Annual Reports

  • 10-K (Sep 29, 2014)
  • 10-K (Oct 2, 2013)
  • 10-K (Sep 30, 2013)
  • 10-K (Oct 1, 2012)
  • 10-K (Oct 28, 2011)
  • 10-K (Sep 28, 2011)

 
Quarterly Reports

 
8-K

 
Other

Copart 10-K 2005

 

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION


Form 10-K

FOR ANNUAL AND TRANSITIONAL REPORTS PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

(Mark One)

 

 

þ

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

For the fiscal year ended: July 31, 2005

 

 

OR

o

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

For the transition period from                to                

 

Commission file number 0-23255

Copart, Inc.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

California
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)

94-2867490
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification Number)

4665 Business Center Drive
Fairfield, California

94534
(Zip code)

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code:
(707) 639-5000

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
None

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
Common Stock (Title of Class)


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes þ  No o

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is an accelerated filer (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes þ  No o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o  No þ

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting Common Stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of January 31, 2005 (the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second quarter) was $1,145,005,000 based upon the last sales price reported for such date on the Nasdaq National Market. For purposes of this disclosure, shares of Common Stock held by persons who hold more than 5% of the outstanding shares of Common Stock and shares held by officers and directors of the registrant, have been excluded in that such persons may be deemed to be affiliates. This determination of affiliate status is not necessarily conclusive for other purposes.

At October 14, 2005, registrant had 90,456,126 outstanding shares of Common Stock.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Items 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 of Part III incorporate certain information by reference from the registrant’s definitive proxy statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be held on December 6, 2005 (“Proxy Statement”). Except with respect to the information specifically incorporated by reference, the Proxy Statement is not deemed to be filed as a part hereof.

 




TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

Page

 

Information concerning forward-looking statements used in this report

 

2

 

 

 

PART I

 

 

 

Item 1.

 

Business

 

 

 

 

 

General

 

3

 

 

 

Industry Overview

 

4

 

 

 

Operating and Growth Strategy

 

5

 

 

 

Our Competitive Advantages

 

7

 

 

 

Our Service Offerings

 

9

 

 

 

Supply Arrangements and Supplier Marketing

 

11

 

 

 

Buyers

 

11

 

 

 

Competition

 

11

 

 

 

Management Information Systems

 

12

 

 

 

Employees

 

12

 

 

 

Environmental Matters

 

12

 

 

 

Governmental Regulations

 

13

 

 

 

Legal Proceedings

 

13

 

 

 

Factors That May Affect Future Results

 

15

 

Item 2.

 

Properties

 

22

 

Item 3.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

22

 

Item 4.

 

Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders

 

22

 

Item 4A.

 

Executive Officers of the Registrant

 

23

 

 

 

PART II

 

 

 

Item 5.

 

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity Related Shareholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

25

 

Item 6.

 

Selected Financial Data

 

26

 

Item 7.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations      

 

27

 

Item 7A.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

36

 

Item 8.

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

36

 

Item 9.

 

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure     

 

36

 

Item 9A.

 

Controls and Procedures

 

37

 

Item 9B.

 

Other Information

 

38

 

 

 

PART III

 

 

 

Item 10.

 

Directors and Executive Officers of the Registrant

 

38

 

Item 11.

 

Executive Compensation

 

39

 

Item 12.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management

 

39

 

Item 13.

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions

 

39

 

Item 14.

 

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

 

39

 

 

 

PART IV

 

 

 

Item 15.

 

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

 

40

 

 

1




SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This report, including the information incorporated by reference herein, contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terms such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “expect,” “plan,” “intend,” “forecast,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “predict,” “potential,” “continue” or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. The forward-looking statements contained in this report involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and situations that may cause our or our industry’s actual results, level of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these statements. These factors include those listed under the caption “Factors That May Affect Future Results” beginning on page 15 of this report and those discussed elsewhere in this report. We encourage investors to review these factors carefully.

Although we believe that, based on information currently available to Copart and its management, the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements. You should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements.

2




PART I

Item 1.                        Business

General

Copart, Inc. is a leading provider of salvage vehicle sales services in the United States.

We provide vehicle suppliers, primarily insurance companies, with a full range of services to process and sell salvage vehicles over the Internet through our Virtual Bidding Second Generation (“VB2”) Internet auction-style sales technology. We sell principally to licensed vehicle dismantlers, rebuilders, repair licensees, used vehicle dealers and exporters. Salvage vehicles are either damaged vehicles deemed a total loss for insurance or business purposes or are recovered stolen vehicles for which an insurance settlement with the vehicle owner has already been made. We offer vehicle suppliers a full range of services that expedite each stage of the salvage vehicle sales process and minimize administrative and processing costs. We generate revenues primarily from fees paid by vehicle suppliers and vehicle buyers as well as related fees for services such as towing and storage.

We have grown our salvage vehicle sales business through a combination of acquisitions and the development of new facilities and also by increasing our buyer base and implementing additional value-added services for both buyers and suppliers. For fiscal year 2005, our revenues were approximately $457.1 million and our operating income was approximately $156.9 million. During the fiscal year ending July 31, 2005, we acquired two salvage vehicle storage facilities and opened seven new salvage vehicle storage facilities. We acquired storage sites located in Lexington, Kentucky and Columbia, Missouri. We opened new vehicle storage sites in Strongsville, Ohio; Ocala, Florida; Knoxville, Tennessee; Loganville, Georgia; Spokane, Washington; Tallahassee, Florida and Hialeah, Florida.

During fiscal 2004, we converted all of our salvage vehicle storage facilities to an Internet based auction-style model using VB2. This second generation technology combines two bidding processes. An open Preliminary Bidding feature allows a buyer to enter bids either at a bidding station at the storage facility during the three preview days or over the Internet. To improve the effectiveness of bidding, the VB2 system lets a buyer see the current high bid on the vehicle they want to purchase. The preliminary bidding phase is an open sales format. Buyers enter the maximum price they are willing to pay for a vehicle and VB2’s BID4U feature will incrementally bid the vehicle on their behalf. Preliminary bidding ends one hour prior to the start of an Internet-only virtual sale. BID4U will represent the high preliminary bidder at the Internet-only virtual sale. This feature allows bidders the opportunity to bid against each other and the high preliminary bidder. The bidders enter bids via the Internet in a real time format. BID4U submits bids for the high preliminary bidder, up to their maximum bid. When bidding stops, a countdown is initiated. If no bids are received during the countdown, the vehicle sells to the highest bidder. VB2 opens our sales process to registered buyers anywhere in the world who have Internet access.

We believe the implementation of VB2 across our salvage operations has increased the pool of available buyers for each sale and the added competition has increased the amount buyers are willing to pay for vehicles from us. It has also improved the efficiency of our operations. For fiscal 2005, sales of vehicles to buyers outside the state where the vehicle is located accounted for 46% of total vehicles sold; 25% of salvage vehicles were sold to out of state buyers and 21% were sold to buyers out of country, based on registration.

We believe that we offer the highest level of service in the salvage vehicle sales and auction industry and have established our leading market position as follows:

·       by providing coverage that facilitates supplier access to buyers around the world, reducing towing and third-party storage expenses, offering a local presence for vehicle inspection stations, and providing prompt response to catastrophes and natural disasters by specially-trained teams;

3




·       by providing a comprehensive range of customer services that include merchandising services, efficient title processing, timely pick-up and delivery of vehicles and Internet sales;

·       by establishing and efficiently integrating new facilities and acquisitions;

·       by increasing the number of bidders that can participate at each sale through the ease and convenience of Internet bidding;

·       by applying technology to enhance operating efficiency through Internet bidding, web-based order processing, salvage value quotes, electronic communication with buyers and sellers, vehicle imaging and an electronic used vehicle parts locator service; and

·       by providing the venue for insurance customers through our Virtual Insured Exchange “VIX” product to enter a vehicle into a live virtual sale to establish its true value, thereby allowing the insurance customer to avoid dealing with estimated values when negotiating with owners who wish to retain their damaged vehicles.

We have expanded our business beyond salvage vehicle sales services and have entered the market for public sales of used vehicles. We sell vehicles directly to the public and automobile dealers on behalf of banks, leasing or financing companies, automobile dealers, repossession companies and for our own account. Currently, we own six public automobile sales facilities located in Detroit, Michigan; Chesapeake, Virginia; New Castle, Delaware; Greencastle, Pennsylvania; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and Richmond, Virginia. We operate our public automobile sales business under Motors Auction Group, Inc. (“MAG”), a wholly owned subsidiary. To date, revenues from our public sales business have not been significant relative to the revenues from our salvage business.

We were organized as a California corporation in 1982 and became a public company in 1994. Our principal executive offices are located at 4665 Business Center Drive, Fairfield, California 94534, and our telephone number at that address is (707) 639-5000. We maintain a website, http://www.copart.com, where we make available, free of charge, our Securities and Exchange Commission filings, including our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and all amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act, as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the Securities and Exchange Commission. We are providing the address to our website solely for the information of investors. Information contained on our website is not incorporated by reference herein and our web address is included as an inactive textual reference only.

Industry Overview

The salvage vehicle industry provides a venue for salvage vehicle suppliers to liquidate total loss vehicles. Salvage vehicle sales companies generally auction or sell salvage vehicles on consignment either for a fixed fee or a percentage of the sales price. On occasion, salvage sales companies may purchase vehicles from vehicle suppliers at a formula-based price, based on a percentage of the vehicles’ estimated pre-loss value (“actual cash value”) and sell the vehicles for their own account. Salvage vehicle sales companies typically operate from one or more salvage facilities where vehicles are processed, viewed, stored and sold. However, Copart through the introduction of VB2, eliminated local live auctions in our operations, and we now sell all our salvage vehicles over the Internet.

Although there are other suppliers of salvage vehicles, such as financial institutions, vehicle leasing companies, automobile rental companies, charities and automobile dealers, the primary source of salvage vehicles is insurance companies.

Automobile manufacturers are incorporating certain standard features that increase passenger safety, including unibody construction, passenger safety cages with surrounding crumple zones to absorb impacts,

4




plastic components, airbags, xenon lights and computer systems. We believe that one effect of these features is that newer vehicles involved in accidents are more likely to be deemed a total loss for insurance purposes, which could result in an increasing supply of total loss salvage vehicles in the future.

The primary buyers of salvage vehicles are vehicle dismantlers, rebuilders, repair licensees, used vehicle dealers and exporters. Vehicle dismantlers, which we believe are the largest group of salvage vehicle buyers, either dismantle a vehicle and sell parts individually or sell the entire vehicle to rebuilders, used vehicle dealers or the public. Vehicle rebuilders and vehicle repair licensees generally purchase salvage vehicles to repair and resell. Used vehicle dealers generally purchase recovered stolen or slightly damaged vehicles for resale.

Following an accident involving an insured vehicle, the damaged vehicle is generally towed to a towing company or a vehicle repair facility for temporary storage pending insurance company examination. The vehicle is inspected by the insurance company’s adjuster, who estimates the costs of repairing the vehicle and gathers information regarding the damaged vehicle’s mileage, options and condition in order to estimate its actual cash value (fair market value). The adjuster determines whether to pay for repairs or to classify the vehicle as a total loss based upon the adjuster’s estimate of repair costs and the vehicle’s salvage value, as well as customer service considerations. If the cost of repair is greater than the actual cash value less the estimated salvage value, the insurance company generally will classify the vehicle as a total loss. The insurance company will thereafter assign the vehicle to a salvage vehicle sales company, settle with the insured vehicle owner and receive title to the vehicle.

The primary factors that vehicle suppliers consider when selecting a salvage vehicle sales company include:

·       the anticipated percentage return on salvage (i.e., gross salvage proceeds, minus vehicle handling and selling expenses, divided by the actual cash value);

·       the services provided by the salvage vehicle sales company and the degree to which such services reduce administrative costs and expenses;

·       the price the salvage vehicle sales company charges for its services;

·       national coverage and ability to respond on a national scale; and

·       the ability to generate custom seller reports.

Upon receipt of the pick up order (the assignment), the salvage vehicle sales company arranges for the transport of a vehicle to a facility. As a service to the vehicle supplier, the salvage vehicle sales company will customarily pay advance charges (reimbursable charges paid on behalf of vehicle suppliers) to obtain the subject vehicle’s release from a towing company or vehicle repair facility. Typically, advance charges paid on behalf of the vehicle supplier are recovered upon sale of the salvage vehicle.

The vehicle then remains in storage until ownership documents are transferred from the insured vehicle owner and the title to the vehicle is cleared through the appropriate state’s motor vehicle regulatory agency (“DMV”). Total loss vehicles may be sold in most states only after obtaining a salvage title from the DMV. Upon receipt of the appropriate documentation from the DMV, which is generally received within 45 to 60 days of vehicle pick-up, the vehicle is sold.

Operating and Growth Strategy

Our growth strategy is to increase our revenues and profitability by, among other things (i) acquiring and developing new salvage vehicle storage facilities in key markets, (ii) pursuing national and regional vehicle supply agreements, (iii) expanding our service offerings to suppliers and buyers, (iv) increasing revenue and profitability at our public automobile sales facilities and (v) expanding the application of VB2 

5




into new markets. In addition, we implement our pricing structure and merchandising procedures and attempt to affect cost efficiencies at each of our acquired facilities by introducing our operational procedures, integrating our management information systems and redeploying personnel when necessary.

As part of our overall expansion strategy, our objective is to increase our revenues, operating profits and market share in the vehicle sales industry. To implement our growth strategy, we intend to continue to do the following:

Acquire and Develop New Salvage Vehicle Storage Facilities in Key Markets

Our strategy is to offer integrated services to vehicle suppliers on a national or regional basis by acquiring or developing salvage facilities in new and existing markets. We integrate our new acquisitions into our national network and capitalize on certain operating efficiencies resulting from, among other things, the reduction of duplicative overhead and the implementation of our operating procedures.

The following table sets forth facilities that we have acquired or opened from August 1, 2002 through July 31, 2005.

Salvage Locations

 

 

 

Acquisition/
Opening Date

 

Geographic Service Area

Reno, Nevada

 

September 2002

 

Northern Nevada

Springfield, Missouri

 

October 2002

 

Missouri

Corpus Christi, Texas

 

November 2002

 

South Texas

Ft. Pierce, Florida

 

December 2002

 

Central Florida

Rancho Cucamonga, California

 

January 2003

 

Southern California

Richmond, Virginia

 

May 2003

 

Virginia

Albany, New York

 

July 2003

 

Upstate New York

Toronto, Canada

 

September 2003

 

Ontario, Canada

Eugene, Oregon

 

September 2003

 

Central Oregon

Helena, Montana

 

January 2004

 

Montana

Cleveland, Ohio

 

June 2004

 

Northeast Ohio and Northwestern Pennsylvania

Anchorage, Alaska

 

July 2004

 

Alaska

Strongsville, Ohio

 

January 2005

 

Northwest Ohio

Ocala, Florida

 

February 2005

 

Central Florida

Knoxville, Tennessee

 

February 2005

 

Eastern Tennessee

Lexington, Kentucky

 

April 2005

 

Northern and Central Kentucky

Loganville, Georgia

 

April 2005

 

Central Georgia

Spokane, Washington

 

July 2005

 

Eastern Washington and Northern Idaho

Tallahassee, Florida

 

July 2005

 

Gulf Region

Hialeah, Florida

 

July 2005

 

Southeast Florida

Columbia, Missouri

 

July 2005

 

Central Missouri

 

Public Locations

 

 

 

Acquisition/
Opening Date

 

Geographic Service Area

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

 

September 2002

 

Western Pennsylvania

Richmond, Virginia

 

October 2002

 

Virginia

 

Pursue National and Regional Vehicle Supply Agreements

Our broad national presence enhances our ability to enter into local, regional or national supply agreements with vehicle suppliers. We actively seek to establish national and regional supply agreements with insurance companies by promoting our ability to achieve high net returns and broader access to buyers through our national coverage and electronic commerce capabilities. By utilizing our existing

6




insurance company supplier relationships, we are able to build new supplier relationships and pursue additional supply agreements in existing and new markets.

Expand Our Service Offerings to Suppliers and Buyers

Over the past several years, we have expanded our available service offerings to vehicle suppliers and buyers. The primary focus of these new service offerings is to maximize returns to our suppliers and maximize product value to our buyers. Recent service enhancements include, for our suppliers, real-time access to sales data over the Internet and, for our buyers, the implementation of VB2 real-time bidding at all of our facilities, permitting buyers at any location worldwide to participate in the sales at all of our yards in North America. We plan to continue to refine and expand our services, including offering software that can assist our suppliers in expediting claims and salvage management tools that help suppliers integrate their systems with ours.

Increase Revenue and Profitability at Our Public Sales Facilities

Our public automobile sales facilities allow dealers to bid via the Internet and both dealers and the general public to bid at live sales on a wide range of end-of-lease vehicles, repossessed vehicles, dealer trade-ins and vehicles that we offer for sale on our own account. To date, we have acquired six facilities and launched our public automobile sales website.

Expand the Application of VB2 into New Markets

We believe that the value that VB2 has demonstrated in the salvage vehicle sales market, primarily by (i) increasing returns to sellers by expanding the pool of bidders to any person in the world with access to the Internet and (ii) increasing buyer convenience by eliminating the need to travel to the physical location of the sale, can be beneficial to other industries. Accordingly, we will actively explore the possible application of VB2 outside of the salvage vehicle sales industry.

Our Competitive Advantages

We believe that the following attributes and the services that we offer position us to take advantage of many opportunities in the salvage vehicle sales industry.

National Coverage and Ability to Respond on a National Scale

Since our inception in 1982, we have expanded from a single facility in Vallejo, California to an integrated network of 117 facilities located in the United States and Canada as of July 31, 2005. We are able to offer integrated services on a national basis to our vehicle suppliers, which allow us to respond to the needs of our suppliers and buyers with maximum efficiency. Our national coverage provides our suppliers with key advantages, including:

·       a reduction in administrative time and effort;

·       a reduction in overall vehicle towing costs;

·       convenient local facilities;

·       improved access to buyers throughout the world; and

·       a prompt response in the event of a natural disaster or other catastrophe.

7




Value-Added Services

We believe that we offer the most comprehensive range of services in our industry, including:

·       Internet bidding, Internet proxy bidding and virtual sales powered by VB2, which enhance the competitive bidding process;

·       on-line payment capabilities via our ePay product;

·       e-mail notifications to potential buyers of salvage vehicles that match desired characteristics;

·       automatic outbid notification by phone through VB2 voice info;

·       sophisticated vehicle processing at storage sites, including ten-view digital imaging of each vehicle and the scanning of each vehicle’s title and other significant documents such as body shop invoices, all of which are available from us through the Internet;

·       CoPartfinder, our Internet-based used vehicle parts locator that provides vehicle dismantlers with greater resale opportunities for their salvage purchases; and

·       Offsite sales, which allow vehicle suppliers to sell any vehicle, boat, or heavy equipment without transporting it to one of our facilities.

Proven Ability to Acquire and Integrate Acquisitions

We have a proven track record of successfully acquiring and integrating salvage vehicle storage facilities. Since becoming a public company in 1994, we have completed the acquisition of 60 salvage vehicle storage facilities. As part of our acquisition and integration strategy, we seek to:

·       strengthen our national network and access new markets;

·       utilize our existing corporate and technology infrastructure over a larger base of operations; and

·       introduce our comprehensive services and operational expertise.

We strive to integrate all new facilities into our existing network without disruption of service to vehicle suppliers. We work with new suppliers to implement our fee structures and new service programs. We typically retain existing employees at acquired facilities in order to retain knowledge about, and respond to, the local market. We also assign a special integration team to help convert newly acquired facilities to our own management information and proprietary software systems, enabling us to ensure a smooth and consistent transition to our business operating and sales systems.

Technology to Enhance and Expand Our Business

We have developed management information and proprietary software systems that allow us to deliver a fully integrated service offering. Our proprietary software programs provide vehicle suppliers with online access to data and reports regarding their salvage vehicles being processed at any of our facilities. This technology allows vehicle suppliers to monitor each stage of our salvage vehicle sales process, from pick up to sale and settlement by the buyer. Our full range of Internet services allows us to expedite each stage of the salvage vehicle sales process and minimizes the administrative and processing costs for us as well as our suppliers. We believe that our integrated technology systems generate improved capacity and financial returns for our clients, resulting in high client retention, and allow us to expand our national supply contracts.

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Our Service Offerings

We offer vehicle suppliers a full range of services, which expedite each stage of the salvage vehicle sales process, maximizing proceeds and minimizing costs.

Online Supplier Access

Through Copart Access, our Internet-based service for vehicle suppliers, we enable suppliers to assign vehicles for sale, check sales calendars, view vehicle images and history, view and reprint body shop invoices and towing receipts and view the historical performance of the vehicles sold at our sales.

Salvage Estimation Services

We offer Copart ProQuote, a proprietary service that assists suppliers in the vehicle claims evaluation process by providing online salvage value estimates, which helps suppliers determine whether to repair a particular vehicle or deem it a total loss.

Virtual Insured Exchange (“VIX”)

We provide the venue for insurance customers to enter a vehicle into a live virtual auction-style sale to establish its true value, thereby allowing the insurance customer to avoid dealing with estimated values when negotiating with owners who wish to retain their damaged vehicles.

Transportation Services

We maintain contracts with third-party vehicle transport companies, which enables us to pick up most of our suppliers’ vehicles within 24 hours. Our national network and transportation capabilities provides cost and time savings to our vehicle suppliers and ensures on-time vehicle pick up and prompt response to catastrophes and natural disasters.

Vehicle Inspection Stations

We offer certain of our major insurance company suppliers office and yard space to house vehicle inspection stations on-site at our storage facilities. We have over 30 vehicle inspection stations at our facilities nationwide. An on-site vehicle inspection station provides our insurance company suppliers with a central location to inspect potential total loss vehicles, which reduces storage charges that otherwise, may be incurred at the initial storage or repair facility.

On-Demand Reporting

We provide vehicle suppliers with on-demand reports online, via fax or e-mail that summarize data on salvage vehicles that we process for the particular supplier. These reports track our vehicle suppliers’ gross and net returns on each vehicle, service charges, and other data that enable our vehicle suppliers to more easily administer and monitor the salvage vehicle disposition process.

DMV Processing

We have extensive expertise in DMV document and title processing for salvage vehicles. We have developed a computer system which provides a direct link to the DMV computer systems of several states. This allows us to expedite the processing of vehicle title paperwork.

Flexible Vehicle Processing Programs

At the election of the vehicle supplier, we sell vehicles pursuant to our Percentage Incentive Program consignment basis or on a fixed fee consignment basis.

9




Percentage Fee Consignment.   Our Percentage Incentive Program (“PIP”) is an innovative processing program designed to broadly serve the needs of vehicle suppliers. Under PIP, we agree to sell all of the salvage vehicles of a vehicle supplier in a specified market usually for a predetermined percentage of the vehicle sales price. Because our revenues under PIP are directly linked to the vehicle’s sale price, we have an incentive to actively merchandise those vehicles to maximize the net return on salvage vehicles. We provide the vehicle supplier, at our expense, with transport of the vehicle to our nearest facility, storage for up to 90 days and DMV document and title processing. In addition, we provide merchandising services such as covering or taping openings to protect vehicle interiors from weather, washing vehicle exteriors, vacuuming vehicle interiors, cleaning and polishing dashboards and tires, making keys for driveable vehicles and identifying driveable vehicles. We believe our merchandising efforts increase the sales prices of salvage vehicles, thereby increasing the return on salvage vehicles to both vehicle suppliers and us. In fiscal year 2005, 2004 and 2003, we processed approximately 68%, 65% and 67%, respectively, of all our salvage vehicles under PIP.

Fixed Fee Consignment.   Under our fixed fee consignment program, we sell vehicles for a fixed consignment fee, generally $50 to $175 per vehicle. Although sometimes included in the consignment fee, we may also charge additional fees for the cost of transporting the vehicle to our facility, storage of the vehicle, and other incidental costs. In fiscal year 2005, 2004 and 2003, we processed approximately 32%, 35% and 33%, respectively, of all our salvage vehicles under the fixed fee consignment program.

Buyer Network

We maintain a database of thousands of registered buyers of salvage vehicles in the vehicle dismantling, rebuilding, repair, resale and exporting businesses. Our database includes each buyer’s vehicle preference and purchasing history. This data enables us to notify via e-mail prospective buyers throughout the world of salvage vehicles available for bidding that match their vehicle preferences. Listings of salvage vehicles to be sold on a particular day and location are also made available on the Internet.

Sales Process

We offer a flexible and unique sales process designed to maximize the sale prices of the vehicles. We utilize VB2, an auction-style sales methodology that we developed. This second generation technology combines two bidding processes. An open Preliminary Bidding feature allows a buyer to enter bids either at a bidding station at the storage facility during the three preview days or over the Internet. To improve the effectiveness of bidding, the VB2 system lets a buyer see the current high bid on the vehicle they want to purchase. The preliminary bidding phase is an open sales format. Buyers enter the maximum price they are willing to pay for a vehicle and BID4U will incrementally bid the vehicle on their behalf. Preliminary bidding ends one hour prior to the start of an Internet-only virtual sale. BID4U will represent the high preliminary bidder at the Internet-only virtual sale. This feature allows bidders the opportunity to bid against each other and the high preliminary bidder. The bidders enter bids via the Internet in a real time format. BID4U submits bids for the high preliminary bidder, up to their maximum bid. When bidding stops, a countdown is initiated. If no bids are received during the countdown, the vehicle sells to the highest bidder. VB2 opens our sales process to registered buyers anywhere in the world who have Internet access.

CoPartfinder

CoPartfinder is our unique Internet “search engine” that enables users to locate used vehicle parts quickly and efficiently. CoPartfinder is accessible by the public through a Copart-sponsored website. CoPartfinder lists vehicles recently sold at our sales and identifies certain purchasers. This allows vehicle dismantlers and other resellers to streamline their parts sale process and access a large pool of potential buyers. We charge a nominal fee to potential parts buyers, who can use CoPartfinder to search for specific

10




vehicle makes and models and view digital images of vehicles that meet their requirements. Once a specific parts supplier is identified for a specific part requirement, buyers may have the option to call, fax, or e-mail the dismantler/supplier. We believe that CoPartfinder provides an incentive for vehicle dismantlers to purchase their salvage vehicles through our sales process.

Supply Arrangements and Supplier Marketing

We obtain salvage vehicles from hundreds of different vehicle suppliers. State Farm Insurance Company accounted for 12%, 12% and 13% of our revenues for fiscal years 2005, 2004 and 2003, respectively. Of the total number of vehicles that we processed in fiscal year 2005, 2004 and 2003, we obtained approximately 79%, 85% and 85%, respectively from insurance company suppliers. Our arrangements with our suppliers are either written or oral agreements that are typically subject to cancellation by either party upon 30 to 90 days notice.

We typically contract with the regional or branch office of an insurance company or other vehicle suppliers. The agreements are customized to each vehicle supplier’s particular needs and often provide for the disposition of different types of salvage vehicles by differing methods. Our contracts or arrangements generally provide that we will sell total loss and recovered stolen vehicles generated by the vehicle supplier in a designated geographic area.

We market our services to vehicle suppliers through an in-house sales force that utilizes a variety of sales techniques, including targeted mailing of our sales literature, telemarketing, follow-up personal sales calls, and participation in trade shows and vehicle and insurance industry conventions. Based upon our historical data on salvage vehicles and vehicle information supplied by vehicle suppliers, our marketing personnel will provide vehicle suppliers with detailed analysis of the net return on salvage vehicles and a proposal setting forth ways in which we believe that we can improve net returns on salvage vehicles and reduce administrative costs and expenses.

Buyers

We maintain a database of thousands of registered buyers of salvage vehicles in the vehicle dismantling, rebuilding, repair, resale and export businesses. We believe that we have established a broad international and domestic buyer base by providing buyers of salvage vehicles with a variety of programs and services. To gain admission to one of our sales and become a registered buyer, prospective buyers must first pay an initial registration fee and an annual fee, provide requested personal and business information and have, in most states, a vehicle dismantler’s, dealer’s, resale, repair license or export license. Registration entitles a buyer to transact business at any of our sales subject to local licensing and permitting requirements. A buyer may also bring guests to a facility to preview vehicles for sale for a fee. Strict admission procedures are intended to prevent frivolous bids that would invalidate the sale. We market to buyers on the Internet and via e-mail notifications, sales notices, telemarketing and participation in trade show events.

Competition

We face significant competition for the supply of salvage vehicles and for the buyers of those vehicles. We believe our principal competitors include vehicle auction and sales companies and vehicle dismantlers. These national, regional and local competitors may have established relationships with vehicle suppliers and buyers and may have financial resources that are greater than ours. The largest national or regional vehicle auctioneers include the ADESA Corporation, Auction Broadcasting Company, Insurance Auto Auctions, Inc., Manheim Auctions and SADISCO. The largest national dismantlers include Greenleaf and LKQ Corporation. These national dismantlers, in addition to trade groups of dismantlers such as the

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American Recycling Association and the United Recyclers Group, may purchase salvage vehicles directly from insurance companies, thereby bypassing auction and sales companies entirely, including us.

Management Information Systems

Our primary management information system consists of an IBM AS/400 mainframe computer system, integrated computer interfaces and proprietary business operating software that we developed and which tracks salvage and public sales vehicles throughout the sales process. We call this proprietary business operating software the Copart Auction System (“CAS”) and have implemented CAS at all of our salvage storage facilities. For the public sales business we call this proprietary business operating software Motors Auction Exchange (“MAX”). In addition, we have integrated our mainframe computer system with Internet and Intranet systems in order to provide secure access to CAS and MAX data and images in a variety of formats.

Our auction-style service product, VB2, is served by an array of identical high-density, high-performance servers. Each individual sale is configured to run on an available server in the array and can be rapidly provisioned to any other available server in the array as required. Our Sale, Internet and Imaging services are load balanced across different geographical data centers.

We have invested in a new production data center that is designed to run the business in the event of an emergency. The facility’s electrical and mechanical systems are continually monitored. This facility is located in an area considered to be free of weather related disasters and earthquakes.

Employees

As of July 31, 2005, we had approximately 2,421 full-time employees, of whom approximately 252 were engaged in general and administrative functions and approximately 2,169 were engaged in yard and fleet operations. We are not currently subject to any collective bargaining agreements and believe our relationships with our employees are good.

Environmental Matters

Our operations are subject to various laws and regulations regarding the protection of the environment. In the salvage vehicle sales industry, large numbers of wrecked vehicles are stored at facilities and, during that time, spills of fuel, motor oils and other fluids may occur, resulting in soil, surface water or groundwater contamination. Certain of our facilities store petroleum products and other hazardous materials in above-ground containment tanks and some of our facilities generate waste materials such as solvents or used oils that must be disposed of as non-hazardous or hazardous waste, as appropriate. We have implemented procedures to reduce the amount of soil contamination that may occur at our facilities, and we have initiated safety programs and training of personnel on the safe storage and handling of hazardous materials. We believe that we are in compliance, in all material respects, with all applicable environmental regulations and we do not anticipate any material capital expenditures to remain in environmental compliance.

In connection with the acquisition of our Dallas, Texas facility in 1994, we set aside $3.0 million to cover the costs of environmental remediation, stabilization and related consulting expenses for a six-acre portion of the facility that contained elevated levels of lead due to the activities of the former operators. We began the stabilization process in 1996 and completed it in 1999. We paid all remediation and related costs from the $3.0 million fund and, in accordance with the acquisition agreement, distributed the remainder of the fund to the seller of the Dallas facility, less $.2 million which was held back to cover the costs of obtaining the no-further-action letter. In September 2002, our environmental engineering consultant issued a report, which concludes that the soil stabilization has effectively stabilized the lead-impacted soil, and that the concrete cap should prevent impact to storm water and subsequent surface

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water impact. Our consultant thereafter submitted an Operations and Maintenance Plan (“Plan”) to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (“TCEQ”) providing for a two-year inspection and maintenance plan for the concrete cap, and a two-year ground and surface water monitoring plan. In January of 2003, the TCEQ approved the Plan, subject to the additions of upstream (background) surface water samples from the intermittent stream adjacent to the facility and documentation of any repairs to the concrete cap during the post closure-monitoring period. The first semi-annual water sampling was conducted in April 2003, which reflected that the lead-impacted, stabilized soil is not impacting the ground and/or surface water. The second round of semi-annual water samples collected in October and November 2003 reported concentration of lead in one storm water and one surface water sample in excess of the established upstream criteria for lead. In correspondence, which we received in July 2004, the TCEQ approved with comment our water monitoring report dated February 24, 2004. The TCEQ instructed us to continue with post-closure monitoring and maintenance activities and submit the next report in accordance with the approved schedules. In February 2005, a report from our environmental engineering consultant was transmitted to the TCEQ containing the results of annual monitoring activities consisting of two (2) semi-annual sampling events which occurred in April/June 2004 and October/November 2004. Laboratory analytical results indicated no lead concentrations exceeding the target concentration level set in the Corrective Measures Study for the site. The Company’s environmental engineering consultant concluded in the February 2005 report to the TECQ that it is unlikely that lead concentrations detected in the stormwater runoff samples are attributable to the lead impacted soils. Based on the results of the 2004 samplings, we requested that no further action be taken and that a closure letter be issued by the TCEQ. We are not assured of receiving the no-further-action letter and we may incur further liabilities if the stabilization process proves ineffective. In addition, in 1994, we detected a small quantity of two hazardous substances in a temporary groundwater monitoring well at the Dallas facility. Our environmental consultants concluded that both substances arose from an off-site source and no further action was recommended.

We do not believe that any of the above environmental matters will, either individually or in the aggregate, have a material adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

Governmental Regulations

Our operations are subject to regulation, supervision and licensing under various federal, provincial, state and local statutes, ordinances and regulations. The acquisition and sale of damaged and recovered stolen vehicles is regulated by state and provincial motor vehicle departments. In addition to the regulation of sales and acquisitions of vehicles, we are also subject to various local zoning requirements with regard to the location of our storage facilities. These zoning requirements vary from location to location. At various times, we may be involved in disputes with local governmental officials regarding the development and/or operation of our business facilities. We believe that we are in compliance in all material respects with applicable regulatory requirements. We may be subject to similar types of regulations by federal, provincial, state, and local governmental agencies in new markets.

Legal Proceedings

We are involved in litigation and damage claims arising in the ordinary course of business, such as actions related to injuries, property damage, handling or disposal of vehicles and patent infringement. We are also involved in various governmental and administrative proceedings primarily relating to licensing and operation of our business. Among this litigation is a lawsuit filed by Ciano Dessources on May 21, 2003 in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Superior Court Department against Copart of Connecticut, Inc. and Copart, Inc. which purports to be a class action on behalf of persons whose vehicles were disposed of by us as abandoned vehicles, which the named plaintiff contends were disposed of without complying with state laws. Relief sought included class certification, declaratory, remedial and/or injunctive relief,

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including the ordering of a compliance program that will essentially protect consumers, as well as damages, fees, and costs. Copart’s Motion for Summary Judgment was granted on December 8, 2004, dismissing the class claim element of the lawsuit. However this dismissal may be reconsidered, and may also be appealed once the remaining individual claims of the named plaintiff are adjudicated.

On June 10, 2005, Manheim Services Corp. filed suit against Copart, Inc. in the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia, Atlanta Division, alleging infringement of Manheim’s assigned U.S. Patent No. 5,774,873. Relief sought included a patent infringement judgment, an injunction prohibiting Copart from using any infringing product or service (including VB2), damages, fees, costs and expenses. On August 3, 2005, Copart denied the claim and asserted counterclaims based on violations of antitrust laws and common-law tortious interference. No trial date has yet been set.

On September 16, 2005, Richard M. Gray filed suit against Copart and A. Safrin, in the State Court for the County of Chatham, State of Georgia, alleging a class action for unreasonable amounts claimed for storage liens by Copart, and related claims. Relief sought included class certification, damages, fees, costs and expenses.

We provide for costs relating to these matters when a loss is probable and the amount can be reasonably estimated. The effect of the outcome of these matters on our future results of operations cannot be predicted because any such effect depends on future results of operations, the amount and timing of the resolution of such matters. We believe that any ultimate liability will not have a material effect on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows. However, the amount of the liabilities associated with these claims, if any, cannot be determined with certainty.

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FACTORS THAT MAY AFFECT FUTURE RESULTS

We depend on a limited number of major suppliers of salvage vehicles. The loss of one or more of these major suppliers could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition, and an inability to increase our sources of vehicle supply could adversely affect our growth rates.

Historically, a limited number of vehicle suppliers have accounted for a substantial portion of our revenues. In fiscal 2005, vehicles supplied by our two largest suppliers accounted for approximately 20% of our revenues. Supplier arrangements are either written or oral agreements typically subject to cancellation by either party upon 30 to 90 days notice. Vehicle suppliers have terminated agreements with us in the past in particular markets, which has affected the pricing for sales services in those markets. There can be no assurance that our existing agreements will not be cancelled. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that we will be able to enter into future agreements with vehicle suppliers or that we will be able to retain our existing supply of salvage vehicles. A reduction in vehicles from a significant vehicle supplier or any material changes in the terms of an arrangement with a substantial vehicle supplier could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition. In addition, a failure to increase our sources of vehicle supply could adversely affect our earnings and revenue growth rates.

Our strategic shift from live salvage sales to an entirely Internet based sales model presents new risks, including substantial technology risks.

In fiscal 2004, we converted all our salvage sales from a live auction process to an entirely Internet based auction-style model based on technology developed internally by us. The conversion represents a significant change in the way we conduct business and presents numerous risks, including our increased reliance on the availability and reliability of our network systems. In particular, we believe the conversion presents the following risks, among others:

·       Our operating results in a particular period could be adversely affected in the event our networks are not operable for an extended period of time for any reason, as a result of Internet viruses, or as a result of any other technological circumstance that makes us unable to conduct our virtual sales.

·       Our business is increasingly reliant on internally developed technology, and we have limited historic experience developing technologies or systems for large-scale implementation and use.

·       The change in our business model may make it more difficult for management, investment analysts, and investors to model or predict our future operating results until sufficient historic data is available to evaluate the effect of the VB2 implementation over a longer period of time and in different economic environments.

·       Our increasing reliance on proprietary technology subjects us to intellectual property risks, including the risk of third party infringement claims or the risk that we cannot establish or protect intellectual property rights in our technologies. We have filed patent applications for VB2 in the United States, Netherlands, and Europe, but we cannot provide any assurances that patents will actually issue or that, if issued, the patent could not later be found to be unenforceable or invalid. In June 2005, Manheim Services Corp. filed suit against us in federal district court in Georgia, alleging, among other things, that VB2 infringes a patent assigned to Manheim. We intend to defend the lawsuit vigoriously, but an adverse ruling, settlement, or judgment, could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operation.

Our results of operations may not continue to benefit from the implementation of VB2 to the extent we have experienced in recent periods.

We believe that the implementation of our proprietary VB2 sales technologies across our salvage operations has had a favorable impact on our results of operations by increasing the size and geographic scope of our buyer base and increasing the average selling price for vehicles sold through our sales. VB2 

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was implemented across all our salvage yards beginning in the third quarter of fiscal 2004. We do not believe, however, that we will continue to experience improvements in our results of operations at the same relative rates we have experienced in the last year.

In addition, we implemented VB2 in our public sales facilities. We cannot predict if, or to what extent, VB2 will have a favorable impact on these operations. Differences between our salvage and public operations, in particular the relative importance of inspecting the vehicle being sold, may result in our experiencing a negative or less favorable impact on our public sales than we have experienced in our salvage sales.

Failure to have sufficient capacity to accept additional cars at one or more of our salvage yards could adversely affect our relationships with insurance companies or other suppliers of salvage vehicles.

Capacity at our salvage yards varies from period to period and from region to region. For example, following adverse weather conditions in a particular area, our yards in that area may fill and limit our ability to accept additional salvage vehicles while we process existing inventories. We regularly evaluate our capacity in all our markets and, where appropriate, seek to increase capacity through the acquisition of additional land and yards. We may not be able to reach agreements to purchase independent salvage yards in markets where we have limited excess capacity, and zoning restrictions or difficulties obtaining use permits may limit our ability to expand our capacity through acquisitions of new land. Failure to have sufficient capacity at one or more of our yards could adversely affect our relationships with insurance companies or other suppliers of salvage vehicles, which could have an adverse effect on our operating results.

Factors such as mild weather conditions in the United States can have an adverse effect on our revenues and operating results as well as our revenue and earnings growth rates.

Mild weather conditions in the United States tend to result in a decrease in the available supply of salvage vehicles because traffic accidents decrease and fewer automobiles are damaged. Accordingly, mild weather can have an adverse effect on our salvage vehicle inventories, which would be expected to have an adverse effect on our revenue and operating results and related growth rates and could have an adverse effect on our operating results. Conversely, our inventories will tend to increase in poor weather such as a harsh winter or as a result of adverse weather-related conditions such as flooding. During periods of mild weather conditions, our ability to increase our revenues and improve our operating results and related growth will be increasingly dependent on our ability to obtain additional vehicle suppliers and to compete more effectively in the market, each of which is subject to the other risks and uncertainties described in these sections.

High fuel prices in the United States and Canada may have an adverse effect on our revenues and operating results as well as our earnings growth rates.

Significant increases in the cost of fuel could lead to a reduction in miles driven per car and a reduction in accident rates. A material reduction in accident rates could have a material impact on revenue growth. In addition, under our PIP contracts the cost of towing the vehicle to one of our facilities is included in the PIP fee. We may incur increased fees which we will not be able to pass on to the insurance companies. A material increase in tow rates could have a material impact on our operating results.

The salvage vehicle sales industry is highly competitive and we may not be able to compete successfully.

We face significant competition for the supply of salvage vehicles and for the buyers of those vehicles. We believe our principal competitors include other vehicle sales and auction companies with whom we compete directly in obtaining vehicles from insurance companies and other suppliers, and large vehicle dismantlers, who may buy salvage vehicles directly from insurance companies, bypassing the salvage sales process. Many of the insurance companies have established relationships with competitive sales and

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auction companies and large dismantlers. Many of our competitors may have greater financial resources than us. Due to the limited number of vehicle suppliers, the absence of long-term contractual commitments between us and our suppliers and the increasingly competitive market environment, there can be no assurance that our competitors will not gain market share at our expense.

We may also encounter significant competition for local, regional and national supply agreements with vehicle suppliers. There can be no assurance that the existence of other local, regional or national contracts entered into by our competitors will not have a material adverse effect on our business or our expansion plans. Furthermore, we are likely to face competition from major competitors in the acquisition of salvage vehicle sales facilities, which could significantly increase the cost of such acquisitions and thereby materially impede our expansion objectives or have a material adverse effect on our results of operations. These potential new competitors may include consolidators of automobile dismantling businesses, organized salvage vehicle buying groups, automobile manufacturers, automobile auctioneers and software companies. While most vehicle suppliers have abandoned or reduced efforts to sell salvage vehicles directly without the use of service providers such as us, there can be no assurance that this trend will continue, which could adversely affect our market share, results of operations and financial condition. Additionally, existing or new competitors may be significantly larger and have greater financial and marketing resources than us; therefore, there can be no assurance that we will be able to compete successfully in the future.

Because the growth of our business has been due in large part to acquisitions and development of new salvage vehicle sales facilities, the rate of growth of our business and revenues may decline if we are not able to successfully complete acquisitions and development of new facilities.

We seek to increase our sales and profitability through the acquisition of other salvage vehicle sales facilities and the development of new salvage vehicle storage facilities. There can be no assurance that we will be able to:

·       continue to acquire additional facilities on favorable terms;

·       expand existing facilities in no growth regulatory environments;

·       increase revenues and profitability at acquired and new facilities;

·       maintain the historical revenue and earnings growth rates we have been able to obtain through facility openings and strategic acquisitions; or

·       create new salvage vehicle storage facilities that meet our current revenue and profitability requirements.

As we continue to expand our operations, our failure to manage growth could harm our business and adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

Our ability to manage growth is not only dependent on our ability to successfully integrate new facilities, but also on our ability to:

·       hire, train and manage additional qualified personnel;

·       establish new relationships or expand existing relationships with vehicle suppliers;

·       identify and acquire or lease suitable premises on competitive terms;

·       secure adequate capital;

·       maintain the supply of vehicles from vehicle suppliers; and

·       compete successfully in the public automobile sales sector.

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Our inability to control or manage these growth factors effectively could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

Our annual and quarterly performance may fluctuate, causing the price of our stock to decline.

Our revenues and operating results have fluctuated in the past and can be expected to continue to fluctuate in the future on a quarterly and annual basis as a result of a number of factors, many of which are beyond our control. Factors that may affect our operating results include, but are not limited to, the following:

·       fluctuations in the market value of salvage and used vehicles;

·       the availability of salvage vehicles;

·       variations in vehicle accident rates;

·       buyer participation in the Internet bidding process;

·       delays or changes in state title processing;

·       changes in state or federal laws or regulations affecting salvage vehicles;

·       changes in state laws affecting who may purchase salvage vehicles;

·       our ability to integrate and manage our acquisitions successfully;

·       the timing and size of our new facility openings;

·       the announcement of new vehicle supply agreements by us or our competitors;

·       severity of weather and seasonality of weather patterns;

·       the amount and timing of operating costs and capital expenditures relating to the maintenance and expansion of our business, operations and infrastructure;

·       the availability and cost of general business insurance;

·       labor costs and collective bargaining;

·       availability of subhaulers at competitive rates;

·       acceptance of buyers and sellers of our Internet-based model deploying VB2, a proprietary Internet auction-style sales technology;

·       current levels of out of state and foreign demand for salvage vehicles may not continue;

·       the introduction of a similar Internet product by a competitor; and

·       the ability to obtain necessary permits to operate salvage storage facilities.

Due to the foregoing factors, our operating results in one or more future periods can be expected to fluctuate. As a result, we believe that period-to-period comparisons of our results of operations are not necessarily meaningful and should not be relied upon as any indication of future performance. In the event such fluctuations result in our financial performance being below the expectations of public market analysts and investors, the price of our common stock could decline substantially.

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Our strategic shift to an Internet based sales model has increased the relative importance of intellectual property assets to our business, and any inability to protect those rights could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or results of operations.

Implementation of VB2 across our salvage operations and more recently in our public sales has increased the relative importance of intellectual property rights to our business. Our intellectual property rights include pending patent applications for VB2 as well as trademarks, trade secrets, copyrights and other intellectual property rights. We are in the process of prosecuting an initial patent application relating to VB2 and cannot predict whether a patent will actually issue from that application. Even if a patent is issued, the scope of the protection gained may be insufficient or any issued patent could subsequently be deemed invalid or unenforceable. In addition, we are increasingly entering agreements with third parties regarding the license or other use of our intellectual property in foreign jurisdictions. Effective intellectual property protection may not be available in every country in which our products and services are distributed, deployed, or made available. We seek to maintain certain intellectual property rights as trade secrets. The secrecy could be compromised by third parties, or intentionally or accidentally by our employees, which would cause us to lose the competitive advantage resulting from those trade secrets. Any significant impairment of our intellectual property rights, or any inability to protect our intellectual property rights, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

We are, and may in the future be, subject to intellectual property rights claims, which are costly to defend, could require us to pay damages, and could limit our ability to use certain technologies in the future.

Litigation based on allegations of infringement or other violations of intellectual property rights are common among companies who rely heavily on intellectual property rights. Our reliance on intellectual property rights has increased significantly in recent years as we have implemented our VB2 auction-style sales technologies across our business and abandoned live auctions. As we face increasing competition, the possibility of intellectual property rights claims against us grows. In June 2005, a competitor filed a patent infringement claim against us relating to our VB2 technologies. This litigation and any other intellectual property claims, whether with or without merit, can be time-consuming, expensive to litigate and settle, and can divert management resources and attention from our core business. An adverse determination in current or future litigation could prevent us from offering our products and services in the manner currently conducted. We may also have to pay damages or seek a license for the technology, which may not be available on reasonable terms and which may significantly increase our operating expenses, if it is available for us to license at all. We could also be required to develop alternative non-infringing technology, which could require significant effort and expense.

New accounting pronouncements or new interpretations of existing standards could require the Company to make adjustments in our accounting policies that could adversely affect our financial statements.

The Financial Accounting Standards Board, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, the Securities and Exchange Commission, or other accounting organizations or governmental entities issue new pronouncements or new interpretations of existing accounting standards that sometimes require us to change our accounting policies and procedures. To date, we do not believe any new pronouncements or interpretations have had an adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations, but future pronouncements or interpretations could require us to change our policies or procedures. Moreover, we continually review our critical accounting policies in light of the accounting literature and changes in our operations.

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Government regulation of the salvage vehicle sales and auction industry may impair our operations, increase our costs of doing business and create potential liability.

Participants in the salvage vehicle sales and auction industry are subject to, and may be required to expend funds to ensure compliance with a variety of U.S. or Canadian, federal, state, provincial and local governmental, regulatory and administrative rules, regulations, land use ordinances, licensure requirements and procedures, including those governing vehicle registration, the environment, zoning and land use. Failure to comply with present or future regulations or changes in interpretations of existing regulations may result in impairment of our operations and the imposition of penalties and other liabilities. At various times, we may be involved in disputes with local governmental officials regarding the development and/or operation of our business facilities. We believe that we are in compliance in all material respects with applicable regulatory requirements. We may be subject to similar types of regulations by federal, provincial, state, and local governmental agencies in new markets. In addition, new regulatory requirements or changes in existing requirements may delay or increase the cost of opening new facilities, may limit our base of salvage vehicle buyers and may decrease demand for our vehicles.

The operation of our storage facilities poses certain environmental risks, which could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

Our operations are subject to federal, state, provincial and local laws and regulations regarding the protection of the environment. In the salvage vehicle sales industry, large numbers of wrecked vehicles are stored at storage facilities and, during that time, spills of fuel, motor oil and other fluids may occur, resulting in soil, surface water or groundwater contamination. Environmental issues resulting from fuel spills, oil spillage, or similar problems are also present at our public sales facilities. In addition, certain of our facilities generate and/or store petroleum products and other hazardous materials, including waste solvents and used oil. We could incur substantial expenditures for preventative, investigative or remedial action and could be exposed to liability arising from our operations, contamination by previous users of certain of our acquired facilities, or the disposal of our waste at off-site locations. Environmental laws and regulations could become more stringent over time and there can be no assurance that we or our operations will not be subject to significant costs in the future. Although we have obtained indemnification for pre-existing environmental liabilities from many of the persons and entities from whom we have acquired facilities, there can be no assurance that such indemnifications will be adequate. Any such expenditures or liabilities could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

If we experience problems with our providers of fleet operations, our business could be harmed.

We rely upon independent subhaulers to pick up and deliver vehicles to and from our storage facilities. Our failure to pick up and deliver vehicles in a timely and accurate manner could harm our reputation and brand, which could have a material adverse effect on our business. Further, an increase in fuel cost may lead to increased prices charged by our independent subhaulers, which may significantly increase our cost. These costs may not be passed on to our sellers or buyers.

We are partially self-insured for certain losses.

We are partially self-insured for certain losses related to general liability, workers’ compensation and auto liability. Our liability represents an estimate of the ultimate cost of claims incurred as of the balance sheet date. The estimated liability is not discounted and is established based upon analysis of historical data and actuarial estimates. While we believe these estimates are reasonable based on the information currently available, if actual trends, including the severity of claims and medical cost inflation, differ from our estimates, our results of operations could be impacted. Further, we rely on independent actuaries to assist us in establishing the proper amount of reserves for anticipated payouts associated with these self-insured exposures. If these actuaries provide guidance based on erroneous assumptions, use models

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mathematically flawed or otherwise provide advice that is inaccurate or unrepresentative, then it could have an adverse impact on our results of operations.

Our executive officers, directors and their affiliates hold a large percentage of our stock and their interests may differ from other shareholders.

Our executive officers, directors and their affiliates beneficially own, in the aggregate, approximately 23% of our common stock as of July 31, 2005. If they were to act together, these shareholders would have significant influence over most matters requiring approval by shareholders, including the election of directors, any amendments to our articles of incorporation and certain significant corporate transactions, including potential merger or acquisition transactions. In addition, without the consent of these shareholders, we could be delayed or prevented from entering into transactions that could be beneficial to us or our other investors. These shareholders may take these actions even if they are opposed by our other investors.

We have a shareholder rights plan, or poison pill, which could affect the price of our common stock and make it more difficult for a potential acquirer to purchase a large portion of our securities, to initiate a tender offer or a proxy contest, or to acquire us.

In March 2003, our board of directors adopted a shareholder rights plan, commonly known as a poison pill. The poison pill may discourage, delay, or prevent a third party from acquiring a large portion of our securities, initiating a tender offer or proxy contest, or acquiring us through an acquisition, merger, or similar transaction. Such an acquirer could be prevented from consummating one of these transactions even if our shareholders might receive a premium for their shares over then-current market prices.

If we lose key management or are unable to attract and retain the talent required for our business, we may not be able to successfully manage our business or achieve our objectives.

Our future success depends in large part upon the leadership and performance of our executive management team, all of whom are employed on an at-will basis and none of whom are subject to any agreements not to compete. If we lose the service of one or more of our executive officers or key employees, in particular Willis J. Johnson, our Chief Executive Officer, and A. Jayson Adair, our President, or if one or more of them decides to join a competitor or otherwise compete directly or indirectly with us, we may not be able to successfully manage our business or achieve our business objectives.

Compliance with new rules and regulations concerning corporate governance may be costly and time consuming.

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or Sarbanes-Oxley, requires, among other things, that companies adopt new corporate governance measures, imposes comprehensive reporting and disclosure requirements, sets stricter independence and financial expertise standards for board and audit committee members and imposes increased civil and criminal penalties for companies, their chief executive officers and chief financial officers for securities law violations. In addition, the Nasdaq National Market, on which our common stock is traded, has adopted additional comprehensive rules and regulations relating to corporate governance. These laws, rules and regulations will increase the scope, complexity and cost of our corporate governance, reporting and disclosure practices, which could harm our results of operations and divert management’s attention from business operations. These new rules and regulations may also make it more difficult and more expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance and make it more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified members of our board of directors, particularly to serve on our audit committee.

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Item 2.                        Properties

Our corporate headquarters are located in Fairfield, California. This facility consists of approximately 100,000 square feet of office space owned by Copart. We also own or lease an additional 117 operating facilities in the United States and Canada located in California, Texas, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Washington, Oregon, Georgia, Missouri, New York, Connecticut, Florida, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Maryland, Ohio, Illinois, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Mississippi, North Carolina, Indiana, Arizona, Louisiana, Utah, Nevada, Alabama, South Carolina, Iowa, Michigan, Tennessee, Virginia, Colorado, Idaho, New Mexico, Kentucky, Delaware, Maine, West Virginia, Montana, Alaska and Ontario. We believe that our existing facilities are adequate to meet current requirements and that suitable additional or substitute space will be available as needed to accommodate any expansion of operations and additional offices. After the fiscal year ended July 31, 2005 we opened facilities in Hawaii and Nebraska increasing the number of states we operate in to 44.

Item 3.                        Legal Proceedings

We are involved in litigation and damage claims arising in the ordinary course of business, such as actions related to injuries, property damage, handling or disposal of vehicles and patent infringement. We are also involved in various governmental and administrative proceedings primarily relating to licensing and operation of our business. Among this litigation is a lawsuit filed by Ciano Dessources on May 21, 2003 in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Superior Court Department against Copart of Connecticut, Inc. and Copart, Inc. which purports to be a class action on behalf of persons whose vehicles were disposed of by us as abandoned vehicles, which the named plaintiff contends were disposed of without complying with state laws.  Relief sought included class certification, declaratory, remedial and/or injunctive relief, including the ordering of a compliance program that will essentially protect consumers, as well as damages, fees, and costs. Copart’s Motion for Summary Judgment was granted on December 8, 2004, dismissing the class claim element of the lawsuit. However this dismissal may be reconsidered, and may also be appealed once the remaining individual claims of the named plaintiff are adjudicated.

On June 10, 2005, Manheim Services Corp. filed suit against Copart, Inc. in the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia, Atlanta Division, alleging infringement of Manheim’s assigned U.S. Patent No. 5,774,873. Relief sought included a patent infringement judgment, an injunction prohibiting Copart from using any infringing product or service (including VB2), damages, fees, costs and expenses. On August 3, 2005, Copart denied the claim and asserted counterclaims based on violations of antitrust laws and common-law tortious interference. No trial date has yet been set.

On September 16, 2005, Richard M. Gray filed suit against Copart  and A. Safrin, in the State Court for the County of Chatham, State of Georgia, alleging a class action for unreasonable amounts claimed for storage liens by Copart, and related claims. Relief sought included class certification, damages, fees, costs and expenses. Copart intends to vigorously defend the suit.

We provide for costs relating to these matters when a loss is probable and the amount can be reasonably estimated. The effect of the outcome of these matters on our future results of operations cannot be predicted because any such effect depends on future results of operations, the amount and timing of the resolution of such matters. We believe that any ultimate liability will not have a material effect on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows. However, the amount of the liabilities associated with these claims, if any, cannot be determined with certainty.

Item 4.                        Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders

We did not submit any matters to a vote of our shareholders during the fourth quarter of our 2005 fiscal year.

22




Item 4A.                Executive Officers of the Registrant

Executive Officers

Our executive officers and their ages as of July 31, 2005 were as follows:

Name

 

 

 

 

Age

 

 

Position

Willis J. Johnson

 

58

 

Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and Director

A. Jayson Adair

 

35

 

President and Director

James E. Meeks

 

55

 

Executive Vice President, Chief Operating Officer and Director

William E. Franklin

 

49

 

Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Paul A. Styer

 

49

 

Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary

Vincent W. Mitz

 

42

 

Senior Vice President of Marketing

David L. Bauer

 

44

 

Senior Vice President of Information Technology and
Chief Information Officer

Gerald Waters

 

58

 

Senior Vice President of Strategic Planning

Russell D. Lowy

 

46

 

Senior Vice President of Operations

Thomas E. Wylie

 

54

 

Senior Vice President of Human Resources

Simon E. Rote

 

33

 

Vice President of Finance

 

Willis J. Johnson, our founder, has served as our Chairman of the Board since 2004, Chief Executive Officer since 1986 and as a director since 1982. Mr. Johnson served as our President from 1986 until May 1995. Mr. Johnson was an officer and director of U-Pull-It, Inc. (“UPI”), a self-service auto dismantler which he co-founded in 1982, from 1982 through September 1994. Mr. Johnson sold his entire interest in UPI in September 1994. Mr. Johnson has over 30 years of experience in owning and operating auto dismantling companies.

A. Jayson Adair has served as our President since November 1996 and as a director since September 1992. From April 1995 until October 1996, Mr. Adair served as our Executive Vice President. From August 1990 until April 1995, Mr. Adair served as our Vice President of Sales and Operations and from June 1989 to August 1990, Mr. Adair served as our Manager of Operations.

James E. Meeks has served as our Vice President and Chief Operating Officer since September 1992 when he joined us concurrent with our purchase of South Bay Salvage Pool (“San Martin Operation”). Mr. Meeks has served as our Executive Vice President and director since October 1996 and as Senior Vice President since April 1995. From April 1986 to September 1992, Mr. Meeks, together with his family, owned and operated the San Martin Operation. Mr. Meeks was also an officer, director and part owner of Cas & Meeks, Inc., a towing and subhauling service company, which he operated from 1991 to March 2001. Mr. Meeks has over 30 years of experience in the vehicle dismantling business.

William E. Franklin has served as our Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer since March 2004. Mr. Franklin has over 20 years of international finance and executive management experience. From October 2001 to March 2004 he served as the Chief Financial Officer of Ptek Holdings, Inc., an international telecommunications company. Prior to that he was the President and CEO of Clifford Electronics, an international consumer electronics company. Mr. Franklin received a Master’s degree in Business Administration from the University of Southern California and his Bachelor’s of Science degree in Finance from California State University Bakersfield. Mr. Franklin is a Certified Public Accountant.

Paul A. Styer has served as our General Counsel since September 1992, served as our Senior Vice President since April 1995 and as our Vice President from September 1992 until April 1995. Mr. Styer served as one of our directors from September 1992 until October 1993. Mr. Styer has served as our Secretary since October 1993. From August 1990 to September 1992, Mr. Styer conducted an independent

23




law practice. Mr. Styer received a B.A. from the University of California, Davis and a J.D. from the University of the Pacific. Mr. Styer is a member of the California State Bar Association.

Vincent W. Mitz has served as our Senior Vice President of Marketing since May 1995. Prior thereto, Mr. Mitz was employed by NER Auction Systems from 1981 until its acquisition by Copart in 1995. At NER, Mr. Mitz held numerous positions culminating as Vice President of Sales and Operations for NER’s New York region from 1990 to 1993 and Vice President of Sales & Marketing from 1993 to 1995.

David L. Bauer has served as our Senior Vice President of Information Technology and Chief Information Officer since joining Copart in December 1995. Prior thereto, Mr. Bauer was an independent systems consultant from 1987 to 1995. Prior to working independently, Mr. Bauer spent 1983 to 1987 working in Arthur Andersen & Company’s Management Information Consulting Division, leaving in 1987 as a Consulting Manager. Mr. Bauer earned a B.A. in Economics from the University of California, San Diego in 1981 and an MBA from University of California, Davis in 1983.

Gerald Waters has served as our Senior Vice President of Strategic Planning since August 2003. Mr. Waters served as Senior Vice President of Operations from May 1995 to August 2003 and as Vice President of Sales and Marketing from January 1993 to May 1995. Prior to 1993 Mr. Waters was employed for 23 years with a major auto insurance provider in various claims management positions. Mr. Waters received a B.S. in Accounting from the Long Island University, C. W. Post Center. Mr. Waters retired effective September 26, 2005.

Russell D. Lowy has served as our Senior Vice President of Operations since July 2002. Mr. Lowy served as Vice President of Operations, Eastern Division from December 1999 to July 2002. From December 1998 to December 1999, Mr. Lowy served as Director of Training and Auditing. Mr. Lowy served as Assistant Vice President of Operations from 1996 to 1997, Regional Manager of Northern California from 1995 to 1996 and Marketing Manager from 1993 to 1994. Prior to joining us, Mr. Lowy spent nine years with ADP—Claims Solutions Group. Mr. Lowy received a B.S. in Business Administration from California State University, Chico in 1982.

Thomas E. Wylie has served as our Senior Vice President of Human Resources since September 2003. Mr. Wylie has over 25 years of human resources and organizational change management experience. From January 2001 to November 2003 he served as Vice President, Human Resources, Systems and Administration for the California Division of Kaiser Permanente, a health care organization headquartered in Oakland, California. Prior to that he was the Vice President of Human Resources for Global Business Services, a division of Honeywell International in Morristown, New Jersey. He held several other positions with Honeywell starting in 1979. Mr. Wylie received a bachelor’s degree from Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota.

Simon E. Rote has served as our Vice President of Finance since March 2003. Prior thereto, Mr. Rote served as our Controller from December 1998 to March 2003, and as our Assistant Controller from December 1997 to December 1998. Mr. Rote was an auditor with KPMG from 1994 to 1997. Mr. Rote received a B.S. in Accounting from St. Mary’s College in 1994.

Our executive officers are elected by our board of directors and serve at the discretion of the board. There are no family relationships among any of our directors or executive officers, except that A. Jayson Adair is the son-in-law of Willis J. Johnson.

 

24




PART II

Item 5.                        Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Shareholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Market Information

The following table summarizes the high and low sales prices per share of our common stock for each quarter during the last two fiscal years. As of July 31, 2005, there were 90,337,643 shares outstanding. Our common stock has been quoted on the Nasdaq National Market under the symbol “CPRT” since March 17, 1994. As of July 31, 2005, we had 1,367 shareholders of record.

Fiscal Year 2005

 

 

 

High

 

Low

 

Fourth Quarter

 

26.21

 

21.65

 

Third Quarter

 

25.99

 

21.00

 

Second Quarter

 

27.33

 

18.40

 

First Quarter

 

23.40

 

17.70

 

 

Fiscal Year 2004

 

 

 

High

 

Low

 

Fourth Quarter

 

28.11

 

17.04

 

Third Quarter

 

22.56

 

14.86

 

Second Quarter

 

18.50

 

11.44

 

First Quarter

 

13.27

 

8.30

 

 

Dividend Policies

We have not paid a cash dividend since becoming a public company in 1994. We currently intend to retain any earnings for use in our business and do not anticipate paying any cash dividends in the foreseeable future.

We expect to continue to use cash flows from operations to finance our working capital needs and to develop and grow our business. In addition to our stock repurchase, we are considering a variety of alternative potential uses for our remaining cash balances and our cash flow from operations. These alternative potential uses include additional stock repurchases, the payment of dividends and acquisitions.

Stock Repurchase

In February 2003, the Company’s Board of Directors authorized the Company to repurchase up to 9 million shares of its Common Stock. The repurchases may be effected through solicited or unsolicited transactions in the open market or in privately negotiated transactions. No time limit has been placed on the duration of the share repurchase program. The repurchases will be made at such times and in such amounts as Copart deems appropriate and may be discontinued at any time. During fiscal 2005, the Company did not repurchase any shares. For the year ended July 31, 2004, the Company repurchased a total of 977,100 shares at a weighted average price of $10.97 per share. The total number of shares repurchased under the program is approximately 3.7 million, leaving approximately 5.3 million available under the repurchase program.

Issuances of Unregistered Securities

There were no issuances of unregistered securities in the quarter ended July 31, 2005.

25




Item 6.                        Selected Financial Data

The following selected operating and balance sheet data, as of and for the years ended July 31, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002 and 2001 have been derived from the audited consolidated financial statements of the Company. The selected consolidated financial data should be read in conjunction with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and the Company’s consolidated financial statements and the notes thereto.

 

 

Fiscal Year Ending July 31,

 

 

 

2005

 

2004

 

2003

 

2002

 

2001

 

 

 

(In 000’s except per share and other data)

 

Selected Operating Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenues

 

$

457,111

 

$

400,796

 

$

347,423

 

$

316,456

 

$

253,889

 

Operating income

 

156,859

 

124,765

 

90,754

 

89,940

 

68,117

 

Income before income taxes

 

165,069

 

130,296

 

94,167

 

93,658

 

71,044

 

Net income

 

102,116

 

79,220

 

57,222

 

57,389

 

42,685

 

Basic per share amounts:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income

 

$

1.13

 

$

0.89

 

$

0.63

 

$

0.65

 

$

0.52

 

Weighted average shares

 

90,162

 

89,457

 

91,408

 

88,718

 

82,340

 

Diluted per share amounts:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income

 

$

1.10

 

$

0.87

 

$

0.62

 

$

0.63

 

$

0.50

 

Weighted average shares

 

92,984

 

91,537

 

93,018

 

91,251

 

84,614

 

Balance Sheet Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments

 

$

252,548

 

$

178,320

 

$

116,746

 

$

132,690

 

$

15,245

 

Working capital

 

296,017

 

229,888

 

166,905

 

175,184

 

60,795

 

Total assets

 

793,528

 

673,023

 

587,100

 

535,848

 

315,064

 

Total debt

 

 

16

 

107

 

409

 

712

 

Shareholders’ equity

 

709,379

 

602,263

 

525,640

 

486,217

 

269,152

 

Other Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of storage facilities

 

117

 

107

 

102

 

94

 

84

 

 

26




Item 7.                        Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

SPECIAL NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This report, including the information incorporated by reference herein, contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terms such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “expect,” “plan,” “intend,” “forecast,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “predict,” “potential,” “continue” or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. The forward-looking statements contained in this report involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and situations that may cause our or our industry’s actual results, level of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these statements. These factors include those listed under the caption “Factors That May Affect Future Results” beginning on page 15 of this report and those discussed elsewhere in this report. We encourage investors to review these factors carefully.

Although we believe that, based on information currently available to Copart and its management, the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements. You should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements.

Overview

We provide vehicle suppliers, primarily insurance companies, with a full range of services to process and sell salvage vehicles over the Internet through our Virtual Bidding Second Generation (“VB2”) Internet auction-style sales technology. We sell principally to licensed vehicle dismantlers, rebuilders, repair licensees, used vehicle dealers and exporters. Salvage vehicles are either damaged vehicles deemed a total loss for insurance or business purposes or are recovered stolen vehicles for which an insurance settlement with the vehicle owner has already been made. We offer vehicle suppliers a full range of services that expedite each stage of the salvage vehicle sales process and minimize administrative and processing costs. We generate revenues primarily from fees paid by vehicle suppliers and vehicle buyers as well as related fees for services such as towing and storage.

We process salvage vehicles principally on a consignment method, on either the Percentage Incentive Program (“PIP”) or on a fixed fee consignment basis. Using either consignment method, only the fees associated with vehicle processing are recorded in revenue.

For the fiscal years ended July 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003, approximately 68%, 65% and 67% of the vehicles we sold, respectively, were processed under PIP. We attempt to convert vehicle supplier agreements at acquired operations to PIP, which typically results in higher net returns to vehicle suppliers and higher fees to us than standard fixed fee consignment programs. Those vehicles not sold under the PIP program were processed under fixed fee agreements.

Due to a number of factors, including the timing and size of new acquisitions, market conditions, and acceptance of PIP by vehicle suppliers, the percentage of vehicles processed under these programs in future periods may vary.

Our revenues consist of salvage fees charged to vehicle suppliers and vehicle buyers, transportation revenue and purchased vehicle revenues. Salvage fees from vehicle suppliers include sales fees under PIP agreements and fixed fee programs where we charge for title processing, special preparation, storage and selling. Salvage fees also include fees charged to vehicle buyers for purchasing vehicles, storage and annual registration. Transportation revenue includes charges to suppliers for towing vehicles under fixed fee contracts. Transportation revenue also includes towing charges assessed to buyers for delivering vehicles.

27




Purchased vehicle revenues are comprised of the price that buyers paid at our sales for vehicles processed that we own.

Costs attributable to yard and fleet expenses consist primarily of operating personnel (which includes yard management, clerical and yard employees), rent, contract vehicle towing, insurance, fuel, fleet maintenance and repair, and costs of vehicles we sold under purchase contracts. Costs associated with general and administrative expenses consist primarily of executive management, accounting, data processing, sales personnel, human resources, professional fees, research and development and marketing expenses.

During fiscal 2004, we converted all of our salvage vehicle storage and sales facilities to an Internet based auction-style model using our VB2 Internet sales technology. This second generation technology combines two bidding processes. An open Preliminary Bidding feature allows a buyer to enter bids either at a bidding station at the storage facility during the three preview days or over the Internet. To improve the effectiveness of bidding, the VB2 system lets a buyer see the current high bid on the vehicle they want to purchase. The preliminary bidding phase is an open sales format. Buyers enter the maximum price they are willing to pay for a vehicle and BID4U will incrementally bid the vehicle on their behalf. Preliminary bidding ends one hour prior to the start of an Internet-only virtual sale. BID4U will represent the high preliminary bidder at the Internet-only virtual sale. This feature allows bidders the opportunity to bid against each other and the high preliminary bidder. The bidders enter bids via the Internet in a real time format. BID4U submits bids for the high preliminary bidder, up to their maximum bid. When bidding stops, a countdown is initiated. If no bids are received during the countdown, the vehicle sells to the highest bidder. VB2 opens our sales process to registered buyers anywhere in the world who have Internet access.

We believe the implementation of VB2 across our salvage operations has increased the pool of available buyers for each sale and the added competition has increased the amount buyers are willing to pay for salvage from us. It has also improved the efficiency of our operations. For fiscal 2005, sales of vehicles to buyers outside the state where the vehicle is located accounted for 46% of total vehicles sold; 25% of salvage vehicles were sold to out of state buyers and 21% were sold to buyers out of country.

The period-to-period comparability of our operating results and financial condition is substantially affected by business acquisitions, new openings, weather and product introductions during such periods.

Acquisitions and New Operations

We have experienced significant growth as we have acquired twelve vehicle storage facilities and established eleven new facilities since the beginning of fiscal 2003. All of these acquisitions have been accounted for using the purchase method of accounting.

As part of our overall expansion strategy of offering integrated service to vehicle suppliers, we anticipate acquiring and developing facilities in new regions, as well as the regions currently served by our facilities. As part of this strategy, in fiscal 2005 we acquired new facilities in or near Lexington, Kentucky and Columbia, Missouri and opened new facilities in Strongsville, Ohio; Ocala, Florida; Knoxville, Tennessee; Loganville, Georgia; Spokane, Washington; Tallahassee, Florida and Hialeah, Florida. In fiscal 2004 we acquired new facilities in or near Eugene, Oregon; Cleveland, Ohio and Anchorage, Alaska and opened new facilities in or near Toronto, Canada and Helena, Montana. In fiscal 2003, we acquired new facilities in or near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Reno, Nevada and Richmond, Virginia and opened new facilities in or near Springfield, Missouri; Corpus Christi, Texas; Ft. Pierce, Florida; Rancho Cucamonga, California; Richmond, Virginia and Albany, New York. We believe that these acquisitions and openings strengthen our coverage as we have 117 facilities located in North America and are able to provide national coverage for our suppliers.

28




We seek to increase revenues and profitability by, among other things, (i) acquiring and developing new salvage vehicle storage facilities in key markets, (ii) pursuing national and regional vehicle supply agreements, (iii) expanding our service offerings to suppliers and buyers, (iv) increasing revenue and profitability at our public automobile sales facilities and (v) expanding the application of VB2 into new markets. In addition, we implement our pricing structure and merchandising procedures and attempt to effect cost efficiencies at each of our acquired facilities by implementing our operational procedures, integrating our management information systems and redeploying personnel, when necessary.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

The preparation of consolidated financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and the related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates, including those related to vehicle pooling costs, allowance for doubtful accounts, goodwill, income taxes, long-lived assets and self insured liabilities. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe are reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying value of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

Management has discussed the selection of critical accounting policies and estimates with the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors and the Audit Committee has reviewed our disclosure relating to critical accounting policies and estimates in this annual report on Form 10-K. Our significant accounting policies are described in Note 2 to our consolidated financial statements for fiscal 2005. The following is a summary of the more significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements:

Revenue Recognition

We provide a portfolio of services to our sellers and buyers that facilitate the sale and delivery of a vehicle from seller to buyer. These services include the ability to use our internet sales technology and vehicle delivery, loading, title processing, preparation and storage. We evaluate multiple-element arrangements relative to our buyer and seller agreements in accordance with Emerging Issues Task Force Issue No. 00-21, Revenue Arrangements with Multiple Deliverables (EITF 00-21), which addresses accounting for multiple-element arrangements, and Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 104 Revenue Recognition (SAB104), which addresses revenue recognition for units of accounting.

The services we provide to the seller of a vehicle involve disposing of a vehicle on the seller's behalf and under most of our current contracts, collecting the proceeds from the buyer. We are not entitled to any such seller fees until we have collected the sales proceeds from the buyer for the seller and, accordingly, we recognize revenue for seller services after service delivery and cash collection.

In certain cases, seller fees are not contingent upon collection of the seller proceeds from the buyer. However, we determined that we are not able to separate the services into separate units of accounting because we do not have fair value for undelivered items. As a result, we do not recognize seller fees until the final seller service has been delivered, which occurs upon collection of the sales proceeds from the buyer for the seller.

We provide a number of services to the buyer of the vehicle, charging a separate fee for each service. Each of these services has been assessed under the criteria of EITF 00-21 to determine whether we have met the requirements to separate them into units of accounting within a multi-element arrangement. We have concluded that the auction service and the post-auction services are separate units of accounting. The fees for the auction service are recognized upon completion of the auction, and the fees for the post-auction services are recognized upon successful completion of those services using the residual method.

29




We also charge buyers an annual registration fee for the right to participate in our vehicle sales program, which is recognized ratably over the term of the arrangement, and relist and late-payment fees which are recognized upon receipt of payment by the buyer. No provision for returns has been established, as all sales are final with no right of return, although we provide for bad debt expense in the case of non-performance by our sellers.

Vehicle Pooling Costs

We defer, in vehicle pooling costs, certain yard and fleet expenses associated with vehicles consigned to and received by us but not sold as of the balance sheet date. We quantify the deferred costs using a calculation that includes the number of vehicles at our facilities at the beginning and end of the period, the number of vehicles sold during the period and an allocation of certain yard and fleet expenses of the period. The primary expenses allocated and deferred are certain facility costs, labor, transportation, and vehicle processing. If our allocation factors change, then yard and fleet expenses could increase or decrease correspondingly in the future. These costs are expensed as vehicles are sold in the subsequent periods on an average cost basis.

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

We maintain an allowance for doubtful accounts in order to provide for estimated losses resulting from disputed amounts billed to suppliers or buyers and the inability of our suppliers or buyers to make required payments. If billing disputes exceed expectations and/or if the financial condition of our suppliers or buyers were to deteriorate, additional allowances may be required.

Valuation of Goodwill and Intangibles

We evaluate separately the impairment of goodwill of our salvage and our public sales operating segments, annually by comparing the fair value of the operating segment to its carrying value. In prior years, we evaluated impairment of goodwill at the facility level by comparing the fair value of the reporting unit to its carrying value. During fiscal 2004, when we centralized the sales process with the implementation of VB2, we determined the appropriate level for testing for impairment was at the salvage and public sales levels. Under this accounting policy, we have not recognized any charges for the impairment of goodwill in previous years or the current year. Future adverse changes in market conditions or poor operating results of an operating segment could result in an inability to recover the carrying value of the investment, thereby requiring further impairment charges in the future.

Deferred Tax Assets

We evaluate the realizability of our deferred tax assets on an ongoing basis. Generally accepted accounting principles require the assessment of our performance and other relevant factors when determining the need for a valuation allowance with respect to these deferred tax assets. Our ability to realize deferred tax assets is dependent on its ability to generate future taxable income. Accordingly, we have established a valuation allowance when, in certain taxable jurisdictions, the utilization of the tax asset is uncertain. Additional timing differences and future tax losses may occur which could warrant a need for establishing additional valuation allowances or reserves against certain deferred tax assets.

We are also required to estimate income tax provisions and amounts ultimately payable or recoverable in numerous jurisdictions. Such estimates involve significant interpretations of regulations and are inherently very complex. Resolution of income tax treatments in individual jurisdictions may not be known for many years after completion of any fiscal year.

30




Long-lived Asset Valuation

We evaluate long-lived assets and certain identifiable intangibles for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. Recoverability of assets is measured by a comparison of the carrying amount of an asset to estimated undiscounted future cash flows expected to be generated by the asset. If the estimated undiscounted cash flows change in the future, we may be required to reduce the carrying amount of an asset.

Retained Insurance Liabilities

We are partially self-insured for certain losses related to general liability, workers’ compensation and auto liability. Our liability represents an estimate of the ultimate cost of claims incurred as of the balance sheet date. The estimated liability is not discounted and is established based upon analysis of historical data and actuarial estimates. While we believe these estimates are reasonable based on the information currently available, if actual trends, including the severity of claims and medical cost inflation, differ from our estimates, our results of operations could be impacted.

Results of Operations

The following table sets forth for the periods indicated below, certain information derived from our consolidated statements of income expressed as a percentage of revenues. There can be no assurance that any trend in operating results will continue in the future.

 

 

Fiscal Years Ended July 31,

 

 

 

2005

 

2004

 

2003

 

Revenues

 

100.0

%

100.0

%

100.0

%

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yard and fleet

 

55.4

 

58.9

 

64.6

 

General and administrative

 

10.3

 

10.0

 

9.3

 

Total operating expenses

 

65.7

 

68.9

 

73.9

 

Operating income

 

34.3

 

31.1

 

26.1

 

Other income, net

 

1.8

 

1.4

 

1.0

 

Income before income taxes

 

36.1

 

32.5

 

27.1

 

Income taxes

 

13.8

 

12.7

 

10.6

 

Net income

 

22.3

%

19.8

%

16.5

%

 

31




Fiscal 2005 Compared to Fiscal 2004

Revenues were approximately $457.1 million during fiscal 2005, an increase of approximately $56.3 million, or 14%, over fiscal 2004. The increase was due primarily to increased vehicle sales volume, on which fees are generated and higher fees resulting from increased sales proceeds per vehicle.  The increase in gross proceeds per vehicle (the gross sales price of the vehicle) yields higher revenue per car as buyer fees and certain fees, including those sold under the PIP program, are based on the gross proceeds per vehicle and generally increase as gross proceeds per vehicle grow. We believe the increase in proceeds per vehicle was the result of the introduction of Virtual Bidding Second Generation “VB2” as more buyers are able to participate in the sales. Existing facilities contributed approximately $51.7 million of the revenue growth and new facilities in or near Strongsville, Ohio; Ocala, Florida; Knoxville, Tennessee; Lexington, Kentucky; Loganville, Georgia; Spokane, Washington; Tallahassee, Florida; Hialeah, Florida and Columbia, Missouri contributed approximately $4.6 million of new revenue.

Historically, we recorded revenue for most seller and buyer fees upon completion of a sale. During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2005, we recorded an immaterial correction of an error to account for our services in accordance with the policy above; the effect of which was to reduce revenue, net income and diluted earnings per share by $4.4 million, $1.5 million and $0.01, respectively for the fourth quarter and fiscal year ended July 31, 2005.

Yard and fleet expenses were approximately $253.3 million during fiscal 2005, an increase of approximately $17.5 million, or 7%, over fiscal 2004. The increase in yard and fleet expenses was due principally to the cost of handling increased volume at existing operations and the costs of new facilities. Approximately $4.4 million of the increase was the result of the acquisition and opening of new facilities. Yard and fleet expenses from existing facilities, grew by approximately $13.1 million, or 6%. Yard and fleet expenses decreased to 55% of revenues during fiscal 2005, as compared to 59% of revenues during fiscal 2004 due in part to the fixed cost nature of our business. Yard and fleet expenses in fiscal 2004 included a net adjustment to insurance reserves and sales taxes that decreased this expense by $3.6 million.

General and administrative expenses were approximately $47.0 million during fiscal 2005, an increase of approximately $6.8 million, or 17%, over fiscal 2004. The increase was primarily due to increases in software development cost, technology hardware leasing cost, and IT payroll costs, all directly associated with the development and deployment of VB2. In addition, the company saw increases in the cost of professional services, impacted by Sarbanes-Oxley compliance and increased payroll and benefit costs associated with expanded support headcount. General and administrative expenses remained relatively flat as a percentage of revenues during fiscal 2005 and 2004.

Total other income was approximately $8.2 million during fiscal 2005, an increase of approximately $2.7 million, or 48% from fiscal 2004. The increase was due primarily to an increase in interest income of approximately $3.4 million due to higher interest rates and a higher cash balance. Gain on the sale of fleet equipment decreased approximately $1.4 million as we sold the majority of the fleet in fiscal 2004 in connection with our decision to subcontract towing services. Other income, which consists primarily of rental income, increased approximately $0.7 million as we continued the rental of primarily unutilized areas within our facilities.

Our effective combined federal, state and local income tax rate for fiscal 2005 and fiscal 2004 was approximately 38% and 39%, respectively. The decrease in rate is attributable to an overall lower state tax rate, as we made certain revisions to our transfer pricing methodology and the beneficial impact of the growth in interest income which is predominantly federal tax exempt. We do not expect significant changes to our effective tax rate in fiscal 2006.

Due to the foregoing factors, we realized net income of approximately $102.1 million for fiscal 2005, compared to net income of approximately $79.2 million for fiscal 2004.

32




Fiscal 2004 Compared to Fiscal 2003

Revenues were approximately $400.8 million during fiscal 2004, an increase of approximately $53.4 million, or 15%, over fiscal 2003. The increase was due primarily to increased salvage vehicle volume, new service revenue and higher fees resulting from increased sales proceeds per vehicle. We believe the increase in proceeds per vehicle was the result of the introduction of Virtual Bidding Second Generation “VB2” as more buyers are able to participate in the sales. Existing facilities contributed approximately $52.0 million of new revenue and new facilities in or near Toronto, Canada; Eugene, Oregon; Helena, Montana; Cleveland, Ohio and Anchorage, Alaska contributed approximately $1.4 million of new revenue.

Yard and fleet expenses were approximately $235.8 million during fiscal 2004, an increase of approximately $11.4 million, or 5%, over fiscal 2003. Included in yard and fleet expense is a net adjustment to insurance reserves that decreased this expense by $3.6 million. The increase in yard and fleet expenses was due principally to the cost of handling increased volume at existing operations and the costs of new facilities. Approximately $2.1 million of the increase was the result of the acquisition and opening of new facilities. Depreciation and amortization expense associated with yard activities increased approximately $5.0 million over fiscal 2003. This increase was due primarily to depreciation and amortization of capital expenditures and covenants not to compete and depreciation of acquired assets resulting from the acquisition of new storage and sales facilities. Yard and fleet expenses decreased to 59% of revenues during fiscal 2004, as compared to 65% of revenues during fiscal 2003. Yard and fleet expenses decreased as a percentage of revenue and was due in part to the fixed cost nature of our business.

General and administrative expenses were approximately $40.2 million during fiscal 2004, an increase of approximately $8.0 million, or 25%, over fiscal 2003. The increase was primarily due to increases in software development cost, technology hardware leasing cost, and IT payroll costs, all directly associated with the development and deployment of VB2. In addition, the company saw increases in the cost of professional services, impacted by Sarbanes-Oxley compliance and increased payroll and benefit costs associated with expanded support headcount. General and administrative expenses increased to 10% of revenues during fiscal 2004, as compared to 9% of revenues during fiscal 2003.

Total other income was approximately $5.5 million during fiscal 2004, an increase of approximately $2.1 million, or 62% from fiscal 2003. Gain on sale of fleet equipment represents the gain on the sale of 602 vehicles. The sale of the equipment is associated with our decision to replace company owned trucks with subhaulers for towing services. Interest income decreased approximately $0.1 million due to lower interest rates during the first nine months of the fiscal year. Other income, which consists primarily of rental income, increased approximately $1.1 million as we rented several under-utilized facilities.

Our effective combined federal, state and local income tax rate for fiscal 2004 and fiscal 2003 was approximately 39%.

Due to the foregoing factors, we realized net income of approximately $79.2 million for fiscal 2004, compared to net income of approximately $57.2 million for fiscal 2003.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Historically, we have financed our growth through cash generated from operations, public offerings of common stock, equity issued in conjunction with certain acquisitions and debt financing. Cash and cash equivalents increased by approximately $246.8 million and $61.6 million in fiscal 2005 and 2004, respectively, mainly as a result of the conversion of $172.6 million in short-term investments in fiscal 2005 and changes in operating activities. Our liquidity and capital resources have not been materially affected by inflation. During the winter months, most of our facilities process 10% to 30% more vehicles than at other times of the year. This seasonal volume growth requires increased cash to pay out advances and handling costs of the additional business.

33




As of July 31, 2005, we had working capital of approximately $296.0 million, including cash and cash equivalents of approximately $252.5 million.  We invest substantially all of our cash balances in AAA rated auction rate securities.  Auction rate securities are principally variable rate securities tied to short-term interest rates with maturities on the face of the securities in excess of 90 days. Auction rate securities have interest rate resets through a modified Dutch auction, at predetermined short-term intervals, usually every 7, 28 or 35 days. They trade at par and are callable at par on any interest payment date at the option of the issuer. Interest paid during a given period is based upon the interest rate determined during the prior auction. Although these instruments are issued and rated as long-term securities, they are priced and traded as short-term securities because of the liquidity provided through the interest rate reset. These auction rate securities were converted to cash prior to the end of the current fiscal year and were held in money market accounts. Our primary source of cash is from the collection of sellers’ fees and buyers’ fees from the sale of salvage vehicles.

We believe that our currently available cash, cash generated from operations and borrowing availability under our bank credit facilities will be sufficient to satisfy our operating and working capital requirements for at least the next twelve months. However, if we experience significant growth in the future, we may be required to raise additional cash through the issuance of new debt or additional equity.

Operating Activities

Net cash provided by operating activities increased by $20.9 million from fiscal 2004 to $136.0 million in fiscal 2005, due to the profitability of the company offset by routine changes in working capital.

Investing Activities

During the fiscal year ended July 31, 2005, we purchased approximately $755.4 million in short-term investments. These purchases were offset by the sale of $928.0 million of short-term investments. We typically invest our cash in auction rate notes with ratings of AAA, which were converted to cash prior to the end of the fiscal year.

Capital expenditures (excluding those associated with fixed assets attributable to acquisitions) were approximately $66.3 million, $64.6 million and $70.7 million for fiscal 2005, 2004 and 2003, respectively. Our capital expenditures have related primarily to opening and improving facilities and acquiring yard equipment. In addition, in fiscal 2004, the company sold most of its transportation fleet as it moved to outsource this function. Sale of fleet equipment generated approximately $19.0 million in gross proceeds.

During the fiscal year ended July 31, 2005, we used cash for the acquisition of operations in Lexington, Kentucky and Columbia, Missouri, which had an aggregate cash cost of approximately $4.5 million. During the fiscal year ended July 31, 2004, we used cash for the acquisition of operations in Eugene, Oregon; Cleveland, Ohio and Anchorage, Alaska, which had an aggregate cash cost of approximately $4.7 million. During the fiscal year ended July 31, 2003, we used cash for the acquisition of operations in West Mifflin, Pennsylvania; Reno, Nevada and Richmond, Virginia, which had an aggregate cash cost of approximately $6.6 million.

Financing Activities

In fiscal 2005, 2004 and 2003, we generated approximately $1.8 million, $5.1 million and $0.4 million, respectively, through the exercise of stock options.

In fiscal 2005, 2004 and 2003, we generated approximately $1.4 million, $1.3 million and $1.9 million, respectively, through the issuance of shares under the employee stock purchase program.

In February 2003, the Company’s Board of Directors authorized the Company to repurchase up to 9 million shares of its Common Stock. The repurchases may be effected through solicited or unsolicited

34




transactions in the open market or in privately negotiated transactions. No time limit has been placed on the duration of the share repurchase program. The repurchases will be made at such times and in such amounts, as we deem appropriate and may be discontinued at any time. For the year ended July 31, 2005, we did not repurchase any shares. As of July 31, 2005, we repurchased a total of 3,672,300 shares at a weighted average price of $8.49. For the year ended July 31, 2004, we repurchased a total of 977,100 shares at a weighted average price of $10.97 per share. We accounted for the repurchase of our Common Stock by charging Common Stock for $31.2 million. Through October 14, 2005, we have not repurchased any shares.

Lease, Purchase and Other Contractual Obligations

The following table summarizes our significant contractual obligations and commercial commitments as of July 31, 2005 (in thousands):

Payments Due By Period

 

Contractual Obligations(1)

 

 

 

Total

 

Less than
1 Year

 

1-3 Years

 

3-5 Years

 

More than
5 Years

 

Operating Leases

 

$

108,338

 

 

$

23,566

 

 

$

33,595

 

$

21,917

 

 

$

29,260

 

 

 

Amount of Commitment Expiration Per Period

 

Commercial Commitments(2)

 

 

 

Total

 

Less than
1 Year

 

1-3 Years

 

3-5 Years

 

More than
5 Years

 

Letters of Credit

 

$10,550

 

 

$10,550

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


(1)          Contractual obligations consist of future minimum lease payments under operating leases, including off-balance sheet leases, used in the normal course of business.

(2)          Commercial commitments include primarily letters of credit provided for insurance programs and certain business transactions.

Credit Facilities

On February 23, 2001, we entered into a credit facility with our existing banking syndicate. The facility provided by Wells Fargo Bank, Fleet National Bank and U.S. Bank National Association consists of an unsecured revolving reducing line of credit in the amount of $10.6 million that matures in 2006. As of July 31, 2005, we had available $0.1 million under this facility, after taking into account $10.5 million of outstanding letters of credit. We are subject to customary covenants, including the following financial covenants: 1) ratio of funded debt to earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA); 2) profitable operation; 3) leverage ratio and 4) interest coverage ratio. We are in compliance with all covenants at July 31, 2005.

Recently Issued Accounting Standards

In November 2004, the FASB issued SFAS No. 151, “Inventory Costs, an amendment of ARB No. 43, Chapter 4”. This statement amends the guidance in ARB No. 43, Chapter 4, “Inventory Pricing,” to clarify the accounting for abnormal amounts of idle facility expense, freight, handling costs, and wasted material (spoilage). SFAS No. 151 requires that those items be recognized as current-period charges regardless of whether they meet the criterion of “so abnormal.” In addition, this statement requires that allocation of fixed production overheads to the costs of conversion be based on the normal capacity of the production facilities. The provisions of SFAS 151 shall be applied prospectively and are effective for inventory costs incurred during fiscal years beginning after June 15, 2005, with earlier application permitted for inventory costs incurred during fiscal years beginning after the date this Statement is issued. The adoption of SFAS No. 151 is not expected to have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

35




In December 2004, the FASB issued SFAS No. 123 (revised 2004), “Share-Based Payment” (“SFAS 123R”), which replaces SFAS 123. The accounting required by SFAS 123R is similar to that of SFAS 123; however, the choice between recognizing the fair value of stock options in the income statement or disclosing the pro forma income statement effect of the fair value of stock options in the notes to the financial statements allowed under SFAS 123 has been eliminated in SFAS 123R. SFAS 123R is effective for all fiscal years beginning after June 15, 2005, and early adoption is permitted. Management intends to use the modified prospective transition method to adopt SFAS 123R beginning in fiscal 2006 and expects that the implementation of SFAS 123R will increase our stock-based compensation expense in fiscal 2006.

In May 2005, the FASB issued SFAS No. 154, “Accounting Changes and Error Corrections—a replacement of APB Opinion No. 20 and FASB Statement No. 3”. This Statement replaces APB Opinion No. 20, “Accounting Changes,” and FASB Statement No. 3, “Reporting Accounting Changes in Interim Financial Statements,” and changes the requirements for the accounting for and reporting of a change in accounting principle. This Statement applies to all voluntary changes in accounting principle. It also applies to changes required by an accounting pronouncement in the unusual instance that the pronouncement does not include specific transition provisions. SFAS 154 is effective for accounting changes and corrections of errors made in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2005. Management currently believes that adoption of the provisions of SFAS No. 154 will not have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

Item 7A.                Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

Our principal exposures to financial market risk are interest rate and foreign currency risk. Our exposure to market risk for changes in interest rates relates primarily to our investment portfolio of marketable securities. As of July 31, 2005, our cash and cash equivalents consisted primarily of funds invested in money market accounts, which bear interest at a variable rate. During the course of the year we invested substantially all of our cash balances in AAA rated auction rate securities, which also bear interest at a variable rate. Due to the average maturity and nature of the Company’s investment portfolio, we believe a sudden change in interest rates would not have a material effect on the value of our investment portfolio. As the interest rates on a material portion of our cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments are variable, a change in interest rates earned on our investment portfolio would impact interest income along with cash flows, but would not materially impact the fair market value of the related underlying instruments.

Our exposure to foreign currency risks relates to our operations in Canada, which have not been significant. We do not hedge our exposure to the Canadian dollar. We do not use derivative financial instruments for speculative or trading purposes.

Item 8.                        Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

The response to this item is submitted as a separate section of this Annual Report on Form 10-K in Item 15. See Part IV, Item 15(a) for an index to the financial statements and supplementary financial information.

Item 9.                        Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

None.

36




Item 9A.                Controls and Procedures

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

We conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures, or “Disclosure Controls,” as of the end of the period covered by this annual report on Form 10-K. This evaluation, or “Controls Evaluation” was performed under the supervision and with the participation of management, including our Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and Director (our “CEO”) and our Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer (our “CFO”). Disclosure Controls are controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), such as this annual report, is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms. Disclosure Controls include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our CEO and CFO, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Our Disclosure Controls include some, but not all, components of our internal control over financial reporting. Our internal control over financial reporting was also separately evaluated as of the end of the period covered by this annual report on Form 10-K in connection with Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting which is set forth below.

Based upon the Controls Evaluation, our CEO and CFO have concluded that as of the end of the period covered by this annual report on Form 10-K, our Disclosure Controls were effective to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our Exchange Act reports is accumulated and communicated to management, including the CEO and CFO, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure, and that such information is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified by the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining internal control over financial reporting (as such item is defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f)) to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of our financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that in reasonable detail accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of our assets; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that our receipts and expenditures are being made only in accordance with authorizations of our management and directors; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of our assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Management assessed our internal control over financial reporting as of July 31, 2005, the end of our fiscal year. Management based its assessment on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). Management’s assessment included evaluation of such elements as the design and operating effectiveness of key financial reporting controls, process documentation, accounting policies, and our overall control environment. This assessment is supported by testing and monitoring performed by our Finance department.

Based on our assessment, management has concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of the end of the fiscal year to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external reporting purposes

37




in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. We reviewed the results of management’s assessment with the Audit Committee of our Board of Directors.

Our independent registered public accounting firm, KPMG LLP, audited management’s assessment of internal control over financial reporting and also independently assessed the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. KPMG LLP has issued an attestation report which is included in Part IV, Item 15 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Limitations on the Effectiveness of Controls

Our management, including our CEO and CFO, does not expect that our Disclosure Controls or our internal control over financial reporting will prevent all error and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the control system’s objectives will be met. Further, the design of a control system must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within Copart, Inc. have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Controls can also be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the controls. The design of any system of controls is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Over time, controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions or deterioration in the degree of compliance with associated policies or procedures. Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control system, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

There have not been any changes in our internal control over financial reporting (as such term is defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) of the Exchange Act), during the most recent fiscal quarter that have materially affected or are reasonably likely to materially affect our internal control over financial reporting.

Item 9B.               Other Information

None.

PART III

Item 10.                 Directors and Executive Officers of the Registrant

Information concerning the Board of Directors of the Company, the members of the Company’s Audit Committee, the Company’s Audit Committee Financial Expert, and compliance with Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is incorporated by reference to the sections entitled “Election of Directors and Director Biographies,” “Board of Directors Information” and “General—Compliance with Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Requirements” in the Company’s Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held on December 6, 2005 (the “Proxy Statement”).

Information regarding executive officers is included in Item 4A, Part I hereof under the caption “Executive Officers of the Registrant.”

38




The information required by this Item with respect to material changes to the procedures by which our stockholders may recommend nominees to our Board of Directors is incorporated herein by reference from the information provided under the heading “The Nominating and Governance Committee” of our Proxy Statement.

Code of Ethics

We have adopted the Copart, Inc. Code of Ethics for Principal Executive and Senior Financial Officers (“Code of Ethics”). The Code of Ethics applies to our principal executive officer, our principal financial officer, our principal accounting officer or controller, and persons performing similar functions and responsibilities who shall be identified by our Audit Committee from time to time.

The Code of Ethics is available at our website, located at http://www.copart.com. It may be found at our website as follows:

1. From our main web page, click on “Investor Relations.”

2. Next, click on “Corporate Governance.”

3. Finally, click on “Code of Ethics for Principal Executive and Senior Financial Officers.”

We intend to satisfy disclosure requirements regarding an amendment to, or waiver from, a provision of the Code of Ethics by posting such information on our website, at the address and location specified above.

Item 11.                 Executive Compensation

The information required by this Item is incorporated herein by reference from the Company’s Proxy Statement under the heading “Executive Compensation.”

Item 12.                 Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management

The information required by this Item is incorporated herein by reference from the Company’s Proxy Statement under the headings “Security Ownership” and “Equity Compensation Plan Information.”

Item 13.                 Certain Relationships and Related Transactions

The information required by this Item is incorporated herein by reference from the Company’s Proxy Statement under the heading “Certain Transactions.”

Item 14.                 Principal Accountant Fees and Services

The information required by this Item is incorporated herein by reference from the section captioned “Proposal Three—Ratification of Independent Auditors” in the Proxy Statement.

39




PART IV

Item 15.                 Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

The following documents are filed as part of this report:

 

 

 

 

Page

(a)

 

1.

 

Index to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

 

 

 

 

 

Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

45

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Balance Sheets at July 31, 2005 and 2004

 

47

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Income for the three years ended July 31, 2005

 

48

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity and Comprehensive Income for the three years ended July 31, 2005

 

49

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the three years ended July 31, 2005

 

50

 

 

 

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

51

 

All schedules are omitted because they are not applicable or the required information is shown in the consolidated financial statements or notes thereto.

3.                Exhibits

Number

 

Description

 3.1

 

Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation of the registrant(4)

 3.1b

 

Certificate of Amendment of Articles of Incorporation(4)

 3.2

 

Bylaws of the registrant, as amended(3)

 3.2b

 

Certificate of Amendment of Bylaws(12)

 3.3

 

Certificate of Determination of Rights, Preferences and Privileges of Series A Participating Preferred Stock of Copart, Inc.(8)

 3.4

 

Certificate of Amendment of Bylaws(10)

 4.1

 

Preferred Stock Rights Agreement, dated as of March 6, 2003, between the Company and Equiserve Trust Company, N.A., including the Certificate of Determination, the form of Rights Certificate and the Summary of Rights attached thereto as Exhibits A, B, and C, respectively.(8)

10.1*

 

Copart, Inc. 1992 Stock Option Plan, as amended(2)

10.2*

 

1994 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (as amended December 8, 2003) with form of Subscription Agreement(11)

10.3*

 

1994 Director Option Plan, with form of Subscription Agreement(11)

10.4*

 

Copart, Inc. 2001 Stock Option Plan(6)

10.5

 

Form of Indemnification Agreement, signed by Executive Officers and Directors and the registrant(7)

10.6

 

General lease dated as of December 29, 1997 between Robert Arthur Gomes and Robert Paul Gomes and Copart of Connecticut, Inc.(7)

10.7

 

Standard Industrial/Commercial single-tenant lease-net dated as of December 23, 1998 between Wickland Oil Martinez and the registrant(7)

10.8

 

Lease agreement dated as of September 14, 2001 between Woodmich L.L.C. and the registrant(7)

 

40




 

Number

 

Description

10.10

 

Aircraft lease dated as of April 11, 2002 between Fleet Capital Corporation and the registrant(7)

10.11

 

Credit Agreement among the registrant and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, U.S. Bank, National Association and Fleet National Bank and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as Administrative Agent and Lead Arranger and Fleet National Bank, as Syndication Agent, dated February 23, 2001(5)

10.12

 

Amendment No. 1 dated November 1, 2004, to Stock Option Agreement dated as of October 6, 2003 between the registrant and Marvin L. Schmidt(13)

14.01

 

Code of Ethics for Principal Executive and Senior Financial Officers (adopted September 30, 2003)(9)

21.1

 

List of subsidiaries of registrant(9)

23.1

 

Consent of KPMG LLP, Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

24.1

 

Power of Attorney (included on page 44)

31.1

 

Certification of Willis J. Johnson, Chief Executive Officer, pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

31.2

 

Certification of William E. Franklin, Chief Financial Officer, pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

32.1

 

Certification of Willis J. Johnson, Chief Executive Officer, pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

32.2

 

Certification of William E. Franklin, Chief Financial Officer, pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002


(1)          Incorporated by reference from exhibit to registrant’s Registration Statement on Form S-1, originally filed on January 19, 1994, as amended (File No. 33-74250).

(2)          Incorporated by reference from exhibit to registrant’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on December 31, 1999.

(3)          Incorporated by reference from exhibit to registrant’s Form 10-K for its fiscal year ended July 31, 1995, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on October 21, 1995.

(4)          Incorporated by reference from exhibit to registrant’s Form 10-K for its fiscal year ended July 31, 2000, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on October 26, 2000.

(5)          Incorporated by reference from exhibit to registrant’s Form 10-Q for the quarter ended January 31, 2001, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 16, 2001.

(6)          Incorporated by reference from exhibit to registrant’s Form 10-Q for the quarter ended January 31, 2002, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 18, 2002.

(7)          Incorporated by reference from exhibit to registrant’s Form 10-K for its fiscal year ended July 31, 2002, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on October 29, 2002.

(8)          Incorporated by reference from exhibit to registrant’s Form 8-A12/G filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 11, 2003.

41




(9)          Incorporated by reference from exhibit to registrant’s Form 10-K for its fiscal year ended July 31, 2003, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on October 17, 2003.

(10) Incorporated by reference from exhibit to registrant’s Form 10-Q for the quarter ended October 31, 2003, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on December 15, 2003.

(11) Incorporated by reference from exhibit to registrant’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on February 6, 2004.

(12) Incorporated by reference from exhibit to registrant’s Form 10-K for its fiscal year ended July 31, 2004, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on October 14, 2004.

(13) Incorporated by reference from exhibit to registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on November 1, 2004.

*                    Denotes a compensation plan in which an executive officer participates

(b)          Exhibits. See response to Item 15(a)(3) above.

(c)           Financial Statement Schedule. See response to Item 15(a)(2) above.

42




SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

Registrant

 

COPART, INC.

 

By:

/s/ WILLIS J. JOHNSON

 

 

Willis J. Johnson
Chief Executive Officer

October 14, 2005

 

 

 

COPART, INC.

 

By:

/s/ WILLIAM E. FRANKLIN

 

 

William E. Franklin
Chief Financial Officer

October 14, 2005

 

 

 

43




POWER OF ATTORNEY

KNOWN ALL PERSONS BY THESE PRESENTS, that each person whose signature appears below constitutes and appoints Willis J. Johnson and William E. Franklin, and each of them, as his true and lawful attorneys-in-fact and agents, each with full power of substitution and resubstitution, for him and in his name, place and stead, in any and all capacities, to sign any and all amendments to this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and to file the same, with all exhibits thereto, and other documents in connection therewith, with the Securities and Exchange Commission, granting unto said attorneys-in-fact and agents, full power and authority to do and perform each and every act and thing requisite and necessary to be done in connection therewith, as fully to all intents and purposes as he might or could do in person, hereby ratifying and confirming all that said attorney-in-fact and agent, or his substitute or substitutes, may lawfully do or cause to be done by virtue hereof.

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

Signature

 

 

Capacity in Which Signed

 

 

Date

 

/s/ WILLIS J. JOHNSON

 

Chief Executive Officer (Principal

 

October 14, 2005

Willis J. Johnson

 

Executive Officer and Director)

 

 

/s/ WILLIAM E. FRANKLIN

 

Senior Vice President of Finance and Chief

 

October 14, 2005

William E. Franklin

 

Financial Officer (Principal Financial and

 

 

 

 

Accounting Officer)

 

 

/s/ A. JAYSON ADAIR

 

President and Director

 

October 14, 2005

A. Jayson Adair

 

 

 

 

/s/ HAROLD BLUMENSTEIN

 

Director

 

October 14, 2005

Harold Blumenstein

 

 

 

 

/s/ JAMES GROSFELD

 

Director

 

October 14, 2005

James Grosfeld

 

 

 

 

/s/ JAMES E. MEEKS

 

Executive Vice President, Chief Operating

 

October 14, 2005

James E. Meeks

 

Officer and Director

 

 

/s/ JONATHAN VANNINI

 

Director

 

October 14, 2005

Jonathan Vannini

 

 

 

 

/s/ STEVEN D. COHAN

 

Director

 

October 14, 2005

Steven D. Cohan

 

 

 

 

 

 

44




REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

The Board of Directors and Shareholders
Copart, Inc.:

We have audited management’s assessment, included in Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting as part of Item 9(a) of this Form 10-K, that Copart, Inc. maintained effective internal control over financial reporting as of July 31, 2005, based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). Copart, Inc.’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on management’s assessment and an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, evaluating management’s assessment, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control, and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

In our opinion, management’s assessment that Copart, Inc. maintained effective internal control over financial reporting as of July 31, 2005, is fairly stated, in all material respects, based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). Also, in our opinion, Copart, Inc. maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of July 31, 2005, based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO).

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated balance sheets of Copart, Inc. and subsidiaries as of July 31, 2005 and 2004, and the related consolidated statements of income, shareholders’ equity and comprehensive income, and cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended July 31, 2005, and our report dated October 14, 2005 expressed an unqualified opinion on those consolidated financial statements.

/S/ KPMG LLP

 

San Francisco, California
October 14, 2005

45




REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

The Board of Directors and Shareholders
Copart, Inc.:

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Copart, Inc. and subsidiaries as of July 31, 2005 and 2004, and the related consolidated statements of income, shareholders’ equity and comprehensive income, and cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended July 31, 2005. These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Copart, Inc. and subsidiaries as of July 31, 2005 and 2004, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended July 31, 2005, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the effectiveness of Copart, Inc. and subsidiaries’ internal control over financial reporting as of July 31, 2005, based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO), and our report dated October 14, 2005, expressed an unqualified opinion on management’s assessment of, and the effective operation of, internal control over financial reporting.

/S/ KPMG LLP

 

San Francisco, California
October 14, 2005

46




COPART, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(in thousands, except share amounts)

 

 

July 31,
2005

 

July 31,
2004

 

ASSETS

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

252,548

 

$

5,720

 

Short-term investments

 

 

172,600

 

Accounts receivable, net

 

91,323

 

81,633

 

Vehicle pooling costs

 

25,431

 

23,966

 

Prepaid expenses and other assets

 

6,826

 

5,437

 

Property and equipment held for sale

 

 

3,755

 

Total current assets

 

376,128

 

293,111

 

Property and equipment, net

 

292,949

 

257,667

 

Intangibles, net

 

1,938

 

2,941

 

Goodwill

 

116,375

 

112,691

 

Land purchase options and other assets

 

6,138

 

6,613

 

Total assets

 

$

793,528

 

$

673,023

 

LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

 

$

56,965

 

$

44,080

 

Deferred revenue

 

12,477

 

9,721

 

Income taxes payable

 

7,248

 

3,819

 

Deferred income taxes

 

3,295

 

5,438

 

Other current liabilities

 

126

 

165

 

Total current liabilities

 

80,111

 

63,223

 

Deferred income taxes

 

2,878

 

6,355

 

Other liabilities

 

1,160

 

1,182

 

Total liabilities

 

84,149

 

70,760

 

Commitments and contingencies

 

 

 

 

 

Shareholders’ equity:

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock, no par value—180,000,000 shares authorized; 90,337,643 and 90,075,843 shares issued and outstanding at July 31, 2005 and 2004, respectively

 

272,017

 

267,276

 

Accumulated other comprehensive income

 

354

 

95

 

Retained earnings

 

437,008

 

334,892

 

Total shareholders’ equity

 

709,379

 

602,263

 

Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity

 

$

793,528

 

$

673,023

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

47




COPART, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME

(in thousands, except per share amounts)

 

 

Years Ended July 31,

 

 

 

2005

 

2004

 

2003

 

Revenues

 

$

457,111

 

$

400,796

 

$

347,423

 

Operating costs and expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yard and fleet

 

253,273

 

235,815

 

224,403

 

General and administrative

 

46,979

 

40,216

 

32,266

 

Total operating expenses

 

300,252

 

276,031

 

256,669

 

Operating income

 

156,859

 

124,765

 

90,754

 

Other income (expense):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense

 

(62

)

(3

)

(21

)

Interest income

 

4,919

 

1,509

 

1,651

 

(Loss)/gain on sale of fleet equipment

 

(57

)

1,359

 

255

 

Other income

 

3,410

 

2,666

 

1,528

 

Total other income

 

8,210

 

5,531

 

3,413

 

Income before income taxes

 

165,069

 

130,296

 

94,167

 

Income taxes

 

62,953

 

51,076

 

36,945

 

Net income

 

$

102,116

 

$

79,220

 

$

57,222

 

Basic net income per share

 

$

1.13

 

$

.89

 

$

.63

 

Weighted average shares outstanding

 

90,162

 

89,457

 

91,408

 

Diluted net income per share

 

$

1.10

 

$

.87

 

$

.62

 

Weighted average shares and dilutive potential common shares outstanding

 

92,984

 

91,537

 

93,018

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

48




COPART, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

(in thousands, except share amounts)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accumulated

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Stock

 

Other

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outstanding

 

 

 

Comprehensive

 

Retained

 

Shareholders’

 

 

 

 

Shares

 

Amount

 

Income

 

Earnings

 

Equity

 

 

Balances at July 31, 2002

 

92,239,859

 

$

287,768

 

 

$

 

 

$

198,450

 

 

$

486,218

 

 

 

Net income

 

 

 

 

 

 

57,222

 

 

57,222

 

 

Exercise of stock options and related tax benefit, net of repurchased shares

 

134,000

 

774

 

 

 

 

 

 

774

 

 

Shares issued for Employee Stock Purchase Plan

 

204,753

 

1,873

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,873

 

 

Shares repurchased

 

(2,695,200

)

(20,447

)

 

 

 

 

 

(20,447

)

 

Balances at July 31, 2003

 

89,883,412

 

269,968

 

 

 

 

255,672

 

 

525,640

 

 

Net income

 

 

 

 

 

 

79,220

 

 

79,220

 

 

Currency translation adjustment

 

 

 

 

95

 

 

 

 

95

 

 

Comprehensive income

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

79,315

 

 

Exercise of stock options and related tax benefit, net of repurchased shares

 

1,033,796

 

6,686

 

 

 

 

 

 

6,686

 

 

Shares issued for Employee Stock Purchase Plan

 

135,735

 

1,345

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,345

 

 

Shares repurchased

 

(977,100

)

(10,723

)

 

 

 

 

 

(10,723

)

 

Balances at July 31, 2004

 

90,075,843

 

267,276

 

 

95

 

 

334,892

 

 

602,263

 

 

Net income

 

 

 

 

 

 

102,116

 

 

102,116

 

 

Currency translation adjustment

 

 

 

 

259

 

 

 

 

259

 

 

Comprehensive income

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

102,375

 

 

Exercise of stock options and related tax benefit, net of repurchased shares

 

193,167

 

3,297

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,297

 

 

Shares issued for Employee Stock Purchase Plan

 

68,633

 

1,444

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,444

 

 

Balances at July 31, 2005

 

90,337,643

 

$

272,017

 

 

$

354

 

 

$

437,008

 

 

$

709,379

 

 

 

49




COPART, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(in thousands)

 

 

Years Ended July 31,

 

 

 

2005

 

2004

 

2003

 

Cash flows from operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net income

 

$

102,116

 

$

79,220

 

$

57,222

 

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

31,296

 

30,808

 

25,545

 

Allowance for doubtful accounts

 

(517

)

760

 

(175

)

Deferred rent

 

(13

)

(74

)

(189

)

Gain on sale of fleet equipment and other property and equipment

 

(752

)

(1,239

)

(190

)

Deferred income taxes

 

(5,620

)

(122

)

7,206

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts receivable

 

(8,882

)

(10,629

)

(7,447

)

Vehicle pooling costs

 

(1,251

)

(375

)

(3,332

)

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

(1,390

)

400

 

(226

)

Land purchase options and other assets

 

476

 

1,244

 

(915

)

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

 

13,248

 

5,663

 

6,167

 

Deferred revenue

 

2,757

 

13

 

1,356

 

Income taxes payable

 

4,523

 

9,441

 

(6,272

)

Net cash provided by operating activities

 

135,991

 

115,110

 

78,750

 

Cash flows from investing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchase of short-term investments

 

(755,420

)

(140,180

)

(155,965

)

Sale of short-term investments

 

928,020

 

78,935

 

180,784

 

Purchase of property and equipment

 

(66,258

)

(64,551

)

(70,721

)

Proceeds from sale of property and equipment

 

5,649

 

19,891

 

809

 

Purchase of net current assets in connection with acquisitions

 

(504

)

(867

)

(92

)

Purchase of property and equipment in connection with acquisitions

 

(79

)

(41

)

(301

)

Purchase of goodwill and intangible assets in connection with acquisitions

 

(3,960

)

(3,825

)

(6,211

)

Other intangible asset changes

 

 

58

 

 

Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities

 

107,448

 

(110,580

)

(51,697

)

Cash flows from financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bank overdraft

 

 

 

(3,485

)

Proceeds from the exercise of stock options

 

1,791

 

5,082

 

397

 

Proceeds from the issuance of Employee Stock Purchase Plan shares

 

1,444

 

1,345

 

1,873

 

Repurchases of common stock

 

 

(10,723

)

(20,447

)

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities

 

3,235

 

(4,296

)

(21,662

)

Effect of foreign currency translation

 

154

 

95

 

 

Net increase in cash and cash equivalents

 

246,828

 

329

 

5,391

 

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period

 

5,720

 

5,391

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period

 

$

252,548

 

$

5,720

 

$

5,391

 

Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest paid

 

$

62

 

$

3

 

$

21

 

Income taxes paid

 

$

64,670

 

$

41,753

 

$

36,002

 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

50




COPART, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
July 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003

(1) Business and Basis of Presentation

Description of Business

Copart, Inc. and its subsidiaries (“the Company”) provide vehicle suppliers, primarily insurance companies, with a full range of services to process and sell salvage vehicles over the Internet through our Virtual Bidding Second Generation (“VB2”) Internet auction-style sales technology. The Company sells principally to licensed vehicle dismantlers, rebuilders, repair licensees, used vehicle dealers and exporters. Salvage vehicles are either damaged vehicles deemed a total loss for insurance or business purposes or are recovered stolen vehicles for which an insurance settlement with the vehicle owner has already been made. The Company offers vehicle suppliers a full range of services that expedite each stage of the salvage vehicle sales process and minimize administrative and processing costs.

Principles of Consolidation

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company’s wholly owned subsidiaries. Significant intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated in consolidation.

(2)  Summary of Significant Accounting Policies and Practices

Revenue Recognition

The Company provides a portfolio of services to its sellers and buyers that facilitate the sale and delivery of a vehicle from seller to buyer. These services include the ability to use its internet sales technology and vehicle delivery, loading, title processing, preparation and storage. The Company evaluates multiple-element arrangements relative to our buyer and seller agreements in accordance with Emerging Issues Task Force Issue No. 00-21, Revenue Arrangements with Multiple Deliverables (EITF 00-21), which addresses accounting for multiple-element arrangements, and Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 104 Revenue Recognition (SAB104), which addresses revenue recognition for units of accounting.

The services the Company provides to the seller of a vehicle involve disposing of a vehicle on the seller's behalf and under most of our current contracts, collecting the proceeds from the buyer. The Company is not entitled to any seller fees until the Company has collected the sales proceeds from the buyer for the seller and, accordingly, the Company recognizes revenue for seller services after service delivery and cash collection.

In certain cases, seller fees are not contingent upon collection of the seller proceeds from the buyer. However, the Company determined that it is not able to separate the services into separate units of accounting because the Company does not have fair value for undelivered items. As a result, the Company does not recognize seller fees until the final seller service has been delivered, which occurs upon collection of the sales proceeds from the buyer for the seller.

The Company provides a number of services to the buyer of the vehicle, charging a separate fee for each service. Each of these services has been assessed under the criteria of EITF 00-21 to determine whether the Company has met the requirements to separate them into units of accounting within a multi-element arrangement. The Company has concluded that the auction service and the post-auction services are separate units of accounting. The fees for the auction service are recognized upon completion of the

51




COPART, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
July 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003

(2)  Summary of Significant Accounting Policies and Practices (Continued)

auction, and the fees for the post-auction services are recognized upon successful completion of those services using the residual method.

The Company also charges buyers an annual registration fee for the right to participate in its vehicle sales program, which is recognized ratably over the term of the arrangement, and relist and late-payment fees which are recognized upon receipt of payment by the buyer. No provision for returns has been established, as all sales are final with no right of return, although we provide for bad debt expense in the case of non-performance by our sellers.

Historically, the Company recorded revenue for most seller and buyer fees upon completion of a sale. During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2005, we recorded an immaterial correction of an error to account for our services in accordance with the policy above; the effect of which was to reduce revenue, net income and diluted earnings per share by $4.4 million, $1.5 million and $0.01, respectively for the fourth quarter and fiscal year ended July 31, 2005.

Yard and Fleet Expenses

Yard and fleet expenses consist primarily of operating personnel (which includes yard management, clerical and yard employees), rent, contract vehicle towing, insurance, fuel and equipment maintenance and repair.

General and Administrative Expenses

General and administrative expenses consist primarily of executive, accounting and data processing, sales personnel, professional fees, software and product development and marketing expenses.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

The Company considers all highly liquid investments purchased with original maturities of three months or less to be cash equivalents.

Vehicle Pooling Costs

The Company capitalizes vehicle pooling costs which consist of certain labor, towing, facility, outside services and other costs directly attributable to the gathering and processing of vehicles prior to their sale. The Company calculates the amounts attributable to vehicles sold and vehicles in storage on a quarterly basis. Vehicle pooling costs are recognized as expenses in the period the vehicle is sold. The Company continually evaluates and adjusts the components of vehicle pooling costs as necessary.

Accounts Receivable

Accounts receivable, which consist primarily of advance charges due from insurance companies and the gross sales price of the vehicle due from buyers, are recorded at the invoiced amount and do not bear interest. The Company maintains an allowance for doubtful accounts for estimated losses on earned fees resulting from the inability of the Company’s customers to make payments based upon historical write-offs as a percentage of net revenues and management’s review of outstanding accounts receivable. Amounts due from customers are charged against the allowance for doubtful accounts when management believes

52




COPART, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
July 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003

(2)  Summary of Significant Accounting Policies and Practices (Continued)

the collectibility of the amount is unlikely. The Company does not have off-balance sheet credit exposure related to its customers.

Property and Equipment

Property and equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and amortization. Leasehold improvements are amortized on a straight-line basis over the shorter of the lease terms or the useful lives of the respective assets.

Depreciation is computed on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful lives of: 3 to 7 years for transportation and other equipment; 5 to 10 years for office furniture and equipment; and 15 to 40 years or life of lease, whichever is shorter, for buildings and leasehold improvements.

Intangible Assets

Intangible assets consist of covenants not to compete. Amortization is provided on the straight-line basis over the life of the covenant, which ranges from 5 to 7 years.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

The amounts recorded for financial instruments in the Company’s consolidated financial statements, which include cash and cash equivalents, short-term investments, accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued liabilities approximate fair value as of July 31, 2005 and 2004.

Income Taxes

Income taxes are accounted for under the asset and liability method. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases and operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date.

Net Income Per Share

Basic net income per share amounts were computed by dividing net income by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding. Diluted net income per share amounts were computed by dividing net income by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding plus dilutive potential common shares calculated for stock options outstanding using the treasury stock method.

Stock-Based Compensation

The Company accounts for its stock-based employee compensation plans using the intrinsic-value-based method prescribed by Accounting Principles Board Opinion No. 25, “Accounting for Stock Issued to Employees” (“APB 25”), and related interpretations, as allowed under Financial Accounting Standards

53




COPART, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)
July 31, 2005, 2004 and 2003

(2)  Summary of Significant Accounting Policies and Practices (Continued)

Board Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (“SFAS”) No. 123, “Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation” (“SFAS 123”) as amended by SFAS No. 148, “Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation—Transition and Disclosure” (“ SFAS 148”). Accordingly, compensation cost is measured as the excess, if any, of the fair value of the Company’s stock at the date of the grant over the price the employee must pay to acquire the stock. Options granted to consultants and other non-employees are accounted for at fair value.

Pro forma information regarding net income and net income per share is required by SFAS No. 123, and has been determined as if the Company had accounted for options granted under its plans using the fair value method. For these purposes, the fair value of options issued under the plans was estimated at the date of grant using a Black-Scholes option pricing model with the following assumptions: no dividend yield, volatility factor of the expected market price of the Company’s stock of 0.40, a forfeiture rate of 0.08, a weighted-average expected life of the options of five years and a risk-free interest rate of 3.7%, 3.3% and 2.9% for 2005, 2004 and 2003, respectively. The weighted average fair value of options granted were $5.13, $3.57 and $2.93, for 2005, 2004 and 2003, respectively. For purposes of pro forma disclosures, the estimated fair value of the options is amortized to expense over the options vesting period. The effects of applying SFAS No. 123 in this pro forma disclosure are not necessarily indicative of future results.

The Company’s pro forma information related to option grants to employees as calculated in accordance with SFAS 123 and SFAS 148 is as follows: