BOOM » Topics » Explosive Metalworking

This excerpt taken from the BOOM 8-K filed Oct 29, 2009.

Explosive Metalworking

DMC’s Explosive Metalworking segment recorded third quarter sales of $27.3 million compared with sales of $42.7 million in the same quarter a year ago.  Operating income was $3.4 million versus $8.6 million in the comparable year-ago quarter.  Adjusted EBITDA was $4.9 million versus $10.2 million in the third quarter of 2008. Order backlog at the Explosive Metalworking segment was $63 million versus $57 million at the end of this year’s second quarter.

 

This excerpt taken from the BOOM 8-K filed Jul 30, 2009.

Explosive Metalworking

Second quarter sales at DMC’s Explosive Metalworking segment were $31.6 million compared with sales of $53.0 million in the same quarter a year ago.  Operating income was $4.6 million versus $9.8 million in the comparable year-ago quarter.  Adjusted EBITDA was $6.0 million versus $12.5 million in the second quarter of 2008. Order backlog at the Explosive Metalworking segment was $57 million versus $74 million at the end of this year’s first quarter.

 

This excerpt taken from the BOOM 8-K filed Apr 30, 2009.

Explosive Metalworking

First quarter sales at DMC’s Explosive Metalworking segment were $43.5 million versus sales of $51.6 million in last year’s first quarter.  Operating income was $9.4 million versus $10.0 million in the comparable year-ago period.  Adjusted EBITDA was $10.9 million versus $12.4 million in the first quarter of 2008. The Explosive Metalworking segment finished the quarter with an order backlog of $74 million versus $97 million at December 31, 2008.

 

These excerpts taken from the BOOM 10-K filed Mar 13, 2009.

Explosive Metalworking

        The Explosive Metalworking segment seeks to build on its leadership position in its markets. During the year ended December 31, 2008, the Explosive Metalworking segment represented approximately 84% of our revenue. The four manufacturing plants and their respective shooting sites in Pennsylvania, Germany, France and Sweden provide the production capacity to address concurrent projects for DMC Clad's current domestic and international customer base.

        The primary product of the Explosive Metalworking segment is explosion-welded clad metal plate. Clad metal plates are used in the construction of heavy, corrosion resistant pressure vessels and heat exchangers for oil and gas, alternative energy, chemical and petrochemical, hydrometallurgy, aluminum production, shipbuilding, power generation, industrial refrigeration, and similar industries. The characteristics of DMC Clad's explosive metalworking processes may enable the development of new products in a variety of industries and DMC Clad continues to explore such development opportunities.

        The principal product of metal cladding, regardless of the process used, is a metal plate composed of two or more dissimilar metals, usually a corrosion resistant metal and steel, bonded together. Prior to the explosion-welded clad process, the materials are inspected, the mating surfaces are ground, and the metal plates are assembled for cladding. The process involves placing a sheet of the cladder over a parallel plate of backer material and then covering the cladder material with a layer of specifically formulated explosive. A small gap or "standoff space" is maintained between the alloy cladder and the backer substrate. The explosion is then initiated on one side of the cladder and travels across the surface of the cladder forcing it down onto the backer. The explosion happens in approximately one-thousandth of a second. The collision conditions cause a thin layer of the mating surfaces to be spalled away in a jet. This action removes oxides and surface contaminants immediately ahead of the collision point. The extreme pressures force the two metal components together, creating a metallurgical bond between them. The explosion-welded clad process produces a strong, ductile, continuous metallurgical weld over the clad surface. After the explosion is completed, the resulting clad plates are flattened and cut, and then undergo testing and inspection to assure conformance with internationally accepted product specifications.

6


Explosive Metalworking





        The Explosive Metalworking segment seeks to build on its leadership position in its markets. During the year ended December 31,
2008, the Explosive Metalworking segment represented approximately 84% of our revenue. The four manufacturing plants and their respective shooting sites in Pennsylvania, Germany, France and Sweden
provide the production capacity to address concurrent projects for DMC Clad's current domestic and international customer base.



        The
primary product of the Explosive Metalworking segment is explosion-welded clad metal plate. Clad metal plates are used in the construction of heavy, corrosion resistant pressure
vessels and heat exchangers for oil and gas, alternative energy, chemical and petrochemical, hydrometallurgy, aluminum production, shipbuilding, power generation, industrial refrigeration, and similar
industries. The characteristics of DMC Clad's explosive metalworking processes may enable the development of new products in a variety of industries and DMC Clad continues to explore such development
opportunities.



        The
principal product of metal cladding, regardless of the process used, is a metal plate composed of two or more dissimilar metals, usually a corrosion resistant metal and steel, bonded
together. Prior to the explosion-welded clad process, the materials are inspected, the mating surfaces are ground, and the metal plates are assembled for cladding. The process involves placing a sheet
of the cladder over a parallel plate of backer material and then covering the cladder material with a layer of specifically formulated explosive. A small gap or "standoff space" is maintained between
the alloy cladder and the backer substrate. The explosion is then initiated on one side of the cladder and travels across the surface of the cladder forcing it down onto the backer. The explosion
happens in approximately one-thousandth of a second. The collision conditions cause a thin layer of the mating surfaces to be spalled away in a jet. This action removes oxides and surface
contaminants immediately ahead of the collision point. The extreme pressures force the two metal components together, creating a metallurgical bond between them. The explosion-welded clad process
produces a strong, ductile, continuous metallurgical weld over the clad surface. After the explosion is completed, the resulting clad plates are flattened and cut, and then undergo testing and
inspection to assure conformance with internationally accepted product specifications.



6








This excerpt taken from the BOOM 8-K filed Mar 5, 2009.

Explosive Metalworking

 

Fourth quarter sales at the Company’s Explosive Metalworking segment were $47.7 million versus $50.2 million in the fourth quarter last year.  The decline is largely attributable to the previously noted delays in product shipments.  Operating income was $9.1 million versus $11.7 million in last year’s fourth quarter.  Adjusted EBITDA was $10.0 million versus $13.1 million in the fourth quarter of 2007.

 

Order backlog for the Explosive Metalworking segment at December 31, 2008, was $97 million versus $99 million reported at the end of the 2008 third quarter and $100 million recorded at the end of fiscal 2007.

 

 



 

This excerpt taken from the BOOM 8-K filed Oct 30, 2008.

Explosive Metalworking

 

Third quarter sales at the Company’s Explosive Metalworking segment increased 6% to $42.7 million from $40.3 million in the third quarter last year. The increase reflects a $5.6 million sales contribution from the clad business of DYNAenergetics’, which was acquired by DMC in November 2007. This contribution offset a $3.2 million decrease in sales at DMC’s legacy explosive metalworking divisions.  Operating income was $8.6 million versus $10.6 million in last year’s third quarter.  Adjusted EBITDA was $10.2 million versus $11.0 million in the third quarter a year-ago.

 

Order backlog for the explosive metalworking segment at the end of the third quarter was $99 million versus $105 million reported at the end of this year’s second quarter and $77 million recorded at the end of last year’s third quarter. Approximately $4 million of the sequential decrease in backlog was related to changes in foreign exchange rates.

 

This excerpt taken from the BOOM 8-K filed Jul 31, 2008.

Explosive Metalworking

 

Second quarter sales at the company’s Explosive Metalworking segment increased 60% to $53.0 million from $33.1 million in the second quarter last year.   The increase reflects an $8.6 million sales contribution from the explosive welding business of DYNAenergetics, as well as an $11.3 million, or 34%, increase in sales from DMC’s legacy explosion welding divisions.  Operating income increased 8% to $9.8 million from $9.0 million in last year’s second quarter.  Adjusted EBITDA increased 31% to $12.5 million from $9.5 million in the comparable year-ago quarter.

 

Order backlog at the end of the second quarter was $105 million, up from $102 million reported at the end of this year’s first quarter and $85 million recorded at the end of last year’s second quarter.

 



 

This excerpt taken from the BOOM 8-K filed May 1, 2008.

Explosive Metalworking

 

First quarter sales at the company’s Explosive Metalworking segment increased 64% to $51.6 million from $31.5 million in the first quarter last year.   The increase reflects a $10.7 million sales contribution from the explosive welding business of DYNAenergetics, as well as a $9.4 million increase in sales from DMC’s legacy explosion welding divisions.  Operating income increased 33% to $10.0 million from $7.5 million in last year’s first quarter.  Adjusted EBITDA increased 58% to $12.4 million from $7.8 million in the year-ago first quarter.

 



 

Order backlog at the end of the first quarter was a record $102.1 million, up from $100.0 million reported at the end of the last quarter and $67.9 million recorded at the end of last year’s first quarter.

 

These excerpts taken from the BOOM 10-K filed Mar 14, 2008.

Explosive Metalworking

        The Explosive Metalworking segment seeks to build on its leadership position in its markets. During the year ended December 31, 2007, the Explosive Metalworking segment represented approximately 94% of our revenue. The four manufacturing plants and their respective shooting sites in Pennsylvania, Germany, France and Sweden provide the production capacity to address concurrent projects for DMC Clad's current domestic and international customer base.

        The primary product of the Explosive Metalworking segment is explosion-welded clad metal plate. Clad metal plates are used in the construction of heavy, corrosion resistant pressure vessels and heat exchangers for oil and gas, alternative energy, chemical and petrochemical, hydrometallurgy, aluminum production, shipbuilding, power generation, industrial refrigeration and similar industries. The characteristics of DMC Clad's explosive metalworking processes may enable the development of new products in a variety of industries and DMC Clad continues to explore such development opportunities.

        The principal product of metal cladding, regardless of the process used, is a metal plate composed of two or more dissimilar metals, usually a corrosion resistant metal and steel, bonded together. Prior to the explosion-welded clad process, the materials are inspected, the mating surfaces are ground, and the metal plates are assembled for cladding. The process involves placing a sheet of the cladder over a parallel plate of backer material and then covering the cladder material with a layer of specifically formulated explosive. A small gap or "standoff space" is maintained between the alloy cladder and the backer substrate. The explosion is then initiated on one side of the cladder and travels across the surface of the cladder forcing it down onto the backer. The explosion happens in approximately one-thousandth of a second. The collision conditions cause a thin layer of the mating surfaces to be spalled away in a jet. This action removes oxides and surface contaminants immediately ahead of the collision point. The extreme pressures force the two metal components together, creating a metallurgical bond between them. The explosion-welded clad process produces a strong, ductile, continuous metallurgical weld over the clad surface. After the explosion is completed, the resulting clad plates are flattened and cut, and then undergo testing and inspection to assure conformance with internationally accepted product specifications.

6


Explosive Metalworking





        The Explosive Metalworking segment seeks to build on its leadership position in its markets. During the year ended December 31, 2007, the Explosive
Metalworking segment represented approximately 94% of our revenue. The four manufacturing plants and their respective shooting sites in Pennsylvania, Germany, France and Sweden provide the production
capacity to address concurrent projects for DMC Clad's current domestic and international customer base.



        The
primary product of the Explosive Metalworking segment is explosion-welded clad metal plate. Clad metal plates are used in the construction of heavy, corrosion resistant pressure
vessels and heat exchangers for oil and gas, alternative energy, chemical and petrochemical, hydrometallurgy, aluminum production, shipbuilding, power generation, industrial refrigeration and similar
industries. The characteristics of DMC Clad's explosive metalworking processes may enable the development of new products in a variety of industries and DMC Clad continues to explore such development
opportunities.



        The
principal product of metal cladding, regardless of the process used, is a metal plate composed of two or more dissimilar metals, usually a corrosion resistant metal and steel, bonded
together. Prior to the explosion-welded clad process, the materials are inspected, the mating surfaces are ground, and the metal plates are assembled for cladding. The process involves placing a sheet
of the cladder over a parallel plate of backer material and then covering the cladder material with a layer of specifically formulated explosive. A small gap or "standoff space" is maintained between
the alloy cladder and the backer substrate. The explosion is then initiated on one side of the cladder and travels across the surface of the cladder forcing it down onto the backer. The explosion
happens in approximately one-thousandth of a second. The collision conditions cause a thin layer of the mating surfaces to be spalled away in a jet. This action removes oxides and surface
contaminants immediately ahead of the collision point. The extreme pressures force the two metal components together, creating a metallurgical bond between them. The explosion-welded clad process
produces a strong, ductile, continuous metallurgical weld over the clad surface. After the explosion is completed, the resulting clad plates are flattened and cut, and then undergo testing and
inspection to assure conformance with internationally accepted product specifications.



6








This excerpt taken from the BOOM 8-K filed Mar 6, 2008.

Explosive Metalworking

The Company’s Explosive Metalworking segment reported fourth quarter sales of $50.2 million, up 48% from $34.0 million in the fourth quarter last year. Operating income increased 25% to $11.7 million from $9.4 million in the 2006 fourth quarter. The six weeks of contributions from DYNAenergetics’ explosion welding business included $4.4 million in fourth quarter revenue.  Order backlog at the end of fiscal 2007 was $100.0 million versus $68.8 million at Dec. 31, 2006, and $77.1 million at the end of the third quarter.  The acquisition of DYNAenergetics contributed $21.5 million to the 2007 year-end backlog.

 

This excerpt taken from the BOOM 8-K filed Oct 25, 2007.

Explosive Metalworking

The Company’s Explosive Metalworking segment reported third quarter sales of $40.3 million, up 72% from $23.5 million in the third quarter last year. Operating income increased 83% to $10.6 million from $5.8 million in the 2006 third quarter.  Order backlog at the end of this year’s third quarter was $77.1 million versus $68.8 million at December 31, 2006, and an all-time high $84.7 million at the end of the prior quarter.

 

This excerpt taken from the BOOM 8-K filed Jul 26, 2007.

Explosive Metalworking

The Company’s Explosive Metalworking segment reported second quarter sales of $33.1 million, up 24% from $26.6 million in the second quarter last year. Second quarter operating income increased 17% to $9.0 million from $7.7 million in the comparable year-ago quarter.  Order backlog at the end of the second quarter was a record $84.7 million, an increase of 62% from the backlog reported at the end of last year’s second quarter, and up 25% from the end of this year’s first quarter.

This excerpt taken from the BOOM 10-K filed Mar 8, 2007.

Explosive Metalworking

The Explosive Metalworking segment seeks to build on its leadership position in its markets.  The Explosive Metalworking segment currently represents approximately 95% of our revenue.  The three manufacturing plants and their respective shooting sites in Pennsylvania, France and Sweden provide the production capacity to address concurrent projects for DMC Clad’s current domestic and international customer base.

The primary product of the Explosive Metalworking segment is explosion-welded clad metal plate. Clad metal plates are used in the construction of heavy, corrosion resistant pressure vessels and heat exchangers for upstream oil and gas, oil refinery, chemical and petrochemical, hydrometallurgy, aluminum production, shipbuilding, power generation, industrial refrigeration and similar industries.  The characteristics of DMC Clad’s explosive metalworking processes may enable the development of new products in a variety of industries and DMC Clad continues to explore such development opportunities.

The principal product of metal cladding, regardless of the process used, is a metal plate composed of two or more dissimilar metals, usually a corrosion resistant metal and steel, bonded together. Prior to the explosion-welded clad process, the materials are inspected, the mating surfaces are ground, and the metal plates are assembled for cladding. The process involves placing a sheet of the cladder over a parallel plate of backer material and then covering the cladder material with a layer of specifically formulated explosive. A small gap or “standoff space” is maintained between the alloy cladder and the backer substrate. The explosion is then initiated on one side of the cladder and travels across the surface of the cladder forcing it down onto the backer. The explosion happens in approximately one-thousandth of a second.  The collision conditions cause a thin layer of the mating surfaces to be spalled away in a jet.  This action removes oxides and surface contaminants immediately ahead of the collision point.  The extreme pressures force the two metal components together, creating a metallurgical bond between them.  The explosion-welded clad process produces a strong, ductile, continuous metallurgical weld over the clad surface.  After the explosion is completed, the resulting clad plates are flattened and cut, and then undergo testing and inspection to assure conformance with internationally accepted product specifications.

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This excerpt taken from the BOOM 10-K filed Mar 15, 2006.

Explosive Metalworking

 

The Explosive Metalworking segment seeks to build on its leadership position in its markets. The Explosive Metalworking segment currently represents approximately 95% of our revenue. The three manufacturing plants and their respective shooting sites in Pennsylvania, France and Sweden provide the production capacity to address concurrent projects for DMC Clad’s current domestic and international customer base.

 

The primary product of the Explosive Metalworking segment is explosion-welded clad metal plate. Clad metal plates are used in the construction of heavy, corrosion resistant pressure vessels and heat exchangers for upstream oil and gas, oil refinery, petrochemicals, hydrometallurgy, aluminum production, shipbuilding, power generation, industrial refrigeration and similar industries. The characteristics of DMC Clad’s explosive metalworking processes may enable the development of new products in a variety of industries and DMC Clad continues to explore such development opportunities.

 

The principal product of metal cladding, regardless of the process used, is a metal plate composed of two or more dissimilar metals, usually a corrosion resistant metal and steel, bonded together. Prior to the explosion-welded clad process, the materials are inspected, the mating surfaces are ground, and the metal plates are assembled for cladding. The process involves placing a sheet of the cladder over a parallel plate of backer material and then covering the cladder material with a layer of specifically formulated explosive. A small gap or “standoff space” is maintained between the alloy cladder and the backer substrate. The explosion is then initiated on one side of the cladder and travels across the surface of the cladder forcing it down onto the backer. The explosion happens in approximately one-thousandth of a second. The collision conditions cause a thin layer of the mating surfaces to be spalled away in a jet. This action removes oxides and surface contaminants immediately ahead of the collision point. The extreme pressures force the two metal components together, creating a metallurgical bond between them. The explosion-welded clad process produces a strong, ductile, continuous metallurgical weld over the clad surface. After the explosion is completed, the resulting clad plates are flattened and cut, and then undergo testing and inspection to assure conformance with internationally accepted product specifications.

 

5



 

This excerpt taken from the BOOM 10-K filed Mar 22, 2005.

Explosive Metalworking

 

The explosive metalworking business includes the use of explosives to perform metal cladding and shock synthesis of industrial diamonds. While metal cladding is a mature industry, DMC believes that the characteristics of its explosive metalworking processes may enable the development of new products in a variety of industries and continues to explore such development opportunities.

 

Metal Cladding. The principal product of metal cladding is a metal plate composed of two or more dissimilar metals, usually a corrosion resistant alloy and carbon steel, welded or clad together at the atomic level. High-energy metal cladding is performed by detonating an explosion on the surface of an assembly of two parallel metal plates, the cladding metal and the backing metal, separated by a “standoff space”. The explosive force creates a metallurgical bond between the two metal components. The technology is unique in that it can be used to weld non-compatible metals, which cannot be welded by conventional processes, such as titanium-steel, aluminum-steel, and aluminum-copper. It can also be

 

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used to weld compatible metals, such as stainless steels and nickel alloys to steel.  DMC Detacladâ is used in the fabrication of pressure vessels and heat exchangers for chemical and petrochemical processing, refining, mining, power generations, air conditioning (HVAC) and other industries where corrosion, temperature, and pressure combine to produce demanding environments. DMC Detacoupleâ bimetal welding transition joints are used in ship construction, and in a variety of electrochemical industries including aluminum smelting.

 

The Company’s clad metal products are primarily produced on a project-by-project basis conforming to requirements set forth in customer purchase orders. Upon receipt of an order, the Company obtains the component materials from a variety of sources based on quality, availability and cost. The company explosively bonds the metals in one of its three manufacturing plants (Mount Braddock, PA, USA; Rivesaltes, France and Likenas, Sweden). Final products are processed to meet contract specific requirements for product configuration and quality/inspection level. Maintaining DMC’s corporate culture and reputation for product quality and on-time delivery is a critical factor for management.

 

Shock Synthesis. DMC operates under an agreement to provide explosive shock synthesis services associated with the manufacture of industrial diamonds. Shock synthesis is one step in a series of operations required for production of industrial grade diamond abrasives.

 

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