ED » Topics » Accounting Policies

This excerpt taken from the ED 10-K filed Feb 22, 2010.

Accounting Policies

The accounting policies of Con Edison and its subsidiaries conform to accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. For the Utilities, these accounting principles include the accounting rules for regulated operations and the accounting requirements of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and the state public utility regulatory commissions having jurisdiction.

The accounting rules for regulated operations specify the economic effects that result from the causal relationship of costs and revenues in the rate-regulated environment and how these effects are to be accounted for by a regulated enterprise. Revenues intended to cover some costs may be recorded either before or after the costs are incurred. If regulation provides assurance that incurred costs will be recovered in the future, these costs would be recorded as deferred charges or “regulatory assets” under the accounting rules for regulated operations. If revenues are recorded for costs that are expected to be incurred in the future, these revenues would be recorded as deferred credits or “regulatory liabilities” under the accounting rules for regulated operations.

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The Utilities’ principal regulatory assets and liabilities are detailed in Note B. The Utilities are receiving or being credited with a return on all of their regulatory assets for which a cash outflow has been made, and are paying or being charged with a return on all of their regulatory liabilities for which a cash inflow has been received. The Utilities’ regulatory assets and liabilities will be recovered from customers, or applied for customer benefit, in accordance with rate provisions approved by the applicable public utility regulatory commission.

Other significant accounting policies of the Companies are referenced below in this Note A and in the notes that follow.

This excerpt taken from the ED 10-K filed Feb 23, 2009.

Accounting Policies

The accounting policies of Con Edison and its subsidiaries conform to accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. For the Utilities, these accounting principles include the Financial Accounting Standards Board’s (FASB) Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 71, “Accounting for the Effects of Certain Types of Regulation,” and, in accordance with SFAS No. 71, the accounting requirements of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and the state public utility regulatory commissions having jurisdiction.

SFAS No. 71 specifies the economic effects that result from the causal relationship of costs and revenues in the rate-regulated environment and how these effects are to be accounted for by a regulated enterprise. Revenues intended to cover some costs may be recorded either before or after the costs are incurred. If regulation provides assurance that incurred costs will be recovered in the future, these costs would be recorded as deferred charges or “regulatory assets” under SFAS No. 71. If revenues are recorded for costs that are expected to be incurred in the future, these revenues would be recorded as deferred credits or “regulatory liabilities” under SFAS No. 71.

The Utilities’ principal regulatory assets and liabilities are detailed in Note B. The Utilities are receiving or being credited with a return on all of their regulatory assets for which a cash outflow has been made, and are paying or being charged with a return on all of their regulatory liabilities for which a cash inflow has been received. The Utilities’ regulatory assets and liabilities will be recovered from customers, or applied for customer benefit, in accordance with rate provisions approved by the applicable public utility regulatory commission.

Other significant accounting policies of the Companies are referenced below in this Note A and in the notes that follow.

This excerpt taken from the ED 10-K filed Feb 22, 2008.

Accounting Policies

The accounting policies of Con Edison and its subsidiaries conform to accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. For the Utilities, these accounting principles include the Financial Accounting Standards Board’s (FASB) Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 71, “Accounting for the Effects of Certain Types of Regulation,” and, in accordance with SFAS No. 71, the accounting requirements of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and the state public utility regulatory commissions having jurisdiction.

SFAS No. 71 specifies the economic effects that result from the causal relationship of costs and revenues in the rate-regulated environment and how these effects are to be accounted for by a regulated enterprise. Revenues intended to cover some costs may be recorded either before or after the costs are incurred. If regulation provides assurance that incurred costs will be recovered in the future, these costs would be recorded as deferred charges or “regulatory assets” under SFAS No. 71. If revenues are recorded for costs that are expected to be incurred in the future, these revenues would be recorded as deferred credits or “regulatory liabilities” under SFAS No. 71.

The Utilities’ principal regulatory assets and liabilities are detailed in Note B. The Utilities are receiving or being credited with a return on all of their regulatory assets for which a cash outflow has been made, and are paying or being charged with a return on all of their regulatory liabilities for which a cash inflow has been received. The Utilities’ regulatory assets and liabilities will be recovered from customers, or applied for customer benefit, in accordance with rate provisions approved by the applicable public utility regulatory commission.

Other significant accounting policies of the Companies are referenced below in this Note A and in the notes that follow.

This excerpt taken from the ED 10-K filed Feb 21, 2007.

Accounting Policies

The accounting policies of Con Edison and its subsidiaries conform to accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. For the Utilities, these accounting principles include the Financial Accounting Standards Board’s (FASB) Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 71, “Accounting for the Effects of Certain Types of Regulation,” and, in accordance with SFAS No. 71, the accounting requirements of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and the state public utility regulatory commissions having jurisdiction.

SFAS No. 71 specifies the economic effects that result from the causal relationship of costs and revenues in the rate-regulated environment and how these effects are to be accounted for by a regulated enterprise. Revenues intended to cover some costs may be recorded either before or after the costs are incurred. If regulation provides assurance that incurred costs will be recovered in the future, these costs would be recorded as deferred charges or “regulatory assets” under SFAS No. 71. If revenues are recorded for costs that are expected to be incurred in the future, these revenues would be recorded as deferred credits or “regulatory liabilities” under SFAS No. 71.

The Utilities’ principal regulatory assets and liabilities are detailed in Note B. The Utilities are receiving or being credited with a return on all of their regulatory assets for which a cash outflow has been made, and are paying or being charged with a return on all of their regulatory liabilities for which a cash inflow has been received. The Utilities’ regulatory assets and liabilities will be recovered from customers, or applied for customer benefit, in accordance with rate provisions approved by the applicable public utility regulatory commission.

Other significant accounting policies of the Companies are referenced below in this Note A and in the notes that follow.

This excerpt taken from the ED 10-K filed Feb 22, 2006.

Accounting Policies

The accounting policies of Con Edison and its subsidiaries conform to accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. For the Utilities, these accounting principles include the Financial Accounting Standards Board’s (FASB) Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 71, “Accounting for the Effects of Certain Types of Regulation,” and, in accordance with SFAS No. 71, the accounting requirements of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and the state public utility regulatory commissions having jurisdiction.

 

SFAS No. 71 specifies the economic effects that result from the causal relationship of costs and revenues in the rate-regulated environment and how these effects are to be accounted for by a regulated enterprise. Revenues intended to cover some costs may be recorded either before or after the costs are incurred. If regulation provides assurance that incurred costs will be recovered in the future, these costs would be recorded as deferred charges or “regulatory assets” under SFAS No. 71. If revenues are recorded for costs that are expected to be incurred in the future, these revenues would be recorded as deferred credits or “regulatory liabilities” under SFAS No. 71.

 

The Utilities’ principal regulatory assets and liabilities are detailed in Note B. The Utilities are receiving or being credited with a return on all of their regulatory assets for which a cash outflow has been made, and are paying or being charged with a return on all of their regulatory liabilities for which a cash inflow has been received. The Utilities’ regulatory assets and liabilities will be recovered from customers, or applied for customer benefit, in accordance with rate provisions approved by the applicable public utility regulatory commission.

 

Other significant accounting policies of the Companies are referenced below in this Note A and in the notes that follow.

 

This excerpt taken from the ED 10-K filed Feb 25, 2005.

Accounting Policies

The accounting policies of Con Edison and its subsidiaries conform to accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. For the Utilities, these accounting principles include the Financial Accounting Standards Board’s (FASB) Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 71, “Accounting for the Effects of Certain Types of Regulation,” and, in accordance with SFAS No. 71, the accounting requirements of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and the state public utility regulatory commissions having jurisdiction.

 

SFAS No. 71 specifies the economic effects that result from the cause and effect relationship of costs and revenues in the rate-regulated environment and how these effects are to be accounted for by a

 

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NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTSCONTINUED

 

regulated enterprise. Revenues intended to cover some costs may be recorded either before or after the costs are incurred. If regulation provides assurance that incurred costs will be recovered in the future, these costs would be recorded as deferred charges or “regulatory assets” under SFAS No. 71. If revenues are recorded for costs that are expected to be incurred in the future, these revenues would be recorded as deferred credits or “regulatory liabilities” under SFAS No. 71.

 

The Utilities’ principal regulatory assets and liabilities are detailed in Note B. The Utilities are receiving or being credited with a return on all of their regulatory assets for which a cash outflow has been made, and are paying or being charged with a return on all of their regulatory liabilities for which a cash inflow has been received. The Utilities’ regulatory assets and liabilities will be recovered from customers, or applied for customer benefit, in accordance with rate provisions approved by the applicable public utility regulatory commission.

 

Other significant accounting policies of the Companies are referenced in Note E (Pension Benefits), Note F (Other Postretirement Benefits), Note K (Leases), Note L (Goodwill and Intangible Assets), Note N (Stock-Based Compensation), Note P (Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities), and Note S (Guarantees).

 

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