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Bridge Capital Holdings 10-Q 2011

Documents found in this filing:

  1. 10-Q
  2. Ex-31.1
  3. Ex-31.2
  4. Ex-32.1
  5. Ex-32.2
  6. Ex-32.2
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C.   20549

FORM 10-Q

x
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the Quarterly Period Ended: March 31, 2011

OR

¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the Transition Period From ____________ to _____________

000-50914
(Commission File Number)

Bridge Capital Holdings
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

California
 
80-0123855
(State or other jurisdiction of
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification Number)
incorporation or organization)
   

55 Almaden Boulevard, San Jose, CA   95113
(Address of principal executive offices, including zip code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code:  (408) 423-8500

Bridge Bank, N.A. (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
 
Yes x  No ¨                                
 
Indicate by checkmark whether registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer. See definition of “accelerated filer”, “large accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.  (Check one):

Large accelerated filer ¨
Accelerated filer ¨
  Non-accelerated filer ¨
Smaller reporting company x
   
(Do not check if a smaller
 
   
reporting company)
 

Indicate by checkmark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).
Yes ¨  No x
 
The number of shares of Common Stock outstanding as of April 30, 2011:  15,066,740

 
 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION
 
 
 
 
Item 1
Financial Statements
 
     
 
Interim Consolidated Balance Sheets
4
 
 
 
 
Interim Consolidated Statements of Operations
5
 
 
 
 
Interim Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
6
 
 
 
 
Notes to Interim Consolidated Financial Statements
7
 
 
 
Item 2
Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
23
 
 
 
Item 3
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
41
     
Item 4
Controls and Procedures
43
     
PART II - OTHER INFORMATION
 
 
 
 
Item 1
Legal Proceedings
44
 
 
 
Item 1A
Risk Factors
44
     
Item 2
Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds
44
 
 
 
Item 3
Defaults Upon Senior Securities
44
     
Item 4
Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders
44
 
 
 
Item 5
Other Information
44
 
 
 
Item 6
Exhibits
44
 
 
 
Signatures
45
     
Index to Exhibits
46

 
2

 

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

IN ADDITION TO THE HISTORICAL INFORMATION, THIS QUARTERLY REPORT CONTAINS CERTAIN FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION WITHIN THE MEANING OF SECTION 27A OF THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933, AS AMENDED, AND SECTION 21E OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934, AS AMENDED, AND WHICH ARE SUBJECT TO THE “SAFE HARBOR” CREATED BY THOSE SECTIONS. THE READER OF THIS QUARTERLY REPORT SHOULD UNDERSTAND THAT ALL SUCH FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS ARE SUBJECT TO VARIOUS UNCERTAINTIES AND RISKS THAT COULD AFFECT THEIR OUTCOME.  THE COMPANY’S ACTUAL RESULTS COULD DIFFER MATERIALLY FROM THOSE SUGGESTED BY SUCH FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS. SUCH RISKS AND UNCERTAINTIES INCLUDE, AMONG OTHERS, (1) COMPETITIVE PRESSURE IN THE BANKING INDUSTRY INCREASES SIGNIFICANTLY; (2) CHANGES IN THE INTEREST RATE ENVIRONMENT REDUCES MARGIN; (3) GENERAL ECONOMIC CONDITIONS, EITHER NATIONALLY OR REGIONALLY, ARE LESS FAVORABLE THAN EXPECTED, RESULTING IN, AMONG OTHER THINGS, A DETERIORATION IN CREDIT QUALITY; (4) CHANGES IN THE REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT; (5) CHANGES IN BUSINESS CONDITIONS AND INFLATION; (6) COSTS AND EXPENSES OF COMPLYING WITH THE INTERNAL CONTROL PROVISIONS OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT AND OUR DEGREE OF SUCCESS IN ACHIEVING COMPLIANCE; (7) CHANGES IN SECURITIES MARKETS; (8) FUTURE CREDIT LOSS EXPERIENCE; (9) CIVIL DISTURBANCES OR TERRORIST THREATS OR ACTS, OR APPREHENSION ABOUT POSSIBLE FUTURE OCCURANCES OF ACTS OF THIS TYPE; AND (10) THE INVOLVEMENT OF THE UNITED STATES IN WAR OR OTHER HOSTILITIES.   THEREFORE, THE INFORMATION IN THIS QUARTERLY REPORT SHOULD BE CAREFULLY CONSIDERED WHEN EVALUATING THE BUSINESS PROSPECTS OF THE COMPANY.

Forward-looking statements are generally identifiable by the use of terms such as "believe", "expect", "intend", "anticipate", "estimate", "project", "assume," "plan," "predict," "forecast," “in management’s opinion,” “management considers” or similar expressions.  Wherever such phrases are used, such statements are as of and based upon the knowledge of Management, at the time made and are subject to change by the passage of time and/or subsequent events, and accordingly such statements are subject to the same risks and uncertainties noted above with respect to forward-looking statements.

The Company’s primary operations and most of its customers are located in California. Other events, including those of September 11, 2001, have increased the uncertainty related to the national and California economic outlook and could have an effect on the future operations of the Company or its customers, including borrowers. The Company does not undertake, and specifically disclaims any obligation, to update any forward-looking statements to reflect occurrences or unanticipated events or circumstances after the date of such statements.

The reader should refer to the more complete discussion of such risks in the Company’s Annual Reports on Form 10-K.

 
3

 

PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION
 
ITEM 1 – FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
BRIDGE CAPITAL HOLDINGS AND SUBSIDIARY
Interim Consolidated Balance Sheets
(dollars in thousands)

   
(unaudited)
       
   
March 31,
   
December 31,
 
   
2011
   
2010
 
ASSETS
           
Cash and due from banks
  $ 15,001     $ 8,676  
Federal funds sold
    108,520       114,240  
Total cash and equivalents
    123,521       122,916  
                 
Interest bearing deposits in other banks
    1,560       2,539  
Investment securities available for sale
    204,177       217,303  
Loans, net of allowance for credit losses of $15,171 at
               
March 31, 2011 and $15,546 at December 31, 2010
    615,079       634,557  
Premises and equipment, net
    2,396       2,580  
Other real estate owned
    9,666       6,645  
Accrued interest receivable
    3,592       3,439  
Other assets
    38,446       39,752  
Total assets
  $ 998,437     $ 1,029,731  
                 
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
               
Deposits:
               
Demand noninterest-bearing
  $ 475,287     $ 443,806  
Demand interest-bearing
    5,096       5,275  
Savings
    305,113       355,772  
Time
    42,215       43,093  
Total deposits
    827,711       847,946  
                 
Junior subordinated debt securities
    17,527       17,527  
Other borrowings
    -       7,672  
Accrued interest payable
    36       48  
Other liabilities
    30,797       14,235  
Total liabilities
    876,071       887,428  
                 
Commitments and contingencies
    -       -  
                 
SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
               
Preferred stock, no par value; 10,000,000 shares authorized;
               
no shares issued and outstanding at March 31, 2011 and
               
23,864 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2010
    -       23,864  
Common stock, no par value; 30,000,000 shares authorized;
               
15,066,670 shares issued and outstanding at March 31, 2011;
               
14,510,379 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2010;
    101,546       100,435  
Additional paid in capital
    4,566       4,408  
Retained earnings
    17,154       15,784  
Accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income
    (900 )     (2,188 )
Total shareholders' equity
    122,366       142,303  
Total liabilities and shareholders' equity
  $ 998,437     $ 1,029,731  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the financial statements.

 
4

 

BRIDGE CAPITAL HOLDINGS AND SUBSIDIARY
Interim Consolidated Statements of Operations (unaudited)
(dollars in thousands)

   
Three months ended
 
   
March 31,
 
   
2011
   
2010
 
INTEREST INCOME:
     
Loans
  $ 10,816     $ 10,106  
Federal funds sold
    82       59  
Investment securities available for sale
    802       547  
Interest bearing deposits in other banks
    10       45  
Total interest income
    11,710       10,757  
                 
INTEREST EXPENSE:
               
Deposits:
               
Interest-bearing demand
    1       2  
Money market and savings
    227       358  
Certificates of deposit
    78       281  
Other
    346       241  
Total interest expense
    652       882  
                 
Net interest income
    11,058       9,875  
Provision for credit losses
    750       1,250  
Net interest income after provision for credit losses
    10,308       8,625  
                 
NON-INTEREST INCOME:
               
Service charges on deposit accounts
    675       545  
Gain on sale of SBA loans
    641       -  
International fee income
    546       428  
Other non interest income
    684       653  
Total non-interest income
    2,546       1,626  
                 
OPERATING EXPENSES:
               
Salaries and benefits
    5,378       5,284  
Premises and fixed assets
    972       1,052  
Other
    3,887       3,317  
Total operating expenses
    10,237       9,653  
                 
Income before income taxes
    2,617       598  
Income taxes
    1,047       233  
Net income
  $ 1,570     $ 365  
                 
Preferred dividends
    200       1,060  
Net income (loss) available to common shareholders
    1,370       (695 )
                 
Basic income (loss) per share
  $ 0.10     $ (0.11 )
Diluted income (loss) per share
  $ 0.09     $ (0.11 )
Average common shares outstanding
    14,089,577       6,576,923  
Average common and equivalent shares outstanding
    14,466,839       6,576,923  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the financial statements.

 
5

 

BRIDGE CAPITAL HOLDINGS AND SUBSIDIARY
Interim Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows (unaudited)
(dollars in thousands)

   
Three months ended March 31,
 
   
2011
   
2010
 
             
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
           
Net income
  $ 1,570     $ 365  
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
               
Provision for credit losses
    750       1,250  
Depreciation and amortization
    294       672  
Net (gain) loss on sale of other real estate owned
    (262 )     -  
Stock based compensation
    282       345  
Loans originated for sale
    (6,141 )     (6,592 )
Proceeds from loan sales
    10,763       -  
Net (gain) loss on sale of securities
    93       164  
Deferred income tax (credit)
    112       -  
(Increase) decrease in accrued interest receivable and other assets
    1,153       902  
Increase (decrease) in accrued interest payable and other liabilities
    16,550       (1,679 )
Net cash (used in) provided by operating activities
    25,164       (4,573 )
                 
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
               
Purchase of securities available for sale
    (70,074 )     (36,437 )
Proceeds from sale of securities available for sale
    21,392       21,142  
Proceeds from maturity of securities available for sale
    62,890       13,060  
Proceeds from the sale of other real estate owned
    3,051       3,697  
Net decrease (increase)  in loans
    8,296       (7,588 )
Net decrease (increase) in interest bearing deposits in other banks
    979       1,927  
Purchase of fixed assets
    (110 )     (116 )
Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities
    26,424       (4,315 )
                 
CASH FLOW FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
               
Net (decrease) increase  in deposits
    (20,235 )     13,578  
(Decrease) in other borrowings
    (7,672 )     -  
Common stock issued
    988       31,477  
Redemption of preferred stock
    (23,864 )     (30,000 )
Payment of cash dividends
    (200 )     (257 )
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities
    (50,983 )     14,798  
                 
NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH AND EQUIVALENTS:
    605       5,910  
Cash and equivalents at beginning of period
    122,916       119,153  
Cash and equivalents at end of period
  $ 123,521     $ 125,063  
                 
OTHER CASH FLOW INFORMATION:
               
Cash paid for interest
  $ 576     $ 630  
Cash paid for income taxes
  $ 18     $ 88  
                 
NON-CASH INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
               
Loans transferred to other real estate owned
  $ 5,810     $ 3,814  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the financial statements.

 
6

 

BRIDGE CAPITAL HOLDINGS AND SUBSIDIARY
Notes to Interim Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

1.           Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Basis of Presentation

The accompanying unaudited financial statements of Bridge Capital Holdings and Bridge Bank, N.A. (the Company) have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and pursuant to the rules and regulations of the SEC.  The interim financial data as of March 31, 2011 and for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010 is unaudited; however, in the opinion of the Company, the interim data includes all adjustments, consisting only of normal recurring adjustments, necessary for a fair statement of the results for the interim periods.   Certain information and note disclosures normally included in annual financial statements have been omitted pursuant to SEC rules and regulations; however, the Company believes the disclosures made are adequate to ensure that the information presented is not misleading.  Results of operations for the quarters ended March 31, 2011 and 2010 are not necessarily indicative of full year results.

The comparative balance sheet information as of December 31, 2010 is derived from the audited financial statements; however, it does not include all disclosures required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities as of the dates and for the periods presented.  A significant estimate included in the accompanying financial statements is the allowance for loan losses.  Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

FASB ASU 2010-20, Disclosures about the Credit Quality of Financing Receivables and the Allowance for Credit Losses (Topic 310), was issued July 2010. The guidance significantly expands the disclosures that the Company must make about the credit quality of financing receivables and the allowance for credit losses. The objectives of the enhanced disclosures are to provide financial statement users with additional information about the nature of credit risks inherent in the Company’s financing receivables, how credit risk is analyzed and assessed when determining the allowance for credit losses, and the reasons for the change in the allowance for credit losses.

The disclosures as of the end of the reporting period are effective for the Company’s interim and annual periods ending on or after December 15, 2010. The disclosures about activity that occurs during a reporting period are effective for the Company’s interim and annual periods beginning on or after December 15, 2010. The adoption of this Update requires enhanced disclosures and did not have a significant effect on the Company’s financial statements.

FASB ASU 2011-02, Disclosures about a Creditor’s Determination of Whether a Restructuring is a Troubled Debt Restructuring (Topic 310), was issued April 2011.   The guidance clarifies when a loan modification or restructuring is considered a troubled debt restructuring. This guidance is effective for the first interim or annual period beginning on or after June 15, 2011, and will be applied retrospectively to the beginning of the annual period of adoption. The adoption of this guidance is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s financial statements.

Earnings Per Share

Basic net income per share is computed by dividing net income applicable to common shareholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period.  Diluted net income per share is determined using the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period, adjusted for the dilutive effect of common stock equivalents, consisting of shares that might be issued upon exercise of common stock options or warrants and vesting of restricted stock.  Common stock equivalents are included in the diluted net income per share calculation to the extent these shares are dilutive.  See Note 2 to the financial statements for additional information on earnings per share.

 
7

 

Stock-Based Compensation

The Company has adopted guidance issued by the FASB that clarifies the accounting for stock-based payment transactions in which an enterprise receives employee services in exchange for (a) equity instruments of the enterprise or (b) liabilities that are based on the fair value of the enterprise’s equity instruments or that may be settled by the issuance of such equity instruments.  The Company uses the Black-Scholes-Merton (“BSM”) option-pricing model to determine the fair-value of stock-based awards.  The Company has recorded an incremental $282,000 ($188,000 net of tax) of stock-based compensation expense during the three months ended March 31, 2011 as a result of the adoption of the guidance issued by the FASB. 
 
No stock-based compensation costs were capitalized as part of the cost of an asset as of March 31, 2011.   As of March 31, 2011, $5.1 million of total unrecognized compensation cost related to stock options and restricted stock units are expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of 3.7 years.

Stock-based compensation reduced basic earnings per share by $0.01 and $0.04 and diluted earnings per share by $0.01 and $0.05 for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively.
 
Comprehensive Income

The Company has adopted accounting guidance issued by the FASB that requires all items recognized under accounting standards as components of comprehensive earnings be reported in an annual financial statement that is displayed with the same prominence as other annual financial statements. This Statement also requires that an entity classify items of other comprehensive earnings by their nature in an annual financial statement.  Other comprehensive earnings include an adjustment to fully recognize the liability associated with the supplemental executive retirement plan, unrealized gains and losses, net of tax, on cash flow hedges and unrealized gains and losses, net of tax, on marketable securities classified as available-for-sale.  The Company had a cumulative other comprehensive loss totaling $(900,000), net of tax, as of March 31, 2011 and a cumulative other comprehensive loss totaling $(2.2 million), net of tax, as of December 31, 2010.

   
Three months ended
 
(dollars in thousands)
 
March 31,
 
   
2011
   
2010
 
             
Net income
  $ 1,570     $ 365  
                 
Other comprehensive earnings- Net unrealized gains (losses) on securities available for sale
    1,175       327  
Net unrealized gains (losses) on supplemental executive retirement plan
    6       7  
Net unrealized gains (losses) on cash flow hedges
    107       (282 )
                 
Total comprehensive income (loss)
  $ 2,858     $ 417  
 
Allowance for Credit Losses

The allowance for loan losses is a valuation allowance for probable incurred credit losses. Loan losses are charged against the allowance when management believes the uncollectibility of a loan balance is confirmed.  Subsequent recoveries, if any, are credited to the allowance. Management estimates the allowance balance required using past loan loss experience, the nature and volume of the portfolio, information about specific borrower situations and estimated collateral values, economic conditions, and other factors.  Allocations of the allowance may be made for specific loans, but the entire allowance is available for any loan that, in management’s judgment, should be charged off.
 
 
8

 

The allowance generally consists of specific and general reserves.  Specific reserves relate to loans that are individually classified as impaired; however, it is currently the Bank’s practice to immediately charge-off any identified financial loss pertaining to impaired loans versus providing a specific reserve.  A loan is impaired when, based on current information and events, it is probable that the Bank will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement.  Loans, for which the terms have been modified resulting in a concession, and for which the borrower is experiencing financial difficulties, are generally considered troubled debt restructurings and classified as impaired.

 
Commercial and real estate loans are individually evaluated for impairment.  Generally Accepted Accounting Principles specify that if a loan is impaired, a portion of the allowance is allocated so that the loan is reported, net, at the present value of estimated future cash flows using the loan’s existing rate or at the fair value of collateral if repayment is expected solely from the collateral.  Large groups of smaller balance homogeneous loans, such as consumer and residential real estate loans, are collectively evaluated for impairment, and accordingly, they are not separately identified for impairment disclosures.

Troubled debt restructurings are separately identified for impairment disclosures and are measured at the present value of estimated future cash flows using the loan’s effective rate at inception.  If a troubled debt restructuring is considered to be a collateral dependent loan, the loan is reported, net, at the fair value of the collateral.  For troubled debt restructurings that subsequently default, the Bank determines the amount of reserve in accordance with the accounting policy for the allowance for loan losses.

 
General reserves cover non-impaired loans and are based on historical loss rates for each portfolio segment, adjusted for the effects of qualitative or environmental factors that are likely to cause estimated credit losses as of the evaluation date to differ from the portfolio segment’s historical loss experience. Qualitative factors include consideration of the following: changes in lending policies and procedures; changes in economic conditions, changes in the nature and volume of the portfolio; changes in the experience, ability and depth of lending management and other relevant staff; changes in the volume and severity of past due, nonaccrual and other adversely graded loans; changes in the loan review system; changes in the value of the underlying collateral for collateral-dependent loans; concentrations of credit and the effect of other external factors such as competition and legal and regulatory requirements.

Portfolio segments identified by the Bank include commercial, real estate construction, land, real estate other, factoring and asset-based lending, SBA, and consumer loans.  Relevant risk characteristics for these portfolio segments generally include debt service coverage, loan-to-value ratios and financial performance on non-consumer loans and credit scores, debt-to income, collateral type and loan-to-value ratios for consumer loans.

Segment Information

The Company has adopted accounting guidance issued by the FASB that requires certain information about the operating segments of the Company.  The objective of requiring disclosures about segments of an enterprise and related information is to provide information about the different types of business activities in which an enterprise engages and the different economic environment in which it operates to help users of financial statements better understand its performance, better assess its prospects for future cash flows and make more informed judgments about the enterprise as a whole.  The Company has determined that it has one segment, general commercial banking, and therefore, it is appropriate to aggregate the Company’s operations into a single operating segment.

Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities

The Company has adopted guidance issued by the FASB that clarifies the disclosure requirements for derivative instruments and hedging activities with the intent to provide users of financial statements with an enhanced understanding of: (a) how and why an entity uses derivative instruments, (b) how derivative instruments and related hedged items are accounted for, and (c) how derivative instruments and related hedged items affect an entity’s financial position, financial performance, and cash flows. The guidance requires qualitative disclosures about objectives and strategies for using derivatives, quantitative disclosures about the fair value of and gains and losses on derivative instruments, and disclosures about credit-risk-related contingent features in derivative instruments.

 
9

 

 
As required by the guidance, the Company records all derivatives on the balance sheet at fair value.  The accounting for changes in the fair value of derivatives depends on the intended use of the derivative, whether the Company has elected to designate a derivative in a hedging relationship and apply hedge accounting and whether the hedging relationship has satisfied the criteria necessary to apply hedge accounting. Derivatives designated and qualified as a hedge of the exposure to changes in the fair value of an asset, liability, or firm commitment attributable to a particular risk, such as interest rate risk, are considered fair value hedges. Derivatives designated and that qualify as a hedge of the exposure to variability in expected future cash flows, or other types of forecasted transactions, are considered cash flow hedges. Hedge accounting generally provides for the matching of the timing of gain or loss recognition on the hedging instrument with the recognition of the changes in the fair value of the hedged asset or liability that are attributable to the hedged risk in a fair value hedge or the earnings effect of the hedged forecasted transactions in a cash flow hedge.  The Company may enter into derivative contracts that are intended to economically hedge certain of its risks, even though hedge accounting does not apply or the Company elects not to apply hedge accounting under current accounting guidance.  See Note 9 to the financial statements for additional information on derivative instruments and hedging activities.
 
2.           Earnings Per Share

Basic net earnings per share is computed by dividing net earnings applicable to common shareholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period.  Diluted net earnings per share is determined using the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period, adjusted for the dilutive effect of common stock equivalents, consisting of shares that might be issued upon exercise of common stock options or warrants and vesting of restricted stock.  Common stock equivalents are included in the diluted net earnings per share calculation to the extent these shares are dilutive.  A reconciliation of the numerator and denominator used in the calculation of basic and diluted net earnings per share available to common shareholders is as follows:

 
   
Three months ended
 
(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)
 
March 31,
 
   
2011
   
2010
 
             
Net income
  $ 1,570     $ 365  
Less:  dividends on preferred shares
    (200 )     (1,060 )
Net income (loss) available to common shareholders
    1,370       (695 )
                 
Weighted average shares used in computing
               
basic earnings (loss) per share
    14,089,577       6,576,923  
Diluted potential common shares related to stock options,
               
restricted stock, and preferred stock
    377,262       -  
Total average common shares and equivalents
    14,466,839       6,576,923  
                 
Basic earnings (loss) per share
  $ 0.10     $ (0.11 )
Diluted earnings (loss) per share
  $ 0.09     $ (0.11 )

 
10

 
 
3.           Securities
 
The amortized cost and approximate fair values of securities at March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 are as follows:
 

(dollars in thousands)
 
As of March 31, 2011
 
         
Gross Unrealized
   
Fair
 
   
Cost
   
Gains
   
Losses
   
Value
 
Debt Securities:
                       
U.S. government agencies
  $ 31,849     $ 68     $ (126 )   $ 31,791  
Mortgage backed securities
    127,335       969       (276 )     128,028  
Collateralized mortgage obligations
    17,680       43       (3 )     17,720  
Corporate bonds
    26,634       44       (40 )     26,638  
Total debt securities
    203,498       1,124       (445 )     204,177  
Equity Securities:
    -       -       -       -  
Total securities available for sale
    203,498       1,124       (445 )     204,177  
                                 
Total investment securities
  $ 203,498     $ 1,124     $ (445 )   $ 204,177  

   
As of December 31, 2010
 
         
Gross Unrealized
   
Fair
 
   
Cost
   
Gains
   
Losses
   
Value
 
Debt Securities:
                       
U.S. government agency notes
  $ 49,417     $ 218     $ (61 )   $ 49,574  
Mortgage backed securities
    121,105       360       (1,845 )     119,620  
Collateralized mortgage obligations
    -       -       -       -  
Corporate bonds
    7,908       48       -       7,956  
Total debt securities
    178,430       626       (1,906 )     177,150  
Equity Securities:
    40,153                       40,153  
Total Securities Available for Sale
    218,583       626       (1,906 )     217,303  
                                 
Total Investment Securities
  $ 218,583     $ 626     $ (1,906 )   $ 217,303  
 
The scheduled maturities of securities available for sale at March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 were as follows:

(dollars in thousands)
 
March 31, 2011
 
   
Amortized
   
Fair
 
   
Cost
   
Value
 
             
Due in one year or less
  $ 13,446     $ 13,582  
Due after one year through five years
    80,801       81,271  
Due after five years through ten years
    45,209       45,394  
Due after ten years
    64,042       63,930  
Total debt securities available for sale
    203,498       204,177  
                 
Total equity securities available for sale
    -       -  
                 
Total investment securities
  $ 203,498     $ 204,177  

 
11

 

(dollars in thousands)
 
December 31, 2010
 
   
Amortized
   
Fair
 
   
Cost
   
Value
 
             
Due in one year or less
  $ 23,924     $ 24,050  
Due after one year through five years
    67,159       67,142  
Due after five years through ten years
    38,207       37,364  
Due after ten years
    49,140       48,594  
Total debt securities available for sale
    178,430       177,150  
                 
Total equity securities available for sale
    40,153       40,153  
                 
Total investment securities
  $ 218,583     $ 217,303  

As of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, no investment securities were pledged as collateral.   As of March 31, 2011, there were no unrealized losses attributable to securities that had been in an unrealized loss position for greater than 12 months.  As of December 31, 2010, $11,000 in unrealized losses was attributable to one security that had been in an unrealized loss position for greater than 12 months.  This unrealized loss (on a mortgage backed security) which had been in an unrealized loss position for one year or longer as of December 31, 2010, was caused by market interest rate increases subsequent to the purchase of the security.  Because the Bank has the ability to hold this investment until a recovery in fair value, which may be maturity, this investment was not considered to be other-than-temporarily impaired as of December 31, 2010.
 
4.           Loans
 
The balances in the various loan categories are as follows as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010:
 
   
March 31,
   
December 31,
 
(dollars in thousands)
 
2011
   
2010
 
             
Commercial
  $ 256,865     $ 269,034  
Real estate construction
    35,291       40,705  
Land loans
    8,235       9,072  
Real estate other
    139,499       138,633  
Factoring and asset based lending
    122,052       122,542  
SBA
    65,537       67,538  
Other
    4,193       4,023  
Total gross loans
    631,672       651,547  
Unearned fee income
    (1,422 )     (1,444 )
Total loan portfolio
    630,250       650,103  
Less allowance for credit losses
    (15,171 )     (15,546 )
Loans, net
  $ 615,079     $ 634,557  
 
The Bank categorizes loans into risk categories based on relevant information about the ability of borrowers to service their debt such as current financial information, historical payment experience, collateral adequacy, credit documentation, and current economic trends, among other factors.  The Bank analyzes loans individually by classifying the loans as to credit risk.  This analysis typically includes larger, non-homogeneous loans such as commercial real estate and commercial and industrial loans.  This analysis is performed on an ongoing basis as new information is obtained.  The Bank uses the following definitions for loan risk ratings:

Pass – Loans classified as pass include larger non-homogenous loans not meeting the risk rating definitions below and smaller, homogeneous loans not assessed on an individual basis.

Special Mention (Performing/Criticized) - Loans classified as special mention have a potential weakness that deserves management's close attention. If left uncorrected, these potential weaknesses may result in deterioration of the repayment prospects for the loan or of the institution's credit position at some future date.

 
12

 

Substandard (Performing/Criticized) - Loans classified as substandard are inadequately protected by the current net worth and paying capacity of the obligor or of the collateral pledged, if any. Loans so classified have a well-defined weakness or weaknesses that jeopardize the liquidation of the debt. They are characterized by the distinct possibility that the institution will sustain some loss if the deficiencies are not corrected.

Impaired (Nonaccrual) – A loan is considered impaired, when, based on current information and events, it is probable that the Bank will be unable to collect all amounts due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement.

Troubled Debt Restructurings – Loans, for which the terms have been modified resulting in a concession, and for which the borrower is experiencing financial difficulties, are generally considered troubled debt restructurings and classified as impaired; however, in some circumstances a troubled debt restructuring may be performing in compliance with modified terms for an extended period of time and therefore be placed on accrual status and deemed unimpaired.  On March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 troubled debt restructurings on accrual status and deemed unimpaired totaled $4.5 million and $4.5 million, respectively.

 
Risk category of loans:
 
(dollars in thousands)
 
   
As of March 31, 2011
 
         
Performing
             
   
Pass
   
(Criticized)
   
Impaired
   
Total
 
                         
Commercial
  $ 244,715     $ 10,785     $ 1,365     $ 256,865  
Real estate construction
    33,309       1,982       -       35,291  
Land loans
    4,281       1,359       2,595       8,235  
Real estate other
    96,395       35,452       7,652       139,499  
Factoring and asset based lending
    117,595       4,457       -       122,052  
SBA
    57,785       7,543       209       65,537  
Other
    837       3,356       -       4,193  
Total gross loans
  $ 554,918     $ 64,933     $ 11,821     $ 631,672  

   
As of December 31, 2010
 
         
Performing
             
   
Pass
   
(Criticized)
   
Impaired
   
Total
 
                         
Commercial
  $ 258,336     $ 9,568     $ 1,130     $ 269,034  
Real estate construction
    31,395       3,968       5,342       40,705  
Land loans
    4,384       1,512       3,176       9,072  
Real estate other
    93,959       38,041       6,633       138,633  
Factoring and asset based lending
    121,753       789       -       122,542  
SBA
    60,315       6,995       228       67,538  
Other
    822       3,014       187       4,023  
Total gross loans
  $ 570,964     $ 63,887     $ 16,696     $ 651,547  
 
 
13

 

Past due and nonaccrual loans:
 
(dollars in thousands)
 
As of March 31, 2011
 
   
Still Accruing
       
   
30-89 Days
   
Over 90 Days
   
Nonaccrual /
 
   
Past Due
   
Past Due
   
Impaired
 
                   
Commercial
  $ -     $ -     $ 1,365  
Real estate construction
    -       -       -  
Land loans
    399       -       2,595  
Real estate other
    -       2,442       7,652  
Factoring and asset based lending
    -       -       -  
SBA
    49       -       209  
Other
    0       -       -  
Total gross loans
  $ 448     $ 2,442     $ 11,821  

(dollars in thousands)
 
As of December 31, 2010
 
   
Still Accruing
       
   
30-89 Days
   
Over 90 Days
   
Nonaccrual /
 
   
Past Due
   
Past Due
   
Impaired
 
                   
Commercial
  $ 1,860     $ -     $ 1,130  
Real estate construction
    -       -       5,342  
Land loans
    -       -       3,176  
Real estate other
    -       -       6,633  
Factoring and asset based lending
    -       -       -  
SBA
    19       -       228  
Other
    -       -       187  
Total gross loans
  $ 1,879     $ -     $ 16,696  

There were 16 loans, totaling $11.8 million, on non-accrual and deemed impaired at March 31, 2011, and fifteen loans, totaling $16.7 million, on non-accrual and deemed impaired at December 31, 2010.

Average impaired loans for the periods ended March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 were $13.5 million and $17.9 million, respectively.  The following summarizes the breakdown of impaired loans by category as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010:

Impaired loans:
 
(dollars in thousands)
 
As of March 31, 2011
 
   
Upaid
         
Average
 
   
Principal
   
Recorded
   
Recorded
 
   
Balance
   
Investment
   
Investment
 
                   
Commercial
  $ 2,586     $ 1,365     $ 1,041  
Real estate construction
    -       -       2,111  
Land loans
    4,619       2,595       3,654  
Real estate other
    9,483       7,652       6,343  
Factoring and asset based lending
    -       -       -  
SBA
    374       209       221  
Other
    -       -       97  
Total gross loans
  $ 17,062     $ 11,821     $ 13,467  

 
14

 

(dollars in thousands)
 
As of December 31, 2010
 
   
Upaid
         
Average
 
   
Principal
   
Recorded
   
Recorded
 
   
Balance
   
Investment
   
Investment
 
                   
Commercial
  $ 2,116     $ 1,130     $ 1,020  
Real estate construction
    7,653       5,342       5,632  
Land loans
    5,288       3,176       4,132  
Real estate other
    7,861       6,633       6,441  
Factoring and asset based lending
    -       -       77  
SBA
    390       228       369  
Other
    -       187       189  
Total gross loans
  $ 23,308     $ 16,696     $ 17,860  

Income on such loans is only recognized to the extent that cash is received and where the future collection of principal is probable.  Accrual of interest is resumed only when principal and interest are brought fully current and when such loans are considered to be collectible as to both principal and interest.  There was no interest income recognized on impaired loans during the quarters ended March 31, 2011 and 2010.

The allowance for loan losses is a valuation allowance for probable incurred credit losses. Loan losses are charged against the allowance when management believes the uncollectibility of a loan balance is confirmed.  Subsequent recoveries, if any, are credited to the allowance.  The entire allowance is available for any loan that, in management’s judgment should be charged-off.

The allowance generally consists of specific and general reserves.  Specific reserves relate to loans that are individually classified as impaired; however, it is currently the Bank’s practice to immediately charge-off any identified financial loss pertaining to impaired loans versus providing a specific reserve.  As such, the allowance for credit losses as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 reflected general reserves for non-impaired loans and was based on historical loss rates for each portfolio segment, adjusted for the effects of qualitative or environmental factors that were likely to cause estimated credit losses as of the evaluation date to differ from the portfolio segment’s historical loss experience. Qualitative factors included consideration of the following: changes in lending policies and procedures; changes in economic conditions, changes in the nature and volume of the portfolio; changes in the experience, ability and depth of lending management and other relevant staff; changes in the volume and severity of past due, nonaccrual and other adversely graded loans; changes in the loan review system; changes in the value of the underlying collateral for collateral-dependent loans; concentrations of credit and the effect of other external factors such as competition and legal and regulatory requirements.

 
15

 

The following table summarizes the activity in the allowance for loan losses for the quarters ended March 31, 2011 and 2010.

Analysis of the allowance for credit losses:
 
(dollars in thousands)
 
March 31,
   
March 31,
 
   
2011
   
2010
 
             
Balance, beginning of period
  $ 15,546     $ 16,012  
Loans charged off by category:
               
Commercial and other
    727       889  
Real estate construction
    -       -  
Real estate land
    340       20  
Real estate other
    690       537  
Factoring and asset-based lending
    -       -  
Consumer
    -       606  
Total charge-offs
    1,757       2,051  
Recoveries by category:
               
Commercial and other
    38       159  
Real estate construction
    491       778  
Real estate land
    102       7  
Real estate other
    -       -  
Factoring and asset-based lending
    -       -  
Consumer
    -       -  
Total recoveries
    632       944  
Net charge-offs (recoveries)
    1,125       1,107  
Provision charged to expense
    750       1,250  
Balance, end of period
  $ 15,171     $ 16,155  

 5.
Premises and Equipment
 
Premises and equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and amortization.  Depreciation and amortization are computed on a straight-line basis over the shorter of the lease term, generally three to fifteen years, or the estimated useful lives of the assets, generally three to five years.

Premises and equipment at March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 are comprised of the following:

(dollars in thousands)
 
March 31, 2011
 
         
Accumulated
   
Net Book
 
   
Cost
   
Depreciation
   
Value
 
                   
Leasehold improvements
  $ 5,434     $ (3,667 )   $ 1,767  
Furniture and fixtures
    1,092       (973 )     119  
Capitalized software
    3,259       (3,004 )     255  
Equipment
    2,403       (2,148 )     255  
Construction in process
    -       -       -  
Totals
  $ 12,188     $ (9,792 )   $ 2,396  

 
16

 

(dollars in thousands)
 
December 31, 2010
 
         
Accumulated
   
Net book
 
   
Cost
   
Depreciation
   
Value
 
                   
Leasehold improvements
  $ 5,427     $ (3,506 )   $ 1,921  
Furniture and fixtures
    1,075       (952 )     123  
Capitalized software
    3,220       (2,938 )     282  
Equipment
    2,356       (2,102 )     254  
Construction in process
    -       -       -  
Totals
  $ 12,078     $ (9,498 )   $ 2,580  

6.           Junior Subordinated Debt Securities and Other Borrowings

Junior Subordinated Debt Securities

On December 21, 2004, the Company issued $12,372,000 of junior subordinated debt securities (the “debt securities”) to Bridge Capital Trust I, a statutory trust created under the laws of the State of California.  These debt securities are subordinated to effectively all borrowings of the Company and are due and payable in March 2035.  Interest is payable quarterly on these debt securities at a fixed rate of 5.90% for the first five years, and thereafter interest accrues at LIBOR plus 1.98%.  The debt securities can be redeemed at par at the Company’s option beginning in March 2010; they can also be redeemed at par if certain events occur that impact the tax treatment or the capital treatment of the issuance.

The Company also purchased a 3% minority interest in the Trust.  The balance of the equity of the Trust is comprised of mandatorily redeemable preferred securities.

On March 30, 2006 the Company issued $5,155,000 of junior subordinated debt securities (the “debt securities”) to Bridge Capital Trust II, a statutory trust created under the laws of the State of Delaware.  These debt securities are subordinated to effectively all borrowings of the Company and are due and payable in March 2037.  Interest is payable quarterly on these debt securities at a fixed rate of  6.60% for the first five years, and thereafter interest accrues at LIBOR plus 1.38%.  The debt securities can be redeemed at par at the Company’s option beginning in April 2011; they can also be redeemed at par if certain events occur that impact the tax treatment or the capital treatment of the issuance.

The Company also purchased a 3% minority interest in the Trust.  The balance of the equity of the Trust is comprised of mandatorily redeemable preferred securities.

Based upon accounting guidance, these Trusts are not consolidated into the company’s financial statements.  The Federal Reserve Board has ruled that subordinated notes payable to unconsolidated special purpose entities (“SPE’s”) such as these Trusts, net of the bank holding company’s investment in the SPE, qualify as Tier 1 Capital, subject to certain limits.

Other Borrowings

There were no other borrowings at March 31, 2011 while at December 31, 2010, other borrowings consisted of $7.7 million of SBA loans sold in the fourth quarter 2010. Certain recourse provisions in SBA sales agreements as of December 31, 2010 caused a delay in the recognition of the sale.  Proceeds from SBA loan sales were recognized as a secured borrowing until the recourse provisions expired, which was typically three months after the settlement date.  Upon expiration of the recourse provisions, the Bank recognized a gain on the sale and derecognized the loan receivable and the related secured borrowing.  As of March 31, 2011, the recourse provisions in SBA loan sales agreements have been amended to comply with current accounting standards which provide for the immediate recognition of a gain on sale and derecognition of the related loan receivable.

As of March 31, 2011, the Company had a total borrowing capacity with the Federal Home Loan Bank of San Francisco of approximately $248.0 million for which the Company had collateral in place to borrow $34.0 million.  As of March 31, 2011, $12.0 million of this borrowing capacity was pledged to secure a letter of credit.

The Bank also has unsecured borrowing lines with correspondent banks totaling $25.0 million.  At March 31, 2011, there were no balances outstanding on these lines.

 
17

 
 
7.           Stock-Based Compensation
 
The Company has elected to use the BSM option-pricing model, which incorporates various assumptions including volatility, expected life, and interest rates.  The expected volatility is based on the historical volatility of the Company’s common stock over the most recent period commensurate with the estimated expected life of the Company’s stock options, adjusted for the impact of unusual fluctuations not reasonably expected to recur and other relevant factors including implied volatility in market traded options on the Company’s common stock. The expected life of an award is based on historical experience and on the terms and conditions of the stock awards granted to employees.
 
The weighted average assumptions used for the three month periods ended March 31, 2011 and 2010 and the resulting estimates of weighted-average fair value per share of stock options granted during those periods are as follows:

   
Three months ended March 31,
 
   
2011
   
2010
 
             
Expected life
 
75 months
   
75 months
 
             
Stock volatility
    35.00 %     45.00 %
                 
Risk free interest rate
    2.50 %     2.69 %
                 
Dividend yield
    0.00 %     0.00 %
                 
Fair value per share
  $ 3.56     $ 3.35  
 
8.           Fair Value of Financial Instruments

In accordance with accounting guidance, the Company groups its financial assets and financial liabilities measured at fair value in three levels, based on the markets in which the assets and liabilities are traded and the reliability of the assumptions used to determine fair value.  These levels are:

Level 1 – Valuations for assets and liabilities traded in active exchange markets, such as the New York Stock Exchange.  Level 1 also includes U.S. Treasury, other U.S. government and agency mortgage-backed securities that are traded by dealers or brokers in active markets.  Valuations are obtained from readily available pricing sources for market transactions involving identical assets or liabilities.

Level 2 – Valuations for assets and liabilities traded in less active dealer or broker markets.  Valuations are obtained from third party pricing services for identical or comparable assets or liabilities.

Level 3 – Valuations for assets and liabilities that are derived from other valuation methodologies, including option pricing models, discounted cash flow models and similar techniques, and not based on market exchange, dealer, or broker traded transactions.  Level 3 valuations incorporate certain assumptions and projections in determining the fair value assigned to such assets or liabilities.

The balances of assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis are as follows:

(dollars in thousands)
 
As of March 31, 2011
 
                         
   
Total
   
Level 1
   
Level 2
   
Level 3
 
                         
Securities available for sale
  $ 204,177     $ -     $ 204,177     $ -  
Cash flow hedge
    (1,572 )     -       (1,572 )     -  
Warrant portfolio
    724       -       -       724  
                                 
Total
  $ 203,329     $ -     $ 202,605     $ 724  

 
18

 

(dollars in thousands)
 
As of December 31, 2010
 
                         
   
Total
   
Level 1
   
Level 2
   
Level 3
 
                         
Securities available for sale
  $ 217,303     $ -     $ 217,303     $ -  
Cash flow hedge
    (1,750 )     -       (1,750 )     -  
Warrant portfolio
    724       -       -       724  
                                 
Total
  $ 216,277     $ -     $ 215,553     $ 724  

The changes in Level 3 assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis were not material for the quarter ended March 31, 2011.

The Company may be required, from time to time, to measure certain other financial assets at fair value on a non-recurring basis in accordance with GAAP.  These adjustments to fair value usually result from application of lower-of-cost-or-market accounting or write-downs of individual assets.  The assets measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis at March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 included OREO of $9.7 million and $6.6 million, respectively.  The fair value of OREO was determined using Level 2 assumptions.  The Company had no charge-offs during the quarter ended March 31, 2011 as a result of declines in the OREO property values.  The assets measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010 also included impaired loans of $14.3 million and $16.7 million, respectively.  The fair value of impaired loans was determined using Level 3 assumptions.  The Company charged-off $1.8 million during the quarter ended March 31, 2011 as a result of impaired loans.

The following estimated fair value amounts have been determined by using available market information and appropriate valuation methodologies.  However, considerable judgment is required to interpret market data to develop the estimates of fair value.  Accordingly, the estimates presented are not necessarily indicative of the amounts that could be realized in a current market exchange.  The use of different market assumptions and/or estimation techniques may have a material effect on the estimated fair value amounts.

The following table presents the carrying amount and estimated fair value of certain assets and liabilities of the Company at March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010.  The carrying amounts reported in the balance sheets approximate fair value for the following financial instruments: cash and due from banks, federal funds sold, interest-bearing deposits in other banks, demand and savings deposits, bank owned life insurance, and cash flow hedge (see Note 3 for information regarding securities).

(dollars in thousands)
 
March 31, 2011
   
December 31, 2010
 
   
Carrying
   
Fair
   
Carrying
   
Fair
 
   
Value
   
Value
   
Value
   
Value
 
                         
Financial assets:
                       
Cash and due from banks
  $ 15,001     $ 15,001     $ 8,676     $ 8,676  
Federal funds sold
    108,520       108,520       114,240       114,240  
Interest bearing deposits in other banks
    1,560       1,560       2,539       2,539  
Investments securities
    204,177       204,177       217,303       217,303  
Loans and leases, gross
    630,250       637,311       650,103       663,030  
Bank owned life insurance
    10,490       10,490       10,393       10,393  
                                 
Financial liabilities:
                               
Deposits
    827,711       826,208       847,946       846,701  
Trust preferred securities
    17,527       17,895       17,527       17,607  
Other borrowings
    -       -       7,672       7,650  
Cash flow hedge
    (1,572 )     (1,572 )     (1,750 )     (1,750 )

 
19

 

Loans
 
The fair value of loans with fixed rates is estimated by discounting the future cash flows using current rates at which similar loans would be made to borrowers with similar credit ratings.  For loans with variable rates that adjust with changes in market rates of interest, the carrying amount is a reasonable estimate of fair value.

Time deposits
 
The fair value of fixed maturity certificates of deposit is estimated using rates currently offered for deposits of similar remaining maturities.
 
Trust preferred securities
 
The fair value of the trust preferred securities approximates the pricing of a preferred security at current market prices.

9.           Derivatives and Hedging Activities

The Company is exposed to certain risks arising from both its business operations and economic conditions.  The Company principally manages its exposures to a wide variety of business and operational risks through management of its core business activities. The Company manages economic risks, including interest rate, liquidity, and credit risk, primarily by managing the amount, sources, and duration of its assets and liabilities and through the use of derivative financial instruments.  Specifically, the Company enters into derivative financial instruments to manage exposures that arise from business activities that result in the receipt or payment of future known and uncertain cash amounts, the value of which are determined by interest rates.  The Company’s derivative financial instruments are used to manage differences in the amount, timing, and duration of the Company’s known or expected cash receipts and its known or expected cash payments principally related to certain variable rate loan assets and variable rate borrowings.  The Company does not use derivatives for trading or speculative purposes and currently does not have any derivatives that are not designated in qualifying hedging relationships.

Fair Values of Derivative Instruments on the Balance Sheet

The table below presents the fair value of the Company’s derivative instruments that were liabilities, as well as their classification on the balance sheet, as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010.  The Company did not have any derivative instruments that were assets as of March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010.

       
Fair Value
 
Derivatives Designated as Hedging
 
Balance Sheet
 
March 31,
   
December 31,
 
Instruments Under SFAS 133
 
Location
 
2010
   
2010
 
                 
Interest rate contracts
 
Other liabilities
  $ 1,572     $ 1,750  
                     
Total hedged derivatives
      $ 1,572     $ 1,750  
 
Cash Flow Hedges of Interest Rate Risk

The Company’s objectives in using interest rate derivatives are to add stability to interest income and expense and to manage its exposure to interest rate movements. To accomplish this objective, the Company primarily uses interest rate swaps as part of its interest rate risk management strategy.  For hedges of the Company’s variable-rate loan assets, interest rate swaps designated as cash flow hedges involve the receipt of fixed-rate amounts from a counterparty in exchange for the Company making variable-rate payments over the life of the agreements without exchange of the underlying notional amount.  For hedges of the Company’s variable-rate borrowings, interest rate swaps designated as cash flow hedges involve the receipt of variable-rate amounts from a counterparty in exchange for the Company making fixed-rate payments. As of March 31, 2011, the Company had two interest rate swaps with an aggregate notional amount of $17.5 million that were designated as cash flow hedges of interest rate risk associated with the Company’s variable-rate borrowings.

 
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The effective portion of changes in the fair value of derivatives designated and that qualify as cash flow hedges is recorded in Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (“AOCI”) and is subsequently reclassified into earnings in the period that the hedged forecasted transaction affects earnings. During the three months ended March 31, 2011 such derivatives were used to hedge the forecasted variable cash outflows associated with subordinated debt related to trust preferred securities.  During the three months ended March 31, 2011 and March 31, 2010, the amount of pre-tax gain/(loss) recorded in AOCI due to the effective portion of changes in fair value of derivatives designated as cash flow hedges was $60,000 and $$(368,000), respectively.  During the three months ended March 31, 2011 and March 31, 2010, $(113,000) and $57,000, respectively was reclassified into earnings related to the effective portion of cash flow hedges.

The ineffective portion of the change in fair value of the derivatives is recognized directly in earnings. No hedge ineffectiveness was recognized during the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010.

Amounts reported in AOCI related to derivatives will be reclassified to interest income or expense, as applicable, as interest payments are received / made on the Company’s variable-rate assets/liabilities. During the next twelve months, the Company estimates that $625,000 will be reclassified as an increase to interest expense.  During the three months ended March 31, 2010, the Company accelerated the reclassification of amounts in other comprehensive income to earnings as a result of the hedged forecasted transactions related to certain terminated interest rate swaps becoming probable not to occur.  The accelerated amounts for the three months ended March 31, 2010 was a gain of $21,000.  The Company did not accelerate any amounts during the quarter ended March 31, 2011.

The tables below presents the effect of the Company’s derivative financial instruments, interest rate contracts, on the income statement for the three months ended March 31, 2011 and 2010.

   
Interest Income
   
Non-Interest Income
   
Total Income
 
   
Three months
ended March 31,
   
Three months
ended March 31,
   
Three months
ended March 31,
 
 
   
2011
   
2010
   
2011
   
2010
   
2011
   
2009
 
                                     
Amount of gain reclassified from AOCI into income - effective portion
  $ (113 )   $ 57     $ -     $ 21     $ (113 )   $ 78  
                                                 
Amount of gain recognized in income on derivative - ineffective portion and amount excluded from effectiveness testing
    -       -       -       -       -       -  
                                                 
Total derivative income
  $ (113 )   $ 57     $ -     $ 21     $ (113 )   $ 78  

Credit Risk Related Contingent Features

The Company has an agreement with one of its derivative counterparties that contain a provision where if the Company defaults on any of its indebtedness, including default where repayment of the indebtedness has not been accelerated by the lender, then the Company could also be declared in default on its derivative obligations.
 
The Company also has agreements with certain of its derivative counterparties that contain a provision where if the Company fails to maintain its status as a well / adequate capitalized institution, then the counterparty could terminate the derivative positions and the Company would be required to settle its obligations under the agreements.

As of March 31, 2011 the fair value of derivatives in a net liability position, which includes accrued interest but excludes any adjustment for nonperformance risk, related to these agreements was $1.6 million. As of March 31, 2011, the Company has minimum collateral posting thresholds with certain of its derivative counterparties and has posted collateral of $2.4 million against its obligations under these agreements. If the Company had breached any of these provisions at March 31, 2011, it would have been required to settle its obligations under the agreements at the termination value.

 
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10.           Preferred Stock and Warrant under the TARP Capital Purchase Program
 
On December 23, 2008, the Company issued 23,864 shares of Series C Preferred Stock (Preferred Stock) and a 10-year Warrant to purchase up to 396,412 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $9.03 per share.  The Company sold the Preferred Stock and Warrant to the U.S. Treasury under the TARP Capital Purchase Program for an aggregate amount of $23.9 million.  The Company has paid a cash dividend on the Preferred Stock of 5% per annum since the issuance.
 
The Company recorded the issuance of the Preferred Stock and Warrant as an increase in shareholders’ equity.  The net proceeds from the transaction were allocated between Preferred Stock and the Warrant based on their respective fair values at the date of the issuance.  Utilizing the results of a Black-Sholes model, the Company allocated approximately $70,000 to the Warrant (i.e. the discount on the Preferred Stock) to be amortized over a five year period.
 
On March 16, 2011, the Company fully redeemed all of its Preferred Stock under the TARP Capital Purchase Program for $23.9 million.  The redemption was funded by the net proceeds from a $30.0 million private placement of the Company’s common stock completed in the fourth quarter of 2010.  As a result of the early repayment, the Company recorded a $30,000 charge in the first quarter of 2011 to reflect the accelerated accretion of the remaining discount on the preferred stock.
 
On April 20, 2011, the Company negotiated and repurchased the Warrant held by the U.S. Treasury for $1.4 million, which was recorded as a reduction to shareholders’ equity.
 
See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations – Capital Resources” for additional preferred and common stock discussion.

 
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ITEM 2 – MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

In addition to the historical information, this quarterly report contains certain forward-looking information within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and which are subject to the “Safe Harbor” created by those sections.   The reader of this quarterly report should understand that all such forward-looking statements are subject to various uncertainties and risks that could affect their outcome.  The Company’s actual results could differ materially from those suggested by such forward-looking statements.     Such risks and uncertainties include, among others, (1) competitive pressure in the banking industry increases significantly; (2) changes in interest rate environment reduces margin; (3) general economic conditions, either nationally or regionally are less favorable than expected, resulting in, among other things, a deterioration in credit quality; (4) changes in the regulatory environment; (5) changes in business conditions and inflation; (6) costs and expenses of complying with the internal control provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and our degree of success in achieving compliance; (7) changes in securities markets; (8) future credit loss experience; (9) civil disturbances of terrorist threats or acts, or apprehension about possible future occurrences of acts of this type; and (10) the involvement of the United States in war or other hostilities.  Therefore, the information in this quarterly report should be carefully considered when evaluating the business prospects of the Company.

Critical Accounting Policies

Our accounting policies are integral to understanding the results reported.  Our most complex accounting policies require management’s judgment to ascertain the valuation of assets, liabilities, commitments and contingencies. We have established detailed policies and control procedures that are intended to ensure that valuation methods are well controlled and applied consistently from period to period. In addition, the policies and procedures are intended to ensure that the process for changing methodologies occurs in an appropriate manner. The following is a brief description of our current accounting policies involving significant management valuation judgments.
 
Allowance for Loan Losses: The allowance for loan losses represents management’s best estimate of losses inherent in the existing loan portfolio. The allowance for loan losses is increased by the provision for loan losses charged to expense and reduced by loans charged off, net of recoveries. The provision for loan losses is determined based on management’s assessment of several factors: reviews and evaluation of specific loans, changes in the nature and volume of the loan portfolio, current economic conditions and the related impact on specific borrowers and industry groups, historical loan loss experiences, the level of classified and nonperforming loans and the results of regulatory examinations.
 
Loans are considered impaired if, based on current information and events, it is probable that we will be unable to collect the scheduled payments of principal or interest when due according to the contractual terms of the loan agreement. The measurement of impaired loans is generally based on the present value of expected future cash flows discounted at the historical effective interest rate stipulated in the loan agreement, except that all collateral-dependent loans are measured for impairment based on the fair value of the collateral. In measuring the fair value of the collateral, management uses assumptions and methodologies consistent with those that would be utilized by unrelated third parties.
 
Changes in the financial condition of individual borrowers, in economic conditions, in historical loss experience and in the condition of the various markets in which collateral may be sold may all affect the required level of the allowance for loan losses and the associated provision for loan losses.

The accrual of interest on loans is discontinued and any accrued and unpaid interest is reversed when, in the opinion of management, there is significant doubt as to the collectability of interest or principal or when the payment of principal or interest is ninety days past due, unless the amount is well-secured and in the process of collection.
 
Sale of SBA Loans:  The Company has the ability and the intent to sell all or a portion of certain SBA loans in the loan portfolio and, as such, carries the saleable portion of these loans at the lower of aggregate cost or fair value.  At March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, the fair value of SBA loans exceeded aggregate cost and therefore, SBA loans were carried at aggregate cost.

In calculating gain on the sale of SBA loans, the Company performs an allocation based on the relative fair values of the sold portion and retained portion of the loan.  The Company’s assumptions are validated by reference to external market information.
 
 
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Available-for-Sale Securities: the fair value of most securities classified as available-for-sale is based on quoted market prices. If quoted market prices are not available, fair values are extrapolated from the quoted prices of similar instruments.

Supplemental Employee Retirement Plan:  The Company has entered into supplemental employee retirement agreements with certain executive and senior officers.  The measurement of the liability under these agreements includes estimates involving life expectancy, length of time before retirement, and expected benefit levels.  Should these estimates prove materially wrong, we could incur additional or reduced expense to provide the benefits.

 
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Selected Financial Data

The following table reflects selected financial data and ratios as of and for the quarters ended March 31, 2011 and 2010.

 
(dollars in thousands, except per share data)
 
Three months ended
 
   
March 31,
 
 
 
2011
   
2010
 
Statement of Operations Data:
           
             
Interest income
  $ 11,710     $ 10,757  
Interest expense
    652       882  
Net interest income
    11,058       9,875  
Provision for credit losses
    750       1,250  
Net interest income after provision for credit losses
    10,308       8,625  
Other income
    2,546       1,626  
Other expenses
    10,237       9,653  
Income before income taxes
    2,617