CEDC » Topics » ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

This excerpt taken from the CEDC 10-Q filed Nov 8, 2006.

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

Disclosure Controls and Procedures. Disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15(d)-15(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934) refer to the controls and other procedures of a company that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports that it files or submits under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (ii) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company

 

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are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Inherent Limitations in Internal Control over Financial Reporting. The Company’s management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, does not expect that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures or internal control over financial reporting will prevent all errors and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Because of the limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. Further, the design of any control system is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Because of these inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected. Accordingly, the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures are designed to provide reasonable assurance that the controls and procedures will meet their objectives.

Changes to Internal Control over Financial Reporting. The Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer conclude that, during the most recent fiscal quarter, there have been no changes in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting.

Conclusions Regarding Disclosure Controls. Based upon the required evaluation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures, the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures are effective at the reasonable assurance level as of the end of the period covered by this report.

 

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PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

This excerpt taken from the CEDC 10-Q filed Aug 8, 2006.

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

Disclosure Controls and Procedures. Disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15(d)-15(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934) refer to the controls and other procedures of a company that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports that it files or submits under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of

 

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the company; (ii) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Inherent Limitations in Internal Control over Financial Reporting. The Company’s management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, does not expect that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures or internal control over financial reporting will prevent all errors and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Because of the limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. Further, the design of any control system is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Because of these inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected. Accordingly, the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures are designed to provide reasonable assurance that the controls and procedures will meet their objectives.

Changes to Internal Control over Financial Reporting. The Chief Executive Officer and the Chief Financial Officer conclude that, during the most recent fiscal quarter, there have been no changes in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting.

Conclusions Regarding Disclosure Controls. Based upon the required evaluation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures, the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures are effective at the reasonable assurance level as of the end of the period covered by this report.

 

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PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

This excerpt taken from the CEDC 10-Q filed Nov 9, 2005.

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Disclosure Controls and Internal Controls. The term “disclosure controls and procedures” is defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15(d)-15(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. These rules refer to the controls and other procedures of the Company that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports that it files or submits under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (such as this quarterly report), is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Internal controls over financial reporting refer to a process that is designed to provide reasonable assurance that the Company’s transactions are properly authorized, recorded and reported and that the Company’s assets are safeguarded from improper use to permit the preparation of the Company’s financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles.

 

Limitations on the Effectiveness of Controls. The Company’s management, including the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, does not expect that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures or internal controls over financial reporting will prevent all error and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Because of the limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. Further, the design of any control system is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Because of these inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected. Accordingly, the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures are designed to provide reasonable assurance that the controls and procedures will meet their objectives.

 

Changes to Internal Controls. In accordance with the SEC’s requirements, the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer note that, during the most recent fiscal quarter, there have been no changes in the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting.

 

Conclusions regarding Disclosure Controls. Based upon the required evaluation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures, the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures are effective at the reasonable assurance level as of the end of the period covered by this report.

 

PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

 

This excerpt taken from the CEDC 10-Q filed Aug 8, 2005.

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Disclosure Controls and Internal Controls. The term “disclosure controls and procedures” is defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15(d)-15(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. These rules refer to the controls and other procedures of the Company that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports that it files or submits under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (such as this quarterly report), is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Internal controls over financial reporting refer to a process that are designed to provide reasonable assurance that the Company’s transactions are properly authorized, recorded and reported and that the Company’s assets are safeguarded from improper use to permit the preparation of the Company’s financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles.

 

Limitations on the Effectiveness of Controls. The Company’s management, including the CEO and CFO, does not expect that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures or internal controls over financial reporting will prevent all error and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Because of the limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. Further, the design of any control system is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Because of these inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected. Accordingly, the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures are designed to provide reasonable assurance that the controls and procedures will meet their objectives.

 

Changes to Internal Controls. In accordance with the SEC’s requirements, the CEO and the CFO note that, during the most recent fiscal quarter, there have been no changes in the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting.

 

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Conclusions regarding Disclosure Controls . Based upon the required evaluation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this report, the CEO and CFO have concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective at the reasonable assurance level.

 

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PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

 

This excerpt taken from the CEDC 10-Q filed May 10, 2005.

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Disclosure Controls and Internal Controls. The term “disclosure controls and procedures” is defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15(d)-15(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. These rules refer to the controls and other procedures of the Company that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports that it files or submits under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (such as this quarterly report), is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Internal controls over financial reporting refer to a process that are designed to provide reasonable assurance that the Company’s transactions are properly authorized, recorded and reported and that the Company’s assets are safeguarded from improper use to permit the preparation of the Company’s financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles.

 

Limitations on the Effectiveness of Controls. The Company’s management, including the CEO and CFO, does not expect that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures or internal controls over financial reporting will prevent all error and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Because of the limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. Further, the design of any control system is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Because of these inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected. Accordingly, the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures are designed to provide reasonable assurance that the controls and procedures will meet their objectives.

 

Changes to Internal Controls. In accordance with the SEC’s requirements, the CEO and the CFO note that, during the most recent fiscal quarter, there have been no changes in the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting.

 

Conclusions regarding Disclosure Controls. Based upon the required evaluation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this report, the CEO and CFO have concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective at the reasonable assurance level.

 

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PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

 

This excerpt taken from the CEDC 10-Q filed Feb 4, 2005.

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Disclosure Controls and Internal Controls. The term “disclosure controls and procedures” is defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15(d)-15(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. These rules refer to the control and other procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports that it files or submits under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (such as this quarterly report), is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Internal controls over financial reporting refer to a process designed to provide reasonable assurance that the Company’s assets are safeguarded from improper use and that the Company’s transactions are properly authorized, recorded and reported so as to permit the preparation of the Company’s financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles.

 

Limitations on the Effectiveness of Controls. The Company’s management, including the CEO and CFO, does not expect that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures or internal controls over financial reporting will prevent all error and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Because of the limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. Further, the design of any control system is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Because of these inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected. Accordingly, the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures are designed to provide reasonable assurance that the controls and procedures will meet their objectives.

 

Changes to Internal Controls. In accordance with the SEC’s requirements, the CEO and the CFO note that, during the most recent fiscal quarter, there have been no changes in the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting.

 

Conclusions regarding Disclosure Controls. Based upon the required evaluation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this report, the CEO and CFO have concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective at the reasonable assurance level.

 

 


SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

   

CENTRAL EUROPEAN

DISTRIBUTION CORPORATION

(registrant)

Date: February 4, 2005   By:  

/s/ William V. Carey


       

William V. Carey

President and Chief Executive Officer

Date: February 4, 2005   By:  

/s/ Chris Biedermann


       

Chris Biedermann

Chief Financial Officer

 

 


EXHIBIT INDEX

 

Exhibit

Number


 

Exhibit Description


31.1   Certification of the CEO pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) and Rule 15d-14(a)
31.2   Certification of the CFO pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) and Rule 15d-14(a)

 

 

This excerpt taken from the CEDC 10-Q filed Feb 4, 2005.

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

The Company’s management, including the Company’s President and Chief Executive Officer and Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, conducted an evaluation as of September 30, 2004, of the effectiveness of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) and Rule 15d-15(e)). The Company’s disclosure controls and procedures are designed to provide reasonable assurance that the controls and procedures will meet their objectives. Based on that evaluation as of September 30, 2004, the President and Chief Executive Officer and Vice President and Chief Financial Officer concluded that the disclosure controls and procedures were effective at the reasonable assurance level to ensure that all material information relating to the Company or its consolidated subsidiaries required to be disclosed in the reports the Company files and submits under the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934 has been made known to them on a timely basis and that such information is properly recorded, processed, summarized and reported, as required.

 

Changes in Internal Controls

 

There have been no changes in the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting during the most recent fiscal quarter that materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting.

 

Sarbanes-Oxley Section 404 Compliance

 

Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Act”) will require the Company to include an internal control report from management in its Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2004, and in subsequent Annual Reports thereafter. The internal control report must include the following: (1) a statement of management’s responsibility for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, (2) a statement identifying the framework used by management to conduct the required evaluation of the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting, (3) management’s assessment of the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2004, including a statement as to whether or not internal control over financial reporting is effective, and (4) a statement that the Company’s independent auditors have issued an attestation report on management’s assessment of internal control over financial reporting.

 

Management acknowledges its responsibility for establishing and maintaining internal controls over financial reporting and seeks to continually improve those controls. In addition, in order to achieve compliance with Section 404 of the Act within the required timeframe, since 2004 the Company has been conducting a process to document and evaluate its internal controls over financial reporting. In this regard, the Company has dedicated internal resources, and adopted a detailed work plan to: (i) assess and document the adequacy of internal control over financial reporting; (ii) take steps to improve control processes where required; (iii) validate through testing that controls are functioning as documented; and (iv) implement a continuous reporting and improvement process for internal control over financial reporting. The Company believes its process for documenting, evaluating and monitoring its internal control over financial reporting is consistent with the objectives of Section 404 of the Act.

 

During the first nine months of 2004, the Company commenced testing of its internal controls. The Company’s documentation and testing to date have identified certain deficiencies in the initial testing of the documentation, design and effectiveness of internal controls over financial reporting that the Company is in the process of remediating. As of September 30, 2004, the Company’s President and Chief Executive Officer and Vice President and Chief Financial Officer concluded that none of such deficiencies did or would render ineffective the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures from providing reasonable assurance of achieving the desired control objectives and, therefore, further concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective at the reasonable assurance level. Given the risks inherent in the design and operation of internal controls over financial reporting, the Company can provide no assurance as to its, or its independent auditor’s conclusions at December 31, 2004 with respect to the effectiveness of its internal controls over financial reporting.

 

2


Limitation on the Effectiveness of Controls

 

It should be noted that any system of controls, however well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, and not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. In addition, the design of any control system is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events. Because of these and other inherent limitations of control systems, there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions, regardless of how remote.

 

 

3


SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

   

CENTRAL EUROPEAN

DISTRIBUTION CORPORATION

(registrant)

Date: February 4, 2005   By:  

/s/ William V. Carey


       

William V. Carey

President and Chief Executive Officer

Date: February 4, 2005   By:  

/s/ Chris Biedermann


       

Chris Biedermann

Chief Financial Officer

 

 

4


EXHIBIT INDEX

 

Exhibit

Number


 

Exhibit Description


31.1   Certification of the CEO pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) and Rule 15d-14(a)
31.2   Certification of the CFO pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) and Rule 15d-14(a)

 

 

5

This excerpt taken from the CEDC 10-Q filed Feb 4, 2005.

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Disclosure Controls and Internal Controls. The term “disclosure controls and procedures” is defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15(d)-15(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. These rules refer to the controls and other procedures of a company that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports that it files or submits under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (such as this quarterly report), is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Internal controls over financial reporting refer to a process that are designed to provide reasonable assurance that the Company’s transactions are properly authorized, recorded and reported and that the Company’s assets are safeguarded from improper use to permit the preparation of the Company’s financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles.

 

Limitations on the Effectiveness of Controls. The Company’s management, including the CEO and CFO, does not expect that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures or internal controls over financial reporting will prevent all error and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control system are met. Because of the limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. Further, the design of any control system is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Because of these inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected. Accordingly, the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures are designed to provide reasonable assurance that the controls and procedures will meet their objectives.

 

Changes to Internal Controls. In accordance with the SEC’s requirements, the CEO and the CFO note that, during the most recent fiscal quarter, there have been no changes in the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting.

 

Conclusions regarding Disclosure Controls. Based upon the required evaluation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this report, the CEO and CFO have concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective at the reasonable assurance level.


SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

   

CENTRAL EUROPEAN

DISTRIBUTION CORPORATION

(registrant)

Date: February 4, 2005

  By:  

/s/ William V. Carey


       

William V. Carey

President and Chief Executive Officer

Date: February 4, 2005

  By:  

/s/ Chris Biedermann


       

Chris Biedermann

Chief Financial Officer


EXHIBIT INDEX

 

Exhibit

Number


 

Exhibit Description


31.1   Certification of the CEO pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) and Rule 15d-14(a)
31.2   Certification of the CFO pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) and Rule 15d-14(a)
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