C » Topics » Deferred Policy Acquisition Costs (DACs)

This excerpt taken from the C 8-K filed Sep 9, 2005.

Deferred Policy Acquisition Costs (DACs)

 

Deferred Policy Acquisition Costs (DACs), included in other assets, represent the costs of acquiring new business, principally commissions, certain underwriting and agency expenses, and the cost of issuing policies.

 

For traditional life and health business, including term insurance, DAC is amortized over the premium-paying periods of the related policies, in proportion to the ratio of the annual premium revenue to the total anticipated premium revenue in accordance with SFAS No. 60, “Accounting and Reporting by Insurance Enterprises” (SFAS 60), which is generally over 5-20 years. Assumptions as to the anticipated premiums are made at the date of policy issuance or acquisition and are consistently applied over the life of the policy.

 

For universal life and corporate-owned life insurance products, DAC is amortized at a constant rate based upon the present value of estimated gross profits expected to be realized in accordance with SFAS No. 97, “Accounting and Reporting by Insurance Enterprises for Certain Long-Duration Contracts and for Realized Gains and Losses from Sale of Investments” (SFAS 97), which is generally over 16-25 years. Actual profits can vary from management’s estimates, resulting in increases or decreases in the rate of amortization.  Changes in estimates of gross profits result in retrospective adjustments to earnings by a cumulative charge or credit to income.

 

For deferred annuities, both fixed and variable, and payout annuities, DAC is amortized employing a level effective yield methodology in accordance with SFAS No. 91, “Accounting for

 

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Nonrefundable Fees and Costs Associated with Originating or Acquiring Loans and Initial Direct Costs of Leases” (SFAS 91), which is generally over 10-15 years.  An amortization rate is developed using the outstanding DAC balance and projected account balances and is applied to actual account balances to determine the amount of DAC amortization.  The projected account balances are derived using a model that includes assumptions related to investment returns and persistency.  The model rate is evaluated periodically, at least annually, and the actual rate is reset and applied prospectively, resulting in a new amortization pattern over the remaining estimated life of the business.

 

Deferred policy acquisition costs are reviewed to determine if they are recoverable from future income, including investment income, and, if not recoverable, are charged to expense.  All other acquisition expenses are charged to operations as incurred.

 

This excerpt taken from the C 8-K filed Jun 7, 2005.

Deferred Policy Acquisition Costs (DACs)

 

Deferred Policy Acquisition Costs (DACs), included in other assets, represent the costs of acquiring new business, principally commissions, certain underwriting and agency expenses, and the cost of issuing policies.

 

For traditional life and health business, including term insurance, DAC is amortized over the premium-paying periods of the related policies, in proportion to the ratio of the annual premium revenue to the total anticipated premium revenue in accordance with SFAS No. 60, “Accounting and Reporting by Insurance Enterprises” (SFAS 60), which is generally over 5-20 years. Assumptions as to the anticipated premiums are made at the date of policy issuance or acquisition and are consistently applied over the life of the policy.

 

For universal life and corporate-owned life insurance products, DAC is amortized at a constant rate based upon the present value of estimated gross profits expected to be realized in accordance with SFAS No. 97, “Accounting and Reporting by Insurance Enterprises for Certain Long-Duration Contracts and for Realized Gains and Losses from Sale of Investments” (SFAS 97), which is generally over 16-25 years. Actual profits can vary from management’s estimates, resulting in increases or decreases in the rate of amortization.  Changes in estimates of gross profits result in retrospective adjustments to earnings by a cumulative charge or credit to income.

 

For deferred annuities, both fixed and variable, and payout annuities, DAC is amortized employing a level effective yield methodology in accordance with SFAS No. 91, “Accounting for

 

10



 

Nonrefundable Fees and Costs Associated with Originating or Acquiring Loans and Initial Direct Costs of Leases” (SFAS 91), which is generally over 10-15 years.  An amortization rate is developed using the outstanding DAC balance and projected account balances and is applied to actual account balances to determine the amount of DAC amortization.  The projected account balances are derived using a model that includes assumptions related to investment returns and persistency.  The model rate is evaluated periodically, at least annually, and the actual rate is reset and applied prospectively, resulting in a new amortization pattern over the remaining estimated life of the business.

 

Deferred policy acquisition costs are reviewed to determine if they are recoverable from future income, including investment income, and, if not recoverable, are charged to expense.  All other acquisition expenses are charged to operations as incurred.

 

This excerpt taken from the C 10-K filed Feb 28, 2005.

Deferred Policy Acquisition Costs (DACs)

        Deferred Policy Acquisition Costs (DACs), included in other assets, represent the costs of acquiring new business, principally commissions, certain underwriting and agency expenses, and the cost of issuing policies.

        For traditional life and health business, including term insurance, DAC is amortized over the premium-paying periods of the related policies, in proportion to the ratio of the annual premium revenue to the total anticipated premium revenue in accordance with SFAS No. 60, "Accounting and Reporting by Insurance Enterprises" (SFAS 60), which is generally over 5-20 years. Assumptions as to the anticipated

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premiums are made at the date of policy issuance or acquisition and are consistently applied over the life of the policy.

        For universal life and corporate-owned life insurance products, DAC is amortized at a constant rate based upon the present value of estimated gross profits expected to be realized in accordance with SFAS No. 97, "Accounting and Reporting by Insurance Enterprises for Certain Long-Duration Contracts and for Realized Gains and Losses from Sale of Investments" (SFAS 97), which is generally over 16-25 years. Actual profits can vary from management's estimates, resulting in increases or decreases in the rate of amortization. Changes in estimates of gross profits result in retrospective adjustments to earnings by a cumulative charge or credit to income.

        For deferred annuities, both fixed and variable, and payout annuities, DAC is amortized employing a level effective yield methodology in accordance with SFAS No. 91, "Accounting for Nonrefundable Fees and Costs Associated with Originating or Acquiring Loans and Initial Direct Costs of Leases" (SFAS 91), which is generally over 10-15 years. An amortization rate is developed using the outstanding DAC balance and projected account balances and is applied to actual account balances to determine the amount of DAC amortization. The projected account balances are derived using a model that includes assumptions related to investment returns and persistency. The model rate is evaluated periodically, at least annually, and the actual rate is reset and applied prospectively, resulting in a new amortization pattern over the remaining estimated life of the business.

        Deferred policy acquisition costs are reviewed to determine if they are recoverable from future income, including investment income, and, if not recoverable, are charged to expense. All other acquisition expenses are charged to operations as incurred.

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