FAF » Topics » Appraisal or Dissenters Rights

This excerpt taken from the FAF DEF 14A filed Oct 26, 2009.

Appraisal or Dissenters’ Rights

 

Under both California and Delaware law, a shareholder of a corporation participating in certain major corporate transactions may, under varying circumstances, be entitled to appraisal or dissenters’ rights pursuant to which such shareholder may receive cash in the amount of the fair market value (in California) or the fair value (in Delaware) of his or her shares in lieu of the consideration he or she would otherwise receive in the transaction.

 

Under California law, appraisal rights are generally not available to shareholders of a corporation whose shares are listed on a national securities exchange, unless holders of at least 5% of the class of outstanding shares claim the right, or the corporation or any law restricts the transfer of such shares. Appraisal rights are also unavailable to shareholders of a California corporation if the shareholders, the corporation, or both, as constituted immediately prior to the transaction, will own immediately after the transaction equity securities consisting of more than 83.33% of the voting power of the surviving or acquiring corporation or its parent entity. (Accordingly, appraisal rights are not available with respect to the Reincorporation.) Subject to the foregoing exception for more than 83.33% continuing ownership, California generally affords appraisal rights in sales of substantially all of a corporation’s assets in a non-cash transaction. Under California law, fair market value is measured as of the day before the first announcement of the terms of a merger, excluding any appreciation or depreciation in stock value resulting from the proposed transaction.

 

Under Delaware law, appraisal rights are generally not available to shareholders: (a) with respect to a merger or consolidation by a corporation with shares either listed on a national securities exchange (such as the New York Stock Exchange) or held of record by more than 2,000 holders, if such shareholders receive only shares of the surviving corporation or shares that are either listed on a national securities exchange or held of record by more than 2,000 holders, plus cash in lieu of fractional shares; or (b) of a corporation surviving a merger if no vote of the shareholders of the surviving corporation is required to approve the merger under

 

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Delaware law. Delaware law also does not provide appraisal rights in connection with the sale of assets. Delaware law provides that fair value is determined exclusive of any element of value arising from the accomplishment or expectation of the merger or consolidation.

 

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