CCOI » Topics » Competition

These excerpts taken from the CCOI 10-K filed Mar 2, 2009.

Competition

        We face competition from incumbent carriers, Internet service providers and facilities-based network operators, many of whom are much larger than us, have significantly greater financial resources, better-established brand names and large, existing installed customer bases in the markets in which we compete. We also face competition from other new entrants to the communications services market. Many of these companies offer products and services that are similar to our products and services. Unlike some of our competitors, we do not have title to most of the dark fiber that makes up our network. Our interests in that dark fiber are in the form of long-term leases or IRUs obtained from their titleholders. We rely on the maintenance of such dark fiber to provide our on-net services to customers. We are also dependent on third-party providers, some of whom are our competitors, for the provision of connections to our off-net customers.

        We believe that competition is based on many factors, including price, transmission speed, ease of access and use, breadth of service availability, reliability of service, customer support and brand recognition. Because our fiber optic networks have been recently installed compared to those of the incumbent carriers, our state-of-the-art technology may provide us with cost, capacity, and service quality advantages over some existing incumbent carrier networks; however, our network may not support some of the services supported by these legacy networks, such as circuit-switched voice and frame relay. While the Internet access speeds offered by traditional ISPs typically do not match our on-net offerings, these slower services are usually priced lower than our offerings and thus provide competitive pressure on pricing, particularly for more price-sensitive customers. These and other downward pricing pressures have diminished, and may further diminish, the competitive advantages that we have enjoyed as the result of our service pricing.

Competition



        We face competition from incumbent carriers, Internet service providers and facilities-based network operators, many of whom are much
larger than us, have significantly greater financial resources, better-established brand names and large, existing installed customer bases in the markets in which we compete. We also face competition
from other new entrants to the communications services market. Many of these companies offer products and services that are similar to our products and services. Unlike some of our competitors, we do
not have title to most of the dark fiber that makes up our network. Our interests in that dark fiber are in the form of long-term leases or IRUs obtained from their titleholders. We rely
on the maintenance of such dark fiber to provide our on-net services to customers. We are also dependent on third-party providers, some of whom are our competitors, for the provision of
connections to our off-net customers.



        We
believe that competition is based on many factors, including price, transmission speed, ease of access and use, breadth of service availability, reliability of service, customer
support and brand recognition. Because our fiber optic networks have been recently installed compared to those of the incumbent carriers, our state-of-the-art
technology may provide us with cost, capacity, and service quality advantages over some existing incumbent carrier networks; however, our network may not support some of the services supported by
these legacy networks, such as circuit-switched voice and frame relay. While the Internet access speeds offered by traditional ISPs typically do not match our on-net offerings, these
slower services are usually priced lower than our offerings and thus provide competitive pressure on pricing, particularly for more price-sensitive customers. These and other downward pricing
pressures have diminished, and may further diminish, the competitive advantages that we have enjoyed as the result of our service pricing.



These excerpts taken from the CCOI 10-K filed Feb 27, 2008.

Competition

        We face competition from incumbent carriers, Internet service providers and facilities-based network operators, many of whom are much larger than us, have significantly greater financial resources, better-established brand names and large, existing installed customer bases in the markets in which we compete. We also face competition from other new entrants to the communications services market. Many of these companies offer products and services that are similar to our products and services, and we expect the level of competition to intensify in the future. Unlike some of our competitors, we do not have title to most of the dark fiber that makes up our network. Our interests in that dark fiber are in the form of long-term leases or IRUs obtained from their titleholders. We rely on the maintenance of such dark fiber to provide our on-net services to customers. We are also dependent on third-party providers, some of whom are our competitors, for the provision of connections to our off-net customers.

        We believe that competition is based on many factors, including price, transmission speed, ease of access and use, breadth of service availability, reliability of service, customer support and brand recognition. Because our fiber optic networks have been recently installed compared to those of the incumbent carriers, our state-of-the-art technology may provide us with cost, capacity, and service quality advantages over some existing incumbent carrier networks; however, our network may not support some of the services supported by these legacy networks, such as circuit-switched voice and frame relay. While the Internet access speeds offered by traditional ISPs typically do not match our on-net offerings, these slower services are usually priced lower than our offerings and thus provide competitive pressure on pricing, particularly for more price-sensitive customers. These and other downward pricing pressures have diminished, and may further diminish, the competitive advantages that we have enjoyed as the result of our service pricing.

Competition



        We face competition from incumbent carriers, Internet service providers and facilities-based network operators, many of whom are much larger than us, have
significantly greater financial resources, better-established brand names and large, existing installed customer bases in the markets in which we compete. We also face competition from other new
entrants to the communications services market. Many of these companies offer products and services that are similar to our products and services, and we expect the level of competition to intensify
in the future. Unlike some of our competitors, we do not have title to most of the dark fiber that makes up our network. Our interests in that dark fiber are in the form of long-term
leases or IRUs obtained from their titleholders. We rely on the maintenance of such dark fiber to provide our on-net services to customers. We are also dependent on third-party providers,
some of whom are our competitors, for the provision of connections to our off-net customers.



        We
believe that competition is based on many factors, including price, transmission speed, ease of access and use, breadth of service availability, reliability of service, customer
support and brand recognition. Because our fiber optic networks have been recently installed compared to those of the incumbent carriers, our state-of-the-art
technology may provide us with cost, capacity, and service quality advantages over some existing incumbent carrier networks; however, our network may not support some of the services supported by
these legacy networks, such as circuit-switched voice and frame relay. While the Internet access speeds offered by traditional ISPs typically do not match our on-net offerings, these
slower services are usually priced lower than our offerings and thus provide competitive pressure on pricing, particularly for more price-sensitive customers. These and other downward pricing
pressures have diminished, and may further diminish, the competitive advantages that we have enjoyed as the result of our service pricing.



This excerpt taken from the CCOI 10-K filed Mar 14, 2007.

Competition

We face competition from incumbent carriers, Internet service providers and facilities-based network operators, many of whom are much bigger than us, have significantly greater financial resources, better-established brand names and large, existing installed customer bases in the markets in which we compete. We also face competition from other new entrants to the communications services market. Many of these companies offer products and services that are similar to our products and services, and we expect the level of competition to intensify in the future. Unlike some of our competitors, we do not have title to most of the dark fiber that makes up our network. Our interests in that dark fiber are in the form of long-term leases or IRUs obtained from their titleholders. We rely on the maintenance of such dark fiber to provide our on-net services to customers. We are also dependent on third-party providers, some of whom are our competitors, for the provision of lines to our off-net customers.

We believe that competition is based on many factors, including price, transmission speed, ease of access and use, breadth of service availability, reliability of service, customer support and brand recognition. Because our fiber optic networks have been recently installed compared to those of the incumbent carriers, our state-of-the-art technology may provide us with cost, capacity, and service quality advantages over some existing incumbent carrier networks; however, our network may not support some of the services supported by these legacy networks, such as circuit-switched voice and frame relay. While the Internet access speeds offered by traditional ISPs typically do not match our on-net offerings, these slower services are usually priced lower than our offerings and thus provide competitive pressure on pricing, particularly for more price-sensitive customers. Additionally, some of our competitors have recently emerged from bankruptcy. Because the bankruptcy process allows for the discharge of debts and rejection of certain obligations, we may have less of an advantage with respect to these competitors. These and other downward pricing pressures have diminished, and may further diminish, the competitive advantages that we have enjoyed as the result of our service pricing.

This excerpt taken from the CCOI 10-K filed Mar 16, 2006.
Competition

We face competition from incumbent carriers, Internet service providers and facilities-based network operators, many of whom are much bigger than us, have significantly greater financial resources, better-established brand names and large, existing installed customer bases in the markets in which we compete. We also face competition from other new entrants to the communications services market. Many of these companies offer products and services that are similar to our products and services, and we expect the level of competition to intensify in the future. Unlike some of our competitors, we do not have title to most of the dark fiber that makes up our network. Our interests in that dark fiber are in the form of long-term leases or IRUs obtained from their titleholders. We rely on the maintenance of such dark fiber to provide our on-net services to customers. We are also dependent on third-party providers, some of whom are our competitors, for the provision of lines to our off-net customers.

We believe that competition is based on many factors, including price, transmission speed, ease of access and use, breadth of service availability, reliability of service, customer support and brand recognition. Because our fiber optic networks have been recently installed compared to those of the incumbent carriers, our state-of-the-art technology may provide us with cost, capacity, and service quality advantages over some existing incumbent carrier networks; however, our network may not support some of the services supported by these legacy networks, such as circuit-switched voice and frame relay. While the Internet access speeds offered by traditional ISPs typically do not match our on-net offerings, these slower services are usually priced lower than our offerings and thus provide competitive pressure on pricing, particularly for more price-sensitive customers. Additionally, some of our competitors have recently emerged from bankruptcy. Because the bankruptcy process allows for the discharge of debts and rejection

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of certain obligations, we may have less of an advantage with respect to these competitors. These and other downward pricing pressures have diminished, and may further diminish, the competitive advantages that we have enjoyed as the result of our service pricing.

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