DCO » Topics » Critical Accounting Policies

These excerpts taken from the DCO 10-K filed Feb 25, 2009.

Critical Accounting Policies

Critical accounting policies are those accounting policies that can have a significant impact on the presentation of our financial condition and results of operations, and that require the use of subjective estimates based upon past experience and management’s judgment. Because of the uncertainty inherent in such estimates, actual results may differ from these estimates. Below are those policies applied in preparing our financial statements that management believes are the most dependent on the application of estimates and assumptions. For additional accounting policies, see Note 1 of “Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.”

Revenue Recognition

The Company recognizes revenue when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, the price is fixed or determinable, collection is reasonably assured and delivery of products has occurred or services have been rendered. Revenue from products sold under long-term contracts is recognized by the Company on the same basis as other sale transactions. The Company recognizes revenue on the sale of services (including prototype products) based on the type of contract: time and materials, cost-plus reimbursement and firm-fixed price. Revenue is recognized (i) on time and materials contracts as time is spent at hourly rates, which

 

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are negotiated with customers, plus the cost of any allowable materials and out-of-pocket expenses, (ii) on cost-plus reimbursement contracts based on direct and indirect costs incurred plus a negotiated profit calculated as a percentage of cost, a fixed amount or a performance-based award fee, and (iii) on fixed-price service contracts on the percentage-of-completion method measured by the percentage of costs incurred to estimated total costs.

Provision for Estimated Losses on Contracts

The Company records provisions for estimated losses on contracts in the period in which such losses are identified. The provisions for estimated losses on contracts require management to make certain estimates and assumptions, including those with respect to the future revenue under a contract and the future cost to complete the contract. Management’s estimate of the future cost to complete a contract may include assumptions as to improvements in manufacturing efficiency and reductions in operating and material costs. If any of these or other assumptions and estimates do not materialize in the future, the Company may be required to record additional provisions for estimated losses on contracts.

Goodwill

The Company’s business acquisitions have resulted in goodwill. In assessing the recoverability of the Company’s goodwill, management must make assumptions regarding estimated future cash flows, comparable company analyses, discount rates and other factors to determine the fair value of the respective assets. If actual results do not meet these estimates, if these estimates or their related assumptions change in the future, or if adverse equity market conditions cause a decrease in current market multiples and the Company’s stock price the Company may be required to record additional impairment charges for these assets. In the event that a goodwill impairment charge is required, it could adversely affect the operating results and financial position of the Company.

Other Intangible Assets

The Company amortizes purchased other intangible assets with finite lives using the straight-line method over the estimated economic lives of the assets, ranging from one to fourteen years. The value of other intangibles acquired through business combinations has been estimated using present value techniques which involve estimates of future cash flows. Actual results could vary, potentially resulting in impairment charges.

Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation

The Company uses a Black-Scholes valuation model in determining the stock-based compensation expense for options, net of an estimated forfeiture rate, on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period of the award. The Company has two award populations, one with an option vesting term of four years and the other with an option vesting term of one year. The Company estimated the forfeiture rate based on its historic experience.

 

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For performance and restricted stock units the Company calculates compensation expense, net of an estimated forfeiture rate, on a straight line basis over the requisite service/performance period of the awards. The performance stock units vest based on a three-year cumulative performance cycle. The Company has two restricted stock units, one restricted stock unit vests at the end of five years and the other restricted stock unit vests equally over a three year period ending in 2011. The Company estimated the forfeiture rate based on its historic experience.

Inventories

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or market, cost being determined on a first-in, first-out basis. Inventoried costs include raw materials, outside processing, direct labor and allocated overhead, adjusted for any abnormal amounts of idle facility expense, freight, handling costs, and wasted materials (spoilage) incurred, but do not include any selling, general and administrative expense. Costs under long-term contracts are accumulated into, and removed from, inventory on the same basis as other contracts. The Company assesses the inventory carrying value and reduces it, if necessary, to its net realizable value based on customer orders on hand, and internal demand forecasts using management’s best estimates given information currently available. The Company’s customer demand can fluctuate significantly caused by factors beyond the control of the Company. The Company maintains an allowance for potentially excess and obsolete inventories and inventories that are carried at costs that are higher than their estimated net realizable values. If market conditions are less favorable than those projected by management, such as an unanticipated decline in demand and not meeting expectations, inventory write-downs may be required.

Critical Accounting Policies

Critical accounting policies are those accounting policies that can have a significant impact on the presentation of our financial condition and results of operations, and that require the use of subjective estimates based upon past experience and management’s judgment. Because of the uncertainty inherent in such estimates, actual results may differ from these estimates. Below are those policies applied in preparing our financial statements that management believes are the most dependent on the application of estimates and assumptions. For additional accounting policies, see Note 1 of “Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.”

Revenue Recognition

The Company recognizes revenue when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, the price is fixed or determinable, collection is reasonably assured and delivery of products has occurred or services have been rendered. Revenue from products sold under long-term contracts is recognized by the Company on the same basis as other sale transactions. The Company recognizes revenue on the sale of services (including prototype products) based on the type of contract: time and materials, cost-plus reimbursement and firm-fixed price. Revenue is recognized (i) on time and materials contracts as time is spent at hourly rates, which

 

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are negotiated with customers, plus the cost of any allowable materials and out-of-pocket expenses, (ii) on cost-plus reimbursement contracts based on direct and indirect costs incurred plus a negotiated profit calculated as a percentage of cost, a fixed amount or a performance-based award fee, and (iii) on fixed-price service contracts on the percentage-of-completion method measured by the percentage of costs incurred to estimated total costs.

Provision for Estimated Losses on Contracts

The Company records provisions for estimated losses on contracts in the period in which such losses are identified. The provisions for estimated losses on contracts require management to make certain estimates and assumptions, including those with respect to the future revenue under a contract and the future cost to complete the contract. Management’s estimate of the future cost to complete a contract may include assumptions as to improvements in manufacturing efficiency and reductions in operating and material costs. If any of these or other assumptions and estimates do not materialize in the future, the Company may be required to record additional provisions for estimated losses on contracts.

Goodwill

The Company’s business acquisitions have resulted in goodwill. In assessing the recoverability of the Company’s goodwill, management must make assumptions regarding estimated future cash flows, comparable company analyses, discount rates and other factors to determine the fair value of the respective assets. If actual results do not meet these estimates, if these estimates or their related assumptions change in the future, or if adverse equity market conditions cause a decrease in current market multiples and the Company’s stock price the Company may be required to record additional impairment charges for these assets. In the event that a goodwill impairment charge is required, it could adversely affect the operating results and financial position of the Company.

Other Intangible Assets

The Company amortizes purchased other intangible assets with finite lives using the straight-line method over the estimated economic lives of the assets, ranging from one to fourteen years. The value of other intangibles acquired through business combinations has been estimated using present value techniques which involve estimates of future cash flows. Actual results could vary, potentially resulting in impairment charges.

Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation

The Company uses a Black-Scholes valuation model in determining the stock-based compensation expense for options, net of an estimated forfeiture rate, on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period of the award. The Company has two award populations, one with an option vesting term of four years and the other with an option vesting term of one year. The Company estimated the forfeiture rate based on its historic experience.

 

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For performance and restricted stock units the Company calculates compensation expense, net of an estimated forfeiture rate, on a straight line basis over the requisite service/performance period of the awards. The performance stock units vest based on a three-year cumulative performance cycle. The Company has two restricted stock units, one restricted stock unit vests at the end of five years and the other restricted stock unit vests equally over a three year period ending in 2011. The Company estimated the forfeiture rate based on its historic experience.

Inventories

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or market, cost being determined on a first-in, first-out basis. Inventoried costs include raw materials, outside processing, direct labor and allocated overhead, adjusted for any abnormal amounts of idle facility expense, freight, handling costs, and wasted materials (spoilage) incurred, but do not include any selling, general and administrative expense. Costs under long-term contracts are accumulated into, and removed from, inventory on the same basis as other contracts. The Company assesses the inventory carrying value and reduces it, if necessary, to its net realizable value based on customer orders on hand, and internal demand forecasts using management’s best estimates given information currently available. The Company’s customer demand can fluctuate significantly caused by factors beyond the control of the Company. The Company maintains an allowance for potentially excess and obsolete inventories and inventories that are carried at costs that are higher than their estimated net realizable values. If market conditions are less favorable than those projected by management, such as an unanticipated decline in demand and not meeting expectations, inventory write-downs may be required.

Critical Accounting Policies

STYLE="margin-top:6px;margin-bottom:0px; text-indent:4%" ALIGN="justify">Critical accounting policies are those accounting policies that can have a significant impact on the presentation of our financial
condition and results of operations, and that require the use of subjective estimates based upon past experience and management’s judgment. Because of the uncertainty inherent in such estimates, actual results may differ from these estimates.
Below are those policies applied in preparing our financial statements that management believes are the most dependent on the application of estimates and assumptions. For additional accounting policies, see Note 1 of “Notes to Consolidated
Financial Statements.”

Revenue Recognition

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="2">The Company recognizes revenue when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, the price is fixed or determinable, collection is reasonably assured and delivery of products has occurred or services have been
rendered. Revenue from products sold under long-term contracts is recognized by the Company on the same basis as other sale transactions. The Company recognizes revenue on the sale of services (including prototype products) based on the type of
contract: time and materials, cost-plus reimbursement and firm-fixed price. Revenue is recognized (i) on time and materials contracts as time is spent at hourly rates, which

 


25









are negotiated with customers, plus the cost of any allowable materials and out-of-pocket expenses, (ii) on cost-plus reimbursement contracts based on
direct and indirect costs incurred plus a negotiated profit calculated as a percentage of cost, a fixed amount or a performance-based award fee, and (iii) on fixed-price service contracts on the percentage-of-completion method measured by the
percentage of costs incurred to estimated total costs.

Provision for Estimated Losses on Contracts

STYLE="margin-top:6px;margin-bottom:0px; text-indent:4%" ALIGN="justify">The Company records provisions for estimated losses on contracts in the period in which such losses are identified. The provisions for
estimated losses on contracts require management to make certain estimates and assumptions, including those with respect to the future revenue under a contract and the future cost to complete the contract. Management’s estimate of the future
cost to complete a contract may include assumptions as to improvements in manufacturing efficiency and reductions in operating and material costs. If any of these or other assumptions and estimates do not materialize in the future, the Company may
be required to record additional provisions for estimated losses on contracts.

Goodwill

STYLE="margin-top:6px;margin-bottom:0px; text-indent:4%" ALIGN="justify">The Company’s business acquisitions have resulted in goodwill. In assessing the recoverability of the Company’s goodwill,
management must make assumptions regarding estimated future cash flows, comparable company analyses, discount rates and other factors to determine the fair value of the respective assets. If actual results do not meet these estimates, if these
estimates or their related assumptions change in the future, or if adverse equity market conditions cause a decrease in current market multiples and the Company’s stock price the Company may be required to record additional impairment charges
for these assets. In the event that a goodwill impairment charge is required, it could adversely affect the operating results and financial position of the Company.

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="2">Other Intangible Assets

The Company amortizes purchased other intangible assets with
finite lives using the straight-line method over the estimated economic lives of the assets, ranging from one to fourteen years. The value of other intangibles acquired through business combinations has been estimated using present value techniques
which involve estimates of future cash flows. Actual results could vary, potentially resulting in impairment charges.

Accounting for Stock-Based
Compensation

The Company uses a Black-Scholes valuation model in determining the stock-based compensation expense for
options, net of an estimated forfeiture rate, on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period of the award. The Company has two award populations, one with an option vesting term of four years and the other with an option vesting term of
one year. The Company estimated the forfeiture rate based on its historic experience.

 


26








For performance and restricted stock units the Company calculates compensation expense,
net of an estimated forfeiture rate, on a straight line basis over the requisite service/performance period of the awards. The performance stock units vest based on a three-year cumulative performance cycle. The Company has two restricted stock
units, one restricted stock unit vests at the end of five years and the other restricted stock unit vests equally over a three year period ending in 2011. The Company estimated the forfeiture rate based on its historic experience.

STYLE="margin-top:18px;margin-bottom:0px">Inventories

Inventories are stated
at the lower of cost or market, cost being determined on a first-in, first-out basis. Inventoried costs include raw materials, outside processing, direct labor and allocated overhead, adjusted for any abnormal amounts of idle facility expense,
freight, handling costs, and wasted materials (spoilage) incurred, but do not include any selling, general and administrative expense. Costs under long-term contracts are accumulated into, and removed from, inventory on the same basis as other
contracts. The Company assesses the inventory carrying value and reduces it, if necessary, to its net realizable value based on customer orders on hand, and internal demand forecasts using management’s best estimates given information currently
available. The Company’s customer demand can fluctuate significantly caused by factors beyond the control of the Company. The Company maintains an allowance for potentially excess and obsolete inventories and inventories that are carried at
costs that are higher than their estimated net realizable values. If market conditions are less favorable than those projected by management, such as an unanticipated decline in demand and not meeting expectations, inventory write-downs may be
required.

Critical Accounting Policies

STYLE="margin-top:6px;margin-bottom:0px; text-indent:4%" ALIGN="justify">Critical accounting policies are those accounting policies that can have a significant impact on the presentation of our financial
condition and results of operations, and that require the use of subjective estimates based upon past experience and management’s judgment. Because of the uncertainty inherent in such estimates, actual results may differ from these estimates.
Below are those policies applied in preparing our financial statements that management believes are the most dependent on the application of estimates and assumptions. For additional accounting policies, see Note 1 of “Notes to Consolidated
Financial Statements.”

Revenue Recognition

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="2">The Company recognizes revenue when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, the price is fixed or determinable, collection is reasonably assured and delivery of products has occurred or services have been
rendered. Revenue from products sold under long-term contracts is recognized by the Company on the same basis as other sale transactions. The Company recognizes revenue on the sale of services (including prototype products) based on the type of
contract: time and materials, cost-plus reimbursement and firm-fixed price. Revenue is recognized (i) on time and materials contracts as time is spent at hourly rates, which

 


25









are negotiated with customers, plus the cost of any allowable materials and out-of-pocket expenses, (ii) on cost-plus reimbursement contracts based on
direct and indirect costs incurred plus a negotiated profit calculated as a percentage of cost, a fixed amount or a performance-based award fee, and (iii) on fixed-price service contracts on the percentage-of-completion method measured by the
percentage of costs incurred to estimated total costs.

Provision for Estimated Losses on Contracts

STYLE="margin-top:6px;margin-bottom:0px; text-indent:4%" ALIGN="justify">The Company records provisions for estimated losses on contracts in the period in which such losses are identified. The provisions for
estimated losses on contracts require management to make certain estimates and assumptions, including those with respect to the future revenue under a contract and the future cost to complete the contract. Management’s estimate of the future
cost to complete a contract may include assumptions as to improvements in manufacturing efficiency and reductions in operating and material costs. If any of these or other assumptions and estimates do not materialize in the future, the Company may
be required to record additional provisions for estimated losses on contracts.

Goodwill

STYLE="margin-top:6px;margin-bottom:0px; text-indent:4%" ALIGN="justify">The Company’s business acquisitions have resulted in goodwill. In assessing the recoverability of the Company’s goodwill,
management must make assumptions regarding estimated future cash flows, comparable company analyses, discount rates and other factors to determine the fair value of the respective assets. If actual results do not meet these estimates, if these
estimates or their related assumptions change in the future, or if adverse equity market conditions cause a decrease in current market multiples and the Company’s stock price the Company may be required to record additional impairment charges
for these assets. In the event that a goodwill impairment charge is required, it could adversely affect the operating results and financial position of the Company.

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="2">Other Intangible Assets

The Company amortizes purchased other intangible assets with
finite lives using the straight-line method over the estimated economic lives of the assets, ranging from one to fourteen years. The value of other intangibles acquired through business combinations has been estimated using present value techniques
which involve estimates of future cash flows. Actual results could vary, potentially resulting in impairment charges.

Accounting for Stock-Based
Compensation

The Company uses a Black-Scholes valuation model in determining the stock-based compensation expense for
options, net of an estimated forfeiture rate, on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period of the award. The Company has two award populations, one with an option vesting term of four years and the other with an option vesting term of
one year. The Company estimated the forfeiture rate based on its historic experience.

 


26








For performance and restricted stock units the Company calculates compensation expense,
net of an estimated forfeiture rate, on a straight line basis over the requisite service/performance period of the awards. The performance stock units vest based on a three-year cumulative performance cycle. The Company has two restricted stock
units, one restricted stock unit vests at the end of five years and the other restricted stock unit vests equally over a three year period ending in 2011. The Company estimated the forfeiture rate based on its historic experience.

STYLE="margin-top:18px;margin-bottom:0px">Inventories

Inventories are stated
at the lower of cost or market, cost being determined on a first-in, first-out basis. Inventoried costs include raw materials, outside processing, direct labor and allocated overhead, adjusted for any abnormal amounts of idle facility expense,
freight, handling costs, and wasted materials (spoilage) incurred, but do not include any selling, general and administrative expense. Costs under long-term contracts are accumulated into, and removed from, inventory on the same basis as other
contracts. The Company assesses the inventory carrying value and reduces it, if necessary, to its net realizable value based on customer orders on hand, and internal demand forecasts using management’s best estimates given information currently
available. The Company’s customer demand can fluctuate significantly caused by factors beyond the control of the Company. The Company maintains an allowance for potentially excess and obsolete inventories and inventories that are carried at
costs that are higher than their estimated net realizable values. If market conditions are less favorable than those projected by management, such as an unanticipated decline in demand and not meeting expectations, inventory write-downs may be
required.

This excerpt taken from the DCO 10-K filed Feb 25, 2008.

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Critical accounting policies are those accounting policies that can have a significant impact on the presentation of our financial condition and results of operations, and that require the use of subjective estimates based upon past experience and management’s judgment. Because of the uncertainty inherent in such estimates, actual results may differ from these estimates. Below are those policies applied in preparing our financial statements that management believes are the most dependent on the application of estimates and assumptions. For additional accounting policies, see Note 1 of “Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.”

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company recognizes revenue when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, the price is fixed or determinable, collection is reasonably assured and delivery of products has occurred or services have been rendered. Revenue from products sold under long-term contracts is recognized by the Company on the same basis as other sale transactions. The Company recognizes revenue on the sale of services (including prototype products) based on the type of contract: time and materials, cost-plus reimbursement and firm-fixed price. Revenue

 

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is recognized (i) on time and materials contracts as time is spent at hourly rates, which are negotiated with customers, plus the cost of any allowable materials and out-of-pocket expenses, (ii) on cost-plus reimbursement contracts based on direct and indirect costs incurred plus a negotiated profit calculated as a percentage of cost, a fixed amount or a performance-based award fee, and (iii) on fixed-price service contracts on the percentage-of-completion method measured by the percentage of costs incurred to estimated total costs.

 

Provision for Estimated Losses on Contracts

 

The Company records provisions for estimated losses on contracts in the period in which such losses are identified. The provisions for estimated losses on contracts require management to make certain estimates and assumptions, including those with respect to the future revenue under a contract and the future cost to complete the contract. Management’s estimate of the future cost to complete a contract may include assumptions as to improvements in manufacturing efficiency and reductions in operating and material costs. If any of these or other assumptions and estimates do not materialize in the future, the Company may be required to record additional provisions for estimated losses on contracts.

 

Goodwill

 

The Company’s business acquisitions have resulted in goodwill. In assessing the recoverability of the Company’s goodwill, management must make assumptions regarding estimated future cash flows, comparable company analyses, discount rates and other factors to determine the fair value of the respective assets. If these estimates or their related assumptions change in the future, the Company may be required to record impairment charges for these assets. In the event that a goodwill impairment charge is required, it would adversely affect the operating results and financial position of the Company.

 

Other Intangible Assets

 

The Company amortizes purchased other intangible assets with finite lives using the straight-line method over the estimated economic lives of the assets, ranging from one to fourteen years. The value of other intangibles acquired through business combinations has been estimated using present value techniques which involve estimates of future cash flows. Actual results could vary, potentially resulting in impairment charges.

 

Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation

 

For stock options the Company uses a Black-Scholes valuation model in determining the compensation expense, net of an estimated forfeiture rate, on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period of the award. The Company has two identified award populations, one with an option vesting term of four years and the other with an option vesting term of one year. The Company estimated the forfeiture rate based on its historic experience.

 

For performance and restricted stock units the Company calculates compensation expense, net of an estimated forfeiture rate, on a straight line basis over the requisite service/performance period of the awards. The performance stock units vest based on a three-year cumulative performance cycle. The restricted stock units vest at the end of five years. The Company estimated the forfeiture rate based on it historic experience.

 

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Inventories

 

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or market, cost being determined on a first-in, first-out basis. Inventoried costs include raw materials, outside processing, direct labor and allocated overhead, adjusted for any abnormal amounts of idle facility expense, freight, handling costs, and wasted materials (spoilage) incurred, but do not include any selling, general and administrative expense. Costs under long-term contracts are accumulated into, and removed from, inventory on the same basis as other contracts. The Company assesses the inventory carrying value and reduces it if necessary to its net realizable value based on customer orders on hand, and internal demand forecasts using management’s best estimates given information currently available. The Company’s customer demand can fluctuate significantly caused by factors beyond the control of the Company. The Company maintains an allowance for potentially excess and obsolete inventories and inventories that are carried at costs that are higher than their estimated net realizable values. If market conditions are less favorable than those projected by management, such as an unanticipated decline in demand and not meeting expectations, inventory write-downs may be required.

 

This excerpt taken from the DCO 10-K filed Feb 27, 2007.

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Critical accounting policies are those accounting policies that can have a significant impact on the presentation of our financial condition and results of operations, and that require the use of subjective estimates based upon past experience and management’s judgment. Because of the uncertainty inherent in such estimates, actual results may differ from these estimates. Below are those policies applied in preparing our financial statements that

 

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management believes are the most dependent on the application of estimates and assumptions. For additional accounting policies, see Note 1 of “Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.”

 

Revenue Recognition

 

Except for the Company’s Miltec subsidiary, the Company recognizes revenue when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, the price is fixed or determinable, collection is reasonably assured and delivery of products has occurred or services have been rendered. Revenue from products sold under long-term contracts is recognized by the Company on the same basis as other sale transactions. The Company recognizes revenue on the sale of services (including prototype products) by its Miltec subsidiary based on the type of contract: time and materials, cost-plus reimbursement and firm-fixed price. Revenue is recognized by Miltec (i) on time and materials contracts as time is spent at hourly rates, which are negotiated with customers, plus the cost of any allowable materials and out-of-pocket expenses, (ii) on cost-plus reimbursement contracts based on direct and indirect costs incurred plus a negotiated profit calculated as a percentage of cost, a fixed amount or a performance-based award fee, and (iii) on fixed-price contracts on the percentage-of-completion method measured by the percentage of costs incurred to estimated total costs.

 

Provision for Estimated Losses on Contracts

 

The Company records provisions for estimated losses on contracts in the period in which such losses are identified. The provisions for estimated losses on contracts require management to make certain estimates and assumptions, including those with respect to the future revenue under a contract and the future cost to complete the contract. Management’s estimate of the future cost to complete a contract may include assumptions as to improvements in manufacturing efficiency and reductions in operating and material costs. If any of these or other assumptions and estimates do not materialize in the future, the Company may be required to record additional provisions for estimated losses on contracts.

 

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

 

The Company maintains an allowance for doubtful accounts for estimated losses from the inability of customers to make required payments. The allowance for doubtful accounts is evaluated periodically based on the aging of accounts receivable, the financial condition of customers and their payment history, historical write-off experience and other assumptions. The determination of the allowance for doubtful accounts requires management to make estimates as to these and other factors on the ultimate realization of accounts receivable. These estimates historically have not resulted in material adjustments in subsequent periods when the estimates were adjusted to actual amounts.

 

Goodwill

 

The Company’s business acquisitions have resulted in goodwill. In assessing the recoverability of the Company’s goodwill, management must make assumptions regarding estimated future cash flows, comparable company analyses, and other factors to determine the fair value of the respective assets. If these estimates or their related assumptions change in the future, the Company may be required to record impairment charges for these assets. In the event that a goodwill impairment charge is required, it would adversely affect the operating results and financial position of the Company.

 

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Other Intangible Assets

 

The Company amortizes purchased other intangible assets with finite lives using the straight-line method over the estimated economic lives of the assets, ranging from one to fourteen years. The value of other intangibles acquired through business combinations has been estimated using present value techniques which involve estimates of future cash flows. Actual results could vary, potentially resulting in impairment charges.

 

Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation

 

Effective January 1, 2006, the Company began recognizing compensation expense for share-based payment transactions in the financial statements at their fair value. The expense is measured at the grant date, based on the calculated fair value of the share-based award, and is recognized over the requisite service period (generally the vesting period of the equity award). Prior to January 1, 2006, the Company accounted for share-based compensation based on the intrinsic value of options at the grant date. The transition to fair value was accounted for using the modified prospective method. Therefore, financial statement amounts for prior periods presented in this Form 10-K have not been restated to reflect the fair value method of recognizing compensation cost relating to stock options.

 

Inventories

 

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or market, cost being determined on a first-in, first-out basis. Inventoried costs include raw materials, outside processing, direct labor and allocated overhead, adjusted for any abnormal amounts of idle facility expense, freight, handling costs, and wasted materials (spoilage) incurred, but do not include any selling, general and administrative expense. Costs under long-term contracts are accumulated into, and removed from, inventory on the same basis as other contracts. The Company assesses the inventory carrying value and reduces it if necessary to its net realizable value based on customer orders on hand, and internal demand forecasts using management’s best estimates given information currently available. The Company’s customer demand can fluctuate significantly caused by factors beyond the control of the Company. The Company maintains an allowance for potentially excess and obsolete inventories and inventories that are carried at costs that are higher than their estimated net realizable values. If market conditions are less favorable than those projected by management, such as an unanticipated decline in demand and not meeting expectations, inventory write-downs may be required.

 

This excerpt taken from the DCO 10-Q filed Oct 31, 2006.

Critical Accounting Policies

Critical accounting policies are those accounting policies that can have a significant impact on the presentation of our financial condition and results of operations, and that require the use of subjective estimates based upon past experience and management’s judgment. Because of the uncertainty inherent in such estimates, actual results may differ from these estimates. The Company’s critical accounting polices are included in its Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2005 and have not changed except as noted below. For additional accounting policies, see Note 1 of “Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.”

Revenue Recognition

Except for the Company’s Miltec subsidiary, the Company recognizes revenue when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, the price is fixed or determinable, collection is reasonably assured and delivery of products has occurred or services have been rendered. Revenue from products sold under long-term contracts is recognized by the Company on the same basis as other sale transactions. The Company recognizes revenue on the sale of services (including prototype products) by its Miltec subsidiary based on the type of contract: time and materials, cost-plus reimbursement and firm-fixed price. Revenue is recognized by Miltec (i) on time and materials contracts as time is spent at hourly rates, which are negotiated with customers, plus the cost of any allowable materials and out-of-pocket expenses, (ii) on cost-plus reimbursement contracts based on direct and indirect costs incurred plus a negotiated profit calculated as a percentage of cost, a fixed amount or a performance-based award fee, and (iii) on fixed-price contracts on the percentage-of-completion method measured by the percentage of costs incurred to estimated total costs.

Goodwill

The Company’s business acquisitions have resulted in goodwill. In assessing the recoverability of the Company’s goodwill, management must make assumptions regarding estimated future cash flows

 

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and other factors to determine the fair value of the respective assets. If these estimates or their related assumptions change in the future, the Company may be required to record impairment charges for these assets. In the event that a goodwill impairment charge is required, it would adversely affect the operating results and financial condition of the Company.

Other Intangible Assets

The Company amortizes purchased other intangible assets with finite lives using the straight-line method over the estimated economic lives of the assets, ranging from one to fourteen years. The value of other intangibles acquired through business combinations has been estimated using present value techniques which involve estimates of future cash flows. Actual results could vary, potentially resulting in impairment charges.

Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation

Effective January 1, 2006, the Company began recognizing which compensation expense for share-based payment transactions in the financial statements at their fair value. The expense is measured at the grant date, based on the calculated fair value of the share-based award, and is recognized over the requisite service period (generally the vesting period of the equity award). Prior to January 1, 2006, the Company accounted for share-based compensation based upon the intrinsic value of options at the grant date. The Company transition to fair value was accounted for using the modified prospective method. Therefore, financial statement amounts for prior periods presented in this Form 10-Q have not been restated to reflect the fair value method of recognizing compensation cost relating to stock options.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

On September 15, 2006, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB or the “Board”) issued FASB Statement No. 157, Fair Value Measurements (“SFAS No. 157”), which addresses how companies should measure fair value when they are required to use a fair value measure for recognition or disclosure purposes under generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). As a result of SFAS No. 157 there is now a common definition of fair value to be used throughout GAAP. The FASB believes that the new standard will make the measurement of fair value more consistent and comparable and improve disclosures about those measures. Companies will need to adopt SFAS No. 157 for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after November 15, 2007.

On October 3, 2006, the FASB issued FASB Statement No. 158, Employers’ Accounting for Defined Benefit Pension and Other Postretirement Plans and amendment of FASB Statement No. 87, 88, 106, and 132(R.) (“SFAS No. 158”). This Statement requires an employer that is a business entity and

 

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sponsors one or more single-employer defined benefit plans to recognize the funded status of a benefit—measured as the difference between plan assets at fair value (with limited exceptions) and the benefit obligation—in its statement of financial position. SFAS No. 158 also requires employers to recognize as a component of other comprehensive income, net of tax, the gains or losses and prior service costs or credits that arise during the period but are not recognized as components of net periodic benefit cost pursuant to FASB Statement No. 87, Employers’ Accounting for Pensions, or No. 106, Employers’ Accounting for Postretirement Benefits Other Than Pensions.

On September 13, 2006, the Securities Exchange Commission (“SEC”) released the Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 108 (“SAB No. 108”). For a number of years, the SEC staff has expressed concern over the diversity of practice surrounding how public companies (and their auditors) quantify financial statement misstatements. SAB No. 108 addresses the diversity in quantification practices with respect to annual financial statements. The interpretations in SAB No. 108 express the staff’s views regarding the process of quantifying financial statement misstatement.

In July 2006, the FASB issued Final Interpretation No. 48 (“FIN No. 48”), “Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes,” an interpretation of SFAS No. 109. FIN No. 48 clarifies the accounting for income taxes by prescribing the minimum recognition threshold a tax position is required to meet before being recognized in the financial statements. FIN No. 48 also provides guidance on derecognition, measurement, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure and transition. In addition, FIN No. 48 excludes income taxes from the scope of SFAS No. 5, “Accounting for Contingencies.” FIN No. 48 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2006. Differences between the amounts recognized in the consolidated balance sheets prior to the adoption of FIN No. 48 and the amounts reported after adoption will be accounted for as a cumulative-effect adjustment recorded to the beginning balance of retained earnings. The Company is currently evaluating the effect that the adoption of FIN No. 48 will have on its results of operations and financial position.

In February 2006, the FASB issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 155, “Accounting for Certain Hybrid Financial Instruments” (“SFAS No. 155”). SFAS No. 155 amends SFAS No. 133 “Accounting for Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities” (“SFAS No. 133”), and SFAS No. 140 “Accounting for Transfers and Servicing of Financial Assets and Extinguishments of Liabilities” (“SFAS No. 140”) and addresses the application of SFAS No. 133 to beneficial interests in securitized financial assets. SFAS No. 155 establishes a requirement to evaluate interests in securitized financial assets to identify interests that are freestanding derivatives or that are hybrid financial instruments that contain an embedded derivative requiring bifurcation. Additionally, SFAS No. 155 permits fair value measurement for any hybrid financial instrument that contains an embedded derivative that otherwise

 

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would require bifurcation. SFAS No. 155 is effective for financial instruments acquired or issued after January 1, 2007. The adoption of SFAS No. 155 is not expected to have a material effect on the Company’s consolidated financial position and results of operations.

In November 2005, FASB issued FASB Staff Position (“FSP”) FAS 115-1 and FAS 124-1, “The Meaning of Other-Than-Temporary Impairment and Its Application to Certain Investments.” This FSP addresses the determination as to when an investment is considered impaired, whether that impairment is other than temporary, and the measurement of an impairment loss. The FSP also includes accounting considerations subsequent to the recognition of other-than-temporary impairment and requires certain disclosures about unrealized losses that have not been recognized as other-than-impairments. The guidance in this FSP is applicable to reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2005. The adoption of this FSP did not have a material effect on the Company’s consolidated financial position and results of operations.

In October 2005, the FASB announced that FSP No. 13-1, “Accounting for Rental Costs Incurred during a Construction Period.” This Position states that rental costs incurred during and after a construction period are for the right to control the use of a leased asset during and after construction of a leased asset, and that there is no distinction between the right to use a leased asset during the construction period and the right to use that asset after the construction period. This Position requires that rental costs associated with ground or building operating leases that are incurred during a construction period be recognized as rental expense, included in income from continuing operations. The Company adopted FSP No. 13-1 in January 2006. The adoption of FSP No. 13-1 did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial position and results of operations.

In May 2005, FASB issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 154, “Accounting Changes and Error Corrections – a replacement of APB Opinion No. 20 and FASB Statement No. 3.” This Statement requires the retrospective application to prior periods’ financial statements of changes in accounting principle, unless it is impracticable to determine either the period-specific effects or the cumulative effect of the change.

In November 2004, Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 151, “Inventory Costs, an Amendment of ARB No. 43, Chapter 4” (“SFAS No. 151”), was issued. The amendments made by SFAS No. 151 clarify that abnormal amounts of idle facility expense, freight, handling costs, and wasted materials (spoilage) should be recognized as current-period charges and require the allocation of fixed production overheads to inventory based on the normal capacity of the production facilities. The Company adopted SFAS No. 151 in January 2006. The adoption of SFAS No. 151 did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial position and results of operations.

 

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Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

Not applicable.

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures

The Company’s chief executive officer and chief financial officer have concluded, based on an evaluation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(c)), that such disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of the end of the period covered by this report. No change in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting occurred during the period covered by this report that has materially affected, or is reasonable likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

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This excerpt taken from the DCO 10-K filed Mar 1, 2006.

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Critical accounting policies are those accounting policies that can have a significant impact on the presentation of our financial condition and results of operations, and that require the use of subjective estimates based upon past experience and management’s judgment. Because of the uncertainty inherent in such estimates, actual results may differ from these estimates. Below are those policies applied in preparing our financial statements that management believes are the most dependent on the application of estimates and assumptions. For additional accounting policies, see Note 1 of “Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.”

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company recognizes revenue when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, the price is fixed or determinable, collection is reasonably assured and delivery of products has occurred or services have been rendered. Revenue is recognized under long-term contracts on the same basis as other sale transactions.

 

Provision for Estimated Losses on Contracts

 

The Company records provisions for estimated losses on contracts in the period in which such losses are identified. The provisions for estimated losses on contracts require management to make certain estimates and assumptions, including with respect to the future revenue under a contract and the future cost to complete the contract. Management’s estimate of the future cost to complete a contract may include assumptions as to improvements in manufacturing efficiency and reductions in operating and material costs. If any of these or other assumptions and estimates are not recognized in the future, the Company may be required to record additional provisions for estimated losses on contracts.

 

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

 

The Company maintains an allowance for doubtful accounts for estimated losses from the inability of customers to make required payments. The allowance for doubtful accounts is evaluated periodically based on the aging of accounts receivable, the financial condition of customers and their payment history, historical write-off experience and other assumptions. The determination of the allowance for doubtful accounts requires management to make estimates as to these and other factors on the ultimate realization of accounts receivable. These estimates historically have not resulted in material adjustments in subsequent periods when the estimates were adjusted to actual amounts.

 

Inventories

 

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or market, cost being determined on a first-in, first-out basis. Inventoried costs include raw materials, outside processing, direct labor and allocated overhead, but do not include any selling, general and administrative expense. Costs

 

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under long-term contracts are accumulated into, and removed from, inventory on the same basis as other contracts. The Company assesses the inventory carrying value and reduces it if necessary to its net realizable value based on customer orders on hand, and internal demand forecasts using management’s best estimates given information currently available. The Company’s customer demand is highly unpredictable, and can fluctuate significantly caused by factors beyond the control of the Company. The Company maintains an allowance for inventories for potentially excess and obsolete inventories and inventories that are carried at costs that are higher than their estimated net realizable values. If market conditions are less favorable than those projected by management, such as an unanticipated decline in demand not meeting expectations, inventory write-downs may be required.

 

Goodwill

 

The Company’s business acquisitions have typically resulted in goodwill, which affects the amount of possible impairment expense that the Company may incur. The determination of the value of goodwill requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the Company’s consolidated financial statements. The Company performs goodwill impairment tests on an annual basis in the fourth quarter and between annual tests, in certain circumstances, whenever events may indicate an impairment may have occurred. Goodwill is tested for impairment utilizing a two-step method. In the first step, the Company determines the fair value of the reporting unit using expected future discounted cash flows and other market valuation approaches. If the net book value of the reporting unit exceeds the fair value, the Company would then perform the second step of the impairment test which requires allocation of the reporting unit’s fair value of all of its assets and liabilities in a manner similar to a purchase price allocation, with any residual fair value being allocated to goodwill. The fair value of the goodwill is then compared to the carrying amount to determine impairment. An impairment charge will be recognized only when the implied fair value of a reporting unit, including goodwill, is less than its carrying amount. In assessing the recoverability of the Company’s goodwill, management must make assumptions regarding estimated future cash flows and other factors to determine the fair value of the respective assets. If these estimates or their related assumptions change in the future, the Company may be required to record impairment charges for these assets. In the event that a goodwill impairment charge is required, it would adversely affect the operating results and financial condition of the Company.

 

This excerpt taken from the DCO 10-Q filed Nov 1, 2005.

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Critical accounting policies are those accounting policies that can have a significant impact on the presentation of our financial condition and results of operations, and that require the use of subjective estimates based upon past experience and management’s judgment. Because of the uncertainty inherent in such estimates, actual results may differ from these estimates. Below are those policies applied in preparing our financial statements that management believes are the most dependent on the application of estimates and assumptions. For additional accounting policies, see Note 1 of “Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.”

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company recognizes revenue when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, the price is fixed or determinable, collection is reasonably assured and delivery of products has occurred or services have been rendered. Revenue is recognized under long-term contracts on the same basis as other sale transactions.

 

Provision for Estimated Losses on Contracts

 

The Company records provisions for estimated losses on contracts in the period in which such losses are identified. The provisions for estimated losses on contracts require management to make certain estimates and assumptions, including with respect to the future revenue under a contract and the future cost to complete the contract. Management’s estimate of the future cost to complete a contract may include assumptions as to improvements in manufacturing efficiency and reductions in operating

 

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and material costs. If any of these or other assumptions and estimates are not recognized in the future, the Company may be required to record additional provisions for estimated losses on contracts.

 

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

 

The Company maintains an allowance for doubtful accounts for estimated losses from the inability of customers to make required payments. The allowance for doubtful accounts is evaluated periodically based on the aging of accounts receivable, the financial condition of customers and their payment history, historical write-off experience and other assumptions. The determination of the allowance for doubtful accounts requires management to make estimates as to these and other factors on the ultimate realization of accounts receivable. These estimates historically have not resulted in material adjustments in subsequent periods when the estimates were adjusted to actual amounts.

 

Inventories

 

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or market, cost being determined on a first-in, first-out basis. Inventoried costs include raw materials, outside processing, direct labor and allocated overhead, but do not include any selling, general and administrative expense. Costs under long-term contracts are accumulated into, and removed from, inventory on the same basis as other contracts. The Company assesses the inventory carrying value and reduces it if necessary to its net realizable value based on customer orders on hand, and internal demand forecasts using management’s best estimates given information currently available. The Company’s customer demand is highly unpredictable, and can fluctuate significantly caused by factors beyond the control of the Company. The Company maintains an allowance for inventories for potentially excess and obsolete inventories and inventories that are carried at costs that are higher than their estimated net realizable values. If market conditions are less favorable than those projected by management, such as an unanticipated decline in demand not meeting expectations, inventory write-downs may be required.

 

Goodwill

 

The Company’s business acquisitions have typically resulted in goodwill, which affects the amount of possible impairment expense that the Company may incur. The determination of the value of goodwill requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the Company’s

 

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consolidated financial statements. The Company performs goodwill impairment tests on an annual basis in the fourth quarter and between annual tests, in certain circumstances, whenever events may indicate an impairment may have occurred. Goodwill is tested for impairment utilizing a two-step method. In the first step, the Company determines the fair value of the reporting unit using expected future discounted cash flows and other market valuation approaches. If the net book value of the reporting unit exceeds the fair value, the Company would then perform the second step of the impairment test which requires allocation of the reporting unit’s fair value of all of its assets and liabilities in a manner similar to a purchase price allocation, with any residual fair value being allocated to goodwill. The fair value of the goodwill is then compared to the carrying amount to determine impairment. An impairment charge will be recognized only when the implied fair value of a reporting unit, including goodwill, is less than its carrying amount. In assessing the recoverability of the Company’s goodwill, management must make assumptions regarding estimated future cash flows and other factors to determine the fair value of the respective assets. If these estimates or their related assumptions change in the future, the Company may be required to record impairment charges for these assets. In the event that a goodwill impairment charge is required, it would adversely affect the operating results and financial condition of the Company. Goodwill at October 1, 2005 and December 31, 2004 was $57,201,000.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In October 2005, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) announced that FSP No. 13-1, “Accounting for Rental Costs Incurred during a Construction Period,” is effective for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2005. This Position concludes that rental costs incurred during and after a construction period are for the right to control the use of a leased asset during and after construction of a lessee asset, and that there is no distinction between the right to use a leased asset during the construction period and the right to use that asset after the construction period. This Position requires that rental costs associated with ground or building operating leases that are incurred during a construction period be recognized as rental expense, included in income from continuing operations. We do not expect the adoption of FSP No. 13-1 to have an impact on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.

 

In May 2005, the FASB issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (“SFAS”) No. 154, “Accounting Changes and Error Corrections – a replacement of APB Opinion No. 20 and FASB Statement No. 3.” This Statement requires retrospective application to prior periods’ financial statements of changes in accounting principle, unless it is impracticable to determine either the period-specific effects or the cumulative effect of the change. This Statement will be effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2005. The Company will adopt

 

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this Statement when it becomes effective. The adoption of this Statement could have a significant impact on the Company’s financial results of operations and financial position, should there be a change in accounting principle once this Statement is implemented.

 

In December 2004, Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 123R, “Share-Based Payment” (“SFAS No. 123R”), which finalized the new accounting rules for share-based compensation including stock options, restricted stock and performance based equity compensation, was issued. SFAS No. 123R is an amendment to FASB Statement No. 123 and supersedes APB Opinion No. 25. SFAS No. 123R will be effective for the Company in the first quarter of 2006. Beginning in January 1, 2006 all stock options or other equity-based awards to employees or directors that vest or become exercisable must be accounted for under SFAS No. 123R. Management is in the process of assessing the impact SFAS No. 123R will have on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

On October 22, 2004, the President signed the American Jobs Creation Act of 2004 (“the Act”). For companies that pay income taxes on manufacturing activities in the U.S., the Act provides a deduction from taxable income equal to a stipulated percentage of qualified income from domestic production activities, which will be phased-in from 2005 through 2010. The Act also provides for a two-year phase-out of the existing extraterritorial income (“ETI”) exclusion now in place. The Company currently derives benefit from the ETI exclusion. The Act reduces the Company’s ETI exclusion for 2005 and 2006 to 80% and 60% of the otherwise allowable exclusion. No exclusion will be available in 2007 and beyond.

 

Under the guidance in FASB Staff Position No. FAS 109-1, the deduction for qualified domestic production activities will be treated as a “special deduction” as described in FASB Statement No. 109. As such, the special deduction has no effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities existing at the enactment date. Rather, the impact of this deduction will be reported in the period in which the deduction is claimed on our tax return.

 

In November 2004, Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 151, “Inventory Costs, an Amendment of ARB No. 43, Chapter 4” (“SFAS No. 151”), was issued. The amendments made by SFAS No. 151 clarify that abnormal amounts of idle facility expense, freight, handling costs, and wasted materials (spoilage) should be recognized as current-period charges and require the allocation of fixed production overheads to inventory based on the normal capacity of the production facilities. SFAS No. 151 will become effective for the Company beginning in fiscal 2006. Management is in the process of assessing the impact SFAS No. 151 will have on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

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This excerpt taken from the DCO 10-Q filed Aug 1, 2005.

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Critical accounting policies are those accounting policies that can have a significant impact on the presentation of our financial condition and results of operations, and that require the use of subjective estimates based upon past experience and management’s judgment. Because of the uncertainty inherent in such estimates, actual results may differ from these estimates. Below are those policies applied in preparing our financial statements that management believes are the most dependent on the application of estimates and assumptions. For additional accounting policies, see Note 1 of “Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.”

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company recognizes revenue when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, the price is fixed or determinable, collection is reasonably assured and delivery of products has occurred or services have been rendered. Revenue is recognized under long-term contracts on the same basis as other sale transactions.

 

Provision for Estimated Losses on Contracts

 

The Company records provisions for estimated losses on contracts in the period in which such losses are identified. The provisions for estimated losses on contracts require management to make certain estimates and assumptions, including with respect to the future revenue under a contract and the future cost to complete the contract. Management’s estimate of the future cost to complete a contract may include assumptions as to improvements in manufacturing efficiency and reductions in operating and material costs. If any of these or other assumptions and estimates are not recognized in the future, the Company may be required to record additional provisions for estimated losses on contracts.

 

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

 

The Company maintains an allowance for doubtful accounts for estimated losses from the inability of customers to make required payments. The allowance for doubtful accounts is evaluated periodically based on the aging of accounts receivable, the financial condition of customers and their payment history, historical write-off experience and other assumptions. The determination of the allowance for doubtful accounts requires management to make estimates as to these and other factors on the ultimate realization of accounts receivable. These estimates

 

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historically have not resulted in material adjustments in subsequent periods when the estimates were adjusted to actual amounts.

 

Inventories

 

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or market, cost being determined on a first-in, first-out basis. Inventoried costs include raw materials, outside processing, direct labor and allocated overhead, but do not include any selling, general and administrative expense. Costs under long-term contracts are accumulated into, and removed from, inventory on the same basis as other contracts. The Company assesses the inventory carrying value and reduces it if necessary to its net realizable value based on customer orders on hand, and internal demand forecasts using management’s best estimates given information currently available. The Company’s customer demand is highly unpredictable, and can fluctuate significantly caused by factors beyond the control of the Company. The Company maintains an allowance for inventories for potentially excess and obsolete inventories and inventories that are carried at costs that are higher than their estimated net realizable values. If market conditions are less favorable than those projected by management, such as an unanticipated decline in demand not meeting expectations, inventory write-downs may be required.

 

Goodwill

 

The Company’s business acquisitions have typically resulted in goodwill, which affects the amount of possible impairment expense that the Company may incur. The determination of the value of goodwill requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the Company’s consolidated financial statements. The Company performs goodwill impairment tests on an annual basis in the fourth quarter and between annual tests, in certain circumstances, whenever events may indicate an impairment may have occurred. Goodwill is tested for impairment utilizing a two-step method. In the first step, the Company determines the fair value of the reporting unit using expected future discounted cash flows and other market valuation approaches. If the net book value of the reporting unit exceeds the fair value, the Company would then perform the second step of the impairment test which requires allocation of the reporting unit’s fair value of all of its assets and liabilities in a manner similar to a purchase price allocation, with any residual fair value being allocated to goodwill. The fair value of the goodwill is then compared to the carrying amount to determine impairment. An impairment charge will be recognized only when the implied fair value of a reporting unit, including goodwill, is less than its carrying amount. In assessing the recoverability of the Company’s goodwill, management must make

 

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assumptions regarding estimated future cash flows and other factors to determine the fair value of the respective assets. If these estimates or their related assumptions change in the future, the Company may be required to record impairment charges for these assets. In the event that a goodwill impairment charge is required, it would adversely affect the operating results and financial condition of the Company. Goodwill at July 2, 2005 and December 31, 2004 was $57,201,000.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In December 2004, Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 123R, “Share-Based Payment” (“SFAS No. 123R”), which finalized the new accounting rules for share-based compensation including stock options, restricted stock and performance based equity compensation, was issued. SFAS No. 123R is an amendment to FASB Statement No. 123 and supersedes APB Opinion No. 25. SFAS No. 123R will be effective for the Company in the first quarter of 2006. Beginning in January 1, 2006 all stock options or other equity-based awards to employees or directors that vest or become exercisable must be accounted for under SFAS No. 123R. Management is in the process of assessing the impact SFAS No. 123R will have on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

On October 22, 2004, the President signed the American Jobs Creation Act of 2004 (“the Act”). For companies that pay income taxes on manufacturing activities in the U.S., the Act provides a deduction from taxable income equal to a stipulated percentage of qualified income from domestic production activities, which will be phased-in from 2005 through 2010. The Act also provides for a two-year phase-out of the existing extraterritorial income (“ETI”) exclusion now in place. The Company currently derives benefit from the ETI exclusion. The Act reduces the Company’s ETI exclusion for 2005 and 2006 to 80% and 60% of the otherwise allowable exclusion. No exclusion will be available in 2007 and beyond.

 

Under the guidance in FASB Staff Position No. FAS 109-1, the deduction for qualified domestic production activities will be treated as a “special deduction” as described in FASB Statement No. 109. As such, the special deduction has no effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities existing at the enactment date. Rather, the impact of this deduction will be reported in the period in which the deduction is claimed on our tax return.

 

In November 2004, Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 151, “Inventory Costs, an Amendment of ARB No. 43, Chapter 4” (“SFAS No. 151”), was issued. The amendments made by SFAS No. 151 clarify that abnormal amounts of idle facility expense, freight, handling costs, and wasted materials (spoilage) should be recognized as current-period charges and require the allocation of fixed

 

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production overheads to inventory based on the normal capacity of the production facilities. SFAS No. 151 will become effective for the Company beginning in fiscal 2006. Management is in the process of assessing the impact SFAS No. 151 will have on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

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