CIT » Topics » Fair Value Measurements

This excerpt taken from the CIT 8-K filed Jan 8, 2010.

Fair Value Measurements

Effective January 1, 2008, the Company adopted SFAS No. 157, “Fair Value Measurements”, which defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value of financial assets and liabilities under GAAP, and enhances disclosures about fair value measurements. Fair value is defined as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between two market participants on the measurement date. The impact of adopting SFAS No. 157 on accumulated deficit at January 1, 2008 was not material. Subsequent changes in the fair value of financial assets and liabilities are recognized in earnings as they occur.

The Company determines the fair value of its assets and liabilities based on the fair value hierarchy established in SFAS 157, which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (level 1 measurements) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (level 3 measurements). The three levels of the fair value hierarchy under SFAS No. 157 are described below:

  • Level 1 – Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. Level 1 assets and liabilities include debt and equity securities and derivative contracts that are traded in an active exchange market, as well as certain other securities that are highly liquid and are actively traded in over-the-counter markets;
  • Level 2 – Observable inputs other than Level 1 prices, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities, quoted prices in markets that are not active, or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities. Level 2 assets and liabilities include debt securities with quoted prices that are

12

CIT GROUP AND SUBSIDIARIES — NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

    traded less frequently than exchange-traded instruments and derivative contracts whose value is determined using a pricing model with inputs that are observable in the market or can be derived principally from or corroborated by observable market data. This category generally includes derivative contracts and certain loans held-for-sale;
  • Level 3 – Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities. Level 3 assets and liabilities include financial instruments whose value is determined using valuation models, discounted cash flow methodologies or similar techniques, as well as instruments for which the determination of fair value requires significant management judgment or estimation. This category generally includes retained residual interests in securitizations, highly structured or long-term derivative contracts and collateralized loan obligations (CLO) where independent pricing information cannot be obtained for a significant portion of the underlying assets or liabilities.

A financial instrument’s level within the fair value hierarchy is based on the lowest priority ranking of any input that is significant to the fair value measurement.

The Company did not elect to measure any financial instruments at fair value under SFAS 159, “The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities.”

Effective January 1, 2008, the Company adopted FASB Staff Position FIN 39-1 (FSP FIN 39-1), an amendment to FASB Interpretation No. 39, which allows companies to elect in their accounting policy to offset fair value amounts recognized for derivative instruments executed with the same counterparty under a master netting agreement. In conjunction with this adoption, the Company has elected to present assets and liabilities on a gross-by-counterparty basis. Assets and liabilities, as previously reported at December 31, 2007, were reflected on a net-by-counterparty basis for transactions settled in the same currency. Accordingly, other assets and accrued liabilities and payables as of December 31, 2007 were each increased by $365.4 million from amounts previously reported in order to conform to the current presentation.

This excerpt taken from the CIT 8-K filed Oct 1, 2009.

Fair Value Measurements

Effective January 1, 2008, the Company adopted SFAS No. 157, “Fair Value Measurements”, which defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value of financial assets and liabilities under GAAP, and enhances disclosures about fair value measurements. Fair value is defined as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between two market participants on the measurement date. The impact of adopting SFAS No. 157 on accumulated deficit at January 1, 2008 was not material. Subsequent changes in the fair value of financial assets and liabilities are recognized in earnings as they occur.

The Company determines the fair value of its assets and liabilities based on the fair value hierarchy established in SFAS 157, which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (level 1 measurements) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (level 3 measurements). The three levels of the fair value hierarchy under SFAS No. 157 are described below:

  • Level 1 – Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. Level 1 assets and liabilities include debt and equity securities and derivative contracts that are traded in an active exchange market, as well as certain other securities that are highly liquid and are actively traded in over-the-counter markets;
  • Level 2 – Observable inputs other than Level 1 prices, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities, quoted prices in markets that are not active, or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities. Level 2 assets and liabilities include debt securities with quoted prices that are

12

CIT GROUP AND SUBSIDIARIES — NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

    traded less frequently than exchange-traded instruments and derivative contracts whose value is determined using a pricing model with inputs that are observable in the market or can be derived principally from or corroborated by observable market data. This category generally includes derivative contracts and certain loans held-for-sale;
  • Level 3 – Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities. Level 3 assets and liabilities include financial instruments whose value is determined using valuation models, discounted cash flow methodologies or similar techniques, as well as instruments for which the determination of fair value requires significant management judgment or estimation. This category generally includes retained residual interests in securitizations, highly structured or long-term derivative contracts and collateralized loan obligations (CLO) where independent pricing information cannot be obtained for a significant portion of the underlying assets or liabilities.

A financial instrument’s level within the fair value hierarchy is based on the lowest priority ranking of any input that is significant to the fair value measurement.

The Company did not elect to measure any financial instruments at fair value under SFAS 159, “The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities.”

Effective January 1, 2008, the Company adopted FASB Staff Position FIN 39-1 (FSP FIN 39-1), an amendment to FASB Interpretation No. 39, which allows companies to elect in their accounting policy to offset fair value amounts recognized for derivative instruments executed with the same counterparty under a master netting agreement. In conjunction with this adoption, the Company has elected to present assets and liabilities on a gross-by-counterparty basis. Assets and liabilities, as previously reported at December 31, 2007, were reflected on a net-by-counterparty basis for transactions settled in the same currency. Accordingly, other assets and accrued liabilities and payables as of December 31, 2007 were each increased by $365.4 million from amounts previously reported in order to conform to the current presentation.

These excerpts taken from the CIT 10-K filed Mar 2, 2009.

Fair Value Measurements

Effective January 1, 2008, the Company adopted SFAS No. 157, “Fair Value Measurements”, which defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value of financial assets and liabilities under GAAP, and enhances disclosures about fair value measurements. Fair value is defined as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between two market participants on the measurement date. The impact of adopting SFAS No. 157 on accumulated deficit at January 1, 2008 was not material. Subsequent changes in the fair value of financial assets and liabilities are recognized in earnings as they occur.

The Company determines the fair value of its assets and liabilities based on the fair value hierarchy established in SFAS 157, which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (level 1 measurements) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (level 3 measurements). The three levels of the fair value hierarchy under SFAS No. 157 are described below:

  • Level 1 – Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. Level 1 assets and liabilities include debt and equity securities and derivative contracts that are traded in an active exchange market, as well as certain other securities that are highly liquid and are actively traded in over-the-counter markets;
  • Level 2 – Observable inputs other than Level 1 prices, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities, quoted prices in markets that are not active, or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities. Level 2 assets and liabilities include debt securities with quoted prices that are

CIT ANNUAL REPORT 2008 81

CIT GROUP AND SUBSIDIARIES — NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

    traded less frequently than exchange-traded instruments and derivative contracts whose value is determined using a pricing model with inputs that are observable in the market or can be derived principally from or corroborated by observable market data. This category generally includes derivative contracts and certain loans held-for-sale;
  • Level 3 – Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities. Level 3 assets and liabilities include financial instruments whose value is determined using valuation models, discounted cash flow methodologies or similar techniques, as well as instruments for which the determination of fair value requires significant management judgment or estimation. This category generally includes retained residual interests in securitizations, highly structured or long-term derivative contracts and collateralized loan obligations (CLO) where independent pricing information cannot be obtained for a significant portion of the underlying assets or liabilities.

A financial instrument’s level within the fair value hierarchy is based on the lowest priority ranking of any input that is significant to the fair value measurement.

The Company did not elect to measure any financial instruments at fair value under SFAS 159, “The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities.”

Effective January 1, 2008, the Company adopted FASB Staff Position FIN 39-1 (FSP FIN 39-1), an amendment to FASB Interpretation No. 39, which allows companies to elect in their accounting policy to offset fair value amounts recognized for derivative instruments executed with the same counterparty under a master netting agreement. In conjunction with this adoption, the Company has elected to present assets and liabilities on a gross-by-counterparty basis. Assets and liabilities, as previously reported at December 31, 2007, were reflected on a net-by-counterparty basis for transactions settled in the same currency. Accordingly, other assets and accrued liabilities and payables as of December 31, 2007 were each increased by $365.4 million from amounts previously reported in order to conform to the current presentation.

Fair Value Measurements


Effective January 1, 2008, the Company adopted SFAS No. 157, “Fair Value Measurements”, which defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value of financial assets and liabilities under GAAP, and enhances disclosures about fair value measurements. Fair value is defined as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between two market participants on the measurement date. The impact of adopting SFAS No. 157 on accumulated deficit at January 1, 2008 was not material. Subsequent changes in the fair value of financial assets and liabilities are recognized in earnings as they occur.


The Company determines the fair value of its assets and liabilities based on the fair value hierarchy established in SFAS 157, which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (level 1 measurements) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (level 3 measurements). The three levels of the fair value hierarchy under SFAS No. 157 are described below:



  • Level 1 – Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical
    assets or liabilities. Level 1 assets and liabilities include debt and equity
    securities and derivative contracts that are traded in an active exchange
    market, as well as certain other securities that are highly liquid and are
    actively traded in over-the-counter markets;

  • Level 2 – Observable inputs other than Level 1 prices, such as quoted
    prices for similar assets or liabilities, quoted prices in markets that are
    not active, or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by
    observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities.
    Level 2 assets and liabilities include debt securities with quoted prices
    that are







CIT ANNUAL REPORT 2008 81


CIT GROUP AND SUBSIDIARIES — NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS




    traded less frequently than exchange-traded instruments and derivative contracts
    whose value is determined using a pricing model with inputs that are observable
    in the market or can be derived principally from or corroborated by observable
    market data. This category generally includes derivative contracts and certain
    loans held-for-sale;
  • Level 3 – Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market
    activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities.
    Level 3 assets and liabilities include financial instruments whose value is
    determined using valuation models, discounted cash flow methodologies or similar
    techniques, as well as instruments for which the determination of fair value
    requires significant management judgment or estimation. This category generally
    includes retained residual interests in securitizations, highly structured
    or long-term derivative contracts and collateralized loan obligations (CLO)
    where independent pricing information cannot be obtained for a significant
    portion of the underlying assets or liabilities.


A financial instrument’s level within the fair value hierarchy is based on the lowest priority ranking of any input that is significant to the fair value measurement.



The Company did not elect to measure any financial instruments at fair value under SFAS 159, “The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities.”


Effective January 1, 2008, the Company adopted FASB Staff Position FIN 39-1 (FSP FIN 39-1), an amendment to FASB Interpretation No. 39, which allows companies to elect in their accounting policy to offset fair value amounts recognized for derivative instruments executed with the same counterparty under a master netting agreement. In conjunction with this adoption, the Company has elected to present assets and liabilities on a gross-by-counterparty basis. Assets and liabilities, as previously reported at December 31, 2007, were reflected on a net-by-counterparty basis for transactions settled in the same currency. Accordingly, other assets and accrued liabilities and payables as of December 31, 2007 were each increased by $365.4 million from amounts previously reported in order to conform to the current presentation.


This excerpt taken from the CIT 10-Q filed Nov 10, 2008.

Fair Value Measurements

Effective January 1, 2008, the Company adopted SFAS No. 157, “Fair Value Measurements”, which defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value of financial assets and liabilities under GAAP, and enhances disclosures about fair value measurements. Fair value is defined as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between two market participants on the measurement date. The impact of adopting SFAS No. 157 on accumulated deficit at January 1, 2008 was not material. Subsequent changes in the fair value of financial assets and liabilities are recognized in earnings as they occur.

The Company determines the fair value of its assets and liabilities based on the fair value hierarchy established in SFAS 157, which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (level 1 measurements) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (level 3 measurements). The three levels of the fair value hierarchy under SFAS No. 157 are described below:

<      Level 1 – Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. Level 1 assets and liabilities include debt and equity securities and derivative contracts that are traded in an active exchange market, as well as certain other securities that are highly liquid and are actively traded in over-the-counter markets;
 
<      Level 2 – Observable inputs other than Level 1 prices, such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities, quoted prices in markets that are not active, or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities. Level 2 assets and liabilities include debt securities with quoted prices that are traded less frequently than exchange-traded instruments and derivative contracts whose value is determined using a pricing model with inputs that are observable in the market or can be derived principally from or corroborated by observable market data. This category generally includes derivative contracts and certain loans held-for-sale;
 
<      Level 3 – Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities. Level 3 assets and liabilities include financial instruments whose value is determined using valuation models, discounted cash flow methodologies or similar techniques, as well as instruments for which the determination of fair value requires significant management judgment or estimation. This category generally includes retained residual interests in securitizations, highly structured or long-term derivative contracts and collateralized loan obligations (CLO) where independent pricing information cannot be obtained for a significant portion of the underlying assets or liabilities.

A financial instrument’s level within the fair value hierarchy is based on the lowest priority ranking of any input that is significant to the fair value measurement.

The Company did not elect to measure any financial instruments at fair value under SFAS 159, “The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities.”

Effective January 1, 2008, the Company adopted FASB Staff Position FIN 39-1 (FSP FIN 39-1), an amendment to FASB Interpretation No. 39, which allows companies to elect in their accounting policy to offset fair value amounts recognized for derivative instruments executed with the same counterparty under a master netting agreement. In conjunction with this adoption, the Company has elected to present assets and liabilities on a gross-by-counterparty basis. Assets and liabilities, as previously reported at December 31, 2007, were reflected on a net-by-counterparty basis for transactions settled in the same currency. Accordingly, other assets and accrued liabilities and payables as of December 31, 2007 were each increased by $365.4 million from amounts previously reported in order to conform to the current presentation.

  Item 1: Consolidated Financial Statements 9



CIT GROUP INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES – NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
This excerpt taken from the CIT 10-Q filed Aug 11, 2008.

########################Fair Value Measurements

Effective January 1, 2008, the Company adopted SFAS No. 157, “Fair Value Measurements”, which defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value of financial assets and liabilities under GAAP, and enhances disclosures

8 CIT GROUP INC



CIT GROUP INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES – NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

about fair value measurements. Fair value is defined as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between two market participants on the measurement date. The impact of adopting SFAS No. 157 on accumulated deficit at January 1, 2008 was not material. Subsequent changes in the fair value of financial assets and liabilities are recognized in earnings as they occur.

The Company determines the fair value of its assets and liabilities based on the fair value hierarchy established in SFAS 157, which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (level 1 measurements) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (level 3 measurements). The three levels of the fair value hierarchy under SFAS No. 157 are described below:

•      Level 1 – Quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. Level 1 assets and liabilities include debt and equity securities and derivative contracts that are traded in an active exchange market, as well as certain other securities that are highly liquid and are actively traded in over-the-counter markets;
 
•      Level 2 – Observable inputs other than Level 1 prices such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities; quoted prices in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities. Level 2 assets and liabilities include debt securities with quoted prices that are traded less frequently than exchange-traded instruments and derivative contracts whose value is determined using a pricing model with inputs that are observable in the market or can be derived principally from or corroborated by observable market data. This category generally includes derivative contracts and certain loans held-for-sale;
 
•      Level 3 – Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities. Level 3 assets and liabilities include financial instruments whose value is determined using valuation models, discounted cash flow methodologies or similar techniques, as well as instruments for which the determination of fair value requires significant management judgment or estimation. This category generally includes retained residual interests in securitizations, highly structured or long-term derivative contracts and collateralized loan obligations (CLO) where independent pricing information cannot be obtained for a significant portion of the underlying assets or liabilities.
 

A financial instrument’s level within the fair value hierarchy is based on the lowest priority ranking of any input that is significant to the fair value measurement.

The Company did not elect to measure any financial instruments at fair value under SFAS 159, “The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities.”

Effective January 1, 2008, the Company adopted FASB Staff Position FIN 39-1 (FSP FIN 39-1), an amendment to FASB Interpretation No. 39, which allows companies to elect in their accounting policy to offset fair value amounts recognized for derivative instruments executed with the same counterparty under a master netting agreement. In conjunction with this adoption, the Company has elected to present assets and liabilities on a gross-by-counterparty basis. Assets and liabilities, as previously reported at December 31, 2007, were reflected on a net-by-counterparty basis for transactions settled in the same currency. Accordingly, other assets and accrued liabilities and payables as of December 31, 2007 were each increased by $365.4 million from amounts previously reported in order to conform to the current presentation.

This excerpt taken from the CIT 10-Q filed May 12, 2008.

Fair Value Measurements

Effective January 1, 2008, the Company adopted SFAS No. 157, “Fair Value Measurements”, which defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value under GAAP, and enhances disclosures about fair value measurements. Fair value is defined as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between two market participants on the measurement date. The impact of adopting SFAS No. 157 on accumulated deficit at January 1, 2008 was not material. Subsequent changes in the fair value of financial assets and liabilities are recognized in earnings as they occur.

The Company determines the fair value of its assets and liabilities based on the fair value hierarchy established in SFAS 157, which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (level 1 measurements) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (level 3 measurements). The three levels of the fair value hierarchy under SFAS No. 157 are described below:

Level 1 - Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. Level 1 assets and liabilities include debt and equity securities and derivative contracts that are traded in an active exchange market, as well as certain other securities that are highly liquid and are actively traded in over-the-counter markets;
   
Level 2 - Observable inputs other than Level 1 prices such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities; quoted prices in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities. Level 2 assets and liabilities include debt securities with quoted prices that are traded less frequently than exchange-traded instruments and derivative contracts whose value is determined using a pricing model with inputs that are observable in the market or can be derived principally from or corroborated by observable market data. This category generally includes derivative contracts and certain loans held-for-sale;
   
Level 3 - Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities. Level 3 assets and liabilities include financial instruments whose value is determined using valuation models, discounted cash flow methodologies or similar techniques, as well as instruments for which the determination of fair value requires significant management judgment or estimation. This category generally includes retained residual interests in securitizations, highly structured or long-term derivative contracts and collateralized loan obligations (CLO) where independent pricing information is not able to be obtained for a significant portion of the underlying assets or liabilities.

A financial instrument’s level within the fair value hierarchy is based on the lowest ranking of any input that is significant to the fair value measurement.

The Company did not elect to measure any financial instruments at fair value under SFAS 159, “The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities.”

Effective January 1, 2008, the Company adopted FASB Staff Position FIN 39-1 (FSP FIN 39-1), an amendment to FASB Interpretation No. 39, which allows for the accounting policy election to offset fair value amounts recognized for derivative instruments executed with the same counterparty under a master netting agreement. In conjunction with this adoption, the Company has elected to present assets and liabilities on a gross-by-counterparty basis. Assets and liabilities, as previously reported at December 31, 2007, were reflected on a net-by-counterparty basis for transactions settled in the same currency. Accordingly, other assets and accrued liabilities and payables as of December 31, 2007 were each increased by $365.4 million from amounts previously reported in order to conform to the current presentation.

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