CTRN » Topics » Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

These excerpts taken from the CTRN 10-K filed Apr 15, 2009.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

 

We continually evaluate whether events and changes in circumstances warrant revised estimates of the useful lives or recognition of an impairment loss for long-lived assets. Future adverse changes in market and legal conditions, or poor operating results of underlying assets could result in losses or an inability to recover the carrying value of long-lived assets, thereby possibly requiring an impairment charge. If facts and circumstances indicate that a long-lived asset, including property and equipment, may be impaired, the carrying value is reviewed. If this review indicates that the carrying value of the asset will not be recovered as determined based on projected undiscounted cash flows related to the asset over its remaining life, the carrying value of the asset is reduced to its estimated fair value. Impairment losses in the future are dependent on a number of factors such as site selection and general economic trends, and thus could be significantly different from historical results. To the extent our estimates for net sales, gross profit and store expenses are not realized, future assessments of recoverability could result in impairment charges. There were no impairment charges during fiscal years 2006 through 2008. There were no material changes in the estimates or assumptions related to impairment of long-lived assets during fiscal 2008.

 

(g)   Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

 

In accordance with SFAS No. 144, Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long-Lived Assets, if facts and circumstances indicate that a long-lived asset, including property and equipment, may be impaired, the carrying value is reviewed. If this review indicates that the carrying value of the asset will not be recovered as determined based on projected undiscounted cash flows related to

 

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the asset over its remaining life, the carrying value of the asset is reduced to its estimated fair value. Impairment losses in the future are dependent on a number of factors such as site selection and general economic trends, and thus could be significantly different from historical results. To the extent the Company’s estimates for net sales, gross profit and store expenses are not realized, future assessments of recoverability could result in impairment charges.

 

This excerpt taken from the CTRN 10-K filed Apr 16, 2008.

(g)    Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

 

In accordance with Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Statement No. 144 (“Statement 144”), Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long-Lived Assets, if facts and circumstances indicate that a long-lived asset, including property and equipment, may be impaired, the carrying value of long-lived assets is reviewed. If this review indicates that the carrying value of the asset will not be recovered as determined based on projected undiscounted cash flows related to the asset over its remaining life, the carrying value of the asset is reduced to its estimated fair value. Impairment losses in the future are dependent on a number of factors such as site selection and general economic trends, and thus could be significantly different from historical results. To the extent the Company’s estimates for net sales, gross profit and store expenses are not realized, future assessments of recoverability could result in impairment charges.

 

This excerpt taken from the CTRN 10-Q filed Dec 11, 2007.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

 

The Company continually evaluates whether events and changes in circumstances warrant revised estimates of the useful lives or recognition of an impairment loss for long-lived assets. Future adverse changes in market and legal conditions, or poor operating results of underlying assets could result in losses or an inability to recover the carrying value of the long-lived asset, thereby possibly requiring an impairment charge in the future. If facts and circumstances indicate that a long-lived asset, including property and equipment, may be impaired, the carrying value is reviewed. If this review indicates that the carrying value of the asset will not be recovered as determined based on projected undiscounted cash flows related to the asset over its remaining life, the carrying value of the asset is reduced to its estimated fair value. Impairment losses in the future are dependent on a number of factors such as site selection and general economic trends, and thus could be significantly different from historical results. To the extent the Company’s estimates for net sales, gross profit and store expenses are not realized, future assessments of recoverability could result in impairment charges.

 

This excerpt taken from the CTRN 10-Q filed Sep 10, 2007.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

The Company continually evaluates whether events and changes in circumstances warrant revised estimates of the useful lives or recognition of an impairment loss for long-lived assets. Future adverse changes in market and legal conditions, or poor operating results of underlying assets could result in losses or an inability to recover the carrying value of the long-lived asset, thereby possibly requiring an impairment charge in the future. If facts and circumstances indicate that a long-lived asset, including property and equipment, may be impaired, the carrying value is reviewed. If this review indicates that the carrying value of the asset will not be recovered as determined based on projected undiscounted cash flows related to the asset over its remaining life, the carrying value of the asset is reduced to its estimated fair value. Impairment losses in the future are dependent on a number of factors such as site selection and general economic trends, and thus could be significantly different from historical results. To the extent the Company’s estimates for net sales, gross profit and store expenses are not realized, future assessments of recoverability could result in impairment charges.

This excerpt taken from the CTRN 10-Q filed Jun 7, 2007.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

We continually evaluate whether events and changes in circumstances warrant revised estimates of the useful lives or recognition of an impairment loss for long-lived assets. Future adverse changes in market and legal conditions, or poor operating results of underlying assets could result in losses or an inability to recover the carrying value of the long-lived asset, thereby possibly requiring an impairment charge in the future. If facts and circumstances indicate that a long-lived asset, including property and equipment, may be impaired, the carrying value is reviewed. If this review indicates that the carrying value of the asset will not be recovered as determined based on projected undiscounted cash flows related to the asset over its remaining life, the carrying value of the asset is reduced to its estimated fair value. Impairment losses in the future are dependent on a number of factors such as site selection and general economic trends, and thus could be significantly different from historical results. To the extent our estimates for net sales, gross profit and store expenses are not realized, future assessments of recoverability could result in impairment charges.

This excerpt taken from the CTRN 10-K filed Apr 11, 2007.

(g)  Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

In accordance with Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) statement No. 144 (Statement 144), Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long-Lived Assets, if facts and circumstances indicate that a long-lived asset, including property and equipment, may be impaired, the carrying value of long-lived assets is reviewed. If this review indicates that the carrying value of the asset will not be recovered as determined based on projected undiscounted cash flows related to the asset over its remaining life, the carrying value of the asset is reduced to its estimated fair value. Impairment losses in the future are dependent on a number of factors such as site selection and general economic trends, and thus could be significantly different from historical results. To the extent the Company’s estimates for net sales, gross profit and store expenses are not realized, future assessments of recoverability could result in impairment charges.

This excerpt taken from the CTRN 10-Q filed Nov 28, 2006.

     Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

The Company continually evaluates whether events and changes in circumstances warrant revised estimates of the useful lives or recognition of an impairment loss for intangible assets. Future adverse changes in market and legal conditions or poor operating results of underlying assets could result in losses or an inability to recover the carrying value of the intangible asset, thereby possibly requiring an impairment charge in the future. If facts and circumstances indicate that a long-lived asset, including property and equipment, may be impaired, the carrying value is reviewed. If this review indicates that the carrying value of the asset will not be recovered as determined based on projected undiscounted cash flows related to the asset over its remaining life, the carrying value of the asset is reduced to its estimated fair value. Impairment losses in the future are dependent on a number of factors such as site selection and general economic trends, and thus could be significantly different from historical results. To the extent the Company’s estimates for net sales, gross profit and store expenses are not realized, future assessments of recoverability could result in impairment charges.

This excerpt taken from the CTRN 10-Q filed Aug 25, 2006.

     Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

The Company continually evaluates whether events and changes in circumstances warrant revised estimates of the useful lives or recognition of an impairment loss for intangible assets. Future adverse changes in market and legal conditions or poor operating results of underlying assets could result in losses or an inability to recover the carrying value of the intangible asset, thereby possibly requiring an impairment charge in the future. If facts and circumstances indicate that a long-lived asset, including property and equipment, may be impaired, the carrying value is reviewed. If this review indicates that the carrying value of the asset will not be recovered as determined based on projected undiscounted cash flows related to the asset over its remaining life, the carrying value of the asset is reduced to its estimated fair value. Impairment losses in the future are dependent on a number of factors such as site selection and general economic trends, and thus could be significantly different from historical results. To the extent the Company’s estimates for net sales, gross profit and store expenses are not realized, future assessments of recoverability could result in impairment charges.

This excerpt taken from the CTRN 10-Q filed Jun 1, 2006.

     Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

The Company continually evaluates whether events and changes in circumstances warrant revised estimates of the useful lives or recognition of an impairment loss for intangible assets. Future adverse changes in market and legal conditions or poor operating results of underlying assets could result in losses or an inability to recover the carrying value of the intangible asset, thereby possibly requiring an impairment charge in the future. If facts and circumstances indicate that a long-lived asset, including property and equipment, may be impaired, the carrying value is reviewed. If this review indicates that the carrying value of the asset will not be recovered as determined based on projected undiscounted cash flows related to the asset over its remaining life, the carrying value of the asset is reduced to its estimated fair value. Impairment losses in the future are dependent on a number of factors such as site selection and general economic trends, and thus could be significantly different from historical results. To the extent the Company’s estimates for net sales, gross profit and store expenses are not realized, future assessments of recoverability could result in impairment charges.

This excerpt taken from the CTRN 10-Q filed May 26, 2006.

     Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

The Company continually evaluates whether events and changes in circumstances warrant revised estimates of the useful lives or recognition of an impairment loss for intangible assets. Future adverse changes in market and legal conditions or poor operating results of underlying assets could result in losses or an inability to recover the carrying value of the intangible asset, thereby possibly requiring an impairment charge in the future. If facts and circumstances indicate that a long-lived asset, including property and equipment, may be impaired, the carrying value is reviewed. If this review indicates that the carrying value of the asset will not be recovered as determined based on projected undiscounted cash flows related to the asset over its remaining life, the carrying value of the asset is reduced to its estimated fair value. Impairment losses in the future are dependent on a number of factors such as site selection and general economic trends, and thus could be significantly different from historical results. To the extent the Company’s estimates for net sales, gross profit and store expenses are not realized, future assessments of recoverability could result in impairment charges.

This excerpt taken from the CTRN 10-K filed Apr 10, 2006.

(g)  Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

 

If facts and circumstances indicate that a long-lived asset, including property and equipment, may be impaired, the carrying value of long-lived assets is reviewed. If this review indicates that the carrying value of the asset will not be recovered as determined based on projected undiscounted cash flows related to the asset over its remaining life, the carrying value of the asset is reduced to its estimated fair value. Impairment losses in the future are dependent on a number of factors such as site selection and general economic trends, and thus could be significantly different from historical results. To the extent the Company’s estimates for net sales, gross profit and store expenses are not realized, future assessments of recoverability could result in impairment charges.

 

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