DAC » Topics » Vessel Lives and Estimated Scrap Values

This excerpt taken from the DAC 6-K filed Aug 12, 2009.

Vessel Lives and Estimated Scrap Values

        Our vessels represent our most significant assets and we state them at our historical cost, which includes capitalized interest during construction and other construction, design, supervision and predelivery costs, less accumulated depreciation. We depreciate our containerships, and for the periods prior to their sale, our drybulk carriers, on a straight-line basis over their estimated remaining useful economic lives. Historically, we estimated this to be 25 years. As of January 1, 2005, we determined that the estimated useful lives of our containerships are 30 years in line with the industry practice, whereas for drybulk carriers we continued to estimate their useful lives to be 25 years. Depreciation is based on cost less the estimated scrap value of the vessels. Should certain factors or circumstances cause us to revise our estimate of vessel service lives in the future or of estimated scrap values, depreciation expense could be materially lower or higher. Such factors include, but are not limited to, the extent of cash flows generated from future charter arrangements, changes in international shipping requirements, and other factors many of which are outside of our control.

This excerpt taken from the DAC 20-F filed Jul 13, 2009.

Vessel Lives and Estimated Scrap Values

        Our vessels represent our most significant assets and we state them at our historical cost, which includes capitalized interest during construction and other construction, design, supervision and predelivery costs, less accumulated depreciation. We depreciate our containerships, and for the periods prior to their sale, our drybulk carriers, on a straight-line basis over their estimated remaining useful economic lives. Historically, we estimated this to be 25 years. As of January 1, 2005, we determined that the estimated useful lives of our containerships are 30 years in line with the industry practice, whereas for drybulk carriers we continued to estimate their useful lives to be 25 years. Depreciation is based on cost less the estimated scrap value of the vessels. Should certain factors or circumstances cause us to revise our estimate of vessel service lives in the future or of estimated scrap values, depreciation expense could be materially lower or higher. Such factors include, but are not limited to, the extent of cash flows generated from future charter arrangements, changes in international shipping requirements, and other factors many of which are outside of our control.

This excerpt taken from the DAC 6-K filed Jun 20, 2008.

Vessel Lives and Estimated Scrap Values

        Our vessels represent our most significant assets and we state them at our historical cost, which includes capitalized interest during construction and other construction, design, supervision and

59


predelivery costs, less accumulated depreciation. We depreciate our containerships, and for the periods prior to their sale, our drybulk carriers, on a straight-line basis over their estimated remaining useful economic lives. Historically, we estimated this to be 25 years. As of January 1, 2005, we determined that the estimated useful lives of our containerships are 30 years in line with the industry practice, whereas for drybulk carriers we continued to estimate their useful lives to be 25 years. Depreciation is based on cost less the estimated scrap value of the vessels. Should certain factors or circumstances cause us to revise our estimate of vessel service lives in the future or of estimated scrap values, depreciation expense could be materially lower or higher. Such factors include, but are not limited to, the extent of cash flows generated from future charter arrangements, changes in international shipping requirements, and other factors many of which are outside of our control.

This excerpt taken from the DAC 20-F filed Apr 7, 2008.

Vessel Lives and Estimated Scrap Values

        Our vessels represent our most significant assets and we state them at our historical cost, which includes capitalized interest during construction and other construction, design, supervision and

59


predelivery costs, less accumulated depreciation. We depreciate our containerships, and for the periods prior to their sale, our drybulk carriers, on a straight-line basis over their estimated remaining useful economic lives. Historically, we estimated this to be 25 years. As of January 1, 2005, we determined that the estimated useful lives of our containerships are 30 years in line with the industry practice, whereas for drybulk carriers we continued to estimate their useful lives to be 25 years. Depreciation is based on cost less the estimated scrap value of the vessels. Should certain factors or circumstances cause us to revise our estimate of vessel service lives in the future or of estimated scrap values, depreciation expense could be materially lower or higher. Such factors include, but are not limited to, the extent of cash flows generated from future charter arrangements, changes in international shipping requirements, and other factors many of which are outside of our control.

This excerpt taken from the DAC 20-F filed Apr 4, 2008.

Vessel Lives and Estimated Scrap Values

        Our vessels represent our most significant assets and we state them at our historical cost, which includes capitalized interest during construction and other construction, design, supervision and

59


predelivery costs, less accumulated depreciation. We depreciate our containerships, and for the periods prior to their sale, our drybulk carriers, on a straight-line basis over their estimated remaining useful economic lives. Historically, we estimated this to be 25 years. As of January 1, 2005, we determined that the estimated useful lives of our containerships are 30 years in line with the industry practice, whereas for drybulk carriers we continued to estimate their useful lives to be 25 years. Depreciation is based on cost less the estimated scrap value of the vessels. Should certain factors or circumstances cause us to revise our estimate of vessel service lives in the future or of estimated scrap values, depreciation expense could be materially lower or higher. Such factors include, but are not limited to, the extent of cash flows generated from future charter arrangements, changes in international shipping requirements, and other factors many of which are outside of our control.

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