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First Community Bancshares DEF 14A 2015

Documents found in this filing:

  1. Def 14A
  2. Graphic
  3. Graphic
  4. Graphic
fcbs20150306_def14a.htm

 

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

SCHEDULE 14A

 

Proxy Statement Pursuant to Section 14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended

 

Filed by the Registrant [x]

Filed by a party other than the Registrant [  ]

 

Check the appropriate box:

[  ]     Preliminary Proxy Statement

[  ]     Confidential, for Use of the Commission Only (as permitted by Rule 14a-6(e)(2))

[x]     Definitive Proxy Statement

[  ]     Definitive Additional Materials

[  ]     Soliciting Material under § 240.14a-12

 

FIRST COMMUNITY BANCSHARES, INC.

----------------------------------------------

(Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

 

Not Applicable

-----------------------------------------------------------------

(Name of Person(s) Filing Proxy Statement, if other than the Registrant)

 

Payment of Filing Fee (Check the appropriate box):

 

[x]  No fee required.

 

[  ] Fee computed on table below per Exchange Act Rules 14a-6(i)(1) and 0-11.

 

1.     Title of each class of securities to which transaction applies:

 

2.     Aggregate number of securities to which transaction applies:

 

 

3.

Per unit price or other underlying value of transaction computed pursuant to Exchange Act Rule 0-11 (set forth the amount on which the filing fee is calculated and state how it was determined):

 

The filing fee was determined based on________

 

4.     Proposed maximum aggregate value of transaction:

 

5.     Total fee paid:

 

[  ]  Fee paid previously with preliminary materials.

 

[  ]  Check box if any part of the fee is offset as provided by Exchange Act Rule 0-11(a)(2) and identify the filing for which the offsetting fee was paid previously. Identify the previous filing by registration statement number, or the Form or Schedule and the date of its filing.

 

1.     Amount Previously Paid:

 

2.     Form, Schedule or Registration Statement No.:

 

3.     Filing Party:

 

4.     Date Filed:

 

 
 

 

 

Notice of 2015 Annual Meeting of Stockholders

 

April 28, 2015 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time

Corporate Center

29 College Drive

Bluefield, Virginia 24605

 

March 17, 2015

 

To First Community Bancshares, Inc. Stockholders:

 

First Community Bancshares, Inc.’s Annual Meeting of Stockholders will be held at the Corporate Center, located at 29 College Drive, Bluefield, Virginia 24605, at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time on Tuesday, April 28, 2015. Following a report of the Corporation’s banking and related business operations, stockholders will:

 

 

Vote on the election of three (3) directors to serve as members of the Board of Directors, Class of 2018;

 

 

Vote on ratification of the selection of the independent registered public accounting firm for 2015; and

 

 

Transact other business that may properly come before the meeting.

 

Stockholders of record at the close of business on March 3, 2015, will be entitled to vote at the Annual Meeting and any adjournments.

 

/s/Robert L. Buzzo

Robert L. Buzzo

Secretary

 

 
 

 

 

 

IMPORTANT NOTICE

REGARDING THE AVAILABILITY OF PROXY MATERIALS

FOR THE ANNUAL MEETING OF STOCKHOLDERS TO BE HELD ON

APRIL 28, 2015.

 

The proxy materials for this Annual Meeting of Stockholders of First Community Bancshares, Inc., consisting of the proxy statement, annual report, and proxy card are available over the Internet at http://www.fcbinc.com.

 

If you want to receive a paper or e-mail copy of these documents, or similar documents for future stockholder meetings, you must request the copy. There is NO charge for requesting a copy. In order to facilitate timely delivery, your request should be received no later than April 14, 2015. Please choose one of the following methods to make your request:

 

 

1.

By Internet at www.proxyvote.com;

 

 

2.

By telephone: (800) 579-1639; or

 

 

3.

By e-mail: sendmaterial@proxyvote.com.

 

All persons attending the 2015 Annual Meeting must present photo identification. Please follow the advance registration instructions on the last page of this proxy statement.

 

WHETHER OR NOT YOU ATTEND THE ANNUAL MEETING, YOUR VOTE IS IMPORTANT TO FIRST COMMUNITY BANCSHARES, INC. YOU MAY VOTE BY THE FOLLOWING METHODS:

 

 

1.

By telephone: (800) 690-6903 until 11:59 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time on April 27, 2015; or

 

 

2.

On the Internet at http://www.proxyvote.com until 11:59 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time on April 27, 2015; or

 

 

3.

Complete, sign and return the enclosed proxy card as promptly as possible whether or not you plan to attend the Annual Meeting. An addressed return envelope is enclosed for your convenience.

 

FIRST COMMUNITY BANCSHARES, INC. ENCOURAGES STOCKHOLDERS TO SUBMIT THEIR PROXIES IN ADVANCE OF THE ANNUAL MEETING. YOU MAY REVOKE YOUR PROXY AT ANY TIME PRIOR TO THE TIME IT IS VOTED.

 

 
 

 

 

First Community Bancshares, Inc.

29 College Drive

P. O. Box 989

Bluefield, Virginia 24605-0989

 

March 17, 2015

 

Dear Stockholder,

 

You are invited to attend the 2015 Annual Meeting of Stockholders of First Community Bancshares, Inc. (the “Corporation”) to be held on Tuesday, April 28, 2015, at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time at the Corporate Center located at 29 College Drive, Bluefield, Virginia.

 

The Annual Meeting will begin with a report of the Corporation’s operations. This report will be followed by discussion and voting on the matters set forth in the accompanying notice of Annual Meeting and proxy statement and discussion of other business matters properly brought before the meeting.

 

If you plan to attend the meeting, please follow the registration instructions on the last page of this proxy statement. All persons attending the 2015 Annual Meeting of Stockholders must present photo identification.

 

Whether or not you plan to attend, please ensure that your shares are represented at the meeting by promptly voting and submitting your proxy by telephone, on the Internet, or by completing, signing, dating and returning your proxy card in the enclosed envelope.

 

Very truly yours,

 

 

/s/ William P. Stafford, II

William P. Stafford, II

Chairman of the Board

 

 
 

 

 

Table of Contents

 

 

Page

   

PROXY STATEMENT

1

PROPOSAL 1: ELECTION OF DIRECTORS

3

NOMINEES FOR THE CLASS OF 2018

4

CONTINUING INCUMBENT DIRECTORS

5

NON-DIRECTOR EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

8

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

10

Independence of Directors

10

The Board of Directors and Board Meetings

11

Board Committees

11

COMPENSATION DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS

14

The Corporation’s Compensation Philosophy

14

Summary of Awards in 2014

14

Considerations Used to Determine Compensation

14

Compensation Elements Used to Achieve the Corporation’s Goals

16

Considerations Used in Setting Base Salary for 2014 and Awarding Discretionary Cash Bonuses for 2013 Performance

  17

Determination Not to Award Any Discretionary Cash Bonuses or Equity Compensation in 2014

  18

Compensation and Retirement Committee Report

18

2014 Summary Compensation Table

19

2014 All Other Compensation

20

2014 Other Benefits

21

Outstanding Equity Awards at December 31, 2014

21

2014 Option Exercises and Stock Vested

22

2014 Pension Benefits

22

2014 Non-Qualified Deferred Compensation

23

Potential Payments Upon Termination

23

Payments Made Upon Retirement

24

Payments Made Upon Death or Disability

24

Payments Made Upon a Change of Control

24

Potential Incremental Payments Table

25

DIRECTOR COMPENSATION

26

2014 Non-Management Directors’ Compensation

26

Director Compensation Table

27

OWNERSHIP AND RELATED PERSON TRANSACTIONS

28

Information on Stock Ownership

28

Related Person Transactions

29

Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance

29

REPORT OF THE AUDIT COMMITTEE

30

INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

31

PROPOSAL 2: RATIFICATION OF SELECTION OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

  32

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

33

Stockholder Proposals for Inclusion in Next Year’s Proxy Statement

33

Other Stockholder Proposals and Stockholder Nominations for Directors For Presentation a Next Year’s Annual Meeting

  33

Solicitation of Proxies

33

Stockholder Requests for Copies of 2014 Annual Report and Proxy Materials

33

Delivery of Documents to Stockholders Sharing Same Address (Householding)

33

Electronic Access to Proxy Statement and Annual Report

34

Information about Advance Registration for Attending the Meeting

34

Voting in Person at the Meeting

34

 

 
 

 

 

PROXY STATEMENT

 

First Community Bancshares, Inc.

29 College Drive

P. O. Box 989

Bluefield, Virginia 24605

 

The Board of Directors of First Community Bancshares, Inc. (the “Corporation”) solicits the enclosed proxy for use at the Annual Meeting of Stockholders of the Corporation (the “Annual Meeting”), which will be held on Tuesday, April 28, 2015, at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time at the Corporate Center, 29 College Drive, Bluefield, Virginia, and at any adjournment thereof.

 

The expenses of the solicitation of the proxies for the Annual Meeting, including the cost of preparing, assembling and mailing the notice, proxy statement, proxy card, and return envelopes; the handling and tabulation of proxies received; and charges of brokerage houses and other institutions, nominees or fiduciaries for forwarding such documents to beneficial owners, will be paid by the Corporation. In addition to the mailing of the proxy materials, solicitation may be made in person, by telephone or by other means by officers, directors or regular employees of the Corporation.

 

This proxy statement and the proxies solicited hereby are being first sent or delivered to stockholders of the Corporation on or about March 17, 2015.

 

Voting

 

Shares of common stock (par value $1.00 per share) (“Common Stock”) represented by proxies in the accompanying form, which are properly executed and returned to the Corporation, will be voted at the Annual Meeting in accordance with the stockholder’s instructions contained therein. In the absence of contrary instructions, shares represented by such proxies will be voted FOR the election of the three (3) directors nominated by the Board of Directors and named in this proxy statement and FOR ratification of Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP as the Corporation’s independent registered public accounting firm.

 

Any stockholder may revoke his or her proxy at any time before it is voted. A proxy may be revoked at any time prior to its exercise by the filing of written notice of revocation with the Secretary of the Corporation, by delivering to the Corporation a duly executed proxy bearing a later date, or by attending the Annual Meeting and voting in person. If your shares of Common Stock are held for you in a brokerage, bank or other institutional account, you must obtain a proxy from that institution, bring it with you to the Annual Meeting and submit it with your ballot in order to be able to vote your shares at the Annual Meeting.

 

The Board of Directors has fixed March 3, 2015, as the record date for stockholders entitled to notice of the Annual Meeting. Shares of Common Stock outstanding on the record date are entitled to be voted at the Annual Meeting, and the holders of record on the record date will have one vote for each share so held in the matters to be voted upon by the stockholders. Treasury shares are not voted. As of the close of business on March 3, 2015, the outstanding shares of the Corporation consisted of 18,626,256 shares of Common Stock and 9,692 shares of Class A Preferred Stock. Shares of the Corporation’s Class A Preferred Stock are not entitled to be voted on the matters presented at the Annual Meeting.

 

The presence in person or by proxy of a majority of the shares of the Common Stock entitled to vote is necessary to constitute a quorum at the Annual Meeting. Abstentions and broker non-votes are counted as present and entitled to vote for purposes of determining a quorum. A broker non-vote occurs when a nominee holding shares for a beneficial owner does not vote on a particular proposal because the nominee does not have discretionary voting power for that particular item and has not received instructions from the beneficial owner. Directors are elected by a plurality of the votes cast at a stockholders’ meeting with a quorum present. The three (3) persons who receive the greatest number of votes of the holders of Common Stock represented in person or by proxy at the Annual Meeting will be elected directors of the Corporation. The ratification of the independent registered public accounting firm requires that the number of votes cast in favor of the proposal exceed the number of votes cast against. Abstentions and broker non-votes will have no effect on any of the proposals set forth in this proxy statement.

 

 
1

 

 

If the shares you own are held in “street name,” that is through a brokerage firm, bank, or other nominee, you may vote your shares by following the instructions provided by the nominee. As the record holder of your shares, your nominee is required to vote your shares according to your instructions. In order to vote your shares, you will need to follow the directions provided to you by your nominee, many of which offer the option of voting online or by telephone. Under the current rules of the New York Stock Exchange, or NYSE, and the NASDAQ Stock Market LLC or NASDAQ, if you do not give instructions to your nominee, it will only be able to vote your shares for the ratification of the independent registered public accounting firm and it will not be able to vote your shares for the election of directors.

 

 
2

 

 

PROPOSAL 1: ELECTION OF DIRECTORS

 

The Board of Directors is comprised of seven (7) directors, including six (6) non-management directors, currently divided into three (3) classes with staggered terms: the class of 2015, consisting of three (3) directors; the class of 2016, consisting of two (2) directors; and the class of 2017, consisting of three (3) directors. The three (3) directors from the class of 2015 are all nominated for re-election at the 2015 Annual Meeting. The three (3) directors elected will become the class of 2018, and will serve until the 2018 Annual Meeting.

 

In the event any nominee is unable or declines to serve as a director at the time of the Annual Meeting, the proxies will be voted for an alternate nominee designated by the present Board of Directors to fill the vacancy. In the event that more than three (3) persons are nominated for election as directors, the proxy holders intend to vote all proxies received by them for the nominees listed below, or for any alternates nominated by the Board. All nominees named herein have consented to be named and to serve as directors if elected.

 

No director or executive officer of the Corporation is related to any other director or executive officer of the Corporation by blood, marriage or adoption, except for Mr. Stafford who is the father of Mr. Stafford, II.

 

A table of each director and nominee, including his or her age; the applicable director class, which is based upon the year in which his or her term of service expires; and title, is set forth below. A biography describing each director’s and nominee’s qualifications and business background is set forth below the table. The Corporation does not know of any reason why any nominee would be unable to serve as a director.

 

Members of the Corporation’s Board of Directors are expected to have the appropriate skills and characteristics necessary to function in the Corporation’s current operating environment and contribute to its future direction and strategies. These include legal, financial, management and other relevant skills. In addition, the Corporation looks to achieve a diversified Board, including members with varying experience, age, perspective, residence and background.

 


Name and Title


Age

Director of
Corporation Since

Class of
Directors

W. C. Blankenship, Jr., Director Nominee

64

2012

2015

Samuel L. Elmore, Director

68

2013

2016

Franklin P. Hall, Director

76

2007

2017

Richard S. Johnson, Director

65

2008

2016

I. Norris Kantor, Director Nominee

85

1989

2015

William P. Stafford, Director

81

1989

2017

William P. Stafford, II, CEO and Director Nominee

51

1994

2015

 

 
3

 

 

NOMINEES FOR THE CLASS OF 2018

 

W. C. Blankenship, Jr., Former State Farm Insurance Agent, Tazewell, Virginia.

 

Mr. Blankenship received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1972 from Appalachian State University and served as a successful insurance agent for State Farm from 1976 until 2013. Mr. Blankenship joined First Community Bank in July 1996 following its acquisition of Citizens Bank of Tazewell, Inc. He was appointed to the Citizens Bank Board of Directors during its formation in 1981 and was instrumental in establishing that bank, eventually serving as Chairman of the Board from 1984 through its acquisition by First Community Bank.

 

Mr. Blankenship’s relevant experience qualifying him for service as a director includes: more than thirty-six (36) years of expertise and knowledge in insurance products and services and more than thirty-one (31) years of bank board service.

 


  

I. Norris Kantor, Of Counsel, Katz, Kantor, Stonestreet & Buckner, PLLC, Princeton and Bluefield, West Virginia.

 

Mr. Kantor received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1953 from the Virginia Military Institute and received a Juris Doctor degree in 1956 from the College of Law at West Virginia University. Mr. Kantor has practiced law for more than fifty (50) years and is currently Of Counsel with the law firm of Katz, Kantor, Stonestreet & Buckner, PLLC. He served as a Judge Advocate USAF from 1956 to 1958. Mr. Kantor is a director of Mercer Realty Inc., a real estate management company, and Gomolco, Inc., a real estate holding company. Mr. Kantor currently serves in the following leadership capacities: Board member of the Bluefield State College Board of Governors, New River Parkway Authority, and the Bluefield Development Authority; and Board member and Secretary of Bluefield State College Research and Development Corp. Mr. Kantor is also a former member and Chair of the West Virginia Ethics Commission and former Board member of the Bluefield State College Foundation and New River Community College Board of Governors.

 

Mr. Kantor’s relevant experience qualifying him for service as a director includes: a wide range of legal and business experience gained during his more than fifty (50) years as a practicing attorney; his legal work dealing with the issuance and refunding of numerous utility bonds; his ability to understand complex business, legal and financial topics; and twenty-five (25) years of service as a member of the board of directors of financial service organizations.

 


 

William P. Stafford, II, Chief Executive Officer, First Community Bancshares, Inc., Bluefield, Virginia and Attorney, Brewster, Morhous, Cameron, Caruth, Moore, Kersey & Stafford, PLLC, Bluefield, West Virginia.

 

Mr. Stafford is a graduate of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia, and holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering. He received his Juris Doctor, cum laude, from Washington & Lee University School of Law, Lexington, Virginia. Mr. Stafford has served as Chief Executive Officer of the Corporation since his appointment by the Board in August 2013. Mr. Stafford practices as a member of his firm primarily in the areas of commercial transactions, banking, creditor’s rights, creditor bankruptcy, and trusts and estates. He currently serves as Chairman of the Board of the Corporation. Mr. Stafford serves as Director and Corporate Secretary of the H. P. and Anne S. Hunnicutt Foundation, Inc., Princeton Machinery Service, Inc., and Melrose Enterprises, Ltd. He is a member of Stafford Farms, LLC, Vermillion Development, LLC, and Walnut Hill, LLC, which include real estate and agricultural holdings. Mr. Stafford is a partner in Legal Realty, A Partnership. Mr. Stafford previously served as a member of the West Virginia Infrastructure and Jobs Development Council. Mr. Stafford previously served as a council member and Mayor of the City of Princeton, West Virginia. Mr. Stafford has served, and continues to serve, on numerous civic and community service boards and commissions. Mr. Stafford’s relevant experience qualifying him for service as a director includes: a broad range of regulatory, business, legal and banking related issues encountered in the practice of law; extensive state and municipal government service; extensive civic and community service; and twenty-one (21) years of board service for the Corporation.

Your Board recommends a vote FOR the nominees set forth above.

 

 
4

 

 

CONTINUING INCUMBENT DIRECTORS

 

Samuel L. Elmore, Former Chief Credit Officer and Senior Vice President, First Community Bank, Beckley, West Virginia.

 

Mr. Elmore received a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Management and Marketing in 1970 from University of Charleston. Prior to joining First Community Bank, Mr. Elmore served as Executive Vice President, Citizens Southern Bank, Inc., Beckley, West Virginia; President and Chief Executive Officer, Bank One, Beckley, West Virginia; Vice President, Key Centurion Bancshares, Huntington, West Virginia; and President and Chief Operations Officer, Beckley National Bank, Beckley, West Virginia. Mr. Elmore currently serves on the Boards of First Community Bank and the Raleigh County Commission on Aging. Mr. Elmore previously served on the Boards of The United Way of Beckley, Beckley Area Foundation, Raleigh General Hospital and VACHA.

 

Mr. Elmore’s relevant experience qualifying him for service as a director includes: more than forty (40) years of experience in the community banking industry, including service as an auditor and managing the Corporation’s Credit Administration Department; prior experience with acquisitions and mergers; and a variety of offices held with increasing management responsibilities during his banking career.

 


 

Franklin P. Hall, Retired Commissioner, Virginia Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control, Senior Partner, Hall & Hall, PLC, Richmond, Virginia.

 

Mr. Hall is a 1961 graduate of Lynchburg College, Lynchburg, Virginia, where he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics and Business Administration. Mr. Hall also graduated from The American University, Washington, D.C., with a Master of Business Administration degree in 1964 and The American University Law School with a Juris Doctor degree in 1966. Mr. Hall currently serves as Senior Partner in Hall & Hall, PLC in Midlothian, Virginia, where he has practiced law since 1969. He served as a delegate in the Virginia General Assembly from 1976 to 2009, and Minority Leader of the Virginia House of Delegates from 2002 to 2008. He is a former Chairman of the Board of The CommonWealth Bank in Richmond, Virginia. Mr. Hall has served on the Greater Richmond Chamber of Commerce Foundation Board since 2004. He also has served as a commissioner for the Virginia Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control.

 

Mr. Hall’s relevant experience qualifying him for service as a director includes: a wide range of business and legal knowledge gained during an active forty-six (46) year law practice; his Master of Business Administration degree; thirty-one (31) years of service on boards of financial service organizations; thirty-one (31) years of overseeing the budget for the Commonwealth of Virginia; service as senior member of the Joint Legislative Audit and Review Commission for the Virginia General Assembly; and service as Chair of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Compensation.

 


 

Richard S. Johnson, Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer, The Wilton Companies, Richmond, Virginia.

 

Mr. Johnson earned a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration degree from the University of Richmond, Richmond, Virginia in 1973, with concentrations in Economics and Finance, and graduated with a Master Science degree from Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia in 1977, with a concentration in Real Estate and Urban Land Development.  Mr. Johnson has been the President and Chief Executive Officer of The Wilton Companies, a real estate investment, development, brokerage and management group of companies, since 2002. He assumed the role of Chairman of The Wilton Companies in 2010.  Prior to joining The Wilton Companies, Mr. Johnson served as President of Southern Financial Corp. of Virginia from 1985 to 2002 and Chairman of the Board of Southern Title Insurance Corporation from 1980 to 1985.  Mr. Johnson currently serves as a Director of First Community Bank and Fidelity Group, LLC; Trustee Emeritus of the University of Richmond, and Director and past Chairman of the City of Richmond Economic Development Authority.  Mr. Johnson also serves as Director Emeritus of Ducks Unlimited, Inc. and previously served as a director of the State Fair of Virginia, Children’s Museum of Richmond, Ducks Unlimited, Inc., Ducks Unlimited Canada, University of Richmond and Landmark Apartment Trust of America.

 

 
5

 

 

Mr. Johnson’s relevant experience qualifying him for service as a director includes: long-range planning, various aspects of mortgage underwriting, marketing and mortgage portfolio servicing; previously chairing the Economic Development Authority of the City of Richmond, Virginia; past service as a director and Finance Committee member of Ducks Unlimited, Inc. and Ducks Unlimited Canada; state and national offices with Ducks Unlimited, Inc., including Assistant Treasurer and member of the Finance and Audit Subcommittee; and previous service as a director and Audit Committee member of the Apartment Trust of America.

 


 

William P. Stafford, President, Princeton Machinery Service, Inc., Princeton, West Virginia.

 

Mr. Stafford is President and Director of Princeton Machinery Service, Inc., a machine repair business which he founded and successfully operated for over forty (40) years. Mr. Stafford serves as Director and President of the H. P. and Anne S. Hunnicutt Foundation, Inc., and Melrose Enterprises, Ltd. He is a member of Stafford Farms, LLC. Mr. Stafford previously served as a member of the West Virginia Legislature, the West Virginia Natural Resources Commission, the Mercer County Airport Authority and the Mercer County, West Virginia Economic Development Authority. Mr. Stafford has served on numerous civic and community service boards and commissions.

 

Mr. Stafford's significant business and banking experience qualify him for service as a director. In addition, his state government service, extensive civic and community service, and more than twenty-five (25) years of board service for a publicly traded financial services company provide additional qualifications.

 


 

 
6

 

 

Director Qualifications and Experience. The following table identifies the experience, qualifications, attributes and skills that the Board considered in making its decision to appoint and nominate directors to the Corporation’s Board. This information supplements the biographical information provided above. The vertical axis displays the primary factors reviewed by the Governance and Nominating Committee in evaluating a Board candidate.

  

 

Blankenship, Jr.

Elmore

Hall

Johnson

Kantor

Stafford

Stafford, II

Experience, Qualifications, Skills or Attributes 

             

Professional standing in chosen field 

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Expertise in financial services or related industry 

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Audit Committee Financial Expert (actual or potential) 

     

X

     

Civic and community involvement 

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Other public company experience (current or past) 

     

X

     

Leadership and team building skills 

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Diversity of experience, professions, skills, geographic representation and backgrounds

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Specific skills/knowledge: 

             

-   finance

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

-   technology

           

X

-   marketing

X

X

 

X

     

-   public affairs

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

-   human resources

X

 

X

X

X

 

X

-   governance

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

 

 
7

 

 

NON-DIRECTOR EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

 

Executive officers who are not directors of the Corporation, including their title, age and date they became an officer of the Corporation are set forth in the chart below, which is followed by a brief biography describing each named executive’s business experience.

 

       

Executive of

       

Corporation

Name and Title

 

Age

 

Since

         

Gary R. Mills, President of Corporation and Chief Executive Officer of First Community Bank

 

47

 

2007

David D. Brown, Chief Financial Officer of Corporation and First Community Bank

 

40

 

2006

Robert L. Buzzo, Vice President and Secretary of Corporation, President Emeritus and Director of First Community Bank 

 

65

 

2000

Martyn A. Pell, President of First Community Bank 

 

38

 

2013

E. Stephen Lilly, Chief Operating Officer of Corporation, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of First Community Bank

 

56

 

2000

Robert L. Schumacher, General Counsel of Corporation, Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary of First Community Bank

 

64

 

2001

 

Gary R. Mills, President of the Corporation and Chief Executive Officer of First Community Bank.

 

Mr. Mills has served as President of the Corporation and Chief Executive Officer (“CEO”) of First Community Bank since August 31, 2013, and has been employed by the Corporation since 1998. Mr. Mills served as Chief Executive Officer of the Princeton Division of First Community Bank from 1998 until 2005; Senior Vice President of Credit Administration from 2005 to 2006; and most recently as Chief Credit Officer of the Corporation from 2007 until his appointment as President and Chief Executive Officer. Mr. Mills is a Certified Public Accountant and holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration with a concentration in Accounting from Concord University.

 

David D. Brown, Chief Financial Officer of the Corporation and First Community Bank.

 

Mr. Brown has been Chief Financial Officer (“CFO”) of the Corporation and First Community Bank since May 2006, and has been employed by the Corporation since 2005. Prior to joining the Corporation, Mr. Brown served in various positions including Corporate Auditor of United Bankshares, Inc. from 1999 to 2005. From 1997 to 1999, Mr. Brown practiced in the field of public accounting, concentrating his work on tax, accounting, and auditing across a variety of industries. Mr. Brown is a Certified Public Accountant and holds Master of Public Accountancy and Bachelor of Science degrees from West Virginia University.

 

Martyn A. Pell, President of First Community Bank.

 

Mr. Pell has served as President of First Community Bank since August 31, 2013, and has been employed by the Corporation since 1993. Prior to his current position, Mr. Pell worked in a plethora of business units, including but not limited to accounting, internal audit, credit administration, and commercial lending. He has also previously served as the Chief Financial Officer for Greenpoint Insurance Group, a subsidiary of the Corporation. Mr. Pell holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration from West Virginia University, where he graduated magna cum laude, and a Master of Business Administration degree from Wake Forest University.

 

Robert L. Buzzo, Vice President and Secretary of the Corporation, President Emeritus and Director of First Community Bank.

 

Mr. Buzzo has been Vice President and Secretary of the Corporation and a director of First Community Bank since June 2000, and has been employed by the Corporation since 1973. Mr. Buzzo previously served as President of First Community Bank and currently serves as its President Emeritus. From October 1994 until June 2000, Mr. Buzzo was the Chief Executive Officer of First Community Bank – Bluefield, a division of First Community Bank. Prior to 1994, Mr. Buzzo served in a variety of leadership positions.

 

 
8

 

 

E. Stephen Lilly, Chief Operating Officer of the Corporation, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of First Community Bank.

 

Mr. Lilly has been Chief Operating Officer (“COO”) of the Corporation and First Community Bank since June 2000. Mr. Lilly has been employed by the Corporation since 1997. Mr. Lilly has also served in a variety of banking positions and capacities with the Corporation and other banking organizations where he supervised and managed a number of operational elements, implemented new technologies, and successfully migrated and consolidated bank operations and data. Mr. Lilly also has significant experience in process engineering and customer service management.

 

Robert L. Schumacher, General Counsel of the Corporation and Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary of First Community Bank.

 

Mr. Schumacher has served as General Counsel of the Corporation and First Community Bank since 2005. He has also served as Senior Vice President and Secretary of First Community Bank since 2001. From 2001 until 2005, Mr. Schumacher served as the Corporation’s CFO and Senior Vice President – Finance. In addition, Mr. Schumacher has previously led First Community Bank’s Trust and Financial Services Division in the capacity of Senior Vice President and Senior Trust Officer. Prior to joining the Corporation in 1983, Mr. Schumacher engaged in the private practice of law in Princeton, West Virginia. Mr. Schumacher is a Certified Public Accountant, a Certified Financial Planner, is licensed to practice law, and holds a Juris Doctor degree from West Virginia University.

 

 
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CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

Corporate Governance Guidelines. The Board regularly reviews corporate governance developments and considers modifications to its governance charter to clarify and augment the Board’s processes, including those relating to risk oversight.

 

The Boards Role in Risk Oversight. The Board of Directors believes that each member has a responsibility to monitor and manage risks faced by the Corporation. At a minimum, this requires members of the Board of Directors to be actively engaged in Board discussions, review materials provided to them, and know when it is appropriate to request further information from management and/or engage the assistance of outside advisors. Furthermore, because the banking industry is highly regulated, certain risks to the Corporation are monitored by the Board of Directors through its review of the Corporation’s compliance with regulations set forth by its regulatory authorities, including recommendations contained in regulatory examinations.

 

Because the Corporation believes risk oversight is a responsibility for each member of the Board of Directors, it does not concentrate the Board’s responsibility for risk oversight in a single committee. Instead, each committee concentrates on specific risks for which it possess expertise, and each committee regularly reports to the Board of Directors on its findings. For example, the Audit Committee regularly monitors the Corporation’s exposure to certain reputational risks by establishing and evaluating the effectiveness of its programs to report and monitor fraud and by monitoring the Corporation’s internal controls over financial reporting. The Corporation’s Compensation and Retirement Committee monitors risks associated with the design and administration of the Corporation’s compensation.

 

The Board’s role in risk oversight of the Corporation is consistent with the Corporation’s leadership structure, with the CEO and other members of senior management having responsibility for assessing and managing the Corporation’s risk exposure, and the Board and its committees providing oversight in connection with those efforts.

 

Independence of Directors

 

The Board of Directors annually reviews the relationships of each of its members with the Corporation to determine whether each director is independent. This determination is based on both subjective and objective criteria developed by the NASDAQ listing standards and the SEC rules. Based on the subjective and objective criteria developed by the NASDAQ listing standards and the SEC rules, the Board of Directors determined that the following nominees and current members of the Board of Directors are independent: W. C. Blankenship, Jr.; Franklin P. Hall; Richard S. Johnson and I. Norris Kantor. William P. Stafford, II is not independent because he is an executive officer of the Corporation. William P. Stafford is not independent because he is a Family Member, as defined in the NASDAQ Market Rules, of William P. Stafford, II. Although neither an Executive Officer nor family member of an Executive Officer, Samuel L. Elmore is not independent because he was employed in a part-time consulting capacity by First Community Bank, the Corporation’s wholly owned banking subsidiary, during 2013 in the Raleigh County, West Virginia market.

 

The NASDAQ listing standards contain additional requirements for members of the Audit Committee, the Compensation and Retirement Committee and the Governance and Nominating Committee. All of the directors serving on the Audit Committee and Compensation and Retirement Committee are independent under the additional requirements applicable to such committees. Two members of the Governance and Nominating Committee are independent with the third, Samuel L. Elmore, currently serving under the exceptional and limited circumstances exemption under NASDAQ Rule 5605(e)(3). The Corporation's Board of Directors believes that Mr. Elmore's service on the Governance and Nominating Committee is in the best interests of the Corporation and its Shareholders as further described beginning on page 12. The Board considered the following relationship in evaluating the independence of the Corporation’s Directors and determined that this relationship does not constitute a material relationship with the Corporation and satisfies the standards for independence:

 

Director Johnson serves as Chairman, President and CEO of The Wilton Companies. The Wilton Companies are comprised of three (3) entities under common management. During 2014, the Corporation and its affiliates leased office space from two (2) of these entities, one (1) of which leases expired on August 31, 2014, and was not renewed. Director Johnson holds an equity ownership in this entity. The annual lease payments did not exceed the greater of five percent (5%) of The Wilton Companies’ and its subsidiaries’ consolidated revenues for 2014 or $200,000, and therefore, the relationship satisfied the standards for independence.

 

 
10

 

 

The Board of Directors and Board Meetings

 

Board Leadership Structure. William P. Stafford, II currently serves as CEO of the Corporation and as Chairman of the Board of Directors. The role of the CEO is to set the strategic direction for the Corporation and manage its performance, while the Chairman of the Board is tasked with setting the agenda for Board meetings and presiding over meetings of the Board. The Board of Directors believes combining the roles of CEO and Chairman of the Board is in the best interests of the Corporation at this time, as doing so best positions the Corporation to carry out its strategic plan for core growth; increases value for shareholders; provides for greater accountability and transparency; enhances oversight of operations; and provides for greater Board involvement.

 

Standards of Conduct. All directors, officers and employees of the Corporation must act ethically at all times and in accordance with the policies comprising the Corporation’s Standards of Conduct (“Code”), which is available at the Corporation’s website (www.fcbinc.com) and available in print to any stockholder upon request. Certification of compliance with the Code is required on an annual basis. Only the Board of Directors may waive a provision of the Code for directors and executive officers and shall only do so for just cause in an instance where the underlying ethical objective will not be violated. No waivers were granted to any director or officer during 2014. Amendments to the Code will be published on the Corporation’s website, as required by SEC rules. If an actual or potential conflict of interest arises for a director, the director must promptly inform the Board.

 

Communicating Concerns to Directors. The Audit Committee and the non-management directors have established procedures to enable any employee who has a concern about the Corporation’s conduct, policies, accounting, internal accounting controls or auditing matters, to communicate that concern directly to the Board through an e-mail or written notification directed to the Chairman of the Audit Committee. Such communications may be confidential or anonymous. A notification explaining how to submit any such communication is provided to all new employees during orientation, is available in the employee handbook and on the Intranet, and can be found posted on bulletin boards at each location of the Corporation and its subsidiaries. The status of any outstanding concern is reported to the non-management directors of the Board periodically by the Chairman of the Audit Committee.

 

Stockholder Communications. Stockholders may communicate with all or any member of the Board of Directors by addressing correspondence to the Board of Directors or to the individual director. Stockholders may address such communication to Secretary, First Community Bancshares, Inc., P. O. Box 989, Bluefield, Virginia 24605-0989, and all communications so addressed will be forwarded to the Chairman of the Board of Directors or to the individual director to whom such correspondence is directed, without exception.

 

Board Meetings

 

The Board of Directors held nine (9) regular meetings, as well as five (5) special meetings, three (3) meetings held jointly with the Bank board, and one (1) strategic planning session, in 2014. No member attended fewer than seventy-five percent (75%) of the Board meetings or committee meetings on which the member sits. Each director is expected to devote sufficient time, energy and attention to ensure diligent performance of the director’s duties and to attend all regularly scheduled Board, committee, and stockholder meetings. It is the Board’s policy that the directors should attend the Annual Meeting absent exceptional circumstances. All current directors attended the 2014 Annual Meeting.

 

Board Committees

 

The Board of Directors has adopted written charters for three (3) of its four (4) standing committees: the Audit Committee, the Compensation and Retirement Committee (the “CRC”), and the Governance and Nominating Committee. A current copy of each committee charter is available for review and/or printing on the Corporation’s website at www.fcbinc.com.

 

 
11

 

 

Audit Committee. The members of the Audit Committee are Director Blankenship, who chairs the Committee; Director Hall; and Director Johnson. The Board has determined that Mr. Johnson is the Audit Committee financial expert. The Audit Committee is primarily concerned with the integrity of the Corporation’s financial statements, the independence and qualifications of the independent registered public accounting firm and the performance of the Corporation’s internal audit function and independent registered public accounting firm. Its duties include: (1) selection and oversight of the independent registered public accounting firm; (2) review of the scope of the audit to be conducted by the independent registered public accounting firm, as well as the results of their audit; (3) oversight of the Corporation’s financial reporting activities, including the annual report, and the accounting standards and principles followed; (4) discussion with management of its risk assessment and management policies, including risk relating to the financial statements and financial reporting process and the steps taken by management to monitor and mitigate such risks; (5) approval of audit and non-audit services provided to the Corporation by the independent registered public accounting firm; and (6) review of the organization and scope of the Corporation’s internal audit function and its disclosure and internal controls. The Audit Committee held eight (8) meetings during 2014. The Audit Committee’s report is on page 31.

 

Executive Committee. The members of the Executive Committee are Director Stafford II, who chairs the Committee; Director Blankenship; Director Elmore; Director Hall; Director Johnson; Director Kantor; and Director Stafford. The Executive Committee met on two (2) occasions in 2014. The Committee, subject to the supervision and control of the Board of Directors, has been delegated substantially all of the powers of the Board to act between meetings of the Board, except for certain matters reserved to the Board by law.

 

Compensation and Retirement Committee. The members of the CRC are Director Johnson, who chairs the Committee; Director Blankenship; and Director Kantor. The CRC’s primary duties and responsibilities are to: (1) review, evaluate and determine annually the executive officers’ and directors’ compensation and the corporate goals and objectives relevant thereto, and to evaluate the executive officers’ performance in light of such goals and objectives; (2) review and evaluate all compensation decisions otherwise made by the President and CEO; (3) review, evaluate and determine all equity-based incentive awards; (4)  review organizational systems and plans relating to management development and succession planning; and (5) review and discuss with management the proxy statement’s Compensation Discussion and Analysis and produce the CRC report. The CRC does not delegate any of its responsibilities to subcommittees.

 

The President and CEO of the Corporation provide the CRC with a performance assessment and compensation recommendation for each of the other executive officers of the Corporation. The CRC has the authority to retain or obtain the advice of any advisors as the CRC deems necessary in the performance of its duties. In 2014, the CRC directly engaged Mathews, Young – Management Consulting (“Mathews Young”) to provide compensation analysis and advice regarding base and incentive compensation for employees of the Corporation. At the request of the CRC, Mathews Young: (i) developed a peer group analysis for the CRC’s review of compensation levels; (ii) formulated recommendations for base and incentive compensation; and (iii) developed recommendations for an incentive program for the special assets department. Mathews Young was not retained to provide any other services to the Corporation. Retention of Mathews Young by the CRC raised no conflicts of interest. The CRC held four (4) meetings in 2014. The CRC’s report is on page 18.

 

Compensation and Retirement Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation. None of the members of the CRC are or were formerly officers or employees of the Corporation or any of its subsidiaries. Finally, none of the executive officers of the Corporation served on any compensation committee or any board of directors of another company, of which any of the Corporation’s Board members was also an executive officer.

 

Governance and Nominating Committee. The members of the Governance and Nominating Committee are Director Blankenship, who chairs the Committee; Director Kantor; and Director Elmore. Both Mr. Blankenship and Mr. Kantor are independent. Mr. Elmore is currently serving as a non-independent member of this Committee pursuant to the exceptional and limited circumstances exemption under NASDAQ Rule 5605(e)(3). While Mr. Elmore was employed by the Corporation’s banking subsidiary until May 31, 2013, in a part-time consulting capacity and, as such, is not currently deemed to be independent, he is not an Executive Officer, employee or Family Member of an Executive Officer under the NASDAQ Market Rules. The Corporation's Board of Directors has considered the current Board membership, the existing membership of all Board committees, and Mr. Elmore’s extensive qualifications and experience in the banking industry, and believes that Mr. Elmore's service on the Governance and Nominating Committee is necessary to ensure diversification among the independent Board committees, and is therefore in the best interests of the Corporation and its shareholders. The Committee’s responsibilities include the selection of director nominees for Board service and the development and review of governance guidelines. The Committee also: (1) oversees evaluations of the Board, as well as director performance and Board dynamics; (2) makes recommendations to the Board concerning the structure and membership of the Board committees; and reviews, approves, and ratifies transactions with related persons. This Committee held five (5) meetings in 2014.

 

 
12

 

 

Director Candidates, Qualifications and Diversity. In considering whether to recommend any candidate for inclusion in the Board’s slate of recommended director nominees, including candidates recommended by stockholders, the Governance and Nominating Committee considers a number of criteria, including, without limitation, the candidate’s integrity, business acumen, age, experience, commitment, diligence, geographic representation, conflicts of interest and the ability to act in the interests of all stockholders. The Governance and Nominating Committee believes diversity should be considered in the director identification and nomination process. The Governance and Nominating Committee seeks nominees with a broad diversity of experience, professions, skills, geographic representation and backgrounds. The Committee does not assign specific weights to particular criteria, and no particular criterion is necessarily applicable to all prospective nominees. The Corporation believes that the backgrounds and qualifications of the directors, considered as a group, should provide a significant composite mix of experience, knowledge and abilities that will allow the Board to fulfill its responsibilities.

 

The Committee will consider all stockholder recommendations for candidates for the Board, which should be sent to the Governance and Nominating Committee, c/o Secretary of First Community Bancshares, Inc., P. O. Box 989, Bluefield, Virginia 24605-0989. The Corporation believes that directors should possess the highest personal and professional ethics, integrity and values, and be committed to representing the long-term interests of the stockholders. The Committee also considers candidates recommended by current directors, officers, employees and others. The Committee evaluates all nominees for director in the same manner and typically bases its initial review on any written materials submitted with respect to the candidate.

 

Meetings of Non-management Directors. The non-management directors met without any management director or employee present on at least two (2) occasions in 2014.

 

 
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COMPENSATION DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS

 

This section provides a brief explanation of material information relevant to understanding the objectives, policies and philosophy underlying the Corporation’s compensation programs for named executives as well as other employees included in any incentive compensation program.

 

The Corporations Compensation Philosophy

 

The goal of the Corporation’s executive compensation program is to retain and reward officers who create long-term value for stockholders through consistent financial and operating performance coupled with strong leadership. This overriding objective affects all elements of the compensation program. The intent is to align an executive’s long-term interests as closely as possible with those of stockholders and to motivate high performing executives to continue with the Corporation for long productive careers.

 

Summary of Awards in 2014

 

The CRC and management believe the Corporation’s best interests are served by maintaining consistency in its compensation philosophy and implementation and that discretion should be used in times of prosperity as well as times when either the Corporation or the overall economy, or both, are performing below expectations.

 

Based on 2013 performance, which did not meet expectations sufficient to warrant base compensation enhancement or annual incentive compensation, the Corporation did not approve any compensation adjustments, award any discretionary cash bonuses, or grant any long-term incentive equity compensation for the named executives in 2014.

 

However, in both 2013 and 2014, the Corporation achieved a three-year average growth rate in core diluted earnings per share of not less than five percent (5%). Accordingly, a scheduled vesting of restricted stock awarded to named and other executives and other employees on May 28, 2013 and December 31, 2013, under the First Community Bancshares, Inc. 2012 Omnibus Equity Compensation Plan, occurred on May 28, 2014, resulting in the vesting of 17.2% of the restricted stock awards previously granted and it is anticipated that an additional vesting of 17.2% will occur on May 28, 2015.

 

Considerations Used to Determine Compensation

 

Below is a summary of factors considered by the CRC affecting compensation for named executive officers. The CRC performed its evaluation of compensation in light of the executive’s performance, the Corporation’s performance, the current economic environment, and Corporation’s long-standing practice of prudent executive compensation administration.

 

Emphasis on Consistent and Sustained Performance. The Corporation’s compensation program provides pay opportunities for those executives demonstrating superior performance for sustained periods. Each of the named executives has served the Corporation for many years, and each has held diverse positions with growing levels of responsibility. Relative compensation reflects previous contributions and anticipated future contributions to the Corporation’s long-term success. In evaluating sustained performance, the Corporation also gives weight to the relative performance of each executive in his or her particular industry segment or function. The CRC also uses its judgment in determining named executive compensation adjustments and incentive awards, if any. This long-term view has the effect of encouraging executives to focus on sustaining acceptable, long-term financial performance.

 

Importance of Corporation Results. The CRC places substantial weight on the Corporation’s overall financial success, including achievement of short and long-term strategic goals and annual financial results. The CRC is of the opinion that the named executives share the responsibility of supporting the Corporation’s overriding goals and objectives as part of the management team.

 

Judgment Versus Formula-Driven. The CRC does not use formulas in determining the level or mix of compensation. It evaluates a wide range of quantitative and qualitative factors, which include consistency in reaching targeted goals, the ability to perform in both good and challenging economic times, a history of integrity, evidence that the executive uses good judgment, and his or her ability to lead and create future value for the Corporation.

 

 
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Risk Considerations in the Compensation Program. The CRC views the Corporation’s compensation program with a long-term focus. Under the program, the greatest amount of compensation can be achieved over long periods of time through sustained superior performance. The Corporation believes this provides a strong incentive to manage the Corporation for the long term with a clear message to avoid excessive risk in the near term. The CRC maintains full discretion to adjust compensation based upon performance and adherence to the Corporation’s values.

 

In 2014, the CRC continued its intensive review of the relationship between risk management and incentive compensation to ensure that incentive compensation does not encourage unnecessary or excessive risks. The CRC reviewed the incentive compensation arrangements for the Corporation’s named executives and other top executives in various manners to ensure that their incentive compensation arrangements do not encourage them to take unnecessary and excessive risks that threaten the value of the Corporation. The CRC concluded that the Corporation’s compensation policies and practices do not encourage excessive or inappropriate risk and instead encourage behaviors that support sustainable long-term value creation. For instance, the CRC does not use highly leveraged, short-term incentives that drive high-risk investments at the expense of long-term company value. Rather, the Corporation’s annual incentive compensation is based on balanced performance metrics that promote disciplined progress focused on longer-term goals.

 

Future Compensation Opportunity. The CRC intends to continue to provide a mix of different compensation elements. The CRC believes that each named executive should have a portion of his or her compensation be contingent upon how well the Corporation operates and how well its stock performs in the long run.

 

Use of Compensation Consultants. Because of the enhanced level of regulation and scrutiny on executive compensation, the CRC retains independent compensation consultants as needed to provide technical advice and information related to compensation for all employees of the Corporation. In 2014, Mathews, Young - Management Consulting was the independent consultant of the CRC. With the guidance of Mathews Young, the CRC considered executive compensation as a whole, including all of the aforementioned factors, as well as comparison to a long-established peer group of similarly sized and situated financial service institutions. The CRC does not target specific compensation levels within this group of peers institutions, but rather uses the comparative data as a reference tool after determining the types and amounts of compensation based upon the CRC’s own evaluation.

 

Employment Agreements. Prior to his employment as CEO of the Corporation, Mr. Stafford, II, served solely as an independent director and Chairman of the Board of the Corporation, and was accordingly under no employment agreement. Upon Mr. Stafford’s employment and since reorganization of the executive management team, management and the CRC have been developing an improved, prototype executive employment agreement. When complete, the CRC anticipates each of the Corporation’s key executives, including each of the named executives, executing the new prototype agreement. The new agreements will result in greater uniformity among the executive officers concerning the terms of their employment and treat the executive officers as a team. The execution of said agreements will be reported on a Form 8-K upon execution.

 

With the exception of Mr. Stafford, II, all named executives were covered in 2014 by previously executed employment agreements, each of which include change of control protection for the executive and non-compete and non-solicitation requirements for the protection of the Corporation.

 

The employment agreement with Mr. Lilly, originally entered into on October 7, 2002, was amended and restated as of December 16, 2008, to comply with Section 409A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. Mr. Lilly’s agreement has an initial term of three (3) years and is renewed for an additional three (3) year term each January 1st unless the Corporation or Mr. Lilly give notice that the employment term will not be extended. In the event there is a change of control of the Corporation and Mr. Lilly’s employment is terminated, either voluntarily or by the Corporation, within two (2) years of such change of control, the Corporation will pay Mr. Lilly severance pay in the form of a lump sum payment of 2.99 times his base salary then in effect on the date of termination. Furthermore, the Corporation may terminate Mr. Lilly’s employment at any time for “Cause” (as defined in the employment agreement) without further obligation owed. If the Corporation terminates employment for any reason other than for “Cause” or Mr. Lilly terminates his employment for “Good Reason” (as defined in the employment agreement), the Corporation will generally be obligated to provide the compensation and benefits specified in the agreement for the balance of the term of the agreement, but not less than thirty (30) months following the date of termination. Upon the termination of his employment, Mr. Lilly will be subject to non-competition and non-solicitation restrictions. If Mr. Lilly dies while employed by the Corporation, the Corporation will pay his estate through the end of the month in which his death occurs. If his employment is terminated as a result of permanent disability as determined pursuant to the agreement, then the Corporation has the right to terminate employment before the end of the applicable term.

 

 
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The Corporation also previously entered into initial employment agreements with Messrs. Mills, Brown and Pell on December 16, 2008. These agreements contain substantially similar terms and are modeled after the agreement with Mr. Lilly. The agreements with Messrs. Mills, Brown and Pell have an initial term of two (2) years, and are renewed for an additional two (2) years each January 1st unless the Corporation or the respective executive gives notice that the employment term will not be extended. Mr. Mills’, Mr. Brown’s, and Mr. Pell’s agreements provide for a lump sum payment of 2.00 times base salary, in the event of a change of control coupled with terminated employment either without “Cause” by the Corporation or by the executives for “Good Reason” (as defined in their respective agreements). Furthermore, the Corporation may terminate the employment of Messrs. Mills, Brown, or Pell at any time for “Cause” (as defined in each respective officer’s employment agreement) without further obligation owed. If the Corporation terminates employment for any reason other than for “Cause” or if Messrs. Mills, Brown, or Pell terminates his employment for “Good Reason” (as defined in the respective employment agreement), the Corporation will generally be obligated to provide compensation and benefits specified in the agreement for the balance of the term of the agreement, but not less than eighteen (18) months following the date of termination. Upon the termination of their employment, Messrs. Mills, Brown, and Pell will be subject to non-competition and non-solicitation restrictions. If Messrs. Mills, Brown, or Pell die while employed by the Corporation, the Corporation will pay his estate through the end of the month in which his death occurs. If their employment is terminated as a result of permanent disability as determined pursuant to the agreement, then the Corporation has the right to terminate employment before the end of the applicable term.

 

Compensation Elements Used to Achieve the Corporations Goals

 

The Corporation uses the compensation elements discussed below as a means to reward, retain and align executives’ interests with the long-term interests of the Corporation and stockholders.

 

The CRC attempts to balance the various elements of compensation among annual base compensation (current cash payments), annual incentive awards (when appropriate), and long-term retention and incentive equity awards.

 

Base Compensation. The amount of base compensation for each named executive depends upon the scope of the executive’s duties, his or her individual performance and length of service, and his or her leadership ability. Current salary impacts decisions regarding salary adjustments relative to peers (within and outside the Corporation). Base compensation is paid in the form of cash at regular payroll intervals along with all other employees of the Corporation and reviewed annually.

 

Annual Incentive Compensation. For each named executive, the CRC may award discretionary cash and/or restricted stock incentive compensation based upon the previous year’s performance as evaluated by the CRC, CEO and the President (except the CEO and President do not participate in their own incentive determinations).

 

Long Term Retention and Incentive Equity Compensation. The Corporation’s equity incentive program is designed to reward long-term performance, retain named executives, and align executives’ interests with those of stockholders. The CRC uses stock options and stock awards which are designed to deliver reasonable, but meaningful, equity interests in the Corporation over a rolling five (5) year period.

 

On February 28, 2012, the Board of Directors approved the First Community Bancshares, Inc. 2012 Omnibus Equity Compensation Plan (the “2012 Plan”), which in turn was approved by stockholders at the 2012 Annual Meeting. The Board of Directors effectively replaced all prior equity plans with this single plan that conforms to current best governance practices. As of the date of the mailing of this proxy, there have been eight (8) grants under the 2012 Plan to the named executive officers, none of which occurred in 2014.

 

 
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Deferred Compensation. The Corporation offers a qualified defined contribution plan known as the “KSOP” to most of its employees, including the named executives. However, the named executives, as well as certain other key executives, are unable to fully participate in the KSOP due to certain restrictions on their deferrals based upon annual testing limits imposed by the Internal Revenue Code. The Corporation accordingly provides a non-qualified deferred compensation plan (discussed in more detail elsewhere in this proxy statement) referred to as the “WRAP” plan as a mechanism to allow highly compensated participants to defer a portion of their compensation that may not otherwise be deferred under the Corporation’s qualified plan. The WRAP plan is intended to promote retention of key executives by providing a long-term savings vehicle on a tax efficient basis.

 

Pension Plans. The Corporation provides a defined retirement benefit to the named executives and certain other key executives pursuant to a supplemental executive retention plan (“SERP”). Each executive’s SERP is unfunded and designed to provide a benefit paid upon separation from service at or after age 62. The benefit is targeted at thirty-five percent (35%) of final compensation projected at an assumed three percent (3%) salary progression rate, and subject to an annual benefit limit of $80,000. Vesting is on a graded schedule as follows: twenty-five percent (25%) vesting after five (5) years of service; fifty percent (50%) vesting after ten (10) years of service; seventy-five percent (75%) vesting after fifteen (15) years of service; an additional five percent (5%) vesting for each year of service beyond fifteen (15) years, and full vesting after twenty (20) years of service or reaching age 62, whichever occurs first.

 

Considerations Used in Setting Base Compensation for 2014 and Annual Incentive Compensation for 2013 Performance

 

Each year, and on a continuing basis, the Corporation develops short and long term objectives necessary for it to be successful. These objectives for the most part mirror the Corporation’s strategic plan and annual financial budget planning sessions, during which the Corporation’s performance and growth opportunities are analyzed and goals and objectives are established for the upcoming year(s). These objectives include both objective financial metrics and quantitative and qualitative strategic and operational goals. The CRC uses these objectives to evaluate the performance of the CEO and President. However, each financial metric or quantitative goal used by the CRC in this process is only one of many considerations. Resulting evaluations and any resulting incentive or other compensation is not formula-driven. The CRC, President and CEO believe this process focuses the Board, CRC, CEO, President and the entire management team on factors that create long-term stockholder value. The CRC discusses with the President and the CEO these factors as they relate to their respective compensation. The President and CEO do not participate in the final determination of their respective compensation.

 

In 2014, the CRC worked closely with the CEO and President to monitor base and incentive compensation of other named executives. The CRC’s goal is to achieve a balance of base compensation and incentives that both contributes to retention of a qualified management team and ensures that the Corporation remains competitive over the long term.

 

Each of the other named executives is a leader of an individual business or function of the Corporation. As part of the executive management team, they report directly to the President, who develops the objectives that each individual is expected to achieve, and against which their performance is assessed. These objectives are reviewed with the CRC and are also derived largely from the Corporation’s financial, budget and strategic planning processes. The President assesses each named executive’s individual performance against the objectives, the Corporation’s overall performance and the performance of the executive’s business or function. The President and CEO then report base compensation levels, including any adjustments, as well as proposed annual incentive compensation for each named executive to the CRC. The CRC then approves proposed annual incentive compensation and/or long-term retention and incentive equity compensation, if any, for the named executives, other members of the management team, and other employees. The named executives do not play a role in the determination of their compensation except for their discussion with the President, CEO and/or CRC regarding their individual performance against predetermined objectives.

 

 
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Prior to appointment to their present positions, Mr. Stafford, II, served as a Board member since 1994 and as Chairman of the Board since 2010, and Mr. Mills served as an officer of the subsidiary bank since 1998 and as its Chief Credit Officer since 2007. When Mr. Stafford, II, and Mr. Mills assumed their present positions in the third (3rd) quarter of 2013, the CRC set base compensation for each commensurate with the responsibilities of each position and their prior experience, but which also reflected their absence of prior experience in their new roles. With respect to Mr. Stafford, II, initial base compensation also reflected his agreement with the Board to spend the significant majority, but less than all, of his time in management of the Corporation, which allowed Mr. Stafford, II, to remain a member of his firm and continue his law practice on a much reduced scale. Based on consideration of the above factors, and the relatively short time since assuming their present positions, the CRC did not adjust base compensation for the CEO or President in 2014. In addition, based on 2013 performance and the change in strategic direction, the CRC did not award any annual incentive compensation to the named executives in 2014.

 

Determination Not to Award Any Annual Incentive Compensation or Equity Compensation in 2014

 

As noted above, the CRC determined not to award any discretionary annual incentive compensation or grant any long-term retention and incentive equity compensation to the named executive officers in 2014. This should not be viewed as a negative reflection on the performance of the named executives; rather, this decision reflects less than desired performance of the Corporation in 2013 under a previous strategic plan, the length of time since some of the named executives assumed management of the Corporation in the third (3rd) quarter of 2013, and the Company’s dedication to focusing on the long-term interests of the shareholders.

 

Compensation and Retirement Committee Report

 

The CRC has reviewed the CD&A and discussed that analysis with management. Based on its review and discussions with management, the CRC recommended to the Board of Directors that the CD&A be included in the Corporation’s 2014 Annual Report on Form 10-K and the Corporation’s 2015 proxy statement. The following independent directors, who comprise the CRC, provide this report:

 

Richard S. Johnson (Chairman)

W.C. Blankenship, Jr.

I. Norris Kantor

 

 
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2014 Summary Compensation Table

 

Name of Individual /

Capacities Served

 

Year

   

Salary

   

Bonus

   

Stock Awards (1)

   

Option Awards

   

Change in Pension Value and Non-qualified Deferred Compensation Earnings (2)

   

All Other Compensation (3)

   

Total (4)

 
                                                                 

William P. Stafford, II

 

2014

    $ 200,013     $ -     $ -     $ -     $ 344,175     $ 18,413     $ 562,601  

Chief Executive Officer

 

2013

      73,082       -       63,551       -       -       -       136,633  
                                                                 

Gary R. Mills

 

2014

      300,000       -       -       -       10,655       28,699       339,354  

President

 

2013

      230,192       32,300       91,028       -       9,354       31,203       394,077  
   

2012

      190,000       20,000       -       -       8,204       24,723       242,927  
                                                                 

David D. Brown

 

2014

      225,000       -       -       -       9,026       23,894       257,920  

Chief Financial Officer

 

2013

      185,054       41,600       69,277       -       7,855       23,805       327,591  
   

2012

      166,400       20,000       -       -       7,216       21,050       214,666  
                                                                 

Martyn A. Pell

 

2014

      255,000       -       -       -       11,271       27,408       293,679  

President - First

 

2013

      199,326       33,000       77,169       -       26,125       10,531       346,151  

Community Bank

 

2012

      161,731       20,000       -       -       -       20,323       202,054  
                                                                 

E. Stephen Lilly

 

2014

      252,000       -       -       -       50,998       47,263       350,261  

Chief Operating Officer

 

2013

      252,000       50,400       79,200       -       44,577       42,590       468,767  
   

2012

      252,000       25,000       -       -       38,933       39,861       355,794  

 

(1)

Shares of restricted stock granted in 2013 were made under the First Community Bancshares, Inc. 2012 Omnibus Equity Compensation Plan as approved by shareholders on April 24, 2012. Forty-eight and two-fifths percent (48.4%) of the restricted stock awards granted on May 28, 2013 and December 31, 2013 immediately vested upon the grant date. The remaining shares of restricted stock will equally vest over a three-year period. Additional vesting occurred on May 28, 2014. Vesting is based upon continued employment through the vesting date and performance-based conditions as described in the Compensation Discussion and Analysis. All restricted shares will immediately vest upon a change of control of the Corporation or the executive officer’s death, disability or retirement.

(2)

The amounts in this column represent the increase in the actuarial net present value of all future retirement benefits under the SERPs. The net present value of the retirement benefits used to calculate the net change in benefits was determined using the same assumptions used to determine our retirement obligations and expense for financial statement purposes. Additional information about our SERP is included on page 17. We have not provided above-market or preferential earnings on any nonqualified deferred compensation and, accordingly, no such amounts are reflected in the table.

(3)

The amounts in this column are detailed on the following table entitled “2014 All Other Compensation.”

(4)

Salary and bonus amounts paid to the named executive officers as a percentage of total compensation are as follows for 2014: Mr. Stafford, II – thirty-six percent (36%); Mr. Mills – eighty-eight percent (88%), Mr. Brown – eighty-seven percent (87%); Mr. Pell – eighty-seven percent (87%) and Mr. Lilly – seventy-two percent (72%).

 

 
19

 

 

2014 All Other Compensation

 

The Corporation provides the named executives with additional benefits as shown in the “All Other Compensation” column of the “2014 Summary Compensation Table” shown above, that it believes are reasonable, competitive and in line with the Corporation’s overall executive compensation program. The Corporation provides additional detail of those benefits in the table below.

 

Name of Individual

 

Year

   

Total Retirement Plan Matching Contribution

   

Split Dollar Life Insurance (1)

   

Executive Life Insurance (2)

   

Perquisites (3)

   

Total

 
                                                 

William P. Stafford, II

 

2014

    $ 6,142     $ -     $ 2,671     $ 9,600     $ 18,413  
   

2013

      -       -       -       -       -  
                                                 

Gary R. Mills

 

2014

      20,045       -       4,662       3,992       28,699  
   

2013

      17,169       -       1,930       12,104       31,203  
   

2012

      15,966       -       1,788       6,969       24,723  
                                                 

David D. Brown

 

2014

      8,524       -       1,777       13,593       23,894  
   

2013

      9,619       -       1,101       13,085       23,805  
   

2012

      8,300       -       1,022       11,728       21,050  
                                                 

Martyn A. Pell

 

2014

      13,710       -       2,036       11,662       27,408  
   

2013

      -       -       931       9,600       10,531  
   

2012

      12,499       -       855       6,969       20,323  
                                                 

E. Stephen Lilly

 

2014

      24,960       444       8,266       13,593       47,263  
   

2013

      23,061       418       6,026       13,085       42,590  
   

2012

      20,432       396       5,551       13,482       39,861  

 

(1)

Imputed income on Corporation funded premiums or split dollar plans.

(2)

Corporation funded premium on executive life program.

(3)

Perquisites consist of country club dues and/or automobile allowance in each instance.

 

 
20

 

 

2014 Other Benefits

 

The Corporation provides other perquisites and personal benefits that the Corporation and the CRC believe are reasonable and consistent with its overall compensation program to better enable the Corporation to attract and retain superior employees for key positions. The CRC periodically reviews the levels of perquisites and other personal benefits provided to the named executives.

 

Outstanding Equity Awards at December 31, 2014

 

The following table includes information on the current holdings of unexercised stock option and stock awards that have not yet vested by the named executive officers as of December 31, 2014. Each equity grant is shown separately for each named executive.

 

   

Option Awards

 

Stock Awards

 
                                             

Equity Incentive Plan Awards

 
   

Number of Securities Underlying Unexercised Options (1)

   

Option Exercise

 

Option Expiration

 

Number of Shares or Units of Stock That Have

   

Market Value of Shares or Units of Stock That Have

   

Number of Unearned Shares, Units or Other Rights That Have

   

Market or Payout Value of Unearned Shares, Units or Other Rights That Have

 

Name

 

Exercisable

   

Unexercisable

   

Price

 

Date

 

Not Vested (2)

   

Not Vested (3)

   

Not Vested (4)

   

Not Vested (3)

 
                                                           

William P. Stafford, II

    -             $ -         838     $ 13,802       839     $ 13,818  
                                                           

Gary R. Mills

    233               13.94  

02/05/35

    1,258       20,719       845       13,917  
      865               24.65  

02/05/35

                    413       6,802  
      3,025               29.15  

02/05/35

                               
      5,000               32.50  

06/08/15

                               
                                                           

David D. Brown

    10,000               35.00  

10/24/16

    970       15,976       845       13,917  
                                                126       2,075  
                                                           

Martyn A. Pell

    648               13.94  

04/29/43

    1,070       17,623       756       12,451  
      864               24.65  

04/29/43

                    313       5,155  
      1,512               29.15  

04/26/43

                               
                                                           

E. Stephen Lilly

    7,551               19.80  

06/26/25

    1,120       18,446       1,121       18,463  
      2,156               13.94  

06/26/25

                               
      7,550               24.65  

06/26/25

                               
      7,550               29.15  

06/26/25

                               

 

(1)

All options listed in the above table are vested.

(2)

The number of shares of restricted stock in this column represents the number of shares of restricted stock granted in 2013 that are no longer subject to performance conditions except for the condition that the named executive officer remains an executive on May 28, 2015.

(3)

The market value is determined by multiplying the closing market price of the Corporation’s common stock on December 31, 2014 of $16.47 by the number of shares in the preceding column.

(4)

The number of shares of restricted stock in this column is subject to the performance conditions and continued employment of the named executive officer as further described in the Compensation Discussion and Analysis. These shares were granted in 2013 and will fully vest on May 28, 2016.

 

 
21

 

 

2014 Option Exercises and Stock Vested

 

The following table provides information for the named executive officers with respect to (1) stock option awards exercised during 2014, including the number of shares acquired upon exercise and the value realized at such time, and (2) the number of shares acquired upon the vesting of restricted stock awards and the value realized at such time, before the payment of any applicable withholding tax and brokerage commissions.

 

   

Option Awards

   

Stock Awards

 
   

Shares

           

Shares

         
   

Acquired on

   

Value

   

Acquired on

   

Value

 

Name

 

Exercise

   

Realized

   

Vesting

   

Realized (1)

 
                                 

William P. Stafford, II

    -     $ -       839     $ 12,493  

Gary R. Mills

    -       -       1,258       18,732  

David D. Brown

    -       -       971       14,458  

Martyn A. Pell

    -       -       1,069       15,917  

E. Stephen Lilly

    -       -       1,121       16,692  

 

(1)

Total value realized on vesting is equal to the number of shares acquired on vesting multiplied by the market price of the underlying securities on the vesting date of May 28, 2014 ($14.89).

 

2014 Pension Benefits

 

The table below sets forth the details on pension benefits for the named executives under the following plan:

 

The Corporations Executive SERP. The Corporation’s SERP is unfunded and not qualified for tax purposes. The values in the following table reflect the actuarial present value of the named executive officer’s accumulated benefit under the SERP, computed as of December 31, 2014. Refer to page 17 of this proxy statement for a more detailed discussion of the SERP and to Note 13 of the Consolidated Financial Statements in the Annual Report for the year ended December 31, 2014 for discussion of the methodologies and assumptions underlying the projected SERP benefits.

 

       

Number of

   

Present Value of

   

Payments

 
       

Years Credited

   

Accumulated

   

During Last

 

Name

 

Plan Name

 

Service

   

Benefit

   

Fiscal Year

 
                             

William P. Stafford, II (1)

 

SERP

    21     $ 344,175       -  

Gary R. Mills

 

SERP

    16       74,299       -  

David D. Brown

 

SERP

    10       50,363       -  

Martyn A. Pell

 

SERP

    4       37,396       -  

E. Stephen Lilly

 

SERP

    17       355,490       -  

 

(1)

The number of years of credited service includes years of service as a director of the Corporation.

 

 
22

 

 

2014 Non-Qualified Deferred Compensation

 

Deferral of Salary.  The named executive officers, like any employee otherwise ineligible to fully participate in the KSOP, who meets the Internal Revenue Code definition of being “highly compensated,” have historically been eligible to elect to defer up to seventy-five percent (75%) of their compensation to the Corporation’s WRAP plan, the same as other not highly compensated employees can defer to the KSOP.  Deferrals to the WRAP are invested as directed by each participant and are matched at the discretion of the Board of Directors in conjunction with and subject to limits established each year by the Board of Directors for elective deferrals to the KSOP.  Earnings on deferrals are based on the investment elections made by the individual WRAP participants and no guaranteed return is available to any of the Named Executive Officers participating in the WRAP.  WRAP participants have the option to invest in most of the same funds available to the Corporation’s KSOP participants and also have the option to establish investment accounts with Ameritrade, where they can pick and choose other investments.  On an annual basis, each WRAP participant is allowed to designate or modify the percentage of salary to defer to the WRAP in compliance with Internal Revenue Code Section 409A.  The table below provides detail regarding non-qualified deferred compensation of the named executive officers, which for 2014 included only the deferral of a portion of salaries to the WRAP plan.  Balances previously deferred by the named executives to a second non-qualified plan, known as the “Deferred Compensation Plan,” which the Corporation amended and terminated on December 22, 2010, with said termination effective December 31, 2010, have been combined with the WRAP deferrals and reported in a single table below.  Distributions from the WRAP are only available post-termination or retirement and cannot be taken without a minimum of six (6) months’ separation from employment in compliance with Internal Revenue Code Section 409A.

 

Name

 

Executive Contributions

in Last Fiscal Year (1)

   

Corporation Contributions

in Last Fiscal Year (1)

   

Aggregate Earnings

in Last Fiscal Year (2)

   

Aggregate Withdrawals/

Distributions

   

Aggregate Balance

at Last Fiscal Year End

 

William P. Stafford, II

  $ -     $ -     $ -             $ -  

Gary R. Mills

    6,000       2,756       3,031       -       99,207  

David D. Brown

    -       -       -       -       -  

Martyn A. Pell

    6,904       -       598       -       14,783  

E. Stephen Lilly

    10,464       4,993       5,222       -       172,385  

 

(1)

The amounts reported under “Executive Contributions” are included in each named executive’s amount under the “Salary” column in the “2014 Summary Compensation Table.” The amounts reported under “Corporation Contributions” are included in each named executive’s amount under the “2014 All Other Compensation” column in the “2014 Summary Compensation Table.” The Corporation contributions reflected in the above table are reflective of amounts deferred by the executives in the prior plan year, but matched by the Corporation in the subsequent year. The Corporation does not match executive contributions to the Deferred Compensation Plan.

(2)

The amounts reported under “Aggregate Earnings” are not included in each named executive’s amount under the “Salary” column in the “2014 Summary Compensation Table.”

 

Potential Payments Upon Termination

 

The information below describes the compensation that would become payable under existing plans and agreements based on the named executive officer’s actual termination of employment coupled with the assumption that the named executive officer’s employment had terminated on December 31, 2014, given the named executive’s compensation, years of service and a presumed age of 62.

 

These benefits are in addition to benefits generally available to other non-executive officers, who are salaried employees, such as distributions under the KSOP and disability insurance benefits. The Corporation has estimated the amounts of compensation payable to each named executive under a variety of termination circumstances, including: early retirement, involuntary termination not for “Cause,” termination for “Cause,” termination following a change of control and in the event of the death of the named executive.

 

Since a variety of factors might affect the nature and amount of any benefits payable upon the events discussed below, actual amounts may vary from what the Corporation has projected.

 

Regardless of the manner in which a named executive’s employment terminates, he or she may be entitled to receive amounts earned during his or her term of employment. Such amounts include:

 

 

option or stock award grants made pursuant to the 1999 Plan, 2004 Plan, or 2012 Plan that vest through the most recently completed fiscal year;

 

amounts contributed under the KSOP and the Corporation’s non-qualified deferred compensation plans;

 

amounts accrued and vested through the Corporation’s SERP payable as benefits for the life of the named executive beginning at age 62; and

 

cash surrender value of life insurance payable.

 

 
23

 

  

In the event of an involuntary termination without “Cause,” a named executive officer would receive severance payments outlined in the respective employment agreement as set forth in the discussion beginning on page 15. As required by said employment agreements, any severance payments to a terminated named executive officer would be contingent on his execution of an agreed upon severance agreement and release, which along with severance payments, would outline restrictive covenants against competing against the Corporation and soliciting the Corporation’s employees and customers. Any named executive officer who has not executed an employment agreement would be subject to the same severance policy offered to all employees.

 

Payments Made Upon Retirement

 

In the event of the retirement of a named executive, in addition to the items identified above:

 

 

for options granted under the 1999 Plan, he will retain vested options for up to five (5) years after normal retirement at age 62 and ninety (90) days after early retirement;

 

for options granted under the 2004 Plan, he will retain vested options for the remainder of the outstanding ten-year term;

 

for options granted under the 2012 Plan, he will retain vested options for the period of up to three (3) months, or any statutorily required period; and

 

for restricted performance stock awards granted under the 2012 Plan, he will automatically vest fully in the maximum number of granted awards.

 

Payments Made Upon Death or Disability

 

In the event of the death or disability of a named executive, in addition to the benefit payments made upon termination or retirement, the named executive or his beneficiaries may receive benefits under the Corporation’s disability plan or executive life insurance plan, as appropriate, if enrolled. Currently, Mr. Lilly is the only named executive enrolled in the executive life insurance plan. If Mr. Lilly had died on December 31, 2014, his survivors would have received the projected amount of $426,822 from the proceeds of an individual split dollar life insurance policy, the premiums of which are included in the “2014 All Other Compensation” table on page 20. The estimated amounts payable to the beneficiaries are derived by reflecting a deduction for repayment to the Corporation of the cash surrender value of the split dollar life insurance policies and distribution of eighty percent (80%) of the face value of any remaining insurance proceeds to the respective beneficiaries and twenty percent (20%) to the Corporation.

 

Payments Made Upon a Change of Control

 

As previously stated, the Corporation has entered into employment agreements with each of the named executives, except for Mr. Stafford, II, which agreements include change of control provisions. Pursuant to these agreements, if an executive’s employment is terminated following a change of control (other than a termination by the Corporation for “Cause”) or if the executive terminates his employment in certain circumstances defined in the agreement, in addition to the benefits listed under the heading “Potential Payments Upon Termination,” the named executive will receive a severance payment consisting of 2.00 to 2.99 times current salary. The form of the agreements was filed as an Exhibit to the Corporation’s Form 8-K filed on December 16, 2008.

 

Generally, pursuant to these agreements, a change of control is defined as:

 

 

(i)

A change in ownership of the Corporation when one person (or a group) acquires stock that, when combined with stock previously owned, controls more than fifty percent (50%) of the value or voting power of the stock of the Corporation.

 

(ii)

A change in the effective control of the Corporation on the date that, during any twelve (12) month period, either: 1) any person (or group) acquires stock possessing thirty percent (30%) of the voting power of the Corporation; or 2) a majority of the members of the Board of Directors is replaced by persons whose appointment or election is not endorsed by a majority of the incumbent Board.

 

(iii)

A change in ownership of a substantial portion of the assets of the Corporation when a person (or a group) acquires, during any twelve (12) month period, assets of the Corporation having a total gross fair market value equal to forty percent (40%) or more of the total gross fair market value of all of the Corporation’s assets.

  

 
24

 

 

Potential Incremental Payments Table

 

The following table shows the potential incremental value transfer to each named executive under various termination scenarios. The table was prepared as though each named executive officer’s employment was terminated on December 31, 2014.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Acceleration/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vesting of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Options

   

Non-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

and

   

Qualified

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salary &

   

Restricted

   

Deferred

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William P. Stafford, II

 

Benefits

   

Stock

   

Comp (4)

   

SERP

 

 

 

 

Executive Life Ins (6)

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

Early retirement

 

$

-

 

 

$

-

 

 

$

-

 

 

63,018

 (1,5)

 

 

 

$

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

63,018

 

Retirement

 

 

-

 

 

 

27,620

 

 

 

-

 

 

80,000

 (2,5)

 

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

107,620

 

Termination for "Cause"

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-

 

Termination without "Cause"

 

 

15,386

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

63,018

 (1,5)

 

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

78,404

 

Change in control termination

 

 

15,386

 

 

 

27,620

 

 

 

-

 

 

344,175

 (4)

 

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

387,181

 

Disability

 

 

1,629,663

 

 

 

27,620

 

 

 

-

 

 

63,018

 (1,5)

 

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,720,301

 

Death (3)

 

 

-

 

 

 

27,620

 

 

 

-

 

 

63,018

 (1,5)

 

 

 

 

450,000

 (4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

540,638

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gary R. Mills

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Early retirement

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

99,207

 

 

34,981

 (1,5)

 

 

 

 

5,850

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

140,038

 

Retirement

 

 

-

 

 

 

41,439

 

 

 

99,207

 

 

80,000

 (2,5)

 

 

 

 

5,850

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

226,496

 

Termination for "Cause"

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

99,207

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

5,850

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

105,057

 

Termination without "Cause"

 

 

460,218

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

99,207

 

 

34,981

 (1,5)

 

 

 

 

5,850

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

600,256

 

Change in control termination

 

 

600,000

 

 

 

41,439

 

 

 

99,207

 

 

74,299

 (4)

 

 

 

 

5,850

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

820,795

 

Disability

 

 

2,132,701

 

 

 

41,439

 

 

 

99,207

 

 

34,981

 (1,5)

 

 

 

 

5,850

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,314,178

 

Death (3)

 

 

-

 

 

 

41,439

 

 

 

99,207

 

 

34,981

 (1,5)

 

 

 

 

750,000

 (4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

925,627

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David D. Brown

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Early retirement

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

17,341

 (1,5)

 

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

17,341

 

Retirement

 

 

-

 

 

 

31,968

 

 

 

-

 

 

80,000

 (2,5)

 

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

111,968

 

Termination for "Cause"

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-

 

Termination without "Cause"

 

 

347,718

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

 

17,341

 (1,5)

 

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

365,059

 

Change in control termination

 

 

450,000

 

 

 

31,968

 

 

 

-

 

 

50,363

 (4)

 

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

532,331

 

Disability

 

 

2,841,350

 

 

 

31,968

 

 

 

-

 

 

17,341

 (1,5)

 

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,890,659