EE » Topics » Application of SFAS No. 71

These excerpts taken from the EE 10-K filed Feb 27, 2009.

Application of SFAS No. 71

We apply the provisions of Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 71, “Accounting for the Effects of Certain Types of Regulation,” (“SFAS No. 71”) to our regulated operations in our Texas, New Mexico and FERC jurisdictions. SFAS No. 71 requires a rate regulated enterprise to reflect the economic impact of regulatory decisions in its financial statements. As a result, we record certain costs or obligations as either assets or liabilities on our balance sheet and amortize them in subsequent periods as they are reflected in regulated rates. The deferral of costs as regulatory assets is appropriate only when the future recovery of such costs is probable. The application of SFAS No. 71 requires our management to make assumptions and estimates as to the amount of costs that regulatory authorities will ultimately permit us to recover. In the event we determine that we can no longer apply SFAS No. 71 to all or a portion of our operations, either as (i) a result of the establishment of retail competition in our service territory; (ii) a change in the regulatory approach for setting rates from cost-based ratemaking to another form of ratemaking; or (iii) other regulatory actions that restrict cost recovery to a level insufficient to recover costs, we could be required to record a charge against income in the amount of the remaining unamortized net regulatory assets. Such an action could materially reduce our shareholders’ equity.

Application of SFAS No. 71

We apply the provisions of Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 71, “Accounting for the Effects of Certain Types of Regulation,” (“SFAS No. 71”) to our regulated operations in our Texas, New Mexico and FERC jurisdictions. SFAS No. 71 requires a rate regulated enterprise to reflect the economic impact of regulatory decisions in its financial statements. As a result, we record certain costs or obligations as either assets or liabilities on our balance sheet and amortize them in subsequent periods as they are reflected in regulated rates. The deferral of costs as regulatory assets is appropriate only when the future recovery of such costs is probable. The application of SFAS No. 71 requires our management to make assumptions and estimates as to the amount of costs that regulatory authorities will ultimately permit us to recover. In the event we determine that we can no longer apply SFAS No. 71 to all or a portion of our operations, either as (i) a result of the establishment of retail competition in our service territory; (ii) a change in the regulatory approach for setting rates from cost-based ratemaking to another form of ratemaking; or (iii) other regulatory actions that restrict cost recovery to a level insufficient to recover costs, we could be required to record a charge against income in the amount of the remaining unamortized net regulatory assets. Such an action could materially reduce our shareholders’ equity.

Application of SFAS No. 71

We apply the provisions of Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 71, “Accounting for the Effects of Certain Types
of Regulation,” (“SFAS No. 71”) to our regulated operations in our Texas, New Mexico and FERC jurisdictions. SFAS No. 71 requires a rate regulated enterprise to reflect the economic impact of regulatory decisions in its
financial statements. As a result, we record certain costs or obligations as either assets or liabilities on our balance sheet and amortize them in subsequent periods as they are reflected in regulated rates. The deferral of costs as regulatory
assets is appropriate only when the future recovery of such costs is probable. The application of SFAS No. 71 requires our management to make assumptions and estimates as to the amount of costs that regulatory authorities will ultimately
permit us to recover. In the event we determine that we can no longer apply SFAS No. 71 to all or a portion of our operations, either as (i) a result of the establishment of retail competition in our service territory; (ii) a
change in the regulatory approach for setting rates from cost-based ratemaking to another form of ratemaking; or (iii) other regulatory actions that restrict cost recovery to a level insufficient to recover costs, we could be required to record
a charge against income in the amount of the remaining unamortized net regulatory assets. Such an action could materially reduce our shareholders’ equity.

SIZE="2">Collection of Fuel Expense

In general, by law and regulation, our actual fuel and purchased power expenses are recovered
from our customers. In times of rising fuel prices, we experience a lag in recovery of higher fuel costs. These costs are subject to reconciliation by the Texas Commission and the NMPRC. Prior to the completion of a reconciliation, we record fuel
transactions such that fuel revenues including fuel costs recovered through base rates in New Mexico equal fuel expense except for the fixed portion in New Mexico prior to July 2007. In the event that a disallowance of fuel cost recovery
occurs during a reconciliation proceeding, the amounts recorded for fuel and purchased power expenses could differ from

 


33







Table of Contents




the amounts we are allowed to collect from our customers, and we could incur a loss to the extent of the disallowance.

STYLE="margin-top:18px;margin-bottom:0px">Decommissioning Costs and Estimated Asset Retirement Obligation

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="2">Pursuant to the ANPP Participation Agreement and federal law, we must fund our share of the estimated costs to decommission Palo Verde Units 1, 2 and 3 and associated common areas. We recorded a liability and a
corresponding asset for the fair value of our decommissioning obligation upon implementation of SFAS No. 143, “Accounting for Asset Retirement Obligations.” We adjust the liability to its present value periodically over time, and the
corresponding asset is depreciated over its useful life. The determination of the estimated liability requires the use of various assumptions pertaining to decommissioning costs, escalation and discount rates.

STYLE="margin-top:12px;margin-bottom:0px; text-indent:4%">We and other Palo Verde Participants rely upon decommissioning cost studies and make discount rate, rate of return and inflation projections to determine
funding requirements and estimate liabilities related to decommissioning. Every third year outside engineers perform a study to estimate decommissioning costs associated with Palo Verde Units 1, 2 and 3 and associated common areas. We determine how
we will fund our share of those estimated costs by making assumptions about future investment returns and future decommissioning cost escalations. The funds are invested in professionally managed investment trust accounts. We are required to
establish a minimum accumulation and a minimum funding level in our decommissioning trust accounts at the end of each annual reporting period in accordance with the ANPP Participation Agreement. If actual decommissioning costs exceed our estimates,
we would incur additional costs related to decommissioning. Further, if the rates of return earned by the trusts fail to meet expectations, we will be required to increase our funding to the decommissioning trust accounts. Although we cannot predict
the results of future studies, we believe that the liability we have recorded for our decommissioning costs will be adequate to fund our share of the costs, assuming that Palo Verde Units 1, 2 and 3 operate over their remaining lives (which
includes an assessment of the probability of a license extension) and that the DOE assumes responsibility for permanent disposal of spent fuel at plant shut down. Historically, we have been permitted to collect in rates in Texas and New Mexico
the costs of nuclear decommissioning. Should we become subject to the Texas Restructuring Law, we will be able to collect from regulated transmission and distribution customers the costs of decommissioning. Reference is made to Note E,
“Accounting for Asset Retirement Obligations” to the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

These excerpts taken from the EE 10-K filed Feb 29, 2008.

Application of SFAS No. 71

The Company applies the provisions of Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 71, “Accounting for the Effects of Certain Types of Regulation,” (“SFAS No. 71”) to its regulated operations in Texas and New Mexico. SFAS No. 71 requires a rate regulated enterprise to reflect the economic impact of regulatory decisions in its financial statements. As a result, we record certain costs or obligations as either assets or liabilities on our balance sheet and amortize them in subsequent periods. The deferral of costs as regulatory assets is appropriate only when the future recovery of such costs is probable. The application of SFAS No. 71 requires our management to make assumptions and estimates as to the amount of costs that regulatory authorities will ultimately permit us to recover. In the event we determine that we can no longer apply SFAS No. 71 to all or a portion of our operations, either as (i) a result of the establishment of retail competition in our service territory; (ii) a change in the regulatory approach for setting rates from cost-based ratemaking to another form of ratemaking; or (iii) other regulatory actions that restrict cost recovery to a level insufficient to recover costs, we could be required to record a charge against income in the amount of the remaining unamortized net regulatory assets. Such an action could materially reduce our shareholders’ equity.

As of December 31, 2006, we determined that we met the criteria to re-apply SFAS No. 71 to our Texas jurisdiction, and we recorded regulatory assets of $9.6 million and associated accumulated deferred tax liabilities of $3.5 million, representing costs currently being recovered through the Texas fuel factor, which resulted in an extraordinary gain of $6.1 million, net of tax. We determined it was not appropriate at this time to recognize other potential regulatory assets and liabilities, such as the costs associated with refinancing our first mortgage bonds in 2005, because in our judgment they have not yet been included in our recoverable cost of service. We had previously made a determination to re-apply SFAS No. 71 to our New Mexico jurisdiction beginning July 1, 2004. At December 31, 2007, we had $27.8 million of regulatory assets, net of regulatory liabilities. We may record additional regulatory assets and regulatory liabilities in the future based on our judgment as to whether sufficient evidence exists that our regulators will include them in our rate base and or cost of service. Thus, the amount of our net regulatory assets could increase materially in the future. In addition, we include an allowance for equity and borrowed funds used during construction as a cost of construction of electric plant in service. The allowance for equity funds used during construction is recognized as other income and the allowance for borrowed

 

34


Table of Contents

funds used during construction is shown as capitalized interest in our statement of operations. Under this treatment, we report higher other income and lower capitalized interest expense than we would have reported prior to the re-application of SFAS No. 71, and the difference may be material if our construction program continues at current levels or should increase relative to current levels. The factors that supported our decision are set forth in Note A to the consolidated financial statements.

Application of SFAS No. 71

The Company applies the provisions of Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 71, “Accounting for the Effects of
Certain Types of Regulation,” (“SFAS No. 71”) to its regulated operations in Texas and New Mexico. SFAS No. 71 requires a rate regulated enterprise to reflect the economic impact of regulatory decisions in its financial
statements. As a result, we record certain costs or obligations as either assets or liabilities on our balance sheet and amortize them in subsequent periods. The deferral of costs as regulatory assets is appropriate only when the future recovery of
such costs is probable. The application of SFAS No. 71 requires our management to make assumptions and estimates as to the amount of costs that regulatory authorities will ultimately permit us to recover. In the event we determine that we
can no longer apply SFAS No. 71 to all or a portion of our operations, either as (i) a result of the establishment of retail competition in our service territory; (ii) a change in the regulatory approach for setting rates from
cost-based ratemaking to another form of ratemaking; or (iii) other regulatory actions that restrict cost recovery to a level insufficient to recover costs, we could be required to record a charge against income in the amount of the remaining
unamortized net regulatory assets. Such an action could materially reduce our shareholders’ equity.

As of December 31, 2006, we
determined that we met the criteria to re-apply SFAS No. 71 to our Texas jurisdiction, and we recorded regulatory assets of $9.6 million and associated accumulated deferred tax liabilities of $3.5 million, representing costs currently
being recovered through the Texas fuel factor, which resulted in an extraordinary gain of $6.1 million, net of tax. We determined it was not appropriate at this time to recognize other potential regulatory assets and liabilities, such as the
costs associated with refinancing our first mortgage bonds in 2005, because in our judgment they have not yet been included in our recoverable cost of service. We had previously made a determination to re-apply SFAS No. 71 to our New
Mexico jurisdiction beginning July 1, 2004. At December 31, 2007, we had $27.8 million of regulatory assets, net of regulatory liabilities. We may record additional regulatory assets and regulatory liabilities in the future based on
our judgment as to whether sufficient evidence exists that our regulators will include them in our rate base and or cost of service. Thus, the amount of our net regulatory assets could increase materially in the future. In addition, we include an
allowance for equity and borrowed funds used during construction as a cost of construction of electric plant in service. The allowance for equity funds used during construction is recognized as other income and the allowance for borrowed

 


34







Table of Contents



funds used during construction is shown as capitalized interest in our statement of operations. Under this treatment, we report higher other income and lower
capitalized interest expense than we would have reported prior to the re-application of SFAS No. 71, and the difference may be material if our construction program continues at current levels or should increase relative to current levels.
The factors that supported our decision are set forth in Note A to the consolidated financial statements.

This excerpt taken from the EE 10-K filed Feb 28, 2007.

Application of SFAS No. 71

As of December 31, 2006, we determined that we met the criteria to re-apply SFAS No. 71 to our Texas jurisdiction. We had previously made a determination to re-apply SFAS No. 71 to our New Mexico jurisdiction beginning July 1, 2004. This brings our accounting into line with the vast majority of regulated utilities in the United States. The factors that supported our decision are set forth in Note A to the consolidated financial statements.

Under this accounting standard, we are required to record certain costs or obligations as either assets or liabilities on our balance sheet and to amortize them in subsequent periods. The deferral of costs as regulatory assets is appropriate only when the future recovery of such costs is probable. The application of SFAS No. 71 requires our management to make assumptions and estimates as to the amount of costs that regulatory authorities will ultimately permit us to recover. In the event we determine that we can no longer apply SFAS No. 71 to all or a portion of our operations, either as (i) a result of the establishment of retail competition in our service territory; (ii) a change in the regulatory approach for setting rates from cost-based ratemaking to another form of ratemaking; or (iii) other regulatory actions that restrict cost recovery to a level insufficient to recover costs, we could be required to record a charge against income in the amount of the remaining unamortized net regulatory assets. Such an action could materially reduce our shareholders’ equity.

At December 31, 2006 we recorded regulatory assets of $9.6 million and associated accumulated deferred tax liabilities of $3.5 million, representing costs currently being recovered through the Texas fuel factor, which resulted in an extraordinary gain of $6.1 million, net of tax. We determined it was not appropriate at this time to recognize other potential regulatory assets and liabilities, such as the costs associated with refinancing our first mortgage bonds in 2005, because in our judgment they have not yet been included in our recoverable cost of service. At December 31, 2006, we had recorded $19.9 million of regulatory assets, net of regulatory liabilities. We may record additional regulatory assets and regulatory liabilities in the future based on our judgment as to whether sufficient evidence exists that our regulators will include them in our rate base and or cost of service. Thus, the amount of our net regulatory assets could increase materially in the future. In addition, we will include an allowance for

 

31


Table of Contents
Index to Financial Statements

equity and borrowed funds used during construction as a cost of construction of electric plant in service. The allowance for equity funds used during construction will be recognized as other income and the allowance for borrowed funds used during construction will be shown as capitalized interest in our statement of operations. Under this treatment, we will report higher other income and lower capitalized interest expense than we would have reported prior to the re-application of SFAS No. 71, and the difference may be material if our construction program continues at current levels or should increase relative to current levels.

"Application of SFAS No. 71" elsewhere:

Entergy (ETR)
Wikinvest © 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012. Use of this site is subject to express Terms of Service, Privacy Policy, and Disclaimer. By continuing past this page, you agree to abide by these terms. Any information provided by Wikinvest, including but not limited to company data, competitors, business analysis, market share, sales revenues and other operating metrics, earnings call analysis, conference call transcripts, industry information, or price targets should not be construed as research, trading tips or recommendations, or investment advice and is provided with no warrants as to its accuracy. Stock market data, including US and International equity symbols, stock quotes, share prices, earnings ratios, and other fundamental data is provided by data partners. Stock market quotes delayed at least 15 minutes for NASDAQ, 20 mins for NYSE and AMEX. Market data by Xignite. See data providers for more details. Company names, products, services and branding cited herein may be trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners. The use of trademarks or service marks of another is not a representation that the other is affiliated with, sponsors, is sponsored by, endorses, or is endorsed by Wikinvest.
Powered by MediaWiki