FPTB » Topics » ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

These excerpts taken from the FPTB 10-K filed Mar 6, 2009.

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures

An evaluation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Section 13(a)-14(c) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”)) as of December 31, 2008, was carried out under the supervision and with the participation of the our Chief Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer and several other members of our senior management within the 90-day period preceding the filing date of this annual report. Our Chief Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer concluded that, as of December 31, 2008, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective in ensuring that the information required to be disclosed by us in the reports we file or submit under the Exchange Act is (i) accumulated and communicated to our management (including our Chief Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer) in a timely manner, and (ii) recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms.

There were no changes in our internal controls over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Exchange Act) that occurred during the quarter ended December 31, 2008, that have materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

We do not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures will prevent all error and all fraud. A control procedure, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control procedure are met. Because of the inherent limitations in all control procedures, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgment in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the control. The design of any control procedure also is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions; over time, controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control procedure, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.

The annual report of management on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting and the attestation report thereon issued by our independent registered public accounting firm are set forth under “Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting” and “Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm” under “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.”

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures

An evaluation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Section 13(a)-14(c) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”)) as of December 31, 2008, was carried out under the supervision and with the participation of the our Chief Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer and several other members of our senior management within the 90-day period preceding the filing date of this annual report. Our Chief Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer concluded that, as of December 31, 2008, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective in ensuring that the information required to be disclosed by us in the reports we file or submit under the Exchange Act is (i) accumulated and communicated to our management (including our Chief Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer) in a timely manner, and (ii) recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms.

There were no changes in our internal controls over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Exchange Act) that occurred during the quarter ended December 31, 2008, that have materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

We do not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures will prevent all error and all fraud. A control procedure, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control procedure are met. Because of the inherent limitations in all control procedures, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgment in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the control. The design of any control procedure also is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions; over time, controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control procedure, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.

The annual report of management on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting and the attestation report thereon issued by our independent registered public accounting firm are set forth under “Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting” and “Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm” under “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.”

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures

An evaluation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Section 13(a)-14(c) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”)) as of December 31, 2008, was carried out under the supervision and with the participation of the our Chief Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer and several other members of our senior management within the 90-day period preceding the filing date of this annual report. Our Chief Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer concluded that, as of December 31, 2008, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective in ensuring that the information required to be disclosed by us in the reports we file or submit under the Exchange Act is (i) accumulated and communicated to our management (including our Chief Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer) in a timely manner, and (ii) recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms.

There were no changes in our internal controls over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Exchange Act) that occurred during the quarter ended December 31, 2008, that have materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

We do not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures will prevent all error and all fraud. A control procedure, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control procedure are met. Because of the inherent limitations in all control procedures, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgment in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the control. The design of any control procedure also is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions; over time, controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control procedure, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.

The annual report of management on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting and the attestation report thereon issued by our independent registered public accounting firm are set forth under “Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting” and “Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm” under “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.”

These excerpts taken from the FPTB 10-K filed Mar 10, 2008.

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures

An evaluation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Section 13(a)-14(c) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”)) as of December 31, 2007, was carried out under the supervision and with the participation of the our Chief Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer and several other members of our senior management within the 90-day period preceding the filing date of this annual report. Our Chief Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer concluded that, as of December 31, 2007, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective in ensuring that the information required to be disclosed by us in the reports we file or submit under the Exchange Act is (i) accumulated and communicated to our management (including our Chief Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer) in a timely manner, and (ii) recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms.

There were no changes in our internal controls over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Exchange Act) that occurred during the quarter ended December 31, 2007, that have materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

We do not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures will prevent all error and all fraud. A control procedure, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control procedure are met. Because of the inherent limitations in all control procedures, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgment in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the control. The design of any control procedure also is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions; over time, controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control procedure, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.


Item 9A. Controls and Procedures

An evaluation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in
Section 13(a)-14(c) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”)) as of December 31, 2007, was carried out under the supervision and with the participation of the our Chief Executive Officer, Principal Financial
Officer and several other members of our senior management within the 90-day period preceding the filing date of this annual report. Our Chief Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer concluded that, as of December 31, 2007, our
disclosure controls and procedures were effective in ensuring that the information required to be disclosed by us in the reports we file or submit under the Exchange Act is (i) accumulated and communicated to our management (including our Chief
Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer) in a timely manner, and (ii) recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms.

STYLE="margin-top:12px;margin-bottom:0px; text-indent:4%">There were no changes in our internal controls over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Exchange Act) that occurred during the
quarter ended December 31, 2007, that have materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="2">We do not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures will prevent all error and all fraud. A control procedure, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance
that the objectives of the control procedure are met. Because of the inherent limitations in all control procedures, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company
have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgment in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts
of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the control. The design of any control procedure also is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance
that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions; over time, controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may
deteriorate. Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control procedure, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.

SIZE="2">
Item 9B. Other Information

None.

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PART III

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Item 10. Directors and Executive Officers of the Registrant

Directors and Executive Officers. The
information concerning directors of the Company required by this item is incorporated herein by reference from the Company’s definitive proxy statement for its 2008 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, a copy of which will be filed with the
Securities and Exchange Commission not later than 120 days after the end of the Company’s fiscal year. Information concerning the executive officers of the Company who are not directors is incorporated herein by reference from Part I of this
Form 10-K under the caption “Executive Officers of the Registrant Who Are Not Directors.”

Audit Committee Financial
Expert.
Information concerning the audit committee of the Company’s Board of Directors, including information regarding the audit committee financial experts serving on the audit committee, is incorporated herein by reference from the
definitive proxy statement for the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held in April 2008, except for information contained under the heading “Report of the Audit Committee,” a copy of which will be filed not later than 120 days after the
close of the fiscal year.

Code of Ethics. The Company adopted a written Code of Ethics based upon the standards set forth under
Item 406 of Regulation S-K of the Securities Exchange Act. The Code of Ethics applies to all of the Company’s directors, officers and employees. A copy of the Company’s Code of Ethics was filed with the SEC as Exhibit 14 to the Annual
Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2004. You may obtain a copy of the Code of Ethics free of charge from the Company by writing to the Corporate Secretary of the Company, 610 Bay Boulevard, Chula Vista, California 91910 or by
calling (619) 691-9741. These documents are also available in the corporate governance section of the Company’s website at www.firstpactrustbancorp.com/corporate governance.

STYLE="margin-top:12px;margin-bottom:0px; text-indent:4%">Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance. The information concerning compliance with the reporting requirements of
Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 by directors, officers and ten percent stockholders of the Company required by this item is incorporated herein by reference from the Company’s definitive proxy statement for its 2004
Annual Meeting of Stockholders, a copy of which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission not later than 120 days after the end of the Company’s fiscal year.

STYLE="margin-top:12px;margin-bottom:0px; text-indent:4%">Nomination Procedures. There have been no material changes to the procedures by which shareholders may recommend nominees to the Company’s
Board of Directors.

Audit Committee Matters. The Board of Directors of the Company has a standing Audit Committee, which has been
established in accordance with Section 3(a)(58)(A) of the Exchange Act. The members of that committee are Directors Alvin L. Majors (Chairman), Kenneth W. Scholz, and Donald A. Whitacre, all of whom are considered independent under applicable
Nasdaq listing standards. The Board of Directors has determined that Mr. Alvin L. Majors is an “audit committee financial expert” as defined in applicable SEC rules.

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="2">
Item 11. Executive Compensation

The information concerning executive compensation required by this item
is incorporated herein by reference from the Company’s definitive proxy statement for its 2008 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, except for information contained under the headings “Compensation Committee report on Executive Compensation,
and “Report of the Audit Committee,” a copy of which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission not later than 120 days after the end of the Company’s fiscal year.

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This excerpt taken from the FPTB 10-K filed Feb 28, 2007.

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures

An evaluation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Section 13(a)-14(c) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”)) as of December 31, 2006, was carried out under the supervision and with the participation of the our Chief Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer and several other members of our senior management within the 90-day period preceding the filing date of this annual report. Our Chief Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer concluded that, as of December 31, 2006, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective in ensuring that the information required to be disclosed by us in the reports we file or submit under the Exchange Act is (i) accumulated and communicated to our management (including our Chief Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer) in a timely manner, and (ii) recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms.

There were no changes in our internal controls over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Exchange Act) that occurred during the quarter ended December 31, 2006, that have materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

We do not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures will prevent all error and all fraud. A control procedure, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control procedure are met. Because of the inherent limitations in all control procedures, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgment in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the control. The design of any control procedure also is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions; over time, controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control procedure, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Act) that occurred during the quarter ended December 31, 2006, that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting, the annual report of management on the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting and the attestation report there on issued by our registered public accounting firm are set forth below under “Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting” and “Report of the Independent Registered Public Accounting firm.”

This excerpt taken from the FPTB 10-K filed Mar 9, 2006.

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures

An evaluation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Section 13(a)-14(c) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Exchange Act”)) as of December 31, 2005, was carried out under the supervision and with the participation of the our Chief Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer and several other members of our senior management within the 90-day period preceding the filing date of this annual report. Our Chief Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer concluded that, as of December 31, 2005, our disclosure controls and procedures were effective in ensuring that the information required to be disclosed by us in the reports we file or submit under the Exchange Act is (i) accumulated and communicated to our management (including our Chief Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer) in a timely manner, and (ii) recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms.

There were no changes in our internal controls over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Exchange Act) that occurred during the quarter ended December 31, 2005, that have materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

We do not expect that our disclosure controls and procedures will prevent all error and all fraud. A control procedure, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control procedure are met. Because of the inherent limitations in all control procedures, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgment in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the control. The design of any control procedure also is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions; over time, controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control procedure, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Act) that occurred during the quarter ended December 31, 2005, that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting, the annual report of management on the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting and the attestation report there on issued by our registered public accounting firm are set forth below under “Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting” and “Report of the Independent Registered Public Accounting firm.”

This excerpt taken from the FPTB 10-Q filed May 10, 2005.

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures: An evaluation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Section 13(a)-15(e)of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (the “Act”) as of March 31, 2005 was carried out under the supervision and with the participation of the Company’s Chief Executive Officer, Principal Financial Officer and several other members of the company’s senior management. The Company’s Chief Executive Officer and

 

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Principal Financial Officer concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures as currently in effect are effective in ensuring that the information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports it files or submits under the Act is (i) accumulated and communicated to the Company’s management (including the Chief Executive Officer and Principal Financial Officer) in a timely manner, and (ii) recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms.

 

There have been no changes in internal controls over financial reporting [as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Activities] that occurred during the quarter ended March 31, 2005 that have materially affected or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal controls over financial reporting.

 

The Company does not expect that its disclosure controls and procedures will prevent all error and all fraud. A control procedure, no matter how well conceived and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the control procedure are met. Because of the inherent limitations in all control procedures, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty, and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the individual acts of some persons, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the control. The design of any control procedure also is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions; over time, controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. Because of the inherent limitations in a cost-effective control procedure, misstatements due to error or fraud may occur and not be detected.

 

We intend to continually review and evaluate the design and effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures and to improve our controls and procedures over time and to correct any deficiencies that we may discover in the future. The goal is to ensure that senior management has timely access to all material financial and non-financial information concerning the Company’s business. While we believe that the present design of our disclosure controls and procedures is effective to achieve our goal, future events affecting our business may cause us to modify our disclosure controls and procedures.

 

PART II— OTHER INFORMATION

 

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