CMG » Topics » Adoption of New Accounting Standards

These excerpts taken from the CMG 10-K filed Feb 19, 2009.

Adoption of New Accounting Standards

Effective January 1, 2008, we adopted Financial Accounting Standards Board Statement No. 157, Fair Value Measurements, (“FAS 157”). FAS 157 defines fair value, establishes a framework for using fair value to measure assets and liabilities, and expands disclosure about fair value measurements. FAS 157 applies whenever other statements require or permit assets or liabilities to be measured at fair value. The adoption of FAS 157 did not have an impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURE ABOUT MARKET RISK

Adoption of New Accounting Standards

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="2">Effective January 1, 2008, we adopted Financial Accounting Standards Board Statement No. 157, Fair Value Measurements, (“FAS 157”). FAS 157 defines fair value, establishes a framework for
using fair value to measure assets and liabilities, and expands disclosure about fair value measurements. FAS 157 applies whenever other statements require or permit assets or liabilities to be measured at fair value. The adoption of FAS 157 did not
have an impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 





ITEM 7A.QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURE ABOUT MARKET RISK

SIZE="2">Changing Interest Rates

We’re exposed to interest rate risk through the investment of our cash, cash equivalents, and
available-for-sale securities. Changes in interest rates affect the interest income we earn, and therefore impact our cash flows and results of operations. Our interest income decreased during 2008 due to a significant reduction in interest rates.
As of December 31, 2008, we had $188.2 million deposited in short-term investments and available-for-sale securities bearing a weighted-average interest rate of 0.3% (approximately 0.4% tax equivalent).

STYLE="margin-top:18px;margin-bottom:0px">Commodity Price Risks

We are also exposed to
commodity price risks. Many of the ingredients we use to prepare our food, as well as our packaging materials, are commodities or ingredients that are affected by the price of other commodities, exchange rates, foreign demand, weather, seasonality,
production, availability and other factors outside our control. We work closely with our suppliers and use a mix of forward pricing protocols under which we agree with our supplier on fixed prices for deliveries at some time in the future, fixed
pricing protocols under which we agree on a fixed price with our supplier for the duration of that protocol, and formula pricing protocols under which the prices we pay are based on a specified formula related to the prices of the goods, such as
spot prices. Substantial portions of the dollar value of goods purchased by us are effectively at spot prices. Though we generally do not have long-term supply contracts or guaranteed purchase amounts, our pricing protocols with suppliers can remain
in effect for periods ranging from one month to a year, depending on the outlook for prices of the particular ingredient. We’ve tried to increase, where necessary, the number of suppliers for our ingredients, which we believe can help mitigate
pricing volatility, and we follow industry news, trade issues, exchange rates, foreign demand, weather, crises and other world events that may affect supply prices. Increases in ingredient prices have, and could continue to, adversely affect our
results if we choose not to increase menu prices at the same pace for competitive or other reasons.

These excerpts taken from the CMG 10-K filed Feb 26, 2008.

Adoption of New Accounting Standards

In September 2006, the Emerging Issues Task Force (“EITF”) issued EITF Issue No. 06-2, Accounting for Sabbatical Leave and Other Similar Benefits Pursuant to FASB Statement No. 43 Accounting for Compensated Absences (“EITF 06-2”). The EITF concluded that sabbatical leave accumulates pursuant to the criteria of Statement of Accounting Standard No. 43 Accounting for Compensated Absences (“FAS 43”) and therefore the benefit should be accrued if the remaining criteria of FAS 43 are met. EITF 06-2 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2006. EITF 06-2 can be applied as a change in accounting principle either as a

 

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cumulative-effect adjustment to beginning retained earnings in the year of adoption or as retrospective application to all prior periods. We offer sabbatical leave to employees who have provided ten years of services. Previously, we expensed sabbatical costs as incurred.

We determined an estimated accrued sabbatical balance as of December 31, 2006 of $2.6 million which we recognized as a cumulative-effect adjustment to beginning retained earnings in the first quarter of 2007. During 2007, the assumptions used were changed to estimate the accrual for only the sabbatical currently being earned. In addition, the tax impact of the cumulative effect adjustment had been excluded. As a result, we adjusted the amount of the cumulative-effect adjustment that was recorded to retained earnings effective January 1, 2007 to $1.0 million (net of taxes of $675,000). We have deemed the impact of the adjustment to be immaterial to the consolidated balance sheet for each of the 2007 quarterly reports. During the year ended December 31, 2007, we accrued sabbatical expense of $331,000 (net of taxes of $212,000).

Effective January 1, 2007, we adopted Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Interpretation No. 48, Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes (“FIN 48”). FIN 48 prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement attribute for recognition and measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. FIN 48 also provides guidance on de-recognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure and transition. Adoption of FIN 48 did not have an impact on our consolidated financial statements.

Adoption of New Accounting Standards

SIZE="2">In September 2006, the Emerging Issues Task Force (“EITF”) issued EITF Issue No. 06-2, Accounting for Sabbatical Leave and Other Similar Benefits Pursuant to FASB Statement No. 43 Accounting for Compensated Absences
(“EITF 06-2”). The EITF concluded that sabbatical leave accumulates pursuant to the criteria of Statement of Accounting Standard No. 43 Accounting for Compensated Absences (“FAS 43”) and therefore the benefit
should be accrued if the remaining criteria of FAS 43 are met. EITF 06-2 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2006. EITF 06-2 can be applied as a change in accounting principle either as a

 


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cumulative-effect adjustment to beginning retained earnings in the year of adoption or as retrospective application to all prior periods. We offer sabbatical
leave to employees who have provided ten years of services. Previously, we expensed sabbatical costs as incurred.

We determined an
estimated accrued sabbatical balance as of December 31, 2006 of $2.6 million which we recognized as a cumulative-effect adjustment to beginning retained earnings in the first quarter of 2007. During 2007, the assumptions used were changed to
estimate the accrual for only the sabbatical currently being earned. In addition, the tax impact of the cumulative effect adjustment had been excluded. As a result, we adjusted the amount of the cumulative-effect adjustment that was recorded to
retained earnings effective January 1, 2007 to $1.0 million (net of taxes of $675,000). We have deemed the impact of the adjustment to be immaterial to the consolidated balance sheet for each of the 2007 quarterly reports. During the year ended
December 31, 2007, we accrued sabbatical expense of $331,000 (net of taxes of $212,000).

Effective January 1, 2007, we adopted
Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Interpretation No. 48, Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes (“FIN 48”). FIN 48 prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement attribute for recognition and
measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. FIN 48 also provides guidance on de-recognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure and transition. Adoption of FIN 48 did
not have an impact on our consolidated financial statements.

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