital resources, credit or market risk than our property management and ownership activities. These joint ventures are discussed in Note 4 of the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements.

Critical Accounting Policies

We define critical accounting policies as those that require management’s most difficult, subjective or complex judgments. A summary of our critical accounting policies follows. Additional discussion of accounting policies that we consider significant, including further discussion of the critical accounting policies described below, can be found in the notes to our consolidated financial statements.

Investments in Rental Properties

Rental properties are recorded at cost, less accumulated depreciation, less an adjustment, if any, for impairment. A land value is assigned based on the purchase price if land is acquired separately, or based on market research if acquired in a merger or in an operating community acquisition. We have a development group which manages the design, development and construction of our apartment communities. Projects under development are carried at cost, including direct and indirect costs incurred to ready the assets for their intended use and which are specifically identifiable, including capitalized interest and property taxes until units are placed in service. Direct investment development projects are considered placed in service as certificates of occupancy are issued and the units become ready for occupancy. Depreciation begins as units are placed in service. Land acquired for development is capitalized and reported as “Land under development” until the development plan for the land is formalized. Once the development plan is finalized and construction contracts are signed, the costs are transferred to the balance sheet line item “Construction in progress.” Interest is capitalized on the construction in progress at a rate equal to our weighted average cost of debt. The capitalization of interest ends when the assets are readied for their intended use. Expenditures for ordinary maintenance and repairs are expensed to operations as incurred and significant renovations and improvements that increase the value of the property or extend its useful life are capitalized.

Depreciation is computed on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful lives of the assets, which generally range from 35 to 40 years for buildings and three to ten years for other property. The determination as to whether expenditures should be capitalized or expensed, and the period over which depreciation is recognized, requires management’s judgment.

In accordance with FASB guidance on accounting for the impairment or disposal of long-lived assets, our investments in real estate are periodically evaluated for indicators of impairment. The evaluation of impairment and the determination of estimated fair value is based on several factors, and future events could occur which would cause management to conclude that indicators of impairment exist and a reduction in carrying value to estimated fair value is warranted. There were no assets for which an adjustment for impairment in value was made in 2010, 2009 or 2008.

In the normal course of business, we will receive offers for sale of our properties, either solicited or unsolicited. For those offers that are accepted, the prospective buyer will usually require a due diligence period before consummation of the transaction. It is not unusual for matters to arise that result in the withdrawal or rejection of the offer during this process. We classify real estate as “held for sale” when all criteria under the FASB guidance has been met.

The guidance also requires that the results of operations of any communities that have been sold, or otherwise qualify as held for sale, be presented as discontinued operations in our consolidated financial statements in all periods presented. The community specific real estate classified as held for sale is stated at the lower of its carrying amount or estimated fair value less disposal costs. Depreciation is not recorded on assets once classified as held for sale.

 

39


Stock-Based Compensation

FASB guidance requires all share-based payments to employees, including grants of employee stock options, to be recognized in the income statement based on their fair values.

Stock-based compensation cost is measured at the grant date based on the fair value of the award and is recognized, net of estimated forfeitures, as expense ratably over the requisite service period, which is generally the vesting period. The cost related to stock-based compensation included in the determination of consolidated net income includes all awards outstanding that vested during these periods.

Under the 1992 Stock Option Plan and the 1999 BRE Stock Incentive Plan, as amended, and the Fifth Amended and Restated Non-Employee Director Stock Option and Restricted Stock Plan, we award service based restricted stock, performance based restricted stock without market conditions, performance based restricted stock with market conditions, and stock options.

We measure the value of the service based restricted stock and performance based restricted stock without market conditions at fair value on the grant date, based on the number of units granted and the market value of our common stock on that date. Guidance requires compensation expense to be recognized with respect to the restricted stock if it is probable that the service or performance condition will be achieved. As a result, we amortize the fair value, net of estimated forfeitures, as stock-based compensation expense on a straight-line basis over the vesting period. For service based restricted stock awards, we evaluate our forfeiture rate at the end of each reporting period based on the probability of the service condition being met. For performance based restricted stock awards without market conditions, we evaluate our forfeiture rate at the end of each reporting period based on the specific performance targets for each award and the level of performance criteria expected to be achieved during the performance period. The fair value of performance based restricted stock awards with market conditions is determined using a Monte Carlo simulation to estimate the grant date value. We amortize the fair value of these awards with market conditions, net of estimated forfeitures, as stock-based compensation on a straight-line basis over the vesting period regardless of whether the market conditions are satisfied in accordance with share-based payment guidance.

We estimated the fair value of our options using a Black-Scholes valuation model using various assumptions to determine their grant date fair value. We amortize the fair value, net of estimated forfeitures, as stock-based compensation expense on a straight-line basis over the vesting period.

Consolidation

Arrangements that are not controlled through voting or similar rights are reviewed under the applicable accounting guidance for variable interest entities or “VIEs”. A Company is required to consolidate the assets, liabilities and operations of a VIE if it is determined to be the primary beneficiary of the VIE.

In June 2009, the Financial Accounting Standards Board changed the consolidation analysis for VIEs to require a qualitative analysis to determine the primary beneficiary of the VIE. The determination of the primary beneficiary of a VIE is based on whether the entity has the power to direct matters which most significantly impact the activities of the VIE and has the obligation to absorb losses, or the right to receive benefits, of the VIE which could potentially be significant to the VIE. The guidance requires an ongoing reconsideration of the primary beneficiary and also amends the events triggering a reassessment. The new guidance was effective for the Company beginning January 1, 2010. Additional disclosures for VIEs are required, including a description about a reporting entity’s involvement with VIEs, how a reporting entity’s involvement with a VIE affects the reporting entity’s financial statements, and significant judgments and assumptions made by the reporting entity to determine whether it must consolidate the VIE.

Under the guidance, an entity is a VIE and subject to consolidation, if by design a) the total equity investment at risk is not sufficient to permit the entity to finance its activities without additional subordinated

 

40


financial support provided by any parties, including equity holders or b) as a group the holders of the equity investment at risk lack any one of the following three characteristics: (i) the power, through voting rights or similar rights to direct the activities of an entity that most significantly impact the entity’s economic performance, (ii) the obligation to absorb the expected losses of the entity, or (iii) the right to receive the expected residual returns of the entity. We reviewed the consolidation guidance and concluded that joint venture LLCs are not VIEs. We further reviewed the management fees paid to us by our joint ventures and determined that they do not create variable interests in the entities. As of December 31, 2010, we have no land purchase options outstanding requiring evaluation as VIEs and potential consolidation. We have concluded that there is no impact on the financial statements as a result of the adoption of the guidance.

Under applicable accounting guidance, the managing member of a limited liability company, or LLC, is presumed to control the LLC unless the non-managing member(s) have certain rights that preclude the managing member from exercising unilateral control. We have reviewed our control as the managing member of the our joint venture assets held in LLCs and concluded that we do not have control over any of those LLCs. Consequently, we have applied the equity method of accounting to our investments in joint ventures.

At December 31, 2010, we had no non-refundable cash deposits for land purchase option agreements.

We consolidates entities not deemed to be VIEs that we have the ability to control. The accompanying consolidated financial statements include our accounts, the Operating Company and other controlled subsidiaries. At December 31, 2010, we owned 95% of the Operating Company. All significant intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

Impact of Inflation

Approximately 99% of our total revenues for 2010 were derived from apartment properties. Due to the short-term nature of most apartment unit leases (typically one year or less), we may seek to adjust rents to mitigate the impact of inflation upon renewal of existing leases or commencement of new leases, although we cannot assure that we will be able to adjust rents in response to inflation. In addition, market rates may also fluctuate due to short-term leases and other permitted and non-permitted lease terminations.

Dividends Paid to Common and Preferred Shareholders and Distributions to Minority Members

A cash dividend has been paid to common shareholders each quarter since our inception in 1970. The payment of distributions by BRE is at the discretion of the Board of Directors and depends on numerous factors, including our cash flow, financial condition and capital requirements, REIT provisions of the Internal Revenue Code and other factors. The quarterly common dividend payment of $0.3750 is equivalent to $1.5000 per common share on an annualized basis. Cash dividends per common share were $1.50 in 2010, $1.88 in 2009, and $2.25 in 2008. Total cash dividends paid to common shareholders for the three years ended December 31, 2010, 2009 and 2008 were $93,741,000, $100,681,000, and $116,025,000, respectively. In each of 2010, 2009 and 2008, $11,813,000, in dividends were paid to preferred shareholders.

Distributions accrued and paid to noncontrolling interests were $1,446,000 in 2010, $1,885,000 in 2009, and $2,291,000 in 2008.

 

Item 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

Market risks relating to our operations result primarily from changes in short-term LIBOR interest rates. We do not have any direct foreign exchange or other significant market risk.

Our exposure to market risk for changes in interest rates relates primarily to our line of credit. We primarily enter into fixed and variable rate debt obligations to support general corporate purposes, including acquisitions

 

41


and development, capital expenditures and working capital needs. We continuously evaluate our level of variable rate debt with respect to total debt and other factors, including our assessment of the current and future economic environment.

We seek to limit the risk of interest rate exposure by following established risk management policies and procedures including the use of derivatives to hedge interest rate risk on debt instruments. We do not engage in hedging activities for speculative purposes.

We have a policy of only entering into contracts with major financial institutions based upon their credit ratings and other factors. When viewed in conjunction with the underlying and offsetting exposure that the derivatives are designed to hedge, we have not sustained a material loss from those instruments nor do we anticipate any material adverse effect on our net income or financial position in the future from the use of derivatives currently in place.

The fair values of our financial instruments (including such items in the financial statement captions as cash, other assets, accounts payable and accrued expenses, and lines of credit) approximate their carrying or contract values based on their nature, terms and interest rates that approximate current market rates. The fair value of mortgage loans payable and unsecured senior notes is estimated using discounted cash flow analyses with an interest rate similar to that of current market borrowing arrangements. The estimated fair value of our mortgage loans and unsecured senior notes is approximately $1,536,493,000 at December 31, 2010, as compared with a carrying value of $1,584,405,000 at that date.

We had $209,000,000 and $288,000,000 in variable rate debt outstanding at December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively. A hypothetical 10% adverse change in interest rates would have had an annualized unfavorable impact of approximately $400,000 and $445,000 on our earnings and cash flows based on these period-end debt levels and our average variable interest rates for the twelve months ended December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively. We cannot predict the effect of adverse changes in interest rates on our variable rate debt and, therefore, our exposure to market risk, nor can we assure that fixed rate, long-term debt will be available to us at advantageous pricing. Consequently, future results may differ materially from the estimated adverse changes discussed above.

 

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Item 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

See Part IV, Item 15. Our Consolidated Financial Statements and Schedules are incorporated herein by reference.

 

Item 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

None.

 

Item 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

We maintain disclosure controls and procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our Exchange Act reports is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. In designing and evaluating the disclosure controls and procedures, management recognized that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving the desired control objectives, and management necessarily was required to apply its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible controls and procedures. Also, we have investments in certain unconsolidated entities. As we do not control these entities, our disclosure controls and procedures with respect to such entities are necessarily substantially more limited than those we maintain with respect to our consolidated subsidiaries.

As of December 31, 2010, the end of the quarter and fiscal year covered by this report, management conducted an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and our Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures. Based upon that evaluation, the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures are effective to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company on the reports it files or submits under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms. We continue to review and document our disclosure controls and procedures, including our internal control over financial reporting, and may from time to time make changes aimed at enhancing their effectiveness and to ensure that our systems evolve with our business.

Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting for the Company. Internal control over financial reporting refers to the process designed by, or under the supervision of, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, and effected by our Board of Directors, management and other personnel, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and includes those policies and procedures that:

 

  (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that in reasonable detail accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of our company;

 

43


  (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of our company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and our board of directors; and

 

  (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of company assets that could have a material effect on our financial statements.

Internal control over financial reporting cannot provide absolute assurance of achieving financial reporting objectives because of its inherent limitations. Internal control over financial reporting is a process that involves human diligence and compliance and is subject to lapses in judgment and breakdowns resulting from human failures. Internal control over financial reporting also can be circumvented by collusion or improper management override. Because of such limitations, there is a risk that material misstatements may not be prevented or detected on a timely basis by internal control over financial reporting. However, these inherent limitations are known features of the financial reporting process. Therefore, it is possible to design into the process safeguards to reduce, though not eliminate, this risk.

Management has assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2010, using the framework set forth in the report entitled “Internal Control—Integrated Framework” published by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations (“COSO”) of the Treadway Commission. Based on our evaluation under the framework in Internal Control—Integrated Framework management concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of December 31, 2010.

Ernst & Young LLP, the registered accounting firm that audited the financial statements included in this annual report, has issued an attestation report on our internal control over financial reporting.

Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

There was no change in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the fourth quarter of the period covered by this Annual Report on Form 10-K that has materially affected, or is reasonable likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

The Board of Directors and Shareholders of:

BRE Properties, Inc

We have audited BRE Properties, Inc.’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2010, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (the COSO criteria). BRE Properties, Inc.’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting, and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting included in the accompanying Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk, and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

In our opinion, BRE Properties, Inc. maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2010, based on the COSO criteria.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated balance sheets of BRE Properties, Inc. as of December 31, 2010 and 2009, and the related consolidated statements of income, shareholders’ equity and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2010 of BRE Properties, Inc. and our report dated February 18, 2011 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.

/s/ Ernst & Young LLP

San Francisco, CA

February 18, 2011

 

45


Item 9B. Other Information

Pursuant to Section 303A.12(a) of the New York Stock Exchange’s Corporate Governance Standards, the Chief Executive Officer has certified to the NYSE that she is not aware of any violation by the Company of NYSE corporate governance listing standards. This certification was submitted to the NYSE and was not qualified in any respect. Additionally, certifications by our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer required under Sections 302 and 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 are filed and furnished, respectively, with the Securities and Exchange Commission as exhibits to this report.

 

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PART III

 

Item 10. DIRECTORS AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE REGISTRANT

 

  (a) Identification of Directors. The information required by this Item is incorporated herein by reference to our Proxy Statement relating to our 2011 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, under the headings “Election of Directors” and “Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance,” to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days of December 31, 2010. A summary of the directors and their principal business for the last five years follows:

 

Paula F. Downey

   Ms. Downey has been our Director since March 2008. Currently, Ms. Downey is President and CEO of the California State Automobile Association Inter-Insurance Bureau. She served as President of AAA Northern California, Nevada and Utah (CSAA) from 2005 to 2010. She was Chief Operations Officer from 2003 through 2005 and Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer from 2000 to 2003, and was named CEO in July of 2010. Ms. Downey serves as an officer of California State Automobile Association, California State Automobile Association Inter-Insurance Bureau, and as a director of their subsidiaries including Pacific Lighthouse Reinsurance Ltd., Western United Insurance Company, CSAA Life and Financial Services, Inc., ACA Insurance Company, ACA Member Services Company, and Ceres Reinsurance, Inc. Ms. Downey is 55 years old.

Irving F. Lyons, III

   Mr. Lyons has been our Director since 2006. Mr. Lyons currently serves on the Board of Directors of Equinix, Inc. and Prologis. He served as Vice Chairman of ProLogis, a global provider of distribution facilities and services, from 2001 through May 2006. He was Chief Investment Officer from March 1997 to December 2004, and held several other executive positions since joining ProLogis in 1993. Prior to joining ProLogis, he was a Managing Partner of King & Lyons, a San Francisco Bay Area industrial real estate development and management company, since its inception in 1979. Mr. Lyons is 61 years old.

Christopher J. McGurk

   Mr. McGurk has been our Director since 2006. Currently, Mr. McGurk is Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Cinedigm Digital Cinema Corporation, a NASDAQ-listed provider of digital services, advertising, software and content distribution to theaters. From 2006 to 2010, Mr. McGurk served as CEO of Overture Films, a motion picture studio. Prior to his post at Overture Films, Mr. McGurk served as Vice Chairman and COO of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc. (MGM), a motion picture, television, home video, and theatrical production and distribution company, from 1999 to 2005. From 1996 to 1999, Mr. McGurk served in executive capacities with Universal Pictures, a division of Universal Studios Inc., most recently as President and COO. Mr. McGurk is 54 years old.

Matthew T. Medeiros

   Mr. Medeiros has been our Director since 2005. Mr. Medeiros has served as President, Chief Executive Officer and Director of SonicWALL, a global Internet security company, since March 2003. From 1998 to December 2002, he served as Chief Executive Officer of Philips Components, a division of Royal Philips Electronics, a consumer electronics company. Mr. Medeiros served as Chairman of the Board, LG.Philips LCD, a liquid crystal display joint venture, from 2001 to 2002. Mr. Medeiros is 54 years old.

 

47


Constance B. Moore

   Ms. Moore has been our Director since 2002. Ms. Moore has served as President and Chief Executive Officer of the Company since January 1, 2005, and was President and Chief Operating Officer in 2004. Ms. Moore was Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of BRE from July 2002 through December 2003. She held several executive positions with Security Capital Group & Affiliates, an international real estate operating and investment management company, from 1993 to 2002, including Co-Chairman and Chief Operating Officer of Archstone-Smith Trust. Ms. Moore is 55 years old.

Jeanne R. Myerson

   Ms. Myerson has been our Director since 2002. Ms. Myerson has served as President and Chief Executive Officer of The Swig Company, a private real estate investment firm, since 1997. She served as President and Chief Executive Officer of The Bailard, Biehl & Kaiser REIT from 1993 to 1997. Ms. Myerson is 57 years old.

Jeffrey T. Pero

   Mr. Pero has been our Director since 2009. He is a former partner of Latham & Watkins (LW), an international law firm, and has been engaged in the practice of law since 1971. As partner, his focus was public and private debt and equity financings; mergers and acquisitions; corporate governance; and compliance with U.S. securities laws. He has lectured extensively on these topics in the United States and England. Mr. Pero also served as primary outside counsel to several publicly traded companies, including BRE. He served as the managing partner of the LW London office from 1990 to 1994. Mr. Pero is 64 years old.

Thomas E. Robinson

   Mr. Robinson has been our Director since 2007. Currently, Mr. Robinson is senior advisor to the real estate investment banking group at Stifel, Nicolaus & Company, Inc., St. Louis, MO and its prior affiliate Legg Mason, where he was previously a managing director. Prior to that position he served as the president and chief financial officer of Storage USA, Inc., from 1994-1997. Mr. Robinson currently serves on the Tanger Factory Outlet Centers, Inc. board of directors, is a former trustee/director of Centerpoint Properties Trust and Legg Mason Real Estate Investors, Inc., and a past member of the board of governors of the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts (NAREIT). Mr. Robinson is 63 years old.

Dennis E. Singleton

   Mr. Singleton has been our Director since 2009. Mr. Singleton currently serves on the Board of Directors of Digital Realty Trust, Inc; as vice chairman of the board of trustees of Lehigh University; and is a board member and past president of the Glaucoma Research Foundation. Mr. Singleton was a founding partner of Spieker Properties, Inc., a Northern California-based commercial real estate investment trust (REIT), which was acquired by Equity Office Properties, Inc. in 2003. Mr. Singleton served as Chief Financial Officer and Director of Spieker Properties, Inc. from 1993 to 1995, Chief Investment Officer and Director from 1995 to 1997, and Vice Chairman and Director from 1998 to 2001. Mr. Singleton is 65 years old.

 

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Thomas P. Sullivan

   Mr. Sullivan has been our Director since 2009. He is a founding partner of Wilson Meany Sullivan (WMS), a San Francisco-based, privately owned real estate investment and development firm focused on urban infill locations in the Western United States. At WMS, Mr. Sullivan’s focus is company management, identification of investment opportunities, major transactions, and debt and equity financing. Mr. Sullivan played a major role in the development of large-scale, technologically innovative projects in San Francisco, most notably Foundry Square, the Ferry Building and 250 Embarcadero (headquarters of Gap Inc.). Prior to WMS, Mr. Sullivan served as president of Wilson/Equity Office, a joint venture with Equity Office Properties Trust; and as senior vice president at William Wilson & Associates. Both companies were predecessors of WMS, which was formed by development partners of each entity in 2003. Mr. Sullivan is 53 years old.

 

  (b) Identification of Executive Officers. See “Executive Officers of the Registrant” in Part I of this report.

 

Item 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

The information required by this Item is incorporated herein by reference from our Proxy Statement, relating to our 2011 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, under the headings “Executive Compensation and Other Information” and “Election of Directors—Governance, Board and Committee Meetings; Compensation of Directors,” to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days of December 31, 2010.

 

Item 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL HOLDERS AND MANAGEMENT

The information required by this Item is incorporated herein by reference from our Proxy Statement, relating to our 2011 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, under the heading “Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management,” to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days of December 31, 2010.

 

Item 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS

The information required by this Item is incorporated herein by reference from our Proxy Statement, relating to our 2011 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, under the headings “Certain Relationships and Related Transactions,” to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days of December 31, 2010.

 

Item 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

The information required by this Item is incorporated by reference from our Proxy Statement, relating to our 2011 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, under the headings “Report of the Audit Committee” and “Fees of Ernst & Young LLP,” to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days of December 31, 2010.

 

49


PART IV

 

Item 15. EXHIBITS, FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES AND REPORTS ON FORM 8-K

(a) Financial Statements

 

  1. Financial Statements:

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

     52   

Consolidated Balance Sheets at December 31, 2010 and 2009

     53   

Consolidated Statements of Income for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009, and 2008

     54   

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended December 31, 2010, 2009, and 2008

     55   

Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity for the years ended December  31, 2010, 2009, and 2008

     57   

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

     58   

 

  2. Financial Statement Schedule:

 

Schedule III—Real Estate and Accumulated Depreciation

     84   
All other schedules for which provision is made in the applicable accounting regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission are not required under the related instructions or are inapplicable, and, therefore, have been omitted.   

 

  3. See Index to Exhibits immediately following the Consolidated Financial Statements. Each of the exhibits listed is incorporated herein by reference.

(b) Exhibits

See Index to Exhibits.

(c) Financial Statement Schedules

See Index to Financial Statements and Financial Statement Schedule.

 

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SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

Dated February 18, 2011

 

BRE PROPERTIES, INC.

By:

 

/s/    CONSTANCE B. MOORE        

 

Constance B. Moore

President and Chief Executive Officer

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated:

 

Name

 

Title

 

Date

/s/    CONSTANCE B. MOORE        

Constance B. Moore

 

President, Chief Executive Officer and Director (Principal Executive Officer)

  February 18, 2011

/s/    JOHN A. SCHISSEL        

John A. Schissel

 

Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer (Principal Financial and Accounting Officer)

  February 18, 2011

/s/    PAULA F. DOWNEY        

Paula Downey

  Director   February 18, 2011

/s/    IRVING F. LYONS, III        

Irving F. Lyons, III

  Director   February 18, 2011

/s/    CHRISTOPHER J. MCGURK        

Christopher J. McGurk

  Director   February 18, 2011

/s/    MATTHEW T. MEDEIROS        

Matthew T. Medeiros

  Director   February 18, 2011

/s/    JEANNE R. MYERSON        

Jeanne R. Myerson

  Director   February 18, 2011

/s/    JEFFREY T. PERO        

Jeffrey T. Pero

  Director   February 18, 2011

/s/    THOMAS E. ROBINSON        

Thomas E. Robinson

  Director   February 18, 2011

/s/    DENNIS E. SINGLETON        

Dennis E. Singleton

  Director   February 18, 2011

/s/    THOMAS P. SULLIVAN        

Thomas P. Sullivan

  Director   February 18, 2011

 

51


REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

The Board of Directors and Shareholders of

BRE Properties, Inc.

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of BRE Properties, Inc. as of December 31, 2010 and 2009, and the related consolidated statements of income, shareholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2010. Our audits also included the financial statement schedule listed in the Index at Item 15(a). These financial statements and schedule are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements and schedule based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of BRE Properties, Inc. at December 31, 2010 and 2009, and the consolidated results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2010, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Also, in our opinion, the related financial statement schedule, when considered in relation to the basic financial statements taken as a whole, presents fairly, in all material respects the information set forth therein.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), BRE Properties, Inc.’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2010, based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission and our report dated February 18, 2011 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon .

/s/ Ernst & Young LLP

San Francisco, California

February 18, 2011

 

52


BRE PROPERTIES, INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(Dollar amounts in thousands, except per share data)

 

     December 31,  
     2010     2009  
A S S E T S     

Real estate portfolio

    

Direct investments in real estate:

    

Investments in rental properties

   $ 3,464,466      $ 3,180,633   

Construction in progress

     29,095        101,354   

Less: Accumulated depreciation

     (640,456     (583,953
                
     2,853,105        2,698,034   
                

Equity interests in and advances to real estate joint ventures:

    

Investments in rental properties

     61,132        61,999   

Land under development

     183,291        155,532   
                

Total real estate portfolio

     3,097,528        2,915,565   

Cash

     6,357        5,656   

Other assets

     52,362        58,787   
                

Total assets

   $ 3,156,247      $ 2,980,008   
                
L I A B I L I T I E S A N D S H A R E H O L D  E R S’ E Q U I T Y     

Unsecured senior notes

   $ 773,076      $ 826,918   

Unsecured line of credit

     209,000        288,000   

Mortgage loans payable

     810,842        752,157   

Accounts payable and accrued expenses

     52,070        56,409   
                

Total liabilities

     1,844,988        1,923,484   
                

Redeemable noncontrolling interests

     34,866        33,605   
                

Shareholders’ equity:

    

Preferred stock, $0.01 par value; 20,000,000 shares authorized at both December 31 2010 and 2009; 7,000,000 shares with $25 liquidation preference, issued and outstanding at December 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009

     70        70   

Common stock, $0.01 par value; 100,000,000 shares authorized at both December 31, 2010 and 2009; 64,675,815 and 55,136,359 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009, respectively

     647        551   

Additional paid-in capital

     1,441,048        1,135,505   

Accumulated net income less than cumulative dividends

     (165,372     (113,207
                

Total shareholders’ equity

     1,276,393        1,022,919   
                

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity

   $ 3,156,247      $ 2,980,008   
                

See Accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

53


BRE PROPERTIES, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME

(Amounts in thousands, except per share data)

 

     Years ended December 31,  
     2010     2009      2008  

Revenue

       

Rental income

   $ 329,280      $ 313,987       $ 313,118   

Ancillary income

     12,693        12,193         12,780   
                         

Total rental revenue

     341,973        326,180         325,898   
                         

Expenses

       

Real estate

     111,326        102,734         95,764   

Provision for depreciation

     91,784        82,906         74,723   

Interest

     84,894        82,734         92,032   

General and administrative

     20,570        17,390         20,578   

Other expenses

     5,298        13,522         5,719   
                         

Total expenses

     313,872        299,286         288,816   
                         

Other income

     2,934        3,459         7,885   

Net (loss)/gain on extinguishment of debt

     (23,507     1,470         2,364   

Income before noncontrolling interests, partnership income and
discontinued operations

     7,528        31,823         47,331   

Income from unconsolidated entities

     2,178        2,329         2,560   
                         

Income from continuing operations

     9,706        34,152         49,891   

Net gain on sales of discontinued operations

     40,111        21,574         65,984   

Discontinued operations, net

     5,018        8,614         20,989   
                         

Income from discontinued operations

     45,129        30,188         86,973   

Net Income

   $ 54,835      $ 64,340       $ 136,864   

Redeemable noncontrolling interest in income

     1,446        1,885         2,291   

Net Income attributable to controlling interests

     53,389        62,455         134,573   

Dividends attributable to preferred stock

     11,813        11,813         11,813   
                         

Net income available to common shareholders

   $ 41,576      $ 50,642       $ 122,760   
                         

Per common share data—Basic

       

(Loss)/income from continuing operations (net of preferred dividends and redeemable noncontrolling interest in income)

   $ (0.06   $ 0.38       $ 0.68   

Income from discontinued operations

   $ 0.73      $ 0.57       $ 1.70   
                         

Net income available to common shareholders

   $ 0.67      $ 0.95       $ 2.38   
                         

Weighted average common shares outstanding—basic

     61,420        52,760         51,050   
                         

Per common share data—Diluted

       

(Loss)/income from continuing operations (net of preferred dividends and redeemable noncontrolling interest in income)

   $ (0.06   $ 0.38       $ 0.67   

Income from discontinued operations

   $ 0.73      $ 0.57       $ 1.69   
                         

Net income available to common shareholders

   $ 0.67      $ 0.95       $ 2.36   

Weighted average common shares outstanding—diluted

     61,420        52,761         51,440   

See Accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

54


BRE PROPERTIES, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(Amounts in thousands)

 

     Years ended December 31,  
     2010     2009     2008  

Cash flows from operating activities

      

Net income

   $ 54,835      $ 64,340      $ 136,864   

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash flows generated by operating activities:

      

Net gain on sales of discontinued operations

     (40,111     (21,574     (65,984

Net gain on sales of land

     —          (121     —     

Net loss/(gain) on extinguishment of debt

     23,507        (1,470     (2,364

Noncash abandonment of development pursuits

     —          10,703        3,452   

Noncash interest on convertible debt

     4,778        6,404        6,234   

Income from unconsolidated entities

     (2,178     (2,329     (2,560

Distributions of earnings from unconsolidated entities

     3,564        2,857        2,628   

Provision for depreciation

     91,784        82,906        74,723   

Provision for depreciation from discontinued operations

     2,600        5,513        6,736   

Noncash stock based compensation expense

     4,785        2,596        3,530   

Change in other assets

     1,585        1,594        469   

Change in accounts payable and accrued expenses

     (4,430     (20,736     3,282   
                        

Net cash flows generated by operating activities

     140,719        130,683        167,010   
                        

Cash flows from investing activities

      

Purchase of operating real estate

     (259,600     —          —     

Additions to land under development and predevelopment costs

     (25,117     (18,223     (16,432

Additions to direct investment construction in progress

     (27,513     (96,879     (148,916

Rehabilitation expenditures and other

     (5,944     (7,097     (16,806

Capital expenditures

     (23,051     (20,240     (18,596

Purchase of land

     (19,000     (12,800     —     

Deposits on property under contract to be purchased

     —          (250     (11,493

Deposits on land under contract to be sold

     —          —          7,000   

Improvements to real estate joint ventures

     (614     (212     (336

Proceeds from sale of land

     —          10,100        —     

Additions to furniture fixture and equipment

     (127     (605     (5,456

Proceeds from sales of rental property, net of closing costs

     163,705        65,669        163,215   
                        

Net cash flows used in investing activities

     (197,261     (80,537     (47,820
                        

Cash flows from financing activities

      

Principal payments on mortgage loans and unsecured senior notes

     (2,165     (19,339     (22,586

Proceeds from new mortgage loans, net

     28,350        617,144        —     

Proceeds from issuance of unsecure senior notes, net

     297,477        —          —     

Premium to par paid on convertible notes repurchase

     (12,853     —          —     

Repurchase/repayment of convertible notes, repayment of unsecured notes

     (366,913     (683,639     (8,031

Lines of credit:

      

Advances

     590,000        923,000        664,000   

Repayments

     (669,000     (880,000     (624,000

Proceeds from exercises of stock options and other, net

     13,151        1,741        462   

Proceeds from dividend reinvestment plan

     822        1,367        1,866   

Proceeds from issuance of common stock, net

     287,903        101,891        —     

Cash dividends paid to common shareholders

     (93,741     (100,681     (116,025

Cash dividends paid to preferred shareholders

     (11,813     (11,813     (11,813

Redeemable nontcontrolling interests redemption activity

     (2,759     —          —     

Distributions to redeemable nontcontrolling interests

     (796     (1,461     (1,739

Distributions to other redeemable noncontrolling interests

     (420     (424     (552
                        

Net cash flows provided by (used in) financing activities

     57,243        (52,214     (118,418
                        

Change in cash

     701        (2,068     772   
                        

Balance at beginning of year

   $ 5,656     $ 7,724     $ 6,952  
                        

Balance at end of year

   $ 6,357      $ 5,656      $ 7,724   
                        

See Accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statement

 

55


BRE PROPERTIES, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(Amounts in thousands)

 

     Years ended December 31,  
     2010     2009     2008  

Supplemental disclosure of non cash investing and financing activities

      

Transfers of direct investments in real estate-construction in progress to investments in rental properties

   $ 119,698      $ 283,434      $ 177,246   
                        

Transfer of land under development to direct investments in real estate—construction in progress

   $ 21,234      $ —        $ 19,865   
                        

Change in accrued development costs for construction in progress and land under development

   $ 2,667      $ 7,015      $ 2,922   
                        

Conversion of redeemable interest units

   $ 2,049      $ —        $ 1,712   
                        

Transfer of investment in rental properties to held for sale

   $ 125,714      $ 43,038      $ 105,351   
                        

Change in accrued improvements to direct investments in real estate cost

   $ 1,242      $ (80   $ 1,304   
                        

Change in redemption value of redeemable noncontrolling interests

   $ (6,069   $ (3,920   $ 10,672   
                        

Mortgage note assumed in acquisition of real estate property

   $ 32,500      $ —        $ —     
                        

See Accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

56


BRE PROPERTIES, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

(Dollar amounts in thousands, except share and per share data)

 

     Years ended December 31,  
     2010     2009     2008  

Common stock shares

      

Balance at beginning of year

     55,136,359        51,149,745        50,968,459   

Stock options exercised, net of shares tendered

     592,823        9,500        30,821   

Conversion of operating company units to common shares

     76,097        —          63,600   

Vested restricted shares net of shares tendered

     218,572        120,561        40,578   

Shares issued pursuant to dividend reinvestment plan

     20,909        55,368        46,287   

Common stock issuance

     8,631,055        3,801,185        —     
                        

Balance at end of year

     64,675,815        55,136,359        51,149,745   
                        

Preferred stock shares

      

Balance at beginning of year

     7,000,000        7,000,000        7,000,000   
                        

Balance at end of year

     7,000,000        7,000,000        7,000,000   
                        

Common stock

      

Balance at beginning of year

   $ 551      $ 511      $ 510   

Stock options exercised

     6        —          —     

Conversion of operating company units to common shares

     1        —          1   

Vested restricted shares

     2        1        —     

Shares issued pursuant to dividend reinvestment plan

     1       1       —     

Common stock issuance

     86        38        —     
                        

Balance at end of year

   $ 647      $ 551      $ 511   
                        

Preferred stock

      

Balance at beginning of year

   $ 70      $ 70      $ 70   
                        

Balance at end of year

   $ 70      $ 70      $ 70   
                        

Additional paid-in capital

      

Balance at beginning of year

   $ 1,135,505      $ 1,031,791      $ 1,012,865   

Stock option exercises

     18,381        213        845   

Stock-based compensation

     7,780        4,005        4,720   

Shares retired for tax withholding

     (4,779