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DESTINATION XL GROUP, INC. 10-K 2009
Form 10-K
Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-K

 

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)

OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended January 31, 2009 (Fiscal 2008) Commission File Number 0-15898

 

 

CASUAL MALE RETAIL GROUP, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Delaware   04-2623104

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(IRS Employer

Identification No.)

 

555 Turnpike Street, Canton, MA   02021
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

(781) 828-9300

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, $0.01 par value   The NASDAQ Stock Market, LLC
Preferred Stock Purchase Rights  

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

None

(Title of Class)

 

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer   ¨    Accelerated filer   x
Non-accelerated filer   ¨  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)    Smaller reporting company   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).    Yes  ¨    No  x

As of August 2, 2008, the aggregate market value of the Common Stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $72.6 million, based on the last reported sale price on that date. Shares of Common Stock held by each executive officer and director and by each person who owns 10% or more of the outstanding Common Stock have been excluded on the basis that such persons may be deemed to be affiliates. This determination of affiliate status is not necessarily determinative for other purposes.

The registrant had 41,450,170 shares of Common Stock, $0.01 par value, outstanding as of March 17, 2009.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the Proxy Statement for the 2009 Annual Meeting of Stockholders are incorporated by reference into Part III.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

CASUAL MALE RETAIL GROUP, INC.

 

 

Index to Annual Report on Form 10-K

Year Ended January 31, 2009

 

          Page

PART I

  
Item 1.    Business    3
Item 1A.    Risk Factors    15
Item 1B.    Unresolved Staff Comments    20
Item 2.    Properties    21
Item 3.    Legal Proceedings    24
Item 4.    Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders    24

PART II

  
Item 5.    Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities    25
Item 6.    Selected Financial Data    27
Item 7.    Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations    29
Item 7A.    Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk    42
Item 8.    Financial Statements and Supplementary Data    43
Item 9.    Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure    68
Item 9A.    Controls and Procedures    68
Item 9B.    Other Information    70

PART III

  
Item 10.    Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance    71
Item 11.    Executive Compensation    71
Item 12.    Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters    71
Item 13.    Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence    71
Item 14.    Principal Accounting Fees and Services    71

PART IV

  
Item 15.    Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules    72
   Signatures    80

 

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PART I.

Certain statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K constitute “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. In some cases, forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as “may,” “will,” “estimate,” “intend,” “plan,” “continue,” “believe,” “expect” or “anticipate” or the negatives thereof, variations thereon or similar terminology. The forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report are generally located in the material set forth under the headings “Business” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” but may be found in other locations as well. These forward-looking statements generally relate to plans and objectives for future operations and are based upon management’s reasonable estimates of future results or trends. The forward-looking statements in this Annual Report should not be regarded as a representation by us or any other person that the objectives or plans of the Company will be achieved. Numerous factors could cause our actual results to differ materially from such forward-looking statements, including, without limitation, those risks and uncertainties, set forth under Item 1A, Risk Factors, which begins on page 16 of this report. Readers are encouraged to carefully review these risks and uncertainties.

All subsequent written and oral forward-looking statements attributable to the Company or to persons acting on the Company’s behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by the foregoing. These forward-looking statements speak only as of the date of the document in which they are made. We disclaim any obligation or undertaking to provide any updates or revisions to any forward-looking statement to reflect any change in its expectations or any change in events, conditions or circumstances in which the forward-looking statement is based.

 

Item 1. Business

Casual Male Retail Group, Inc. together with our subsidiaries (the “Company”) is the largest specialty retailer of big & tall men’s apparel with retail operations in the United States and London, England and direct businesses throughout the United States, Canada and Europe. We operate under the trade names of Casual Male XL, Casual Male XL Outlets, Rochester Clothing, B & T Factory Direct, Shoes XL and Living XL. We operate 401 Casual Male XL retail stores, 66 Casual Male XL outlet stores and 27 Rochester Clothing stores. Our direct business includes several catalogs and e-commerce sites which support our brands and product extensions. Unless the context indicates otherwise, all references to “we,” “our,” “ours,” “us” and “the Company” refer to Casual Male Retail Group, Inc. and our consolidated subsidiaries. We refer to our fiscal years ended January 31, 2009, February 2, 2008 and February 3, 2007 as “fiscal 2008,” “fiscal 2007” and “fiscal 2006,” respectively.

HISTORY

Our Company was incorporated in the State of Delaware in 1976 under the name Designs, Inc. Until fiscal 1995, we operated exclusively Levi Strauss & Co. branded apparel mall and outlet stores. In May 2002, we acquired the Casual Male business from Casual Male Corp. at a bankruptcy court-ordered auction. At the time of the acquisition, Casual Male was the largest retailer of men’s clothing in the big & tall market in the United States. As a result of the acquisition and the significance of it to the growth and future identity of our Company, on August 8, 2002, we changed our name to “Casual Male Retail Group, Inc.”

Since the acquisition in 2002, we have invested approximately $75.0 million, of the total $105.0 million spent in capital over the past six years, toward rebuilding our infrastructure, including:

 

   

modernizing our information technology, benefiting every aspect of our operations from distribution, global sourcing, store operations and merchandise planning to overall inventory management and profitability;

 

   

updating and restructuring our distribution center with an enhanced warehousing application that significantly streamlined our distribution processes, enhanced our in-transit times and significantly reduced our costs;

 

   

refreshing our real estate portfolio through our remodeling and relocation initiatives. Since 2002, we have remodeled approximately 262 of our Casual Male retail and outlet stores and have relocated another 50 to improved locations;

 

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acquiring Rochester Clothing in fiscal 2004, with its then 24 retail stores; and,

 

   

re-branding all of our Casual Male stores, including all signage, from Casual Male Big & Tall to Casual Male XL. This name change helped to remove the stigma associated with the words “big & tall” and was positively received throughout the chain.

OUR INDUSTRY

The men’s big & tall apparel market, which includes pants with a waist size of 42” and greater, as well as tops sized 1X and greater, generates approximately $5.5 billion to $6.0 billion in sales annually and represents approximately 13% of the overall men’s apparel business. Growth in this segment has been driven by rapidly changing market demographics. In fiscal 2005, 61% of U.S. adults were overweight or obese, up more than 50% in ten years. Additionally, in 2005, all 50 states classified 15% or more of their total adult population as obese, versus four states in 1991. According to the Center for Disease Control, the rate of obesity for the under-30 age group is growing faster than any other segment of the population. These statistics suggest that there is a significant gap between the market share of the big & tall apparel market and the overall percentage of the population classified as overweight.

The men’s big & tall apparel market is currently served by a variety of retailers, including department stores, mass merchandisers and specialty stores. These stores typically offer a limited assortment of sizes and styles. We estimate that our current market share is approximately 7.7% and believe that we have the potential to reach 12% and beyond. We believe that we can ultimately achieve this goal by catering to the broader target market, attracting customers from various incomes, age and lifestyle segments and offering the widest selection of sizes and styles. A substantial opportunity continues to exist for market share growth from the lower-size range of our market: men in the 42”-46” waist size. These sizes are usually at the high end of the size range for most retailers and, as a result, the selection is usually limited at such retailers.

OUR BUSINESS

The big & tall industry is highly fragmented with a large volume of target customers who, we believe, are essentially underserved. While our long-term goals continue to be market share growth and overall improved profitability, our immediate focus has shifted as a result of the declining economy. With the uncertainty that exists regarding the volatility of the economy and its continued impact on consumer spending, during fiscal 2008, we increased our focus on maintaining a solid liquidity position, generating free cash flow on an expected decreasing sales base and managing our balance sheet, specifically inventory. Based on the current economic outlook for the next 12-18 months, our posture will remain the same.

We operate as a multi-channel retailer with two primary retail brands: Casual Male XL and Rochester Clothing. The Casual Male XL customer is a consumer of primarily moderately priced branded and private label casual sportswear and dresswear. The Rochester Clothing customer is a luxury-oriented consumer of fine quality, designer and branded menswear. In addition, we started B&T Factory Direct in 2007 for the value-oriented component of our target market. With shoes being an integral part of any wardrobe, in 2007 we started our direct business, Shoes XL, to improve our penetration in the shoe product line. Lastly, to cater to the household needs of our target market, we acquired a small business, Living XL, specializing in high-quality household products which help larger people maintain a more comfortable lifestyle.

Our objective is to appeal to all of our customers by providing multiple and convenient ways to shop. Our customer is often a destination shopper when it comes to purchasing apparel for himself. Our direct businesses are a natural extension of our store operations and extend the reach of our brands by offering an easy way for our customers to shop. An NPD Group study completed in 2005 found that the big & tall customer often crosses channels to find the clothing they need and want. The study found that approximately 33% of big & tall customers shop online for their clothing, as compared to 21% of regular sized men. Likewise, the big & tall customer’s rate of catalog shopping is nearly double that for men who do not require special sizes.

 

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This multi-channel approach has enabled us to grow our business by offering a shopping alternative to the full spectrum of our potential target group. Through acquisitions, new business formats and new product development, we believe we cater to all income demographics from the value-oriented customer to the high-end luxury-oriented customer. We offer our customers merchandise in all lifestyles from casual to business, young to mature, in all sizes XL and up.

In spite of the state of the economy, we will continue to pursue any new opportunities that would strengthen our multi-channel experience for our customers. At the same time, through continual improvement in customer service as well as merchandise offerings that meet the struggling financial needs of some of our customers, we hope to mitigate the drop in consumer retail traffic by further improving upon our conversion metrics, the percentage of shoppers who actually make a purchase on their visit as well as the average units sold per transaction.

Casual Male

Our Casual Male business offers an extensive selection of quality sportswear, dress clothing and footwear for the big & tall customer at moderate prices. Our full-price Casual Male merchandise is sold through our 401 Casual Male XL retail stores, Casual Male XL catalogs and e-commerce site www.casualmaleXL.com.

Merchandise

The majority of the Casual Male merchandise is basic or fashion-neutral items, such as jeans, casual slacks, tee-shirts, polo shirts, dress shirts and suit separates. The Casual Male customer is primarily interested in comfort and fit, at a reasonable price. As such, Casual Male’s clothing has features specifically designed for our customer, such as waist-relaxer pants, stretch belts, zipper ties, wide band socks, neck-relaxer shirts and clothing with comfort-stretch technology and reinforced stress points.

We carry several private label lines in our Casual Male XL retail stores and direct businesses which perform very strongly and represent more than 70% of our sales:

-Harbor Bay was our first proprietary brand and it continues to represent a significant portion of our business, specifically our core basic merchandise. Harbor Bay is a traditional line of clothing which competes with the Dockers®, Izod® and Cutter & Buck® branded products.

-626 Blue-Vintage Surplus (“626 Blue”) is targeted toward a younger customer. 626 Blue introduces a younger lifestyle look that caters to a broader market, which is influenced by Abercrombie & Fitch and American Eagle. Our 626 Blue merchandise is comprised of premium washed denim, casual wovens and tee-shirts. This private label line has grown significantly over the past three years.

-Synrgy targets the customer looking for a contemporary look. The merchandise is inspired by Perry Ellis Portfolio and Calvin Klein’s sportswear line.

-Comfort Zone™ apparel is all about comfort, fit and technology. The merchandise has exclusive features such as our patented Neck-Relaxer shirt, Waist-Relaxer pants, Jacket-Relaxer suit separates and Dry-Action wicking polo that provide comfort and performance combined with uncompromising style so that big & tall men can find casualwear and dresswear that fit their lifestyle.

-Oak Hill is a premier line catering to those customers looking for slightly more style and quality than our Harbor Bay but still in a traditional lifestyle.

 

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In addition to our many private label lines, we carry several well-known brands of merchandise including: Polo Ralph Lauren, Nautica, Nautica Jeans Co., EcKo, Levi’s®, Dockers®, Calvin Klein, Reebok® and others.

Our private label brands, together with the traditional well-known brands, enable us to better cater to the various market segments of our overall target market. Our research has shown that we need to appeal to a variety of customers within the big & tall market in our efforts to become the preferred choice among big & tall men.

Our stores are merchandised to showcase entire outfits by lifestyle, including traditional, functional active, young men’s, dresswear and contemporary. This format allows us to merchandise key items and seasonal goods in prominent displays and makes coordinating outfits easier for the customer while encouraging multi-item purchases. This lifestyle layout also allows us to better manage store space in each market to target local demographics. Stores are clustered to meet the demographic needs of customers by climate and ethnicity. The key item strategy is also fully integrated by lifestyle, allowing us to focus on merchandise presentation and offer our customers a compelling value proposition.

Retail Operations

Casual Male XL retail stores.

At January 31, 2009, we operated 401 Casual Male XL full-price retail stores, located primarily in strip centers, power centers or stand-alone locations. These stores offer a broad selection of basic sportswear, other casual apparel, dress wear and accessories, as well as a full complement of our private label collections. The average Casual Male XL store is approximately 3,521 square feet and has approximately $185 in sales per square foot annually.

Casual Male XL outlet stores.

At January 31, 2009, we operated 66 Casual Male XL outlet stores designed to offer a wide range of casual clothing for the big & tall customer at prices that are generally 20-25% lower than those offered at our full-price retail stores. Much of the merchandise in the outlet stores is offered with the purchasing interests of the value-oriented customer in mind. The merchandise assortments and brands carried in the outlet stores are consistent with the merchandise strategies carried in our direct business, B&T Factory Direct, which is discussed below. The average Casual Male XL outlet store is approximately 3,185 square feet and has approximately $188 in sales per square foot annually.

Casual Male XL Direct Businesses

Our direct businesses are a vital part of our multi-channel business. Due to the capacity limitations of any retail store, our stores cannot always stock every size or assortment. Our direct businesses bridge that gap for us. We encourage and expect our store associates to use our catalog and websites to help fulfill our customers clothing needs. If an item is not available in our store, then our store associates can order the item for our customer through one of our direct channels and have it shipped to the store or directly to the customer. Approximately 5% of our retail stores’ sales are sales derived from in-store orders placed through our direct channels.

Our Casual Male XL website, www.casualmaleXL.com, and our “Casual Male XL” catalogs offer an assortment of merchandise similar to what is available in the stores, but also offers a broader selection of brands, styles and sizes. During fiscal 2008, we issued 18 editions of our Casual Male XL catalogs and circulated a total of 8.8 million catalogs. We also own the domain name www.bigandtall.com. This site integrates our Casual Male XL, Rochester Clothing, B&T Factory Direct, Living XL and Shoes XL websites in an effort to generate additional traffic.

Through our business relationship with Sears U.S. and Sears Canada, we offer selected Casual Male merchandise on www.Sears.com and www.Sears.ca, Sears’ Canadian website. In cooperation with Sears U.S., we produce a co-branded Casual Male XL and Sears catalog. During fiscal 2008, we mailed 5 editions of the catalog with a circulation of 500,000. In addition, we also have a co-branded section in the Sears Canada catalog. During fiscal 2008, we appeared in 4 editions with a circulation of 500,000 catalogs depending on the edition.

 

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B&T Factory Direct

Under the B&T Factory Direct name, we operate a B&T Factory Direct catalog business as well as an e-commerce site, www.btdirect.com. This direct business enhances our existing Casual Male XL outlet stores, enabling us to provide a multi-channel shopping experience for the value-oriented customer. The merchandise offered in our “B&T Factory Direct” catalogs and on our website is an expanded selection but similar to the merchandise that can be found in our Casual Male XL outlet stores.

We offer a private label program, specifically for our Casual Male XL outlet stores and our B&T Factory Direct businesses, which is similar to our lifestyle private label lines found in our full-price retail stores but made at lower costs and sold at lower price points for our value-oriented customers. We currently carry Canyon Ridge, which is similar in style to our Harbor Bay product line, and Flex Zone, which is similar to our Comfort Zone™. We also carry 555 Turnpike, which is targeted toward our younger customers similar to 626 Blue, and Fuse, a contemporary line similar in style to our Synrgy product line.

During fiscal 2008, we mailed 9 editions of B&T Factory Direct with a circulation of 2.3 million.

Rochester Business

Merchandise

Our Rochester Clothing stores carry a broad selection of quality apparel, at higher price points, from well-known branded manufacturers such as Polo Ralph Lauren, Robert Graham, Joseph Abboud, Michael Kors, Ermenegildo Zegna, Cutter and Buck, Tommy Bahama, and Paul & Shark. The Rochester customer is able to find a wide range of apparel from traditional and modern sportswear to suits and accessories. These stores cater to our customer, offering a personal shopper-type experience, with experienced staff that has a strong knowledge of the merchandise and services, such as custom made-to-measure suiting and on-site tailoring.

In fiscal 2006, we introduced two private label brands made specifically for our Rochester customers. Rochester 1906™ is targeted as a classic traditional line offering sportswear, loungewear and dress shirts, while Castagne™ is positioned as a more contemporary sportswear line. In fall of 2008, Rochester introduced Society of One, a jeans wear brand catering to the needs of the fashion denim customer. All proprietary private brands feature the highest quality fabrications, details and construction. These brands represent approximately 8% of Rochester sales for fiscal 2008. Although these lines have found a market with our customers, we do not expect private label product to be as big of a contributor as it is in our Casual Male business because of our Rochester customer’s preference for branded high-end fashion merchandise.

Due to the high-end price points of our Rochester business, the decline in the economy during fiscal 2008 has affected our Rochester business the most. In response, we are looking at ways to improve and strengthen the overall profitability of our Rochester business. We strongly believe that the Rochester brand is an integral part of our overall objective of providing a shopping alternative to the full spectrum of our target customers, from the value-oriented customer to the high-end Rochester customer. However, because of the economy and its direct impact on our higher-end customers, we are considering reducing our store count for Rochester. During fiscal 2009, we will begin testing a new hybrid store format in six of our existing Rochester stores. The hybrid store format, which by design will be a 6,000-7,000 square foot store, is a combination Rochester Clothing and Casual Male XL store, allowing the customer an opportunity to see the lifestyle sportswear offered by Casual Male XL while still offering the lifestyle of the higher-end fashion apparel of Rochester Clothing. Our Casual Male customer will also have an opportunity to see an extended offering of higher-end sportswear that currently is not offered in our Casual Male XL stores. We are anticipating that the merchandise will be a combination of 75% Casual Male and 25% Rochester product, including an expanded assortment of suits, sportcoats and dress shirts with on-site tailoring services currently not available in our Casual Male XL stores.

In addition to our hybrid format, we may also consider converting select stores to an outlet format. The outlet format would carry a basic core-line of Rochester clothing and clearance merchandise from our full price retail stores. We are also adding a selection of more moderately priced basics to our Rochester Clothing stores during 2009, primarily from the well-known branded apparel lines that our Rochester customers expect.

 

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Retail Operations

Rochester Clothing stores

At January 31, 2009, we operated 27 Rochester Clothing stores, located in major cities throughout the United States and one store in London, England. The Rochester Clothing stores provide the customer with high-end merchandise from well-recognized brands. The average Rochester Clothing store is approximately 8,192 square feet and has approximately $256 in sales per square foot annually.

Rochester Clothing direct businesses

Because we currently have only 27 Rochester Clothing retail locations, which may not be accessible for many of our Rochester customers, our direct businesses are a significant portion of our overall Rochester business. Our “Rochester Big & Tall” catalog and www.rochesterclothing.com website offer an assortment of clothing that is similar to what can be found in our retail stores, with a broader selection in most cases. During fiscal 2008, we issued 20 editions of the Rochester Big & Tall catalog with a circulation of 3.7 million.

Our Other Direct Businesses

Shoes XL

Our website www.shoesXL.com carries a complete line of men’s footwear in extended sizes. This website offers our customers a full range of footwear in hard-to-find sizes. Our plan is to significantly increase our sales penetration in the shoe product category to levels which are more in line with men’s apparel spending for shoes. The assortment on Shoes XL is a reflection of our apparel, with a broad assortment from moderate to luxury and from casual to formal. Shoes XL currently has a selection of more than 400 shoes, ranging in sizes from 12M to 17M and widths up to 5E. We carry a number of designer brands including Cole Haan, Allen Edmonds, Timberland, Calvin Klein, Lacoste and Bruno Magli. Shoes XL is also supported with a catalog. In fiscal 2008, we mailed 4 editions with a circulation of 1.6 million.

In addition, we have added the expanded shoe assortments within our existing Casual Male XL and Rochester Clothing catalogs, including on our websites, www.casualmaleXL.com, www.btdirect.com and www.rochesterclothing.com, as well as featuring the entire shoe product assortments on www.shoesXL.com.

Living XL

Our Living XL business, which includes our website www.livingxl.com and our Living XL catalogs, specializes in the selling of select unique, high-quality products which help larger people maintain a more comfortable lifestyle. The types of products sold on our website and in our catalogs benefit both men and women and include sports and outdoor accessories, patio furniture, travel accessories, medical products and other household items. During fiscal 2008, we mailed 7 editions of our Living XL catalog with a circulation of 4.6 million.

International Web Stores

During the third quarter of fiscal 2008, we launched our online stores for both our Casual Male XL and Rochester Clothing brands in six European countries: U.K., Germany, France, Italy, Spain and the Netherlands. We engaged GSI Commerce, Inc. (“GSI”), a leading provider of e-commerce solutions, for the design, development and operations of the 12 online stores. GSI provides the Web store design, order processing, fulfillment and customer call center services for each of the Web stores. Each online store is tailored to the specific European country in which it operates and includes country-specific components, such as online payment processing, content translation and customer services.

 

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MERCHANDISE PLANNING AND ALLOCATION

Our merchandise planning and allocation area is critical to the effective management of our inventory, store assortments, product sizes and overall gross margin profitability. The merchandise planning and allocation team has an array of planning and replenishment tools available designed to assist in not only maintaining an appropriate level of inventory and in-stock positions at the store and direct levels, but also tools for pre-season planning for product assortments for each store and the direct channels. Additionally, in-season reporting identifies opportunities and challenges in inventory performance. Over the past several years, we have made important investments in implementing best practice tools and processes.

Our core merchandise makes up over 40% of our Casual Male assortments and over 25% of our Rochester assortments. Our planning and allocation team estimates quantity and demand several months in advance to optimize gross margin and minimize end-of-season merchandise for all seasonal merchandise. We have implemented an all-channel assortment planning methodology that customizes each store’s assortment to accentuate lifestyle preferences for each store.

In 2008, we implemented a merchandising data warehouse intended to provide the merchandising team with standardized reporting for monitoring assortment performance by product category and by store, identifying in-stock positions by size and generally monitoring overall inventory levels relative to selling. At season end, we analyze the overall performance of product category, overall assortments and specific styles by store to focus on the opportunities and challenges for the next season’s pre-season planning cycle.

During 2008, we have been building a set of specific universal reporting tools which is intended to be used to fulfill the daily, weekly and monthly roles and responsibilities of the merchandise planning and allocation team. These reporting tools provide focused and actionable views of the business to optimize the overall assortment by category and by store. We believe that by having all members of the merchandise planning and allocation team follow a standardize set of processes with the use of standardize reporting tools, our inventory performance will be optimized.

STORE OPERATIONS

We believe that our store associates are the key to creating the highest quality visit for our customers. In fiscal 2008, we began a three-year program to essentially change the culture of our stores from an operationally-driven organization to a sales-driven, customer relationship organization. Our overall goal is to help our associates become less task oriented and more focused on the customer. We want our associates to help our customers buy their apparel needs by building their wardrobes, not just selling our customers an item. In order to do this, we have invested in educating our associates. Our training approach not only provides product knowledge but also behavioral training; we are teaching our associates how to interact with each customer and strengthen and build upon their relationships with their customers.

We are also able to gauge the effectiveness of this training by measuring sales productivity at each level of the field organization, including individual sales associates. We believe that these education programs, together with monitoring sales metrics to help identify opportunities for further training, will add to our brand loyalty with our customers, while also improving sales productivity.

Our field organization is overseen by our Senior Vice President of Store Sales and Operations and is comprised of the following:

Casual Male XL store operations

In order to provide management development and guidance to individual store managers, we employ approximately 37 District Managers. The District Managers are divided among four geographical regions, each region consisting of 8 to 11 District Managers depending on the number of stores and the distance between them. Each District Manager is responsible for hiring and developing store managers at the stores assigned to that District Manager’s area and for the overall operations and profitability of those stores. District Managers report to one of our four Regional Directors,

 

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each of whom reports directly to our Senior Vice President of Store Sales and Operations. The Regional Directors and Senior Vice President of Store Sales and Operations coordinate all sales and operations initiatives and activities.

Each store is staffed with a store manager, assistants and associates. Each store manager is responsible for achieving certain sales and operational targets and is entitled to receive bonuses based on achieving those targets.

Rochester Clothing store operations

The Rochester Clothing store operations are divided among three geographical regions which are managed by three Regional Managers reporting to the Vice President of Rochester Sales. Each Regional Manager is directly responsible for hiring and developing store managers at the 6 to 10 stores assigned to that Regional Manager’s area and for the overall operations and profitability of those stores. The Vice President of Rochester Sales reports directly to the Senior Vice President of Store Sales and Operations.

Each Rochester Clothing store is staffed with a salaried and incentive-based store manager and hourly-paid and commissioned assistant managers and sales associates.

Our field organization is supported by our Vice President of Operations whose staff supports the communication, training and development of our field personnel.

MARKETING AND ADVERTISING

Our marketing department creates and implements a wide variety of national, regional and local advertising, direct marketing and sales promotion programs. These direct mail and e-mail programs are designed to increase sales and customer awareness of all of our business channels, which include Casual Male XL, Rochester Clothing, B&T Factory Direct, Living XL and Shoes XL. The primary component to our marketing budget is our direct mail campaigns to our customer databases. With the majority of sales captured in our customer database, we maintain the largest customer database of purchasers of big & tall clothing. Our direct mail and e-mail programs allow continuous communication with our customers both for promotional events as well as relationship programs such as the birthday club and new customer loyalty programs. In addition, local store marketing activities occur on a regular basis and include store opening events and in-store promotion programs.

Advertising and marketing costs for all channels of our businesses represent approximately 7.7% of our total revenue for fiscal 2008, or approximately $34.1 million. This includes creating and distributing catalogs, retail direct mail pieces and in-store signage for our Casual Male XL business, Rochester business, as well as our supporting e-commerce businesses, including B&T Factory Direct, Living XL and Shoes XL.

In addition, we have a very active e-mail campaign updating all of our customers about the latest fashions, wardrobe ideas, promotional discounts and clearance specials. Over the past 12 months, we have sent over 200 e-mails to our customer base for all divisions.

We manage a customer loyalty program for our Casual Male XL customers. At of the end of fiscal 2008, approximately 81% of our Casual Male retail customers were enrolled in this program and 71% of all of our Casual Male customers, both direct and retail, were enrolled. Under the program, customers accumulate points based on purchase activity and earn rewards by reaching certain point thresholds. Through fiscal 2008, rewards earned were valid through the stated expiration date, which was approximately five months from the mailing date and could be redeemed for a discount on a future purchase of merchandise from us. Rewards not redeemed during the five-month redemption period were forfeited. For fiscal 2009, we are modifying and expanding on our current loyalty program. Under the revised program, we are increasing the point threshold under which rewards are earned but the value of the earned award as a percentage of points will be greater. In addition, points will accumulate on a calendar year and will reset with the beginning of a new year. We are also reducing the redemption period on the reward from five months to three months.

In March 2009, we rolled out a new level of our loyalty program, Prestige XL. Prestige XL is a rewards program for our top highest spending customers. This group of individuals spends on average over $1,000 per year. The objective

 

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of this program is to recognize these customers and continue to build brand loyalty with them, which closely aligns with our overall store operation objective of building strong customer service. Our store associates will be able to identify our Prestige XL customer and cater to his shopping needs. The customer will receive specialized benefits including double points, preferred sales, special e-commerce offers and catalog shout-outs. Only a select few will be invited to join the Prestige XL program and enrollment will only be for one year. Each year we will award our past year’s highest spending customers a Prestige XL loyalty card.

We believe that these changes and enhancements to our loyalty programs will continue to improve our sales productivity and encourage a loyal customer base while reducing the overall cost of the programs.

We utilize a customer relationship management (“CRM”) system which allows us to expand our level of communication to our customers, and makes available pertinent customer information at the store level, with the goal of servicing the customer better. With the customer database maintained at the corporate office, our business has daily results on its direct marketing efforts and has the ability to respond to business immediately. Our sales associates now have an array of information available about their customers. Through the CRM real-time database, our sales associates are able to access valuable information on each customer’s buying patterns, preferences and sizes.

For fiscal 2009, we have reduced our marketing budget by approximately $7.9 million to approximately $26.6 million with a strong focus on improving marketing productivity. Our focus and marketing objectives will be aimed toward our existing loyal customer base, where we will focus on our direct mail and e-mail programs. We are planning to minimize mass-media advertising and prospecting of new customers, instead improving overall marketing effectiveness with a smaller budget. Our remaining cost savings will be from the reduction in catalog circulation, some of which started to occur in fiscal 2008. We have begun further tailoring our circulation towards our more active customers and reducing the number of circulations to our less productive customers. By focusing on this more active group of customers, we can improve our productivity while minimizing our costs.

COMPETITION

Our business faces competition from a variety of sources, including department stores, mass merchandisers, other specialty stores and discount and off-price retailers, as well as other retailers that sell big & tall merchandise. While we have successfully competed on the basis of merchandise selection, favorable pricing, customer service and desirable store locations, there can be no assurances that other retailers will not adopt purchasing and marketing concepts similar to ours. In addition, discount retailers with significant buying power, such as Wal-Mart, J.C. Penny and Target, represent a source of competition for us.

The United States men’s big & tall apparel market is highly competitive with many national and regional department stores, specialty apparel retailers, single market operators and discount stores offering a broad range of apparel products similar to ours. Besides retail competitors, we consider any casual apparel manufacturer operating in outlet malls throughout the United States to be a competitor in the casual apparel market. We believe that we are the only national operator of apparel stores focused on the men’s big & tall market.

The catalog business has several competitors, including the King Size Catalog (which is owned by Redcats USA, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Pinault-Printemps-Redoute, SA of France) and J.C. Penny’s Big & Tall Collection catalog.

GLOBAL SOURCING

Over the past three years, we have been growing a direct sourcing program for our private label merchandise. During fiscal 2008, over 70% of our Casual Male merchandise is from our private label product lines. All channels within Casual Male and, on a smaller scale, Rochester, have benefited from our direct sourcing initiatives resulting in increased markups as compared to our brand-name product lines. In addition to direct sourcing of apparel, we began the direct sourcing of Living XL in fiscal 2008.

We have developed business relationships with five specialized apparel buying agents to oversee our production, quality control, and social compliance for the Eastern Hemisphere. In addition, our global sourcing team works directly

 

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with factories in Central and South America. Our global sourcing strategy is a balanced approach considering both cost and lead time, depending on the requirements of the program.

We require each vendor and factory to adhere to our Code of Conduct, which is designed to ensure that the operations of each of our business associates are conducted in a legal, ethical and responsible manner. Our Code of Conduct requires that each of our business associates operates in compliance with the applicable wage, benefit and working hours and other laws of each of the respective countries in which we do business and forbids the use of practices such as child labor or forced labor. We oversee and manage our compliance program internally. We contract with a third-party compliance audit firm to make periodic visits to the factories that produce our merchandise to monitor compliance, including prequalification for new suppliers. All of our agents have their own compliance programs which supplement our program.

In an effort to minimize foreign currency risk, all payments to our direct sourced vendors and buying agents are made in U.S. dollars through the use of letters of credit or payment on account.

DISTRIBUTION

All of our distribution operations, with the exception of Living XL and our International Web stores, are centralized in our headquarters and distribution center located in Canton, Massachusetts. For Living XL, we utilize a third-party distribution center for the receipt, processing and shipping of merchandise. See discussion above regarding our International Web Stores.

We believe that having one centralized distribution facility minimizes the delivered cost of merchandise and maximizes the in-stock position of our stores. We believe that the centralized distribution system enables our stores to maximize selling space by reducing necessary levels of back-room stock carried in each store. In addition, the distribution center provides order fulfillment services for our e-commerce and catalog businesses.

Since 2003, we have utilized United Parcel Services (“UPS”) for all our store shipments as well as all domestic customer deliveries. This association with UPS has improved our distribution capabilities while also reducing our shipping costs. By utilizing UPS, we are able to track all deliveries from the warehouse to our individual stores, including the status of in-transit shipments. Our current contract with UPS is through December 2010.

We utilize the Manhattan Associates’ PKMS warehousing application for our distribution center systems, which has significantly streamlined our distribution processes, enhanced our in-transit times, and significantly reduced our distribution costs. In addition, we have slightly altered our distribution strategy as it relates to seasonal merchandise to allow for replenishment of styles at the color and size level which has optimized sales opportunities and minimized our end of season clearance markdowns. This seasonal merchandise distribution strategy requires significantly higher volume of individual piece processing, a more costly distribution method in contrast to carton handling. However, in conjunction with the installation of a more efficient PKMS warehousing application, we have also updated our processes in order to optimize the new system capabilities in areas such as receiving, cross-dock handling, put-away, and picking including the use of scanning equipment. Accordingly, in spite of the shift in distribution strategy to include the more costly piece replenishment, our distribution costs have decreased and are expected to continue to decrease as a result of the new systems and the adoption of updated process flows. We are also adding a Labor Management component to the PKMS warehousing application that will enable us to track systemically our actual productivity versus an engineered productivity standard, further improving our efficiency.

During fiscal 2007, we implemented new sorting systems for both our retail and direct businesses. During fiscal 2008, we began to see benefits in our labor efficiencies as well as improvements in our daily capacity to process and ship merchandise. Having achieved full productivity in fiscal 2008, we expect to see continued benefits in fiscal 2009.

In-bound calls and order fulfillment for our direct businesses are currently handled at our Canton facility.

 

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MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Our management information systems consist of a full range of retail merchandising and financial systems which include merchandise planning and reporting, distribution center processing, inventory allocation, sales reporting, and financial processing and reporting. Our business operates primarily on an IBM AS/400 platform, with the e-commerce/catalog business on the HP environment. We believe that our current infrastructure provides us the ability and capacity to process transactions more efficiently and provides our management team with comprehensive tools with which to manage our business.

Our suite of merchandising systems consists of the JDA Portfolio Solutions, specifically the MMS Merchandise Management System, Retail Ideas Data Warehouse, and Arthur Merchandise Planning and Advanced Allocation systems. In addition, we also utilize JDA’s E3 Advanced Replenishment system to optimize fill back from vendors and adjustments from seasonal profiles which we believe has improved sales opportunities and control over our inventory of basic merchandise. For our distribution operations, we use Manhattan Associates’ PKMS distribution system. These systems have enabled us to improve sales, better manage inventory levels and streamline operations.

All of our stores have state-of-the-art point-of-sale (“POS”) terminals supplied by IBM. The business is supported by a POS business application provided by NSB Group. The POS applications capture daily transaction information by item, color and size. Communication between our corporate headquarters and all of our stores is facilitated on a daily basis through the use of an electronic mail system. The POS system includes a multitude of features including CRM tools that enable us to track customer buying habits and provide us with the ability to target customers with specific offers and promotions.

Our web sites have all been standardized on a state-of-the-art platform from Art Technology Group. We also implemented the e-SPS Product Life Cycle Management system from NGC to support the growth of our direct sourcing initiatives. To support the marketing area, we implemented the PlanSystem3 environment from Quad-Systems to manage marketing assets, schedule promotions and monitor activities.

Our merchandising management systems are updated daily with all store transactions and provide daily sales, inventory, pricing and merchandise information and management reports to assist us in operating our retail business. Our merchandising system applications also facilitate the placement and tracking of purchase orders and utilize EDI technology. We evaluate this information, together with weekly reports on merchandise statistics, prior to making decisions regarding reorders of fast-selling items and the allocation of merchandise.

Using QuantiSense, a business intelligence and data warehousing application, we are able to provide our management team the ability to integrate data from several sources into reports that are useful and easily obtained. With its customized reporting capabilities, we have visibility down to the lowest level: style, SKU and store. Over the past year, we have developed customized reporting that has been extremely beneficial to our business. With the use of this software, we now have store grading applications and size scaling to the store level. During fiscal 2008, we completed the customization of our merchandise allocation roles and created a standardized set of “best practices.” During fiscal 2009, we will begin to create similar sets of standardized best practices for our planning and buying groups. These reporting and processing enhancements will allow us to further improve our inventory management.

Since we acquired Casual Male in fiscal 2002, the infrastructure of our management information systems has consistently been a priority to us. The investments that we have made in this regard have substantially improved our overall efficiency and most importantly have enabled us to better manage our most valuable asset – our inventory. Even though we have considerably reduced our capital expenditure plans for fiscal 2009 in response to the current economic conditions, there are several projects which we believe should continue during the immediate future as they will enable us to further streamline our operations and ultimately result in future cost savings.

The largest of these projects is to establish one chain-wide inventory system. Presently, our direct businesses and retail businesses maintain separate inventory systems. We have been working since the beginning of fiscal 2008 toward integration of these systems so that our inventory is shared among all channels of our business. The completion of this project will have numerous benefits to us including eliminating the redundancy of inventory items that currently exist

 

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as a result of managing two systems and, from an operational perspective, we will simplify the ordering process considerably.

Along similar lines, we will integrate our primary merchandise management system with our product life cycle management system. The completion of this project will provide our merchants and sourcing department with full visibility and automation from purchase order to received shipments, which is increasingly more important as our private label program continues to grow.

We are also working to upgrade our websites to the latest platform, which will have internal benefits as well as improve our customers’ shopping experience. We will be adding enhanced advanced search programs allowing more complex faceted searches. Our primary short-term goal is to maintain and strengthen our relationship with our customer: when they visit our direct businesses on-line, we want to ensure that the experience is effortless and that they find what they are looking for.

From a store perspective, we also need to be able to manage and build upon these customer relationships through enhanced CRM programs. Working with our vendors, we are presently considering various enhancements to our existing software so that we can provide our sales associates with the real-time information they need to improve productivity and enable better customer relationships.

Although we do not expect to complete all of these initiatives during fiscal 2009, we do expect that they will be completed within the next 12-18 months.

SEASONALITY

Consistent with the retail industry, our business is seasonal, traditionally generating the largest volume of sales during the Christmas selling season in December. The majority of our operating income is generated in the fourth quarter as a result of the impact of the Christmas selling season.

TRADEMARKS/TRADEMARK LICENSE AGREEMENTS

We own several servicemarks and trademarks relating to our businesses, including, among others, “Casual Male®”, “Casual Male XL™”, “B&T Factory Direct™”, “Rochester Big & Tall™”, “Harbor Bay®”, “Oak Hill™”, “Comfort Zone by Casual Male™”, “Flex-Zone™”, “Comfort Zone™”, “Synrgy™”, “Rochester 1906™” and “Castagne™”. We also have a U.S. patent for an extendable collar system, which is marketed as “Neck-Relaxer®.”

EMPLOYEES

As of January 31, 2009, we employed approximately 3,015 associates, of whom 1,796 were full-time personnel. We hire additional temporary employees during the peak Fall and Holiday seasons. None of our employees is represented by any collective bargaining agreement.

AVAILABLE INFORMATION

Our corporate website is www.casualmaleXL.com. We make available, free of charge, through our website our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and amendments to such reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, as soon as reasonably practicable after we have electronically filed such material with, or furnished such materials to, the Securities and Exchange Commission. The SEC maintains an internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information for issuers that file electronically with the SEC at http://www.sec.gov.

 

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Item 1A. Risk Factors

The following discussion identifies certain important factors that could affect our financial position, our actual results of operations and our actions and could cause our financial position, results of operations and our actions to differ materially from any forward-looking statements made by or on behalf of our Company. Other factors, which are not identified herein, could also have such an effect.

The following risk factors are all of the important factors of which we are aware that could cause actual results, performance or achievements to differ materially from those expressed in any of our forward-looking statements. We operate in a continually changing business environment and new risk factors emerge from time to time. Other unknown or unpredictable factors also could have material adverse effects on our future results, performance or achievements. We cannot assure you that projected results or events will be achieved or will occur.

Risks Related to Our Company and Our Industry

Disruptions in the capital and credit markets related to the current national and world-wide financial crisis, which may continue indefinitely or intensify, could adversely affect our results of operations, cash flows and financial condition, or those of our customers and vendors.

The current disruptions in the capital and credit markets may continue indefinitely or intensify, and adversely impact our results of operations, cash flows and financial condition, or those of our customers and vendors. Disruptions in the capital and credit markets as a result of uncertainty, changing or increased regulation, reduced alternatives or failures of significant financial institutions could adversely affect our access to liquidity. Such disruptions may also adversely impact the capital needs of our customers and vendors, which, in turn, could adversely affect our results of operations, cash flows and financial condition.

Our business is seasonal and is affected by general economic conditions.

Like most other retail businesses, our business is seasonal. Historically, over 30% of our net sales have been made and approximately 70% or more of our operating income has been generated during November, December and January. Like other retail businesses, our operations may be negatively affected by local, regional or national economic conditions, such as levels of disposable consumer income, consumer debt, interest rates and consumer confidence. As we experienced during fiscal 2008, the current economic downturn has caused consumers to reduce their spending, which has negatively affected our sales. A sustained economic downturn would have an adverse affect on our results of operations.

Our business may be adversely affected by economic and foreign issues abroad.

Over the past few years, we have been working toward developing a global sourcing program to support our growing proprietary branded merchandise. Economic and civil unrest in areas of the world where we source such merchandise, as well as shipping and docking issues could adversely impact the availability and cost of such merchandise. Political instability, the financial instability of our suppliers, merchandise quality issues, trade restrictions, tariffs, currency exchange rates, transport capacity and costs, inflation and other factors relating to foreign trade are beyond our control. In the event of disruptions or delays in deliveries due to economic or political conditions in foreign countries, such disruptions or delays could adversely affect our results of operations unless and until alternative supply arrangements could be made. These and other issues affecting our suppliers could adversely affect our business and financial performance.

We are dependent on third parties for the manufacture of the merchandise we sell.

We do not own or operate any manufacturing facilities and are therefore entirely dependent on third parties for the manufacture of the merchandise we sell. Without adequate supplies of merchandise to sell to our customers in the merchandise styles and fashions demanded by our particular customer base, sales would decrease materially and our business would suffer. With the current financial state of the economy, the financial stability of our vendors becomes a greater risk. We are dependent on their ability to fulfill our merchandise orders and meet our delivery terms.

 

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Furthermore, over approximately 70% of our merchandise is branded merchandise made specifically for Casual Male and our customers. In the event that manufacturers are unable or unwilling to ship products to us in a timely manner or continue to manufacture products for us, we would have to rely on other current manufacturing sources or identify and qualify new manufacturers. We might not be able to identify or qualify such manufacturers for existing or new products in a timely manner and such manufacturers might not allocate sufficient capacity to us in order to meet our requirements. Our inability to secure adequate and timely supplies of private label merchandise would negatively impact proper inventory levels, sales and gross margin rates, and ultimately our results of operations.

In addition, even if our current manufacturers continue to manufacture our products, they may not maintain adequate controls with respect to product specifications and quality and may not continue to produce products that are consistent with our standards. If we are forced to rely on products of inferior quality, then our brand recognition and customer satisfaction would likely suffer. These manufacturers may also increase the cost to us of the products we purchase from them.

If our suppliers increase our costs, our margins may be adversely affected.

A significant portion of our merchandise is directly imported from other countries, and U.S. domestic suppliers who source their goods from other countries supply most of our remaining merchandise. In the event that commercial transportation is curtailed or substantially delayed, we may not be able to maintain adequate inventory levels of important merchandise on a consistent basis, which would negatively impact our sales and potentially erode the confidence of our customer base, leading to further loss of sales and an adverse impact on our results of operations.

In extreme circumstances, it may be necessary to close less productive stores so as to consolidate important merchandise categories into our most productive stores, which would severely impact our results of operations and cash flow.

Our success significantly depends on our key personnel and our ability to attract and retain additional personnel.

Our future success is dependent on the personal efforts, performance and abilities of our key management which includes our executive officers as well as several significant members of our senior management. For example, the loss of the services of David Levin, our President and Chief Executive Officer, or Dennis Hernreich, our Chief Operating Officer and Chief Financial Officer, each of whom is an integral part of our daily operations and are primary decision makers in all our important operating matters, could significantly impact our business until adequate replacements can be identified and put in place. The loss of any of our senior management may result in a loss of organizational focus, poor operating execution, an inability to identify and execute potential strategic initiatives, an impairment in our ability to identify new store locations, and an inability to consummate possible acquisitions.

These adverse results could, among other things, reduce potential revenues, prevent us from diversifying our product lines and geographic concentrations, and expose us to downturns in our markets. The competition is intense for the type of highly skilled individuals with relevant industry experience that we require and we may not be able to attract and retain new employees of the caliber needed to achieve our objectives.

The loss of, or disruption in, our centralized distribution center could negatively impact our business and operations.

All merchandise for our stores is received into our centralized distribution center in Canton, Massachusetts, where the inventory is then processed, sorted and shipped to our stores. We depend in large part on the orderly operation of this receiving and distribution process, which depends, in turn, on adherence to shipping schedules and effective management of the distribution center. Although we believe that our receiving and distribution process is efficient and well-positioned to support our strategic plans, we cannot assure you that events beyond our control, such as disruptions in operations due to fire or other catastrophic events, employee matters or shipping problems, would not result in delays in the delivery of merchandise to our stores.

With all of our management information systems centralized in our corporate headquarters, any disruption or destruction of our system infrastructure would materially affect our business. This type of disaster is mitigated by our offsite stores and disaster recovery plans, but we would still incur business interruption which could impact our

 

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business for several weeks.

Although we maintain business interruption and property insurance, we cannot assure you that our insurance will be sufficient, or that insurance proceeds will be timely paid to us, in the event our distribution center is shut down for any reason or if we incur higher costs and longer lead times in connection with a disruption from our distribution center.

Our business may be negatively impacted and we may be liable if third parties misappropriate proprietary information of our customers and breach our security systems.

Any security breach could expose us to risks of loss, litigation and liability and could adversely affect our operations. If third parties are able to penetrate our network security or otherwise misappropriate the personal information or credit card information of our customers or if third parties gain unauthorized and improper access to such information, we could be subject to liability. This liability could include claims for unauthorized purchases with credit card information, impersonation or other similar fraud claims. They could also include claims for other misuses of personal information, including unauthorized marketing purposes. These claims could result in litigation. Liability for misappropriation of this information could be significant. Further, if a third party were to use this proprietary customer information in order to compete with us, it could have a material adverse impact on our business and could result in litigation.

During fiscal 2007, we completed our work to become Payment Card Industry (“PCI”) compliant, which we believe was a necessary and required step toward ensuring that our security systems are protected.

We face greater challenges in managing several brands in multiple channels of distribution.

Several retailers have had problems executing a corporate strategy aimed at operating multiple brands in multiple channels. We have expertise in the outlet channel of distribution, but our acquisition of Casual Male in 2002 caused us to conduct operations in the specialty store and internet channels of distribution. We are now also responsible for all aspects of brand management with respect to the Casual Male brand and the Rochester brand, including advertising and promotion, and the servicing and merchandising of private label merchandise. With respect to our branded merchandise, this function is mostly the responsibility of the specific manufacturer of the brand. If the managing of multiple brands within multiple channels is poorly executed, we will not achieve our expected level of profitability, and could ultimately be compelled to eliminate the multiple brand strategy so that the organization may focus on a single brand strategy.

We may not be successful in growing our market share.

A large part of our growth has resulted from our acquisition of the Casual Male business in May 2002 and our acquisition of Rochester Clothing in October 2004 and the increased sales volume and profitability provided by these acquisitions. We believe that our current level of stores is sufficient to sustain our business and we are not dependent on adding new stores to increase our sales volume and profitability. However, for us to be successful in the future and maintain growth, we must be able to continue increasing our market share within the big & tall industry. Our growth is dependent on us being successful in attracting new target customers into our stores, catalogs and e-commerce sites. We cannot assure you that our strategic plans will be successful in attracting customers and growing our market share.

Our business is highly competitive, and competitive factors may reduce our revenues and profit margins.

The United States men’s big & tall apparel market is highly competitive with many national and regional department stores, mass merchandisers, specialty apparel retailers and discount stores offering a broad range of apparel products similar to the products that we sell. Besides retail competitors, we consider any manufacturer of big & tall merchandise operating in outlet malls throughout the United States to be a competitor. It is also possible that another competitor, either a mass merchant or a men’s specialty store or specialty apparel catalog, could gain market share in men’s big & tall apparel due to more favorable pricing, locations, brand and fashion assortment and size availability. Many of our competitors and potential competitors may have substantially greater financial, manufacturing and marketing resources than we do. The presence in the marketplace of various fashion trends and the limited availability of shelf space also can affect competition. We may not be able to compete successfully with our competitors in the future and could lose

 

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brand recognition and market share. A significant loss of market share would adversely affect our revenues and results of operations.

We may be unable to predict fashion trends and customer preferences successfully.

Customer tastes and fashion trends are volatile and tend to change rapidly. Our success depends in large part upon our ability to predict effectively and respond to changing fashion tastes and consumer demands and to translate market trends to appropriate saleable product offerings. If we are unable to predict or respond to changing styles or trends successfully and misjudge the market for products or any new product lines, our sales will be lower and we may be faced with a substantial amount of unsold inventory or missed opportunities. In response, we may be forced to rely on additional markdowns or promotional sales to dispose of excess, slow-moving inventory, which would decrease our revenues and margins. In addition, the failure to satisfy consumer demand could have serious longer-term consequences, such as an adverse impact on our brand value and the loss of market share to our competitors.

Our marketing programs and success in maintaining and building our brand awareness are critical to achieving successful market share growth within the big & tall industry.

Our success in increasing our market share in the big & tall apparel business is largely dependent on maintaining our favorable brand recognition and effectively marketing our merchandise to all of our target customers in several diverse market segments. In order to grow our brand recognition and our market share, we depend on the successful development of our brands through several means including advertising events, direct mail marketing, e-commerce and catalog marketing and customer prospecting. Our business is directly impacted by the success of these efforts and those of our vendors. Future advertising efforts by us, our vendors or our other licensors may be costly and may not result in increased market share or revenues.

The loss of any of our key trademarks or licenses could adversely affect demand for our products.

We own and use a number of trademarks and operate under several trademark license agreements. We believe that these trademarks have significant value and are instrumental in our ability to create and sustain demand for and to market our products. We cannot assure you that these trademarks and licensing agreements will remain in effect and enforceable or that any license agreements, upon expiration, can be renewed on acceptable terms or at all. In addition, any future disputes concerning these trademarks and licenses may cause us to incur significant litigation costs or force us to suspend use of the disputed trademarks.

Acts of terrorism or a catastrophic event could negatively impact our operating results and financial condition.

Unforeseen events, including war, terrorism and other international conflicts, public health issues, and natural disasters such as earthquakes, hurricanes or other adverse weather and climate conditions, whether occurring in the U.S. or abroad, could disrupt our operations, or the operations of our vendors and other suppliers, or result in political or economic instability.

The continued threat of terrorism and heightened security measures in response to an act of terrorism may disrupt commerce and undermine consumer confidence which could negatively impact our sales by causing consumer spending to decline. Furthermore, an act of terrorism or war, or the threat thereof, could negatively impact our business by interfering with our ability to obtain merchandise from vendors or substitute suppliers at similar costs in a timely manner.

Risks Related to Our Corporate Structure and Stock

Our stock price has been and may continue to be extremely volatile due to many factors.

The market price of our common stock has fluctuated in the past and may increase or decrease rapidly in the future depending on news announcements and changes in general market conditions. Between January 31, 2003 and March 2, 2009, the closing price of our common stock ranged from a low of $0.27 per share to a high of $15.10 per share. The following factors, among others, may cause significant fluctuations in our stock price:

 

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overall changes in the economy and general market volatility;

 

   

news announcements regarding quarterly or annual results of operations;

 

   

quarterly comparable sales;

 

   

acquisitions;

 

   

competitive developments;

 

   

litigation affecting us; or

 

   

market views as to the prospects of the retail industry generally.

We may not be able to maintain our listing on The NASDAQ Global Market, which would adversely affect the price and liquidity of our common stock.

To maintain the listing of our common stock on The NASDAQ Global Market we are required to meet certain listing requirements, including a minimum closing bid price of $1.00 per share. Our common stock has traded below the $1.00 minimum bid price since November 18, 2008. Under normal circumstances, companies traded on Nasdaq would receive a deficiency notice from Nasdaq if their common stock has traded below the $1.00 minimum bid price for 30 consecutive business days. Due to market conditions, however, Nasdaq has suspended the enforcement of rules requiring a minimum $1.00 closing bid price, with the suspension to remain in place until Monday, April 20, 2009. If our common stock continues to trade below the $1.00 minimum bid price for 30 consecutive business days following the end of Nasdaq’s enforcement suspension, we would likely receive a deficiency notice. Following receipt of a deficiency notice, we expect we would have 180 calendar days to regain compliance by having our common stock trade over the $1.00 minimum bid price for at least a 10-day period. If we were to fail to meet the minimum bid price for at least 10 consecutive days during the grace period, our common stock could be delisted. Even if we are able to comply with the minimum bid requirement, there is no assurance that in the future we will continue to satisfy Nasdaq listing requirements, with the result that our common stock may be delisted. Should our common stock be delisted from Nasdaq, and the delisting determination was based solely on non-compliance with the $1.00 minimum bid price, we may consider applying to transfer our common stock to The NASDAQ Capital Market provided that we satisfy all criteria for initial inclusion on such market other than the minimum bid price rule. In the event of such a transfer, the NASDAQ Marketplace Rules provide that we would have an additional 180 calendar days to comply with the minimum bid price rule while on The NASDAQ Capital Market. If our stock is delisted from The NASDAQ Global Market and The NASDAQ Capital Market, it would likely be more difficult to trade in or obtain accurate quotations as to the market price of our common stock. Delisting of our common stock could materially adversely affect the market price and market liquidity of our common stock and our ability to raise necessary capital.

Rights of our stockholders may be negatively affected if we issue any of the shares of preferred stock which our Board of Directors has authorized for issuance.

We have available for issuance 1,000,000 shares of preferred stock, par value $0.01 per share. Our Board of Directors is authorized to issue any or all of this preferred stock, in one or more series, without any further action on the part of stockholders. The rights of our stockholders may be negatively affected if we issue a series of preferred stock in the future that has preference over our common stock with respect to the payment of dividends or distribution upon our liquidation, dissolution or winding up.

In addition, the issuance of preferred stock by our Board of Directors pursuant to our certificate of incorporation could have the effect of making it more difficult for a third party to acquire, or of discouraging a third party from acquiring, a majority of the outstanding voting stock of our Company.

We have adopted anti-takeover defenses that could make it difficult for another company to acquire control of our Company or limit the price investors might be willing to pay for our stock, thus affecting the market price of our securities.

On December 8, 2008, our Board of Directors adopted a Shareholder Rights Agreement (“Rights Agreement”), under which the Board authorized and declared a dividend of one preferred stock purchase right (a “Right” and collectively, the “Rights”) for each share of the Company’s common stock. Each Right entitles the registered holder to purchase

 

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from us one one-thousandth of a share of Series A Junior Participating Preferred Stock at a purchase price of $5.00 per share, subject to adjustment.

The Rights become exercisable upon the occurrence of certain events and may make the acquisition of our Company more difficult and expensive. The Rights Agreement may delay or prevent an acquisition of us that stockholders may consider favorable, which could decrease the value of our common stock.

State laws and our certificate of incorporation may inhibit potential acquisition bids that could be beneficial to our stockholders.

We are subject to certain provisions of Delaware law, which could also delay or make more difficult a merger, tender offer or proxy contest involving us. In particular, Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law prohibits a Delaware corporation from engaging in certain business combinations with any interested stockholder for a period of three years unless specific conditions are met. In addition, certain provisions of Delaware law could have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a change in control of us, including, without limitation, discouraging a proxy contest or making more difficult the acquisition of a substantial block of our common stock. The provisions could also limit the price that investors might be willing to pay in the future for shares of our common stock.

 

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

None.

 

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Item 2. Properties

Our corporate offices and retail distribution center are located at 555 Turnpike Street in Canton, Massachusetts. The property consists of a 755,992 gross square foot building located on approximately 27.3 acres. We owned the property until January 30, 2006, at which time we entered into a sale-leaseback transaction with Spirit Finance Corporation, a third-party real estate investment trust (“Spirit”), whereby we entered into a twenty-year lease agreement with a wholly-owned subsidiary of Spirit for an annual rent of $4.6 million. In fiscal 2006, we realized a gain of approximately $29.3 million on the sale of this property, which has been deferred and is being amortized over the initial 20 years of the related lease agreement. Accordingly, our annual rent of $4.6 million is offset by $1.5 million related to the amortization of this deferred gain.

As of January 31, 2009, we operated 401 Casual Male XL retail stores, 66 Casual Male XL outlet stores and 27 Rochester Clothing stores. All of these stores are leased by us directly from owners of several different types of centers, including life-style centers, shopping centers, free standing buildings, outlet centers and downtown locations. The store leases are generally five years in length and contain renewal options extending their terms to between 5 and 10 years. Following this discussion is a listing by state of all store locations open at January 31, 2009.

We utilize a third-party warehouse facility for the receiving, processing and shipping of merchandise for our Living XL business.

Sites for store expansion are selected on the basis of several factors intended to maximize the exposure of each store to our target customers. These factors include the demographic profile of the area in which the site is located, the types of stores and other retailers in the area, the location of the store within the center and the attractiveness of the store layout. We also utilize financial models to project the profitability of each location using assumptions such as the center’s sales per square foot averages, estimated occupancy costs and return on investment requirements. We believe that our selection of locations enables our stores to attract customers from the general shopping traffic and to generate our own customers from surrounding areas.

We are actively working with all of our landlords to review our current lease agreements in light of the current economic condition. In general, the entire real estate portfolio is being reviewed and where possible we are seeking revised terms with landlords. For instance, for leases that have an upcoming rent escalation, we are requesting rent reductions and in some situations requesting rent stabilization from various landlords. We expect that these discussions will continue throughout most of fiscal 2009 as several leases with extension clauses come due.

See also “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation—Liquidity and Capital Resources—Capital Expenditures.”

 

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Table of Contents

Store locations by State at January 31, 2009

Casual Male XL Retail and Casual Male XL Outlet Stores (Outlets denoted by an asterisk)

 

Alabama   California, cont.   Florida, cont.   Indiana, cont.   Massachusetts, cont.
Foley*   San Jose (2)   Pembroke Pines   Michigan City*   Shrewsbury
Hoover   San Leandro   Pensacola   Mishawaka   Tyngsboro
Huntsville   Santa Ana   Sarasota   Muncie   West Springfield
Montgomery   Santa Rosa   St. Augustine*     Wrentham*
  Stockton   Stuart   Iowa  
Arizona   Temecula   Tampa   Clive   Michigan
Chandler   Tracy*   Vero Beach*   Davenport   Allen Park
Gilbert   Tulare*   West Palm Beach   Marion   Ann Arbor
Glendale   Upland     Williamsburg*   Auburn Hills
Mesa   Vacaville*   Georgia     Battle Creek
Phoenix (3)   Valencia   Alpharetta   Kansas   Birch Run*
Tempe*   Victorville   Atlanta   Overland Park   Flint
Tucson (2)   West Covina   Augusta   Topeka   Grand Rapids
  Woodland Hills   Calhoun*   Wichita   Howell*
Arkansas     Commerce*     Lansing
Jonesboro   Colorado   Duluth   Kentucky   Livonia
Little Rock   Colorado Springs   Kennesaw   Bowling Green   Madison Heights
  Glendale   Morrow   Florence   Novi (Detroit)
California   Lone Tree   Savannah   Lexington   Portage
Bakersfield   Loveland*   Stone Mountain   Louisville (2)   Roseville
Camarillo*   Westminster       Saginaw
Commerce *     Idaho   Louisiana   Southfield
Culver City   Connecticut   Boise   Baton Rouge  

Sterling Heights

Daly City   Danbury     Bossier City*  

Taylor

Downey   East Haven   Illinois   Gonzales*  

Waterford

Dublin   Groton   Bloomingdale   Lafayette  

Westland

El Cajon   Hamden   Bloomington   Metairie  
Emeryville   Manchester   Champaign    

Minnesota

Escondido   Milford   Chicago (2)   Maine  

Albertville*

Folsom*   Waterbury   Evergreen Park   Kittery*  

Blaine

Fremont   West Hartford   Fairview Heights   South Portland  

Burnsville

Fresno   Westbrook*   Hometown    

Duluth

Fullerton   Wethersfield   Joliet   Maryland  

Maplewood

Gilroy*     Lansing   Annapolis  

Richfield

Glendale   Delaware   Matteson   Baltimore  

Roseville

Lake Elsinore*   Dover   Naperville   Columbia  

Woodbury

Lake Forest   Rehoboth Beach*   Niles   District Heights  
Lakewood   Wilmington   North Riverside   E. Baltimore  

Mississippi

Long Beach     Oakbrook Terrace   Frederick  

Jackson

Los Altos   Florida   Orland Park   Glen Burnie  

Gulfport*

Los Angeles   Altamonte Springs   Peoria   Greenbelt  
Modesto   Boynton Beach   Rockford   Hagerstown*  

Missouri

Northridge   Brandon   Schaumburg   Largo  

Chesterfield

Ontario*   Daytona Beach   Skokie   Towson  

Columbia

Orange   Fort Lauderdale   Springfield   Rockville  

Independence

Oxnard   Ft. Myers   St. Charles   Waldorf  

Kansas City

Palmdale   Gainesville   Vernon Hills    

Richmond Heights

Palm Desert   Hialeah     Massachusetts  

St. Louis

Pasadena   Jacksonville   Indiana   Burlington  

St. Peters

Pleasant Hill   Lakeland     Dedham  

Springfield

Rancho Cucamonga   Largo   Edinburgh*   Framingham  

Branson*

Riverside   Lauderdale Lakes   Evansville   Hanover  

Osage Beach*

Roseville   Lawndale  

Fort Wayne

 

Hyannis

 

Sacramento (2)

  Miami  

Greenwood

 

Medford

 

Montana

Salinas

  No. Miami Beach  

Indianapolis (3)

 

North Attleboro

 

Billings

San Bernardino

  Ocala  

Lafayette

 

North Dartmouth

 

San Diego

  Orange Park  

Merrillville

 

Saugus

 
  Orlando (3)      

 

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Table of Contents

Casual Male XL Retail and Casual Male XL Outlet Stores, continued

 

Nebraska   New York, cont.   Ohio, cont.   South Carolina   Texas, cont
Lincoln   Elmhurst   Jeffersonville*   Charleston   Tyler
Omaha (3)   Greenburgh   Mansfield   Columbia*   Waco
  Irondequoit   Mentor   Greenville   Webster
New Hampshire   Johnson City   Miamisburg   Myrtle Beach*  
Salem   Lake George*   Niles   N. Charleston   Utah
Manchester   Massapequa   North Olmsted     Murray
Tilton*   Middleton   North Randall   South Dakota   Odgen
  Nanuet   Springdale   Sioux Falls   Orem
New Jersey   New Hyde Park   Toledo    
Bloomfield   New York     Tennessee   Vermont
Cherry Hill   Niagara Falls*   Oklahoma   Antioch   S. Burlington

E. Brunswick

  Northport  

Oklahoma City (2)

 

Chattanooga

 

East Rutherford

  Patchogue  

Tulsa

 

Knoxville

  Virginia

Eatontown

  Port Chester    

Lakeland*

  Alexandria

Hazlet

 

Poughkeepsie

 

Oregon

 

Madison

 

Fairfax

Jackson*

 

Riverhead*

 

Beaverton

 

Memphis (2)

 

Fredericksburg

Lawrenceville

 

Rochester

 

Clackames

 

Pigeon Forge*

 

Hampton

Linden

 

Staten Island

 

Eugene

   

Manassas

May’s Landing

 

Syracuse

 

Portland

 

Texas

 

Norfolk

Menlo Park

 

Tonawanda

 

Salem

 

Allen*

 

Richmond (2)

Paramus

 

Valley Stream

   

Amarillo

 

Roanoke

Secaucus

 

Waterloo*

 

Pennsylvania

 

Arlington

 

Sterling

Somerville

 

Yonkers

 

Altoona

 

Austin (2)

 

Virginia Beach

Succasunna

   

Erie

 

Canutillo*

 

Woodbridge*

Tom’s River

 

North Carolina

 

Gettysburg*

 

Conroe*

 

Williamsburg*

Totowa

 

Asheville

 

Greensburg

 

Corpus Christi

 

Union

 

Burlington*

 

Grove City*

 

Cypress*

 

Washington

West Berlin

 

Charlotte

 

Harrisburg

 

Dallas (2)

 

Auburn*

Woodbury

 

Fayetteville

 

King Of Prussia

 

El Paso

 

Bellevue

 

Greensboro

 

Lancaster*

 

Fort Worth

 

Lynnwood

Nevada

 

Greenville

 

Langhorne

 

Hillsboro*

 

Spokane (2)

Henderson

 

Pineville

 

Monroeville

 

Houston (5)

 

Tacoma

Las Vegas (3)

 

Raleigh

 

Philadelphia (4)*

 

Humble

 

Tukwila

Laughlin*

 

Smithfield*

 

Pittsburgh (2)

 

Hurst

 

Reno

 

Wilmington

 

Pottstown*

 

Laredo

 

West Virginia

 

Winston-Salem

 

Scranton

 

Lewisville

 

South Charleston

New Mexico

   

Springfield

 

Lubbock

 

Albuquerque (2)

 

North Dakota

 

Tannersville

 

Mercedes*

 

Wisconsin

 

Fargo

 

Washington*

 

Mesquite

 

Brookfield

New York

   

West Mifflin

 

Midland

 

Grand Chute

Albany

 

Ohio

 

Whitehall

 

Pasadena

 

Green Bay

Bayshore L.I.

 

Akron

 

Wilkes Barre

 

Plano

 

Greenfield

Bronx (1)

 

Boardman

 

Willow Grove

 

Round Rock

 

Johnson Creek*

Brooklyn (3)

 

Canton

 

Wyomissing

 

San Antonio (3)

 

Madison

Carle Place

 

Cincinnati

 

York

 

San Marcos*

 

Milwaukee

Centereach

 

Columbus (4)*

   

Selma

 

Pleasant Prairie

Cheektowaga

 

Fairlawn

 

Rhode Island

 

Shenandoah

 
 

Grove City

 

Warwick

   

Rochester Clothing

 

Southwest     North     Southeast
Phoenix, AR   Las Vegas , NV   Boston, MA   Seattle, WA   Aventura, FL
Beverley Hills, CA   Dallas, TX   Central Valley, NY*   Southfield, MI   Atlanta, GA
Costa Mesa, CA   Houston, TX   Chicago, IL   Westport, CT.   Boca Raton, FL

Fresno, CA

    King of Prussia, PA    

Washington D.C.

San Francisco, CA

    Manhasset, NY    

San Jose, CA

    Natick, MA    

International

Walnut Creek, CA

    New York, NY    

London, England

    Oakbrook Terrace, IL    
    Paramus, NJ    

 

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Item 3. Legal Proceedings

We are subject to various legal proceedings and claims that arise in the ordinary course of business. We believe that the resolution of these matters will not have an adverse impact on our operations or financial position.

 

Item 4. Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders

No matters were submitted to a vote of our security holders during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2008.

 

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Table of Contents

PART II.

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Our common stock is listed for trading on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the symbol “CMRG.”

The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, the high and low per share sales prices for the common stock, as reported on Nasdaq.

 

Fiscal Year Ended January 31, 2009

   High    Low

First Quarter

   $ 5.11    $ 3.45

Second Quarter

     4.93      2.95

Third Quarter

     4.95      1.73

Fourth Quarter

     1.99      0.35

Fiscal Year Ended February 2, 2008

   High    Low

First Quarter

   $ 13.53    $ 11.08

Second Quarter

     12.75      9.98

Third Quarter

     13.44      7.33

Fourth Quarter

     8.00      3.35

As of March 5, 2009, based upon data provided by independent shareholder communication services and the transfer agent for our common stock, there were approximately 229 holders of record of our common stock. The number of holders does not include individuals or entities who beneficially own shares but whose shares are held of record by a broker or clearing agent, but does include each such broker or clearing agency as one record holder.

We have not paid and do not anticipate paying cash dividends on our common stock. In addition, financial covenants in our loan agreement may restrict dividend payments. For a description of these financial covenants see Note C to the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

As previously disclosed in a Current Report on Form 8-K filed on February 3, 2009, on January 29, 2009, pursuant to Board approval, we repurchased certain stock options with exercise prices significantly in excess of market price from certain directors and executive officers. We repurchased and cancelled the eligible options in exchange for cash payments equal to the fair value of the applicable options on the date of repurchase, as determined using Black-Scholes. The Black-Scholes value of each option repurchased was calculated based upon the closing stock price of our common stock on January 29, 2009.

We repurchased options with underlying shares totaling 2,291,512 for an aggregate purchase price of $7,191.73. These options had exercise prices ranging from $4.54 to $12.35 per share. Of the 2,291,512 shares underlying the repurchased and cancelled options, options covering 1,206,854 shares issued under our 2006 Incentive Compensation Plan (the “2006 Plan”) were repurchased and, pursuant to the terms of the 2006 Plan, will become available for future issuance under the 2006 Plan. In connection with the repurchase and cancellation of these options, we recognized additional stock compensation expense of approximately $1.5 million in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2008 relating to the acceleration of vesting associated with the options.

 

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Stock Performance Graph

The following Performance Graph compares our cumulative stockholder return with that of a broad market index (Standard & Poor’s Industrials Index) and one published industry index (Standard & Poor’s 500 - Composite Retail Index) for each of the most recent five years ended January 31. The cumulative stockholder return for shares of our common stock (“CMRG”) and each of the indices is calculated assuming that $100 was invested on January 31, 2004. We paid no cash dividends during the periods shown. The performance of the indices is shown on a total return (dividends reinvested) basis. The graph lines merely connect January 31 of each year and do not reflect fluctuations between those dates. In addition there is a chart of the annual percentage return of our common stock, the S & P Industrials and Composite Retail 500.

LOGO

Annual Return Percentage

 

     Years Ending  

Company/Index

   Jan 05     Jan 06    Jan 07    Jan 08     Jan 09  

CMRG

   (20.94 )   32.41    74.55    (60.10 )   (92.37 )

S&P INDUSTRIALS

   3.43     9.29    11.94    1.01     (34.26 )

COMPOSITE RETAIL- 500

   13.96     7.84    13.97    (19.24 )   (39.03 )

Indexed Returns

 

Company/Index

   Base Period
Jan 04
   Jan 05    Jan 06    Jan 07    Jan 08    Jan 09

CMRG

   100    79.06    104.69    182.72    72.91    5.56

S&P INDUSTRIALS

   100    103.43    113.05    126.54    127.83    84.03

COMPOSITE RETAIL - 500

   100    113.96    122.89    140.06    113.12    68.97

The performance graph above shall not be deemed “filed” for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), or otherwise subject to the liability of that section. This graph will not be deemed incorporated by reference into any filing under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Exchange Act, whether made before or after the date hereof, regardless of any general incorporation language in such filing.

 

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Table of Contents
Item 6. Selected Financial Data

The following tables set forth selected consolidated financial data of our company as of and for each of the years in the five-year period ended January 31, 2009 and should be read in conjunction with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our accompanying Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes thereto.

Our selected consolidated financial data for the years ended January 31, 2009, February 2, 2008 and February 3, 2007, and as of January 31, 2009 and February 2, 2008, have been derived from our accompanying Consolidated Financial Statements which were audited by Ernst & Young LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm. Our selected consolidated financial data for the years ended January 28, 2006 and January 29, 2005, and as of February 3, 2007, January 28, 2006 and January 29, 2005, have been derived from our Consolidated Financial Statements not included herein, which were audited by Ernst & Young LLP.

For a discussion of certain factors that materially affect the comparability of the selected consolidated financial data or cause the data reflected herein not to be indicative of our future results of operations or financial condition, see Item 1A “Risk Factors” and Item 7 “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”

 

     Fiscal Years Ended (1)  
     January 31,
2009
(Fiscal 2008) (2)
    February 2,
2008
(Fiscal 2007) (2)
    February 3,
2007
(Fiscal 2006) (2)
    January 28,
2006
(Fiscal 2005)
    January 29,
2005
(Fiscal 2004) (3)
 
     (In millions, except per share, weighted average shares and operating data)  

INCOME STATEMENT DATA:

          

Sales

   $ 444.2     $ 464.1     $ 465.4     $ 421.4     $ 365.0  

Gross profit, net of occupancy costs

     189.6       206.0  (7)     211.6       182.2       150.4  

Selling, general and administrative

     178.1       178.1       168.8       151.9       132.5  

Provision for employment contract termination

     —         —         1.2       —         —    

Provision for impairment of assets, including goodwill

     71.4  (4)     —         —         —         —    

Depreciation and amortization

     17.1       17.4       15.0       12.7       9.9  
                                        

Operating income (loss)

     (77.0 )     10.5       26.6       17.6       8.0  

Other income (expense), net

     0.5       0.5       1.1       (1.0 )     0.3  

Interest expense, net

     (3.0 )     (4.3 )     (5.5 )     (8.6 )     (8.0 )
                                        

Income (loss) from continuing operations before minority interest and taxes

     (79.5 )     6.7       22.2       8.0       0.3  

Less: minority interest

     —         —         —         —         (0.7 )

Provision (benefit) for income taxes

     28.9  (5)     2.8       (21.1 (8)     (2.8 (8)     —    
                                        

Income (loss) from continuing operations

   $ (108.4 )   $ 3.9     $ 43.3     $ 10.8     $ 1.0  

Income (loss) from discontinued operations

     (0.9 (6)     (3.5 ) (6)     (0.7 )     —         0.5  
                                        

Net income (loss)

   $ (109.3 )   $ 0.4     $ 42.6     $ 10.8     $ 1.5  
                                        

Income (loss) per share from continuing operations -basic

   $ (2.62 )   $ 0.09     $ 1.23     $ 0.31     $ 0.03  

Income (loss) per share from continuing operations -diluted

   $ (2.62 )   $ 0.09     $ 0.99     $ 0.30     $ 0.03  

Net income (loss) per share- basic

   $ (2.64 )   $ 0.01     $ 1.21     $ 0.31     $ 0.04  

Net income (loss) per share- diluted

   $ (2.64 )   $ 0.01     $ 0.98     $ 0.30     $ 0.04  

Weighted average shares outstanding:

          

for net income (loss) per share-basic

     41,412       41,707       35,276       34,306       34,511  

for net income(loss) per share-diluted

     41,412       43,229       46,457       35,860       36,733  

 

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Table of Contents

BALANCE SHEET DATA:

            

Working capital

   $ 20.0    $ 41.0     $ 66.8     $ 33.3    $ 22.2  

Inventories

     98.6      117.8       114.5       91.5      79.9  

Property and equipment, net

     52.2      62.2       59.1       51.3      74.7  

Total assets

     201.2      325.4       320.4       283.8      267.8  

Long term debt

     7.6      12.5       —         95.4      117.8  

Stockholders’ equity

     71.8      181.9       218.0       89.2      77.0  

Cash flow provided by operations

   $ 23.2    $ 11.7     $ 12.1     $ 16.8    $ 13.4  

Less: capital expenditures

     12.6      21.4       22.7       15.7      20.6  
                                      

Free cash flow (9)

     10.6      (9.7 )     (10.6 )     1.1      (7.2 )

OPERATING DATA:

            

Net sales per square foot

   $ 193    $ 208     $ 211     $ 195    $ 171  

Number of stores open at fiscal year end

     494      488       508       518      527  

 

  (1) Our fiscal year is a 52 or 53 week period ending on the Saturday closest to January 31. The fiscal year ending February 3, 2007 included 53 weeks.
  (2) During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2007, we exited our Jared M. business. In accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (“SFAS”) No. 144, “Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long-Lived Assets,” we have shown the results of our Jared M. business, since its acquisition in fiscal 2006, as discontinued operations. Accordingly, certain prior-year amounts on the Income Statement Data for fiscal 2006 have been reclassified to discontinued operations to conform to the current-year presentation.
  (3) The results for fiscal 2004 include the effect, since October 30, 2004, of the acquisition of Rochester Clothing.
  (4) During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2008, we recorded a full non-cash impairment charge related to our goodwill for $63.1 million and a partial impairment of our Rochester trademark of $2.5 million. These impairments were due to the downturn in the economy and the deterioration in the capital markets which had a direct impact on our business during fiscal 2008 and resulted in a significant decrease in the fair value of our Company at the end of the fourth quarter of fiscal 2008. In addition, we also recorded a non-cash charge of $5.8 million for the impairment of fixed assets.
  (5) During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2008, we recorded a non-cash charge of $28.6 million to establish a full valuation allowance against our deferred tax assets. As a result of our recent operating losses and the overall condition of the economy, the realizability of our deferred tax assets cannot be assured. For a discussion of the valuation allowance, see Note D to the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
  (6) Discontinued operations for fiscal 2007 include a charge of $2.6 million recorded during the third and fourth quarters of fiscal 2007 related to the exiting of our Jared M. business. Of the $2.6 million charge, $1.1 million related to the write-down of inventory, $1.4 million for the impairment of fixed assets and $0.1 million for the write-down of accounts receivables and other assets. During the first quarter of fiscal 2008, we sold our Jared M. business for $250,000. No material gain or loss was recognized on the sale. See Note J to the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for a complete description. In fiscal 2007, when we decided to exit our Jared M. operations, the Jared M. showroom was being sub-leased and therefore, we did not believe an accrual was needed at that time. However, during fiscal 2008, we were not able to secure a sub-lease agreement to completely satisfy our obligations under the lease agreement. Accordingly, during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2008, we recorded an additional charge of $0.9 million for the estimated lease obligation. No income tax benefit was realized on this charge during fiscal 2008 due to the establishment of our full valuation allowance against all of our deferred tax assets.
  (7) During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2007, we recorded a charge to gross margin of approximately $6.1 million, or $0.08 per diluted share, for the write-down of inventory for both our Casual Male and Rochester businesses.
  (8) In the fourth quarter of fiscal 2006, we reversed $31.0 million of our deferred tax valuation allowance of which $30.5 million was recognized as an income tax benefit and $0.5 million was recorded as an adjustment to additional paid-in capital. The income tax benefit of $30.5 million was partially offset by $8.9 million in tax provisions. In the fourth quarter of fiscal 2005, we recognized an income tax benefit of $2.8 million associated with the partial reversal of $3.1 million of our valuation allowance. This benefit was partially offset by $0.3 million in tax provisions. For a discussion of the valuation allowance reversals, see Note D to the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.
  (9) Free cash flow is considered a non-GAAP financial measure under SEC regulations. We present this measure as supplemental information to help investors better understand trends in our business results over time. We use free cash flow to evaluate the performance of our business. Free cash flow is not equivalent to any measure of performance required to be reported under GAAP, nor should this data be considered an indicator of our overall financial performance or liquidity. Moreover, the free cash flow definition we use may not be comparable to similarly titled measurer used by other companies.

 

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Table of Contents
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS

As noted above, this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including, without limitation, this Item 7, contains “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the United States Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Actual results or developments could differ materially from those projected in such statements as a result of numerous factors, including, without limitation those risks and uncertainties set forth in Item 1A, Risk Factors which you are encouraged to read. The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in light of those risks and uncertainties and in conjunction with our accompanying Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes thereto.

EXECUTIVE OVERVIEW

2008 Financial Summary

Fiscal 2008 was a challenging year for the retail industry, which has been significantly weakened by the volatile economic environment. We have seen a lack of consumer confidence which has resulted in a decrease in discretionary spending. In addition, like so many public companies, we incurred substantial decreases in our market capitalization during fiscal 2008, largely due to the volatility in the financial markets as a whole, especially during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2008. These economic conditions began to impact our business as early as the second half of 2007 when our sales slowed from a 5.0% comparative sales growth to a decline of 0.6%. During the first half of 2008, sales trends continued as they were during the second half of 2007 with a further decline of 0.8%, but then accelerated in the second half of 2008 to a decline of 7.5% particularly in the fourth quarter which had a decline of 9.3%.

In spite of the 4.3% drop in overall sales, or $19.9 million from fiscal 2007 levels, we did not allow our financial position to erode. We decreased our inventory position at the end of fiscal 2008 by $19.2 million, or 16%, as compared to the prior year and we reduced our capital expenditures by $8.8 million, or 41%, from prior year levels. At January 31, 2009, our total outstanding debt decreased by $7.1 million, or 12%, compared to February 2, 2008 and our availability under our credit facility at January 31, 2009 was $30.8 million. Our free cash flow (as defined below under “Presentation of Non-GAAP Measures”) for fiscal 2008 improved by over $20 million and was approximately $10.6 million compared to negative free cash flow of $9.7 million for fiscal 2007. Our primary focus has shifted to:

 

   

optimizing our free cash flow;

 

   

maximizing our liquidity available under our revolving line of credit;

 

   

efficiently managing inventory levels and monthly receipts to optimize gross margins; and

 

   

continuing to develop and implement innovative practices and technology to improve customer service.

Also, we have taken further measures to maintain a positive free cash flow posture. In planning for another difficult year in 2009, with sales expected to drop by as much as 10%, we have prepared for generating positive free cash flow by:

 

   

reducing our capital expenditures by over $7 million to less than $5 million for 2009, while still maintaining an innovative posture towards customer service;

 

   

reducing our selling, general and administrative (“SG&A”) expense levels for 2009 by almost 9%, or over $15 million, to an expected level of $162.5 million;

 

   

appropriately maintaining fashion inventory levels such that our overall merchandise margins in fiscal 2009 are expected to improve by 225 to 275 basis points;

 

   

managing fiscal 2009 inventory levels for further reductions of approximately 10%, or $10 million; and

 

   

expecting to further reduce bank debt by over $10 million during 2009.

Based on these changes in our business and in spite of the expectation that sales will drop in 2009 by 10%, we are planning to generate free cash flow in 2009 of $15 million. The free cash flow generated will be used to further reduce

 

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our existing bank debt. We started the year with liquidity under our revolving line of credit of over $30 million, which is expected to improve during the year from free cash flow generation. Our revolving line of credit does not expire until October, 2011 and it contains no financial covenants.

In addition, our objectives to further enhance our customer service and improve sales productivity will continue into 2009, unaffected by the poor economic conditions and the impact on our overall sales, by:

 

   

continuing to transform our cultural focus towards an enhanced customer experience by providing our store sales associates and management with better sales training, development tools and monitoring capabilities;

 

   

improving upon our methodology of planning and allocating appropriate assortments to each store, considering the demographics and lifestyle tendencies of each store location;

 

   

continuing to grow, albeit more deliberately going forward, our direct businesses, including Living XL, Shoes XL and B&T Factory Direct;

 

   

building our primary brands, Casual Male XL and Rochester Clothing, on web sites in the European Union which were launched in the third quarter of fiscal 2008; and

 

   

focusing on growing our market share within the smaller size component of the big & tall target market.

As a result of the impact upon our shorter term profitability, and the decrease in our market value, we recorded substantial non-cash charges totaling $100.0 million, or $(2.42) per diluted share. Included in the $100.0 million of charges is $71.4 million related to the impairment of goodwill, trademarks and long-lived assets and $28.6 million for a valuation allowance against our deferred tax assets.

These non-cash charges masked our operating results for the year. Before considering these non-cash charges and an additional $2.0 million associated with certain one-time charges more fully described in “Selling, General and Administrative Expenses” below, our operating loss for fiscal 2008 was $3.6 million, compared to operating income for fiscal 2007 of $10.5 million. The adjusted operating loss of $3.6 million is a Non-GAAP measure, see Results of Operations – Net Income (Loss). The approximate $14.1 million drop in profitability on a sales decrease of approximately $20 million is more fully described below.

Presentation of Non-GAAP Measure

The presentation of non-GAAP free cash flow is not a measure determined by generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) and should not be considered superior to or as a substitute for net income (loss) or cash flows from operating activities or any other measure of performance derived in accordance with GAAP.

In addition, all companies do not calculate non-GAAP financial measures in the same manner and, accordingly, “free cash flows” presented in this report may not be comparable to similar measures used by other companies. We calculate free cash flows as cash flow from operating activities ($23.2 million in 2008 and $11.7 million in 2007) less capital expenditures ($12.6 million in 2008 and $21.4 million in 2007). With respect to 2009 projected free cash flows of $15 million, the amount was calculated by subtracting estimated capital expenditures of approximately $5 million from estimated cash flow from operations of $20 million.

We believe that inclusion of this non-GAAP measure helps investors gain a better understanding of our performance, especially when comparing such results to previous periods.

SEGMENT REPORTING

We report our operations as one reportable segment, Big & Tall Men’s Apparel, which consists of our two operating segments - Casual Male and Rochester. We consider our operating segments to be similar in terms of economic characteristic, production processes and operations, and have therefore aggregated them into a single reporting segment.

 

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RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Our fiscal year is a 52- or 53-week period ending on the Saturday closest to January 31. Both fiscal 2008 and fiscal 2007 were 52- week periods. Fiscal 2006, which ended February 3, 2007, covered 53 weeks. Comparable sales for fiscal 2007 were based on a 52-week comparison to fiscal 2006. Sales and operating income for the additional 53rd week in fiscal 2006 approximated $6.7 million and $1.0 million, respectively.

Comparable sales for all periods include our retail stores that have been open for at least one full fiscal year together with our e-commerce and catalog sales. Stores that have been remodeled, expanded or re-located during the period are also included in our determination of comparable sales. We include our direct businesses as part of our calculation of comparable sales since we are a multi-channel retailer, offering our customers convenient alternatives for their shopping. The method of calculating comparable sales varies across the retail industry and, as a result, our calculation of comparable sales is not necessarily comparable to similarly titled measures reported by other companies.

SALES

Sales for fiscal 2008 decreased $19.9 million, or 4.3%, to $444.2 million as compared to $464.1 million for fiscal 2007. This decrease reflects the difficult economic and retail environment that we experienced this year. Reduced consumer spending and therefore lack of traffic to our stores has resulted in a very challenging year for us. The sales shortfall of $19.9 million was primarily attributable to a decrease in our comparable sales of 4.3%, which includes a 5.6% decrease from our core Casual Male and Rochester businesses. With a total decrease of 12.5%, our higher-end Rochester business has been affected the most by the downturn in the economy. Conversely, our value-oriented Casual Male XL outlet stores performed significantly better, with a comparable sales decrease of only 1% over the prior year. Our non-core businesses, which include Living XL, Shoes XL, B&T Factory Direct and our International Web stores, generated sales of $15.7 million for fiscal 2008 as compared to $8.9 million for fiscal 2007. Sales in our retail channel declined by 6.0%, while sales increased 4.4% in its direct channel.

Lack of traffic continues to be a substantial contributor to our sales shortfall. For fiscal 2008, our traffic was down 9.2% over last year. However, our conversion metric, which measures the percentage of people who come into the store and make a purchase, increased 6.3% over last year, helping to mitigate the lack of traffic.

Sales for the 52 weeks in fiscal 2007 were $464.1 million as compared to $465.4 million for the 53 weeks in fiscal 2006. Sales for the additional week in fiscal 2006 approximated $6.7 million. On a 52-week comparable basis, total sales for fiscal 2007 increased $5.4 million as compared to sales of $458.7 million for the 52 weeks of fiscal 2006.

The sales increase in fiscal 2007, on a 52 week comparable basis, was due to increases in our direct channels, including our new businesses, Living XL, Shoes XL and B&T Factory Direct, which had aggregate sales of $8.9 million for fiscal 2007. These increases were offset by decreases from both our Rochester Clothing and Casual Male XL stores. During the last six months of fiscal 2007, we started to feel the impact of the change in the economy and its negative impact on our holiday season. We felt a sharp drop in customer traffic during the fourth quarter, which approached almost a 7% decrease as we neared our holiday selling season. Comparable sales for fiscal 2007 increased 2% as compared to fiscal 2006, of which the retail channel had a decrease of 0.5% and our direct channel had an increase of 16.5%. Comparable sales from our core Casual Male and Rochester businesses, excluding the new businesses, for fiscal 2007 were up 0.3% from fiscal 2006.

In fiscal 2009, we are planning for an approximate 10% drop in our sales volume, based on our trends in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2008 and the economic conditions that are expected to continue through the year.

GROSS MARGIN

Gross margin rate for fiscal 2008 was 42.7% as compared to 44.4% for fiscal 2007 and 45.5% for fiscal 2006. The decrease of 170 basis points in the gross margin rate was comprised of a 60 basis point decrease in merchandise margin and a 110 basis point increase in occupancy costs, primarily due to a lower sales base.

 

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Throughout fiscal 2008, we took additional markdowns on our seasonal merchandise to ensure that our inventory levels remained appropriate and, in some cases, accelerated our fourth quarter markdowns as a result of our fourth quarter sales shortfall. This impacted our merchandise margin for fiscal 2008; however, we believe that our inventory levels at January 31, 2009 are current and appropriate considering the continued uncertainty regarding the economy and its impact on our revenues for the early part of 2009.

The increase in our occupancy costs for fiscal 2008 was only 4.0% over the prior year. However, because of the lower sales base, the percentage impact to our gross margin rate is considerably higher. As part of our effort to control costs going into fiscal 2009, we are in discussions with many of our landlords to renegotiate existing rents and escalation provisions in our attempt to reduce our occupancy costs given the current economic climate.

The decrease in gross margin for fiscal 2007 of 110 basis points over fiscal 2006 was due to an 80 basis point increase in merchandise margin offset by a 60 basis point increase in occupancy costs, due to a lower sales base. The remaining change was due to a 130 basis point decrease in margin as the result of recording a $6.1 million charge for the write-down of inventory. The 80 basis point improvement in merchandise margin included the impact of approximately $2.0 million in accelerated markdowns incurred during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2007 to clear seasonal merchandise.

We are expecting a 225 to 275 basis point improvement in merchandise gross margin in fiscal 2009, as we continue to execute our merchandising and marketing strategies, and build upon our direct sourcing activities to lower our merchandise purchase costs.

SELLING, GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

SG&A expenses as a percentage of sales for fiscal 2008, 2007 and 2006 were 40.1%, 38.4% and 36.3%, respectively.

On a dollar basis, SG&A expenses of $178.1 million for fiscal 2008 were flat to fiscal 2007. SG&A expenses for our core businesses decreased $5.0 million, or 2.9%, as compared to fiscal 2007. The majority of the savings was from decreases in marketing, as a result of decreasing circulation of catalogs, productivity savings in our distribution center as a result of improved infrastructure and overall cost savings throughout the business. These cost savings were primarily offset by an increase of approximately $3.5 million related to expenses to support our growing non-core direct businesses, which include Shoes XL, Living XL, B&T Factory Direct and our International Web stores. Fiscal 2008 also includes a non-cash charge of $1.5 million for the acceleration of stock compensation expense associated with the repurchase of certain stock options and an additional $0.5 million related to non-recurring severance expense during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2008.

SG&A expenses in fiscal 2007 increased $9.2 million, or 5.5%, as compared to fiscal 2006. Fiscal 2006 included additional expenses of approximately $3.0 million attributable to the 53rd week in fiscal 2006. The total increase in SG&A expenses of $12.2 million, on a comparable basis to fiscal 2006 was due partly to our new businesses, B&T Factory Direct, Living XL and Shoes XL, which had total SG&A expenses of approximately $6.1 million. A substantial portion of these expenses were marketing costs associated with the new catalogs as well as our direct advertising campaigns. We also recognized an increase of approximately $2.0 million associated with our other direct businesses to support our increased growth from our Casual Male XL and Rochester Clothing catalogs and e-commerce sites. Legal expenses associated with protecting proprietary intangibles and contract rights related to our Rochester Clothing direct business, as well as other litigation, increased by $1.0 million. Also, we expended another $1.5 million in distribution costs associated primarily with start up costs associated with the investment in new sortation systems during 2007.

Tantamount to our strategy of improving profitability and growing operating margins is maintaining a firm control on the growth of our SG&A expenses. Although we believe that we can limit SG&A growth rates, except for certain programs to support our growth activities, unanticipated cost increases by our suppliers, or unanticipated costs that are necessary to support our overall activities could negatively impact our growth in profitability. For fiscal 2009, we have planned to reduce our SG&A costs by approximately $15.0 million. The majority of the reduction relates to: (i) decreased marketing costs for fiscal 2009 due to minimizing mass-media advertising and a more concentrated direct mail program, (ii) reduced corporate payroll costs as a result of head count reductions and pay freezes, (iii) cost savings

 

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in our distribution center as a result of system enhancements and (iv) overall cost savings in store payroll as a result of changing our store operating hours to maximize selling productivity.

PROVISION FOR IMPAIRMENT OF ASSETS, INCLUDING GOODWILL

For fiscal 2008, we recorded a total impairment charge of $71.4 million. This total includes: (i) a charge of $63.1 million for the full impairment of our goodwill for both of our reporting units, (ii) a partial impairment of $2.5 million against our Rochester trademark and (iii) an impairment of long-lived assets of $5.8 million. For more information regarding these impairments, see “Critical Accounting Policies – Goodwill and Intangibles” and “Critical Accounting Policies – Impairment of Long-Lived Assets.”

PROVISION FOR EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT TERMINATION

In the third quarter of fiscal 2006, we terminated certain employment agreements with Rochester management as part of our plan to integrate the remaining San Francisco-based Rochester operations into our headquarters in Canton, MA. In connection with that decision to terminate these agreements, we incurred a charge of $1.2 million in the third quarter of fiscal 2006 to accrue our remaining obligations pursuant to these employees’ employment agreements. No accrual remains at January 31, 2009.

DEPRECIATION AND AMORTIZATION

Depreciation and amortization expense was $17.1 million for fiscal 2008, $17.4 million for fiscal 2007 and $15.0 million for fiscal 2006. The slight decrease in depreciation and amortization for fiscal 2008 as compared to fiscal 2007 is due to a reduction of assets related to the closing of Jared M. in fiscal 2007. The increase in fiscal 2007 as compared to fiscal 2006 was directly attributable to the capital expenditures associated with improving our infrastructure as well as new store growth, our re-branding efforts and remodeling of some of our older locations.

OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE)

During the first quarter of fiscal 2006, we sold our loss prevention subsidiary, LP Innovations, Inc. (“LPI”), for a purchase price of $5.2 million. At the time of the sale, we recognized an initial gain in the amount of $1.5 million which was recorded as other income for fiscal 2006. The gain of $1.5 million was offset slightly by approximately $0.4 million of unrelated non-operating expenses, primarily related to legal costs.

In connection with the LPI sale, we received a note for $2.2 million, representing a portion of the sale price, which we fully reserved against at the time of the sale. We are recognizing income as realizability of this note is assured. Accordingly, for each of the fiscal years 2008 and fiscal 2007, we recognized other income of $0.5 million.

INTEREST EXPENSE, NET

Net interest expense was $3.0 million in fiscal 2008 as compared to $4.3 million in fiscal 2007 and $5.5 million in fiscal 2006. The decrease in interest expense during fiscal 2008 as compared to fiscal 2007 was primarily due to a decreased interest rate on borrowings under our credit facility. In total, including our long-term debt, we had a slight increase in average borrowings during fiscal 2008 as compared to fiscal 2007; however, at January 31, 2009 our total debt is $7.1 million, or 12%, lower than at February 2, 2008.

See “Liquidity and Capital Resources” for more discussion regarding our current debt obligations and future liquidity needs.

 

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DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS

The following table summarizes the results of operations for our Jared M. business which we exited during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2007.

 

(in millions)    Fiscal 2008 (1)     Fiscal 2007 (2)     Fiscal 2006  

Sales

   $ —       $ 3.1     $ 2.1  

Gross margin

     —         0.4       0.9  

Selling, general and administrative expenses

     0.9       4.5       2.1  

Provision for impairment of assets

     —         1.5       —    

Depreciation and amortization

     —         0.2       —    
                        

Loss before taxes

     (0.9 )     (5.8 )     (1.2 )

Provision for income taxes

     —         2.3       0.5  
                        

Loss from discontinued operations

   $ (0.9 )   $ (3.5 )     (0.7 )
                        

 

  (1) During the first quarter of fiscal 2008, we sold our Jared M. business to a third party for a cash purchase price of $250,000 and no gain or loss was realized on the sale. During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2008, we recorded a charge of $895,000 for the outstanding lease obligation for the Jared M. showroom. In fiscal 2007, when we decided to exit our Jared M. operations, the Jared M. showroom was being sub-leased and we did not believe any accrual was needed at that time. However, during fiscal 2008, we were not able to secure a sub-lease agreement to completely satisfy our obligations under the lease agreement. No income tax benefit was realized on this charge during fiscal 2008 due to the establishment of our full valuation allowance against all of our deferred tax assets.
  (2) Discontinued operations for fiscal 2007 include a charge of $2.6 million, of which $1.1 million relates to the write-down of inventory and is included as part of gross margin. The remainder of the charge is for the impairment of fixed assets of $1.4 million and other current assets of $0.1 million.

INCOME TAXES

Pursuant to accounting rules, realization of our deferred tax assets, which relate principally to federal net operating loss carryforwards, which expire from 2018 through 2028, is dependent on generating sufficient taxable income in the near term. We had previously established a full valuation allowance against our deferred tax assets during fiscal years 2001 and 2002, based on the historical losses in those years. Then, as a result of transforming our Company, through acquisitions and divestures, from an operator of Levi’s®/Dockers® outlet stores to the market leader of men’s big & tall apparel, our big & tall business had become profitable from an operating perspective. In fiscal 2005, we reversed $3.1 million and in fiscal 2006, we reversed the majority of the remaining valuation allowance, or $31.0 million.

At the end of fiscal 2006, we considered the positive evidence of thirteen consecutive quarters of positive comparable store sales, our continued improvement in operating income from fiscal 2002 to fiscal 2006, our expectations regarding the generation of future taxable income, and our market position and expected growth of our industry. However, the effect of the weakening economy on our retail business, especially in fiscal 2008, has had a significant impact to our revenue and profitability. Further, the conditions of the economy have also negatively impacted our market value as a result of the deterioration of the capital markets and resulted in substantial impairments which contributed to our operating loss. Accordingly, due to our cumulative operating losses as well as our uncertainty regarding the economy and our ability to generate future taxable income to realize all of our deferred tax assets, in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2008, we recorded a charge of $28.6 million to establish a full valuation allowance against our deferred tax assets.

As of January 31, 2009, we have net operating loss carryforwards of $79.6 million for federal income tax purposes and $54.1 million for state income tax purposes that are available to offset future taxable income, subject to certain annual usage limitations, through fiscal year 2028. As a result of the Casual Male acquisition and the issuance of additional equity in fiscal 2002, the utilization of approximately $24.7 million of the $79.6 million in federal net operating losses is subject to an annual limitation of approximately $4.8 million per year. Additionally, we have alternative minimum tax credit carryforwards of $2.2 million, which are available to further reduce income taxes over an indefinite period.

 

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NET INCOME

The net loss for fiscal 2008 was $(109.3) million, or $(2.64) per diluted share, compared to net income for fiscal 2007 of $0.4 million, or $0.01 per diluted share, and $42.6 million, or $0.98 per diluted share, in fiscal 2006.

 

(in millions)    Fiscal 2008     Fiscal 2007     Fiscal 2006  

Operating income (loss) before non-cash and severance charges (1)

   $ (3.6 )   $ 10.5     $ 27.8  

Severance costs and non-cash acceleration of stock compensation expense

     (2.0 )     —         (1.2 )

Provision for impairment of assets, including goodwill

     (71.4 )     —         —    
                        

Operating income (loss)

   $ (77.0 (2)   $ 10.5  (3)   $ 26.6  (4)

Other income (expense)

     0.5       0.5       1.1  

Interest expense

     (3.0 )     (4.3 )     (5.5 )

Provision (benefit) for income taxes

     (28.9 (2)     (2.8 )     21.1  (3)

Loss from discontinued operations

     (0.9 )     (3.5 )     (0.7 )
                        

Net income (loss)

   $ (109.3 )   $ 0.4     $ 42.6  
                        

 

(1) Operating income (loss) before non-cash and severance charges of $(3.6) million is a Non-GAAP measure and is not meant to be considered superior to or as a substitute for operating income (loss), on a GAAP basis, of $(77.0) million. Considering the materiality of the impairment-related charges incurred during fiscal 2008, we believe that the above table is a meaningful presentation to measure our operating performance, especially when comparing such results to fiscal 2007 and fiscal 2006.
(2) Results for fiscal 2008 include total impairment charges of $71.4 million ($63.1 million for goodwill impairment, $2.5 million for impairment of the Rochester trademark and $5.8 million for the impairment of fixed assets). We also recorded an additional non-cash charge of $1.5 million for stock compensation expense related to the acceleration of vesting for certain stock options which were repurchased during fiscal 2008 and approximately $0.5 million for severance costs. As required by FAS 109, we also established a full reserve against our deferred tax assets at January 31, 2009, and accordingly, recorded a charge of $28.6 million.
(3) Results for fiscal 2007 include a charge of approximately $2.6 million, or $0.04 per diluted share, which is included as part of discontinued operations, related to our decision in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2007 to exit our Jared M. business. Operating income included a charge for $6.1 million, or $0.08 per diluted share, which was recorded as part of gross margin related to inventory write-offs associated with markdowns and the write-off of excess inventory in addition to the correction of freight and other inventory adjustments which were deemed immaterial to the prior periods presented.
(4) Results for fiscal 2006 include other income (expense) of $1.1 million related to the initial gain on the sale of LPI of $1.5 million offset partially by $0.4 million of unrelated non-operating expenses primarily related to legal costs. Fiscal 2006 also include a charge of $1.2 million related to the costs incurred for the early termination of certain employment contracts. In addition, as a result of our continued improvement in profitability, during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2006, we reversed $31.0 million of our valuation allowance against our deferred tax assets of which $30.5 million was recognized as an income tax benefit for fiscal 2006. This amount was offset by approximately $8.9 million of income tax provisions.

SEASONALITY

A comparison of sales in each quarter of the past three fiscal years is presented below. The amounts shown are not necessarily indicative of actual trends, because such amounts also reflect the addition of new stores and the remodeling and closing of others during these periods. Consistent with the retail apparel industry, our business is seasonal. The majority of our operating income is generated in the fourth quarter as a result of the impact of the Christmas selling season. A comparison of quarterly sales, gross profit, and net income per share for the past two fiscal years is presented in Note L of the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

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(in millions, except percentages)

   FISCAL 2008     FISCAL 2007 (1)     FISCAL 2006 (1)  

First quarter

   $ 107.6    24.2 %   $ 110.6    23.8 %   $ 102.9    22.1 %

Second quarter

     113.5    25.6 %     113.5    24.4 %     111.4    23.9 %

Third quarter

     100.0    22.5 %     106.1    22.9 %     106.4    22.9 %

Fourth quarter

     123.1    27.7 %     133.9    28.9 %     144.7    31.1 %
                                       
   $ 444.2    100.0 %   $ 464.1    100.0 %   $ 465.4    100.0 %

 

(1) Sales results for fiscal 2007 and fiscal 2006 exclude sales from the Jared M. discontinued operations.

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

Our primary sources of liquidity are our cash generated from operations and availability under our credit facility, as amended (“Credit Facility”), with Bank of America, N.A. Our current cash needs are primarily for working capital (essentially inventory requirements) and capital expenditures. As discussed below, our capital expenditure program for fiscal 2009 is $5.0 million and is considerably less than in prior years. For fiscal 2009, we have no plans for new store growth and will only pursue those capital projects which we deem imperative to our business and to promote improved customer service.

The current retail environment has been impacted by the recent volatility in the financial markets and the uncertainty in the economy, all of which could result in unanticipated adverse effects on our business. However, we currently believe that our existing cash generated by operations together with our availability under our Credit Facility will be sufficient within current forecasts for us to meet our foreseeable liquidity requirements. In determining future liquidity and cash flow for fiscal 2009, we factored in potential decreases in comparable sales for fiscal 2009 of 10%. We anticipate that we will be able to generate free cash flow of $15 million in fiscal 2009 despite a lower sales base. See “Presentation of Non-GAAP Measures” above regarding non-GAAP free cash flow.

The following table sets forth financial data regarding our liquidity position at the end of the past three fiscal years:

 

     FISCAL YEARS
     2008    2007    2006
(in millions, except ratios)          

Cash provided by operations

   $ 23.2    $ 11.7    $ 12.1

Working capital

     20.0      41.0      66.8

Current ratio

     1.2:1      1.4:1      1.9:1

Although we had an operating loss for fiscal 2008, from a cash flow perspective, we generated an increase of $11.5 million in cash flow provided by operations for fiscal 2008 over the prior year. This increase was primarily the result of our management of inventory and other working capital accounts which offset our lower profitability as compared to fiscal 2007. The decrease in cash flow from operations for fiscal 2007, as compared to fiscal 2006, was primarily due to lower profitability, adjusted for non-cash activity, offset by the timing of working capital payments.

Credit Facility

Our Credit Facility, which matures October 29, 2011, provides for a total commitment of $110 million comprised of (i) a $100 million revolving credit facility which includes a sublimit of $20 million for commercial and standby letters of credit and a sublimit of up to $15 million for SwingLine Loans and (ii) a $10 million “Last Out” revolving credit facility, which will be subordinate to the $100 million revolving credit facility. If at any time our Excess Availability Ratio, as defined in the Credit Facility, is less than 50%, our borrowings must first be made from the “Last Out” revolving credit facility before borrowing from the $100 million revolving credit facility. Borrowings under the Credit Facility bear interest at variable rates based on Bank of America’s prime rate or the London Interbank Offering Rate (“LIBOR”) and vary depending on our levels of excess availability.

At January 31, 2009, we had borrowings outstanding under the Credit Facility of $38.7 million and outstanding standby letters of credit of $5.9 million and documentary letters of credit of $2.2 million. Average borrowings

 

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outstanding under this facility during fiscal 2008 were approximately $50.0 million, resulting in an average unused excess availability of approximately $43.7 million. Our ability to borrow under the Credit Facility is determined using an availability formula based on eligible assets, with increased advance rates based on seasonality. This facility contains no financial covenants.

Master Loan and Security Agreement

On July 20, 2007, we entered into a Master Loan and Security Agreement (the “Master Agreement”) with Banc of America Leasing & Capital, LLC (“BALC”) for equipment financing. In conjunction with the Master Agreement, we entered into an Equipment Security Note (the “First Secured Note”), whereby we borrowed an aggregate of $17.4 million from BALC. The First Secured Note is due July 20, 2011.

On January 16, 2008, we entered into a second Equipment Security Note (the “Second Secured Note”), pursuant to the same terms and provisions of the Master Agreement, whereby we borrowed an additional $2.1 million. The Second Secured Note is due January 16, 2012.

Both secured notes accrue interest at a per annum rate of 1.75% plus the rate of interest equal to the 30-day published LIBOR rate. Principal and interest, in arrears, are payable monthly on each note, commencing one month after issuance of such note. We are subject to a prepayment penalty on both secured notes equal to 1% of the prepaid principal until the first anniversary of the respective secured note, 0.5% of the prepaid principal from the first day after the first anniversary through the end of the second anniversary and no prepayment penalty thereafter. At January 31, 2009, the outstanding balance of the secured notes was $12.5 million.

Both notes are secured by a security interest in all of our rights, title and interest in and to certain equipment.

Stock Repurchase Program

During fiscal 2006, our Board of Directors adopted a $75 million stock repurchase program which terminated on December 31, 2008. Over the term of the program, we repurchased approximately 4.3 million shares for an aggregate price of $50.9 million. No repurchases were made during fiscal 2008.

INVENTORY

At January 31, 2009, total inventories were $98.6 million as compared to $117.8 million at February 2, 2008. The decrease in inventory of $19.2 million, or 16%, is the result of reductions of inventory across all divisions as part of our concerted effort to manage our inventory during this economic recession. We have successfully reduced our inventory levels without sacrificing our broad selection of core basic merchandise and current fashion items.

During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2007, we recorded approximately $6.1 million in inventory write-downs associated with the clearance of obsolete Rochester inventory to make way for its updated merchandising strategy, and the corrections of freight and other inventory adjustments which were deemed immaterial to the prior periods presented. The charge of $6.1 million was included in gross margin in the Statement of Operations for fiscal 2007.

In addition, in connection with the exiting of our Jared M. business, we recorded a charge of $1.1 million for the write-off of inventory. This charge was included in discontinued operations for fiscal 2007 as a reduction in gross margin.

OFF-BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS

We have no off-balance sheet arrangements as defined by 303(a)(4) of Regulation S-K.

 

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CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS

The following table summarizes our contractual obligations at January 31, 2009, and the effect such obligations are expected to have on our liquidity and cash flows in future periods:

 

           Payments due by period

Contractual Obligations

(in millions)

         Total    Less
than
1 year
   1-3
years
   3-5
years
   More
than
5 years

Operating Leases

   (1 )   $ 288.0    $ 49.5    $ 80.2    $ 55.2    $ 103.1

Long-Term Debt Obligations

   (2 )     13.3      5.4      7.9      —        —  

Non-merchandise Purchase Obligations

   (3 )     0.7      0.6      0.1      —        —  
                                    

Total Commitments

   (4 )   $ 302.0    $ 55.5    $ 88.2    $ 55.2    $ 103.1
                                    

 

(1) Includes amounts due on our 20-year lease agreement for our corporate headquarters and operating leases for all of our current store locations and certain equipment and auto leases.
(2) Includes principal payments on our outstanding secured notes and the corresponding estimated interest costs.
(3) Non-merchandise Purchase Obligations include an on-going consulting agreement with Jewelcor Management, Inc., pursuant to which we are obligated to pay $575,000 annually through April 29, 2010. See Note H –“Related Parties” to the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for a full description of this agreement.
(4) This table excludes Merchandise Purchase Obligations, which represent our outstanding obligations pursuant to open purchase orders. At January 31, 2009, we had approximately $48.1 million in open purchase orders. We estimate that approximately 73% of these purchase orders may be considered non-cancelable.

CAPITAL EXPENDITURES

Below is a summary of store openings, closings and remodels from February 2, 2008 to January 31, 2009 and related square footage:

 

Number of Stores:

   Casual
Male
   Rochester    Total
stores

At February 2, 2008

   462    26    488

New outlet stores

   2    —      2

New retail stores

   13    1    14

Closed outlet stores

   1    —      1
            

Closed retail stores

   9    —      9
              

At January 31, 2009

   467    27    494

2008 Relocations

   1    1    —  

Square footage (in thousands)

        

at January 31, 2009

   1,635    220    1,855

at February 2, 2008

   1,594    215    1,809

During fiscal 2008, we incurred approximately $12.6 million in capital expenditures. Approximately $6.4 million of our capital expenditures related to store capital for new, remodeled and relocated stores and approximately $4.7 million was incurred for information technology.

In light of the current economy, we are limiting our capital expenditures for fiscal 2009 to approximately $5.0 million. Our capital projects will be limited to those that we believe will provide a substantial financial benefit, such as our inventory integration project. With the exception of $0.5 million for the conversions to develop six hybrid Rochester/Casual Male XL stores, we do not plan on opening any new store locations during fiscal 2009.

 

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CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Our financial statements are based on the application of significant accounting policies, many of which require our management to make significant estimates and assumptions (see Note A to the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements). We believe that the following items involve some of the more critical judgments in the application of accounting policies that currently affect our financial condition and results of operations.

Stock-Based Compensation

SFAS 123R requires us to measure compensation cost for all stock awards at fair value on date of grant and recognize compensation over the service period for awards expected to vest. The fair value of our stock options is determined using the Black-Scholes valuation model, which requires the input of highly subjective assumptions. These assumptions include estimating the length of time employees will retain their vested stock options before exercising them (the “expected term”), the estimated volatility of our common stock price over the expected term and the number of options that will ultimately not complete their vesting requirements (“forfeitures”). Changes in these subjective assumptions can materially affect the estimate of fair value of stock-based compensation and, consequently, the related amount recognized as an expense on the consolidated statements of operations. As required under the accounting rules, we review our valuation assumptions at each grant date and, as a result, we are likely to change our valuation assumptions used to value employee stock-based awards granted in future periods. The values derived from using the Black-Scholes model are recognized as expense over the service period, net of estimated forfeitures. Actual results, and future changes in estimates, may differ substantially from these current estimates. For fiscal 2008, fiscal 2007 and fiscal 2006, we recognized total compensation expense of $3.7 million, $2.1 million and $0.8 million, respectively. Compensation expense for fiscal 2008 includes $1.5 million related to the acceleration of certain options which were repurchased and cancelled by us. See Note G to the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

Inventory

We value inventory at the lower of cost or market, using a weighted-average cost method. We review our inventory to identify slow-moving and broken assortments and use markdowns to clear merchandise and will record inventory reserves if the estimated future selling price is less than cost. In addition, an inventory shrink estimate is made each period that reduces the value of inventory for lost or stolen merchandise. We perform physical inventories through the year and adjust the shrink reserves accordingly.

During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2007, we recorded approximately $6.1 million in inventory write-downs associated with the excess merchandise and the acceleration of markdowns associated with seasonal merchandise. The charge also included corrections of freight and other inventory adjustments which were deemed immaterial to the prior periods presented.

During the third and fourth quarters of fiscal 2007, we recorded a charge of $1.1 million for the write-off of inventory related to our decision to exit our Jared M. operations. This charge was included as part of discontinued operations for fiscal 2007.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets.

We review our long-lived assets for impairment when indicators of impairment are present and the undiscounted cash flow estimated to be generated by those assets is less than the assets’ carrying amount. We evaluate our long-lived assets for impairment at a store level for all our retail locations. If actual market conditions are less favorable than management’s projections, future write-offs may be necessary.

In fiscal 2008, we recorded an impairment charge for fixed assets of $5.8 million. See “Provision for Impairment of Assets, Including Goodwill” above for more information. In fiscal 2007, in connection with the exiting of our Jared M. operations, we recorded an impairment charge for fixed assets of $1.4 million which was included as part of discontinued operations for fiscal 2007.

 

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Goodwill and Intangibles.

In accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (“SFAS”) No. 142, Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets (“SFAS No. 142”), we evaluate goodwill and intangible assets with indefinite-lives at least annually for impairment by analyzing the estimated fair value. We evaluate goodwill, based on two separate operating segments, our Casual Male business and our Rochester business. As discussed above under “Provision for Impairment of Assets, Including Goodwill,” in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2008, we recorded a full impairment charge of $63.1 million against our goodwill and a partial impairment of $2.5 million against our Rochester trademark.

Goodwill:

During the third quarter of fiscal 2008, we determined that a potential impairment may have existed. At that time, we performed an interim goodwill assessment in accordance with SFAS 142 and concluded, based on our discounted cash flow analysis and market capitalization at that time, no impairment charge was needed. However, as we previously disclosed, our fourth quarter sales and operating results were key assumptions to our anticipated future cash flows. In addition, our market capitalization continued to deteriorate during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2008 largely as a result of the overall decrease in capital markets and continued decline in the economy.

Accordingly, at the end of the fourth quarter of fiscal 2008, we performed our annual impairment assessment for each of our reporting units. The implied fair value of our reporting units was determined using a combination of the income approach, which estimates the fair value of our reporting unit based on future discounted cash flows, and the market approach, which estimates the fair value of our reporting unit on comparable market prices. Our income approach was based upon a set of assumptions regarding discounted future cash flows, which represent our best estimate of future performance at this time.

Further, we have qualitatively reconciled the aggregate estimated fair value of the reporting units to the market capitalization of the consolidated Company. In addition to traditional control premiums, we identified certain reconciling items that have led to a difference between the market capitalization and the fair value of the Company, primarily related to the market’s uncertainty regarding the Company’s future operating results and expected liquidity because we have not provided earnings guidance since the second quarter of fiscal 2008.

Based on the results of these assessments, we concluded that a full impairment had occurred with respect to the goodwill of both reporting units and due to negative implied goodwill values, accordingly, recognized an impairment charge of $63.1 million for the fourth quarter and fiscal year 2008.

Trademark:

Similar to goodwill, our trademarks are also considered indefinite-lived intangible assets and must also be tested annually for potential impairment. At January 31, 2009, we tested both our Casual Male trademark and our Rochester trademark for potential impairment. Utilizing an income approach with appropriate royalty rates applied, we concluded that the Casual Male trademark, with a carrying value of $29.2 million was not impaired. However, we did conclude that a partial impairment of our Rochester trademark had occurred and, accordingly, we recorded a charge in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2008 for $2.5 million to reduce the value of our Rochester trademark to $1.5 million.

Deferred Taxes.

We record a valuation allowance to reduce our deferred tax assets to the amount that is more likely than not to be realized. Due to cumulative losses incurred in the last three years, we have not considered estimated future taxable income in assessing the amount needed for the valuation allowance. At January 31, 2009, we recorded a $28.6 million charge to establish a full valuation allowance against our deferred tax assets. See “Income Taxes” above for more discussion regarding this charge.

RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

In December 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 141 (revised 2007), Business Combinations, (“SFAS 141R”), which changes how business combinations are accounted for and will impact financial statements both on the acquisition date and in subsequent periods. SFAS 141R is effective for the Company’s fiscal year beginning February 1, 2009, and will be applied prospectively. The impact of adopting SFAS 141R will depend on the nature and terms of future acquisitions.

 

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In December 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 160, Noncontrolling Interests in Consolidated Financial Statements (“SFAS 160”), which changes the accounting and reporting standards for the noncontrolling interests in a subsidiary in consolidated financial statements. SFAS 160 recharacterizes minority interests as noncontrolling interests and requires noncontrolling interests to be classified as a component of shareholders’ equity. SFAS 160 is effective for the Company’s fiscal year beginning February 1, 2009 and requires retroactive adoption of the presentation and disclosure requirements for existing minority interests. We do not expect SFAS 160 to have an impact on our consolidated financial statements.

In March 2008, the FASB issued SFAS No. 161, Disclosures About Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities — an amendment of FASB Statement No. 133 (“SFAS 161”). SFAS 161 expands the disclosure requirements of FASB Statement No. 133 about an entity’s derivative instruments and hedging activities to include more detailed qualitative disclosures and expanded quantitative disclosures. The provisions of SFAS 161 are effective for fiscal years and interim periods beginning after November 15, 2008. We do not expect SFAS 161 to have an impact on our consolidated statements.

EFFECTS OF INFLATION

Although our operations are influenced by general economic trends, we do not believe that inflation has had a material effect on the results of our operations in the last three fiscal years.

 

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Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

In the normal course of business, our financial position and results of operations are routinely subject to a variety of risks, including market risk associated with interest rate movements on borrowings and foreign currency fluctuations. We regularly assess these risks and have established policies and business practices to protect against the adverse effects of these and other potential exposures.

Interest Rates

We utilize cash from operations and from our Credit Facility to fund our working capital needs. Our Credit Facility is not used for trading or speculative purposes. In addition, we have available letters of credit as sources of financing for our working capital requirements. Borrowings under the Credit Facility, which expires October 29, 2011, bear interest at variable rates based on Bank of America’s prime rate or LIBOR. At January 31, 2009, the interest rate on our prime based borrowings was 3.25%. Approximately $32.5 million of our outstanding borrowings were in LIBOR contracts with interest rates ranging from 1.53% to 3.16%. Based upon a sensitivity analysis as of January 31, 2009, assuming average outstanding borrowing during fiscal 2008 of $50.0 million, a 50 basis point increase in interest rates would have resulted in a potential increase in interest expense of approximately $250,000.

Foreign Currency

Our Sears Canada catalog operations conduct business in Canadian dollars and our Rochester Clothing store located in London, England conducts business in British pounds. Our international e-commerce sites conduct business in Euros and British pounds. If the value of the Canadian dollar, British pound or Euro against the U.S. dollar weakens, the revenues and earnings of these operations will be reduced when they are translated or remeasured to U.S. dollars. Also, the value of these assets to U.S. dollars may decline. As of January 31, 2009, sales from our Sears Canada operations, our London Rochester Clothing store and our international e-commerce sites were immaterial to consolidated sales. As such, we believe that movement in foreign currency exchange rates will not have a material adverse affect on our financial position or results of operations.

 

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Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

CASUAL MALE RETAIL GROUP, INC.

INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

     Page

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

   44

Consolidated Financial Statements:

  

Consolidated Balance Sheets at January 31, 2009 and February 2, 2008

   45

Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Fiscal Years Ended January 31, 2009, February  2, 2008 and February 3, 2007

   46

Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders’ Equity for the Fiscal Years Ended January 31, 2009,  February 2, 2008 and February 3, 2007

   47

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Fiscal Years Ended January 31, 2009, February  2, 2008 and February 3, 2007

   48

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

   49

 

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REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

The Board of Directors and Stockholders

of Casual Male Retail Group, Inc.

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Casual Male Retail Group, Inc. as of January 31, 2009 and February 2, 2008, and the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the three fiscal years in the period ended January 31, 2009. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Casual Male Retail Group, Inc. at January 31, 2009 and February 2, 2008, and the consolidated results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three fiscal years in the period ended January 31, 2009, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), Casual Male Retail Group, Inc.’s internal control over financial reporting as of January 31, 2009, based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission and our report dated March 18, 2009 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.

As discussed in Note D to the consolidated financial statements, effective February 4, 2007, the Company adopted FASB Interpretation No. 48, Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes—an Interpretation of FASB Statement No. 109.

As discussed in Note I to the consolidated financial statements, effective for the fiscal year ended February 3, 2007, the Company adopted Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 158, Employers’ Accounting for Defined Benefit Pension and Other Post-Retirement Plans—An amendment of FASB Statement Nos. 87, 88, 106, and 132(R).

 

/s/ Ernst & Young LLP

Boston, Massachusetts

March 18, 2009

 

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CASUAL MALE RETAIL GROUP, INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

January 31, 2009 and February 2, 2008

 

     January 31, 2009
(Fiscal 2008)
    February 2, 2008
(Fiscal 2007)
 
     (In thousands, except share data)  

ASSETS

  

Current assets:

    

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 4,953     $ 5,293  

Accounts receivable

     2,026       2,813  

Inventories

     98,633       117,787  

Deferred income taxes

     —         8,885  

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

     9,097       11,503  
                

Total current assets

     114,709       146,281  

Property and equipment, net of accumulated depreciation and amortization

     52,208       62,156  

Other assets:

    

Goodwill

     —         60,660  

Other intangible assets

     33,360       35,191  

Deferred income taxes

     —         19,732  

Other assets

     954       1,341  
                

Total assets

   $ 201,231     $ 325,361  
                

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

    

Current liabilities:

    

Current portion of long-term debt

   $ 4,874     $ 4,874  

Current portion of deferred gain on sale-leaseback

     1,465       1,465  

Accounts payable

     23,956       34,187  

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities

     25,649       23,808  

Notes payable

     38,718       40,978  
                

Total current liabilities

     94,662       105,312  
                

Long-term liabilities:

    

Long-term debt, net of current portion

     7,576       12,450  

Deferred gain on sale-leaseback, net of current portion

     23,447       24,912  

Other long-term liabilities

     3,715       746  
                

Total long-term liabilities

     34,738       38,108  
                

Commitments and contingencies (Note E)

    

Stockholders’ equity:

    

Preferred stock, $0.01 par value, 1,000,000 shares authorized, none issued

     —         —    

Common stock, $0.01 par value, 75,000,000 shares authorized, 52,327,609 and 52,266,840 shares issued at January 31, 2009 and February 2, 2008, respectively

     523       523  

Additional paid-in capital

     275,180       271,354  

Treasury stock at cost, 10,877,439 shares at January 31, 2009

    

and February 2, 2008

     (87,977 )     (87,977 )

Accumulated deficit

     (110,092 )     (835 )

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

     (5,803 )     (1,124 )
                

Total stockholders’ equity

     71,831       181,941  
                

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

   $ 201,231     $ 325,361  
                

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

 

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CASUAL MALE RETAIL GROUP, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

For the fiscal years ended January 31, 2009, February 2, 2008 and February 3, 2007

 

     January 31,
2009

(Fiscal 2008)
    February 2,
2008

(Fiscal 2007)
    February 3,
2007

(Fiscal 2006)
 
     (In thousands, except share data)  

Sales

   $ 444,184     $ 464,128     $ 465,393  

Cost of goods sold including occupancy costs

     254,592       258,155       253,756  
                        

Gross profit

     189,592       205,973       211,637  

Expenses:

      

Selling, general and administrative

     178,072       178,055       168,824  

Provision for impairment of assets, including goodwill

     71,407       —         —    

Provision for employment contract termination

     —         —         1,200  

Depreciation and amortization

     17,100       17,408       15,057  
                        

Total expenses

     266,579       195,463       185,081  
                        

Operating income (loss)

     (76,987 )     10,510       26,556  

Other income (expense), net

     532       502       1,112  

Interest expense, net

     (2,961 )     (4,314 )     (5,466 )
                        

Income (loss) from continuing operations before income taxes

     (79,416 )     6,698       22,202  

Provision (benefit) for income taxes

     28,946       2,772       (21,100 )
                        

Income (loss) from continuing operations

     (108,362 )     3,926       43,302  
                        

Loss from discontinued operations, (net of tax benefit of $2.3 million in fiscal 2007 and $0.5 million in fiscal 2006)

     (895 )     (3,512 )     (670 )
                        

Net income (loss)

   $ (109,257 )   $ 414     $ 42,632  
                        

Net income (loss) per share—basic

      

Income (loss) from continuing operations

   $ (2.62 )   $ 0.09     $ 1.23  

Loss from discontinued operations

   $ (0.02 )   $ (0.08 )   $ (0.02 )
                        

Net income (loss)

   $ (2.64 )   $ 0.01     $ 1.21  

Net income (loss) per share—diluted

      

Income (loss) from continuing operations

   $ (2.62 )   $ 0.09     $ 0.99  

Loss from discontinued operations

   $ (0.02 )   $ (0.08 )   $ (0.01 )
                        

Net income (loss)

   $ (2.64 )   $ 0.01     $ 0.98  

Weighted-average number of common shares outstanding:

      

Basic

     41,412       41,707       35,276  

Diluted

     41,412       43,229       46,457  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

 

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CASUAL MALE RETAIL GROUP, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

For the fiscal years ended January 31, 2009, February 2, 2008 and February 3, 2007

(In thousands)

 

     Common Stock    Additional
Paid-in
Capital
    Treasury Stock     Accumulated
Deficit
    Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
income (loss)
    Total  
     Shares    Amounts      Shares     Amounts        

Balance at January 28, 2006

   39,636    $ 396    $ 156,177     (5,172 )   $ (23,362 )   $ (43,881 )   $ (173 )   $ 89,157  
                                                          

Repurchase of common stock

           (1,514 )     (15,208 )         (15,208 )

Conversion of subordinated convertible notes due 2024

   8,896      90      91,285               91,375  

Exercises under option program

   1,133      11      5,810               5,821  

Exercises of warrants

   1,185      12      3,456               3,468  

Stock option compensation expense

           777               777  

Board of Directors compensation

   10      —        106               106  

Valuation allowance reversal attribute to stock options

           522               522  

Issuance of options to related party for professional services

        —        201               201  

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss):

                  

Cumulative effect of the adoption of FAS 158 related to the Pension Plan

                   (1,111 )     (1,111 )

Foreign currency

                   306       306  

Net income

                 42,632         42,632  
                        

Total comprehensive income

                     42,938  
                                                          

Balance at February 3, 2007

   50,860    $ 509    $ 258,334     (6,686 )   $ (38,570 )   $ (1,249 )   $ (978 )   $ 218,046  
                                                          

Repurchase of common stock

           (4,191 )     (49,407 )         (49,407 )

Exercises under option program

   358      4      2,006               2,010  

Exercises of warrants

   1,029      10      8,740               8,750  

Stock option compensation expense

           2,121               2,121  

Board of Directors compensation

   20      —        153               153  

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss):

                  

Unrecognized loss associated with Pension Plan

                   (741 )     (741 )

Foreign currency

                   595       595  

Net income

                 414         414  
                        

Total comprehensive income

                     268  
                                                          

Balance at February 2, 2008

   52,267    $ 523    $ 271,354     (10,877 )   $ (87,977 )   $ (835 )   $ (1,124 )   $ 181,941  
                                                          

Exercises under option program

                     —    

Stock option repurchase

           (7 )             (7 )

Stock option compensation expense

           3,691               3,691  

Board of Directors compensation

   61      —        142               142  

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss):

                  

Unrecognized loss associated with Pension Plan

                   (3,386 )     (3,386 )

Foreign currency

                   (1,293 )     (1,293 )

Net income (loss)

                 (109,257 )       (109,257 )
                        

Total comprehensive income (loss)

                     (113,936 )
                                                          

Balance at January 31, 2009

   52,328    $ 523    $ 275,180     (10,877 )   $ (87,977 )   $ (110,092 )   $ (5,803 )   $ 71,831  
                                                          

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

 

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CASUAL MALE RETAIL GROUP, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

For the fiscal years ended January 31, 2009, February 2, 2008 and February 3, 2007

 

     Fiscal
2008
    Fiscal
2007
    Fiscal
2006
 
     (In thousands)  

Cash flows from operating activities:

      

Net income (loss)

   $ (109,257 )   $ 414     $ 42,632  

Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash provided by operating activities:

      

Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax

     895       2,034       670  

Amortization of deferred gain on sale leaseback

     (1,465 )     (1,466 )     (1,465 )

Provision for impairment of assets, including goodwill

     71,407      

Provision for employment contract terminations

     —         —         1,200  

Provision for impairment of assets -discontinued operations

     —         1,478       —    

Depreciation and amortization

     17,100       17,408       15,057  

Non-cash interest costs associated with debt conversions

     —         —         208  

Gain on sale of businesses

     —         —         (1,483 )

Deferred taxes, net of valuation allowance

     28,617       1,855       (23,511 )

Loss from disposal of property and equipment

     127       51       363  

Stock option compensation

     3,691       2,121       777  

Issuance of common stock to Board of Directors

     142       153       106  

Issuance of common stock to related party

     —         —         201  

Changes in operating assets and liabilities, net of effect of businesses acquired:

      

Accounts receivable

     254       436       255  

Inventories

     19,154       (4,405 )     (22,620 )

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

     997       1,012       (7,901 )

Other assets

     283       533       (475 )

Accounts payable

     (10,231 )     (1,181 )     7,263  

Accrued liabilities for severance, store closings and impairment charges

     (175 )     (995 )     (30 )

Income taxes

     1,986       (4,217 )     296  

Accrued expenses and other liabilities

     (328 )     (3,493 )     544  
                        

Net cash provided by operating activities

     23,197       11,738       12,087  
                        

Cash flows from investing activities:

      

Additions to property and equipment, net

     (12,595 )     (21,377 )     (22,676 )

Net proceeds from sale-leaseback of corporate headquarters

     —         —         55,937  

Proceeds from sale of businesses

     532       502       2,570  

Payment of earn-out provision for Rochester acquisition

     (1,333 )     (1,333 )     (1,333 )

Acquisitions, net of cash acquired

     (3,000 )     —         (2,980 )
                        

Net cash provided by (used for) investing activities

     (16,396 )     (22,208 )     31,518  
                        

Cash flows from financing activities:

      

Net borrowings (repayments) under credit facility

     (2,260 )     32,449       (28,858 )

Proceeds from the issuance of long-term debt, net of commissions and offering costs

     —         19,496       —    

Principal payments on long-term debt

     (4,874 )     (2,860 )     (9,071 )

Proceeds from the exercise of warrants

     —         8,750       3,468  

Repurchase of common stock

     —         (49,407 )     (15,208 )

Repurchase of certain stock options

     (7 )     —         —    

Proceeds from the exercise of stock options under option program

     —         2,010       5,821  
                        

Net cash provided by (used for) financing activities

     (7,141 )     10,438       (43,848 )
                        

Net decrease in cash and cash equivalents

     (340 )     (32 )     (243 )

Cash and cash equivalents:

      

Beginning of the year

     5,293       5,325       5,568  
                        

End of the year

   $ 4,953     $ 5,293     $ 5,325  
                        

Non-cash transaction

      

Conversion of 5% convertible notes to common stock

       $ 91,375  

Deferred gain on sale-leaseback

       $ 29,308  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.

 

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CASUAL MALE RETAIL GROUP, INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

JANUARY 31, 2009

A. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Nature of Business

Casual Male Retail Group, Inc. (“Company”) is the largest specialty retailer of big & tall men’s apparel. The Company operates under the trade names of Casual Male XL, Casual Male XL Outlets, Rochester Clothing, B & T Factory Direct, Shoes XL and Living XL. At January 31, 2009, the Company operated 467 Casual Male XL retail and outlet stores located throughout the United States, 26 Rochester Clothing stores located in major U.S. cities and one store in London, England. The Company also operates a direct business throughout the United States, Canada and Europe which includes several catalogs and e-commerce sites to support its brands and product extensions.

Basis of Presentation

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its subsidiaries. All significant intercompany accounts, transactions and profits are eliminated.

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosures of contingent liabilities as of the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from estimates.

Segment Reporting

The Company reports its operations as one reportable segment, Big & Tall Men’s Apparel, which consists of its two operating segments—Casual Male and Rochester. The Company considers its operating segments to be similar in terms of economic characteristic, production processes and operations, and have therefore aggregated them into a single reporting segment. The operating results and assets of the Company’s direct businesses, Living XL, Shoes XL and the Company’s International Web Stores, are immaterial.

Fiscal Year

The Company’s fiscal year is a 52-week or 53-week period ending on the Saturday closest to January 31. Fiscal years 2008, 2007 and 2006 ended on January 31, 2009, February 2, 2008 and February 3, 2007, respectively. Fiscal 2006 was a 53-week period. Fiscal 2008 and 2007 were 52-week periods.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

Short-term investments, which have a maturity of ninety days or less when acquired, are considered cash equivalents.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (“SFAS”) No. 107, Disclosure About Fair Value of Financial Instruments, requires disclosure of the fair value of certain financial instruments. The carrying amounts for the Company’s long-term debt approximate fair value as the interest rates and terms are substantially similar to those that could be obtained currently for similar instruments. The carrying amounts of cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, accounts payable, accrued expenses and short-term borrowings approximate fair value because of the short maturity of these instruments.

In fiscal 2008, the Company adopted SFAS No.157, Fair Value Measurements (“FAS 157”). The purpose of FAS 157 is to define fair value, establish a framework for measuring fair value and enhance disclosures about fair value measurements.

Inventories

All inventories are valued at the lower of cost or market, using a weighted-average cost method.

 

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Prior to fiscal 2006, inventory was principally valued at the lower of cost or market on a first in, first out (“FIFO”) basis, under the retail inventory method. During the second quarter of fiscal 2006, the Company changed its method to the lower of cost or market, using a weighted-average cost method. The revaluation of inventory using the weighted-average cost method approximated the Company’s inventory valuation under the previous FIFO retail method; accordingly, the impact of the change was not material to the financial statements for fiscal 2006. Subsequent to fiscal 2006, the Company identified an inventory valuation difference which was deemed immaterial to the prior periods presented and which was recorded in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2007 as part of the total inventory charge of $6.1 million discussed in Note L.

Property and Equipment

Property and equipment are stated at cost. Major additions and improvements are capitalized while repairs and maintenance are charged to expense as incurred. Upon retirement or other disposition, the cost and related depreciation of the assets are removed from the accounts and the resulting gain or loss, if any, is reflected in income. Depreciation is computed on the straight-line method over the assets’ estimated useful lives as follows:

 

Furniture and fixtures   Five to ten years
Equipment   Five to ten years
Leasehold improvements   Lesser of useful lives or related lease term
Hardware and software   Three to seven years

Goodwill and Intangibles

SFAS No. 141, Business Combinations, requires that all business combinations be accounted for under the purchase method. The statement further requires separate recognition of intangible assets that meet one of two criteria set forth in the statement. Under SFAS No. 142, Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets, goodwill and intangible assets with indefinite lives are no longer amortized but are tested at least annually for impairment. Separable intangible assets with defined lives will continue to be amortized over their useful lives.

At least annually, during the fourth quarter, the Company evaluates goodwill, based on two separate operating segments, its Casual Male business and its Rochester business. The goodwill assigned to each operating segment represents the initial purchase price allocation to goodwill as a result of their respective acquisitions. The Company also performs an impairment analysis and records an impairment charge for any intangible assets with a carrying value in excess of its fair value. The following is a discussion of the results of the Company’s impairment testing:

Goodwill:

During the third quarter of fiscal 2008, the Company determined that a potential impairment may have existed. At that time, the Company performed an interim goodwill assessment in accordance with SFAS 142 and concluded, based on its discounted cash flow analysis and market capitalization at that time, no impairment charge was needed. However, the Company’s fourth quarter sales and operating results were key assumptions in determining anticipated future cash flows. In addition, the Company’s market capitalization continued to deteriorate during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2008 largely as a result of the overall decrease in capital markets and continued decline in the economy.

Accordingly, at the end of the fourth quarter of fiscal 2008, the Company performed its annual impairment assessment for each of our reporting units. The implied fair value of our reporting units were determined using a combination of the income approach, which estimates the fair value of our reporting unit based on future discounted cash flows, and the market approach, which estimates the fair value of our reporting unit on comparable market prices. The income approach was based upon a set of assumptions regarding discounted future cash flows, which represented management’s best estimate of future performance at this time.

Further, the aggregate estimated fair value of the reporting units was qualitatively reconciled to the market capitalization of the consolidated Company. In addition to traditional control premiums, certain reconciling items were identified that have led to a difference between the market capitalization and the fair value of the Company, primarily related to the market’s uncertainty regarding the Company’s future operating results and expected liquidity because no earnings guidance has been provided since the second quarter.

 

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Based on the results of these assessments, the Company determined that a full impairment had occurred with respect to the goodwill of both reporting units and, accordingly, recognized an impairment charge of $63.1 million for the fourth quarter and fiscal year 2008.

Trademark:

Similar to goodwill, the Company’s trademarks are also considered indefinite-lived intangible assets and must also be tested annually for potential impairment. At January 31, 2009, both the Casual Male trademark and the Rochester trademark were tested for potential impairment. Utilizing an income approach with appropriate royalty rates applied, the Company concluded that the Casual Male trademark, with a carrying value of $29.2 million was not impaired. However, the Company did conclude that a partial impairment of its Rochester trademark had occurred and, accordingly, a charge was recorded in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2008 for $2.5 million to reduce the value of the Rochester trademark to $1.5 million.

Below is a table showing the changes in the carrying value of the Company’s goodwill and intangible assets from February 2, 2008 to January 31, 2009:

 

(in thousands)

   February 2,
2008
   Additions     Write-off
Due to
Impairment
   Amortization     January 31,
2009

Goodwill

   $ 60,660    $ 2,397 (1)   $ 63,057    $ —       $ —  

Trademarks

     33,200      —         2,500      —         30,700

Other intangibles

     1,991      1,057 (1)     —        (388 )     2,660

 

  (1) In connection with the purchase of certain assets from Dahle Management Corporation (“Dahle”) in the second quarter of fiscal 2008, the Company recorded goodwill of $2.4 million and intangible assets of $1.1 million. The intangible assets consisted of a non-compete agreement, customer lists and favorable lease assets.

Other intangibles, which include customer lists, non-compete agreements and favorable leases commitments, are the only intangible assets with defined lives, which range from 3 to 16 years based on each asset’s estimated economic useful life.

The gross carrying amount and accumulated amortization of our intangibles, subject to amortization, were $$4.4 million and $1.7 million, respectively, at January 31, 2009 and $3.3 million and $1.3 million, respectively, at February 2, 2008. Amortization expense for other intangible assets for the next five fiscal years is as follows:

 

FISCAL YEAR

   (in thousands)

2009

   $ 532

2010

   $ 507

2011

   $ 504

2012

   $ 449

2013

   $ 238

Pre-opening Costs

In accordance with Statement of Position 98-5, Reporting on the Costs of Start-Up Activities, the Company expenses all pre-opening costs for its stores as incurred.

Advertising Costs

The Company expenses in-store advertising costs as incurred. Direct response advertising costs, which consist of catalog production and postage costs, are deferred and amortized over the period of expected direct marketing revenues, which is less than one year. Direct response costs which were deferred at January 31, 2009 and February 2, 2008 were $1.4 million and $2.9 million, respectively. Advertising expense, which is included in selling, general and administrative expenses, was $34.1 million, $34.4 million and $30.9 million for fiscal 2008, 2007 and 2006, respectively.

Revenue Recognition

Revenue from the Company’s retail store operation is recorded upon purchase of merchandise by customers, net of an allowance for sales returns and allowances. Revenue from the Company’s catalog and e-commerce operations is recognized at the time a customer order is shipped.

 

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Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)

Other comprehensive income (loss) include amounts related to foreign currency and pension and are reported in the Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity. The components of the accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) at January 31, 2009 and February 2, 2008 are as follows:

 

(in thousands)    January 31,
2009
    February 2,
2008
 

Foreign currency

   $ (565 )   $ 728  

Pension

     (5,238 )     (1,852 )
                

Total accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)

   $ (5,803 )   $ (1,124 )
                

Foreign Currency Translation

At January 31, 2009, the Company operates a direct business in Canada and has one Rochester Clothing store located in London, England. Assets and liabilities of these operations are translated into U.S. dollars at the exchange rates in effect at each balance sheet date. Stockholders’ equity is translated at applicable historical exchange rates. Income, expense and cash flow items are translated at average exchange rates during the period. Resulting translation adjustments are reported as a separate component of stockholders’ equity.

Shipping and Handling Costs

Shipping and handling costs are included in cost of sales for all periods presented.

Income Taxes

Deferred income taxes are provided to recognize the effect of temporary differences between tax and financial statement reporting. Such taxes are provided for using enacted tax rates expected to be in place when such temporary differences are realized. A valuation allowance is recorded to reduce deferred tax assets if it is determined that it is more likely than not that the full deferred tax asset would not be realized. If it is subsequently determined that a deferred tax asset will more likely than not be realized, a credit to earnings is recorded to reduce the allowance.

Net Income Per Share

SFAS No. 128, Earnings per Share, requires the computation of basic and diluted earnings per share. Basic earnings per share are computed by dividing net income by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the respective period. Diluted earnings per share is determined by giving effect to the exercise of stock options and warrants using the treasury stock method and convertible notes using the “if-converted” method. The “if-converted” method assumes conversion of the convertible notes if the impact of the conversion is more dilutive to earnings after considering the impact of reversing interest expense and increasing the common stock outstanding. The following table provides a reconciliation of the number of shares outstanding for basic and diluted earnings per share:

 

     FISCAL YEARS ENDED

(in thousands)

   January 31,
2009
    February 2,
2008
   February 3,
2007

Net Income:

       

Net income (loss) – Basic

   $ (109,257 )   $ 414    $ 42,632

Add back interest costs, tax effected, assuming Conversion of convertible notes (1)

     —         —        2,769
                     

Net income (loss) – Diluted

   $ (109,257 )   $ 414    $ 45,401
                     

Weighted Average Shares Outstanding:

       

Basic weighted-average common shares outstanding

     41,412       41,707      35,276

Stock options and warrants, excluding anti-dilutive options and warrants of 183 shares for January 31, 2009

     —         1,522      2,542

Shares issued upon conversion of convertible notes at $10.65 per share

     —         —        8,639
                     

Diluted weighted-average shares outstanding

     41,412       43,229      46,457
                     

 

(1) Shares issuable upon the conversion of the convertible notes of 9.4 million for fiscal 2006 were fully converted during fiscal 2006.

 

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The following potential common stock equivalents were excluded from the computation of diluted earnings per share in each year because the exercise price of such options and warrants was greater than the average market price per share of common stock for the respective periods or the impact of SFAS 123R primarily related to unearned compensation.

 

     FISCAL YEARS ENDED

(in thousands, except exercise prices)

   January 31,
2009
   February 2,
2008
   February 3,
2007

Options

   3,388    1,594    735

Warrants

   1,058    —      —  

Ranges of exercise prices of such Options and warrants

   $3.15 - $10.26    $7.52 - $12.35    $9.27 - $11.15

Stock-based Compensation

The Company adopted Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 123 (revised 2004), Share-Based Payment (“SFAS 123R”) in fiscal 2006, using the modified prospective method which requires measurement of compensation cost for all stock awards at fair value on date of grant and recognition of compensation over the service period for awards expected to vest. The fair value of stock options is determined using the Black-Scholes valuation model, which is consistent with the Company’s valuation techniques previously utilized for options in footnote disclosures required under SFAS 123, Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation (“SFAS 123”), as amended by SFAS 148, Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation — Transition and Disclosure (“SFAS 148”), and requires the input of subjective assumptions. These assumptions include estimating the length of time employees will retain their vested stock options before exercising them (the “expected term”), the estimated volatility of the Company’s common stock price over the expected term and the number of options that will ultimately not complete their vesting requirements (“forfeitures”). As required under the accounting rules, the Company reviews its valuation assumptions at each grant date and, as a result, is likely to change its valuation assumptions used to value employee stock-based awards granted in future periods. The values derived from using the Black-Scholes model are recognized as expense over the vesting period, net of estimated forfeitures. The estimation of stock awards that will ultimately vest requires significant judgment. Actual results, and future changes in estimates, may differ from the Company’s current estimates. Prior periods have not been restated to incorporate the stock-based compensation charge.

For fiscal 2008, the Company recognized total compensation expense of $3.7 million, with no corresponding tax benefit. Compensation expense for fiscal 2008 includes $1.5 million related to the acceleration of certain options which were repurchased and cancelled by the Company. See Note G for additional information. For fiscal 2007, the Company recognized $2.1 million, or approximately $1.2 million after tax. Of the total compensation expense of $2.1 million, approximately $0.3 million is reflected in discontinued operations. For fiscal 2006, the Company recognized total compensation expense of $0.8 million, or approximately $0.5 million after tax.

The total compensation cost related to non-vested awards not yet recognized is approximately $0.8 million which will be expensed over a weighted average remaining life of 24 months.

Valuation Assumptions for Stock Options

The fair value of each option grant is estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model with the following weighted-average assumptions used for grants in fiscal 2008, 2007 and 2006:

 

     FISCAL YEARS ENDED  
     January 31,
2009
    February 2,
2008
    February 3,
2007
 

Expected volatility

     45.0 %     40.0 %     45.0 %

Risk-free interest rate

     2.39%-3.15 %     4.07%-4.85 %     4.48%-5.02 %

Expected life

     3.0-4.5       2.0-4.5