SCOR » Topics » Changes in, or interpretations of, accounting rules and regulations, including recent rules and regulations regarding expensing of stock options, could result in unfavorable accounting charges or cause us to change our compensation policies.

This excerpt taken from the SCOR 10-K filed Mar 16, 2009.
Changes in, or interpretations of, accounting rules and regulations, including recent rules and regulations regarding expensing of stock options, could result in unfavorable accounting charges or cause us to change our compensation policies.
 
Accounting methods and policies, including policies governing revenue recognition, expenses and accounting for stock options are continually subject to review, interpretation, and guidance from relevant accounting authorities, including the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, and the SEC. Changes to, or interpretations of, accounting methods or policies in the future may require us to reclassify, restate or otherwise change or revise our financial statements, including those contained in Part II, Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.


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Investors could lose confidence in our financial reports, and our business and stock price may be adversely affected, if our internal control over financial reporting is found by management or by our independent registered public accounting firm to not be adequate or if we disclose significant existing or potential deficiencies or material weaknesses in those controls.
 
Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 requires us to include a report on our internal control over financial reporting in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for each year beginning with the year ending December 31, 2008. That report must include management’s assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of the end of that and each subsequent fiscal year. Additionally, our independent registered public accounting firm will be required to issue a report on management’s assessment of our internal control over financial reporting and on their evaluation of the operating effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting.
 
We continue to evaluate our existing internal controls against the standards adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, or PCAOB. During the course of our ongoing evaluation of our internal controls, we have in the past identified, and may in the future identify, areas requiring improvement, and may have to design enhanced processes and controls to address issues identified through this review. Remedying any significant deficiencies or material weaknesses that we or our independent registered public accounting firm may identify could require us to incur significant costs and expend significant time and management resources. We cannot assure you that any of the measures we may implement to remedy any such deficiencies will effectively mitigate or remedy such deficiencies. Further, if we are not able to complete the assessment under Section 404 in a timely manner or to remedy any identified material weaknesses, we and our independent registered public accounting firm would be unable to conclude that our internal control over financial reporting is effective at the required reporting deadlines. If our internal control over financial reporting is found by management or by our independent registered public accountant to not be adequate or if we disclose significant existing or potential deficiencies or material weaknesses in those controls, investors could lose confidence in our financial reports, we could be subject to sanctions or investigations by The NASDAQ Global Market, the Securities and Exchange Commission or other regulatory authorities and our stock price could be adversely affected.
 
A determination that there is a significant deficiency or material weakness in the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting could also reduce our ability to obtain financing or could increase the cost of any financing we obtain and require additional expenditures to comply with applicable requirements.
 
This excerpt taken from the SCOR 10-K filed Mar 11, 2008.
Changes in, or interpretations of, accounting rules and regulations, including recent rules and regulations regarding expensing of stock options, could result in unfavorable accounting charges or cause us to change our compensation policies.
 
Accounting methods and policies, including policies governing revenue recognition, expenses and accounting for stock options are continually subject to review, interpretation, and guidance from relevant accounting authorities, including the Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, and the SEC. Changes to, or interpretations of, accounting methods or policies in the future may require us to reclassify, restate or otherwise change or revise our financial statements, including those contained in Part II, Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
On December 16, 2004, the FASB issued SFAS No. 123R (revised 2004), Share-Based Payment, which is a revision of SFAS No. 123, Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation (SFAS No. 123R). SFAS No. 123R supersedes APB Opinion No. 25, Accounting for Stock Issued to Employees, and amends SFAS No. 95, Statement of Cash Flows. Generally, the approach in SFAS No. 123R is similar to the approach described in SFAS No. 123. However, SFAS No. 123R requires all share-based payments to employees, including grants of employee stock options, to be recognized in the income statement based on their fair values. We were required to adopt SFAS No. 123R on January 1, 2006, and have adopted it as of that date.
 
As permitted by SFAS No. 123, we accounted for share-based payments to employees through December 31, 2005 using APB Opinion No. 25’s intrinsic value method and, as such, generally recognized no compensation cost


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for employee stock options. Accordingly, the adoption of SFAS No. 123R’s fair value method has had a significant impact on the presentation of our results of operations, although it has not impacted our overall financial position. The long-term impact of adoption of SFAS No. 123R cannot be predicted at this time because it will depend on levels of share-based payments granted in the future and the assumptions for the variables which impact the computation of the fair value of any such grants.
 
Historically, we have used stock options as part of our compensation programs to motivate and retain existing employees and to attract new employees. Because we are now required to expense stock options, we may choose to reduce our reliance on stock options as part of our compensation packages. If we reduce our use of stock options, it may be more difficult for us to retain and attract qualified employees. If we do not reduce our use of stock options, our expenses in future periods may increase. Beginning in 2007, we issued restricted stock awards and restricted stock units, and we expect to reduce our use of stock options as a form of stock-based compensation, but we cannot be certain whether or how our stock-based compensation policy will change in the future.
 
Investors could lose confidence in our financial reports, and our business and stock price may be adversely affected, if our internal control over financial reporting is found by management or by our independent registered public accounting firm to not be adequate or if we disclose significant existing or potential deficiencies or material weaknesses in those controls.
 
Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 requires us to include a report on our internal control over financial reporting in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for each year beginning with the year ending December 31, 2008. That report must include management’s assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of the end of that and each subsequent fiscal year. Additionally, our independent registered public accounting firm will be required to issue a report on management’s assessment of our internal control over financial reporting and on their evaluation of the operating effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting.
 
We continue to evaluate our existing internal controls against the standards adopted by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, or PCAOB. During the course of our ongoing evaluation of our internal controls, we have in the past identified, and may in the future identify, areas requiring improvement, and may have to design enhanced processes and controls to address issues identified through this review. Remedying any significant deficiencies or material weaknesses that we or our independent registered public accounting firm may identify could require us to incur significant costs and expend significant time and management resources. We cannot assure you that any of the measures we may implement to remedy any such deficiencies will effectively mitigate or remedy such deficiencies. In addition, we cannot assure you that we will be able to complete the work necessary for our management to issue its management report in a timely manner, or that we will be able to complete any work required for our management to be able to conclude that our internal control over financial reporting is operating effectively. If we are not able to complete the assessment under Section 404 in a timely manner or to remedy any identified material weaknesses, we and our independent registered public accounting firm would be unable to conclude that our internal control over financial reporting is effective as of December 31, 2008. If our internal control over financial reporting is found by management or by our independent registered public accountant to not be adequate or if we disclose significant existing or potential deficiencies or material weaknesses in those controls, investors could lose confidence in our financial reports, we could be subject to sanctions or investigations by The NASDAQ Global Market, the Securities and Exchange Commission or other regulatory authorities and our stock price could be adversely affected.
 
A determination that there is a significant deficiency or material weakness in the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting could also reduce our ability to obtain financing or could increase the cost of any financing we obtain and require additional expenditures to comply with applicable requirements.
 

EXCERPTS ON THIS PAGE:

10-K
Mar 16, 2009
10-K
Mar 11, 2008
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