GD » Topics » Backlog

This excerpt taken from the GD 8-K filed Oct 28, 2009.

Backlog

Total backlog at the end of the third quarter 2009 was $66.2 billion. Backlog grew in the Combat Systems and Information Systems and Technology segments in the quarter, reflecting continued strong demand for the company’s vehicle and ammunition products and information-technology services. New orders received included $950 million for production, support and reset of Stryker infantry combat vehicles for the U.S. Army, as well as ammunition orders for U.S. and allied customers. Demand for information-technology (IT) services and engineering support for military platforms produced a book-to-bill ratio of greater than 1 in the Information Systems and Technology segment. In addition to the backlog, the estimated potential contract value, representing management’s estimate of value under unfunded indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity (IDIQ) contracts and unexercised options, grew to $18.2 billion at the end of third-quarter 2009.

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This excerpt taken from the GD 8-K filed Jul 29, 2009.

Backlog

The company’s total backlog at the end of the quarter was $67.6 billion, a 22.2 percent increase over the $55.3 billion total backlog reported at the end of the second-quarter 2008. Funded backlog at the end of second-quarter 2009 increased 5.3 percent from one year ago, to $47.7 billion. In addition, the estimated potential contract value, which represents management’s estimate of value under unfunded indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity (IDIQ) contracts and unexercised options, grew to $17.7 billion at the end of second-quarter 2009 from 2008.

This excerpt taken from the GD 8-K filed Apr 29, 2009.

Backlog

Funded backlog at the end of first-quarter 2009 increased 23 percent from one year ago, to $49.2 billion. The company’s total backlog at the end of the quarter was $71.1 billion, 43 percent higher than the $49.8 billion total backlog reported at the end of the year-ago period. In addition to the backlog, the estimated potential contract value, which represents management’s estimate of value under unfunded indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity (IDIQ) contracts and unexercised options, was $17.9 billion at the end of first-quarter 2009.

This excerpt taken from the GD 10-K filed Feb 20, 2009.

BACKLOG

Our total backlog represents the estimated remaining sales value of work to be performed under firm contracts and includes funded and unfunded portions. For additional discussion of backlog, see Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations contained in Part II, Item 7, of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Summary backlog information for each of our business groups follows:

 

               2008 Total
Backlog Not
Expected to be
Completed in
2009
December 31    2008    2007   
     Funded    Unfunded    Total    Funded    Unfunded    Total   

Aerospace

   $ 21,861    $ 618    $ 22,479    $ 11,591    $ 665    $ 12,256    $ 18,119

Combat Systems

     12,127      2,831      14,958      10,824      2,077      12,901      7,339

Marine Systems

     10,482      15,963      26,445      7,621      4,439      12,060      21,141

Information Systems and Technology

     7,242      3,003      10,245      7,158      2,457      9,615      3,454

Total backlog

   $ 51,712    $ 22,415    $ 74,127    $ 37,194    $ 9,638    $ 46,832    $ 50,053

 

This excerpt taken from the GD 8-K filed Jan 28, 2009.

Backlog

The company’s total backlog grew by $13.6 billion in the fourth quarter of 2008, to $74.1 billion. Compared to year-end 2007, total backlog increased by $27.3 billion. Funded backlog at year-end 2008 was $51.7 billion, an increase of $14.5 billion over the prior year.

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This excerpt taken from the GD 8-K filed Oct 22, 2008.

Backlog

Funded backlog at the end of the third quarter 2008 was $49.7 billion, and total backlog was $60.5 billion, compared to $45.2 billion and $55.3 billion, respectively, at the end of the second quarter 2008. Backlog growth in the quarter included significant increases in three of the company’s four business groups.

This excerpt taken from the GD 8-K filed Jul 23, 2008.

Backlog

The company’s funded backlog grew by approximately $5.2 billion or 12.9 percent in the second quarter of 2008, on strong orders for new aircraft in the Aerospace group, as well as demand for tanks, combat vehicles, tactical communications systems and information technology services. Compared to first-quarter 2008, company-wide total backlog grew by 11.2 percent.

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This excerpt taken from the GD 8-K filed Apr 23, 2008.

Backlog

The company’s funded and total backlog each grew by approximately $2.9 billion in the first quarter of 2008, to $40 billion and $49.8 billion respectively at the end of the period. Compared to first-quarter 2007, funded backlog grew by 16 percent and total backlog grew by 14.1 percent.

This excerpt taken from the GD 10-K filed Feb 22, 2008.

Backlog

LOGO

The Information Systems and Technology group’s backlog decreased slightly in 2007 to $9.6 billion compared with $10 billion at the end of 2006. At year end, the group’s funded backlog was $7.2 billion, down from $7.5 billion in 2006. Unlike the company’s other defense businesses, the Information Systems and Technology group’s backlog consists of thousands of contracts that have to be reconstituted each year with new program and task order awards, and relatively few large-scale, long-term programs.

The largest program in Information Systems and Technology’s backlog at year end is the Army’s Warfighter Information Network-Tactical (WIN-T) program. The group’s backlog at December 31, 2007, included $900 for WIN-T and its predecessor program, Joint Network Node (JNN). The Army restructured JNN and WIN-T into a single program in 2007. The company is the prime contractor on this battlefield communications network program that is designed to provide warfighters with fast, secure, mobile command-and-control capabilities. In 2007, the group received approximately $950 of awards for WIN-T to continue the design and development of the system and provide simulation and training.

The group’s backlog also included approximately $430 for the Canadian Maritime Helicopter Project (MHP). Under the MHP program, the company provides integrated mission systems for 28 state-of-the-art helicopters that are intended to replace Canada’s aging fleet of marine helicopters.

 

28    General Dynamics 2007 Annual Report


Table of Contents

Other significant portions of the group’s year-end backlog include approximately $375 for the U.K.’s BOWMAN program, $300 for the ICE2 program, $290 for the MUOS program and $210 for CHS-3. The company received $440 in orders on the ICE2 program and over $100 of orders on CHS-3 in 2007.

In addition to these programs, the group received a number of significant contract awards in 2007.

The group was awarded a contract extension in 2007 worth approximately $100 to continue its support of the U.S. Joint Forces Command’s Joint Experimentation Program and Joint Futures Lab (JEXP), bringing the total contract value to approximately $375. Under this program, the group is providing engineering, technical and administrative services for joint force concept development.

The Department of Homeland Security awarded the Information Systems and Technology group a task order under the Enterprise Acquisition Gateway for Leading Edge Solutions (EAGLE) program. Under the task order, which has a potential value of over $225 if all options are exercised, the group provides technology operations and maintenance services (TOMIS) for Citizen and Immigration Services at more than 280 locations nationwide.

The group was awarded a contract worth approximately $90 by the Navy to provide modifications and support for fire control systems aboard U.S. and U.K. ballistic missile submarines and for the attack weapons control system aboard U.S. guided missile submarines. The contract has a total potential value of approximately $160 if all options are exercised.

The U.K. Royal Air Force awarded the group a contract worth $95 for the tactical data link system of the Tactical Information Exchange Capability (TIEC) program. TIEC provides aircrews with enhanced situational awareness.

The group received an initial order worth approximately $25 on a potential $300 contract to provide IT support services to the U.S. Senate.

The group also received an initial order of $14 from the Army for support and engineering services on the Command Post of the Future (CPOF) program. The CPOF is an executive-level decision support system providing situational awareness and collaborative tools. This IDIQ program has a potential value of approximately $200.

The group’s backlog does not include approximately $8.7 billion of potential contract value associated with IDIQ contracts and unexercised options. The value of these arrangements may be realized over the next 15 years. In 2007, funding under IDIQ contracts contributed over $2.2 billion, or approximately 25 percent of the group’s IDIQ contract value, to the group’s funded backlog, most notably from ICE2, CHS-3, JEXP and WIN-T.

Information Systems and Technology was awarded several significant IDIQ contracts during 2007. The group was selected by the Department of Justice as the system integrator for the Integrated Wireless Network (IWN). IWN is a collaborative effort between the Departments of Justice, Homeland Security and the Treasury intended to provide secure, seamless, interoperable and reliable nationwide wireless voice, data and multimedia communications among federal agents and law enforcement officers engaged in disaster response, law enforcement, protective services and homeland defense. IWN is an IDIQ program with a potential value of $10 billion over 15 years, if all options are exercised.

In addition, the group received one of 29 General Services Administration (GSA) Alliant contracts to provide federal government agencies with infrastructure, application and IT management services. Alliant is an IDIQ program with a $50 billion ceiling among all awardees over a 10-year period.

This excerpt taken from the GD 8-K filed Jan 23, 2008.

Backlog

The company’s funded backlog grew by $292 million in the fourth quarter of 2007, to $37.2 billion. Compared to year-end 2006, funded backlog increased $3.2 billion. Total backlog at year-end 2007 was $46.8 billion.

This excerpt taken from the GD 8-K filed Oct 24, 2007.

Backlog

Funded backlog at the end of the third quarter 2007 was $36.9 billion, and total backlog was $46.5 billion, compared to $35.4 billion and $44.6 billion, respectively, at the end of the second quarter 2007.

This excerpt taken from the GD 8-K filed Jul 25, 2007.

Backlog

Funded backlog at the end of the second quarter 2007 was $35.4 billion, and total backlog was $44.6 billion, compared to $34.5 billion and $43.6 billion, respectively, at the end of the first quarter of 2007.

This excerpt taken from the GD 8-K filed Apr 25, 2007.

Backlog

The company’s funded backlog grew by approximately $500 million in the first quarter of 2007, to $34.5 billion. Total backlog at the end of the quarter was $43.6 billion, essentially unchanged from the end of the fourth quarter of 2006. Compared to the year-ago period, funded backlog grew by more than 18 percent, and total backlog grew by 8.6 percent.

This excerpt taken from the GD 10-K filed Feb 23, 2007.

Backlog

LOGO

The Information Systems and Technology group’s backlog grew 6 percent in 2006 to $10 billion at year end. The group’s funded backlog increased 8 percent over 2005, reaching $7.5 billion. The group continued to generate significant order activity in 2006, achieving a book-to-bill ratio (orders divided by sales) greater than one for the fourth consecutive year. Unlike the company’s other defense businesses, the Information Systems and Technology group’s backlog consists primarily of a large number of mid-size contracts and programs, as well as several large-scale, long-term programs awarded over the past few years.

Programs that made up a significant portion of the group’s year-end backlog included over $600 for the U.K.’s BOWMAN program, approximately $500 for the MHP contract, $515 for the MUOS program and $490 for ICE2. The group received over $650 in orders on the ICE2 program in 2006.

In addition to these programs, the group received numerous significant contract awards in 2006.

The Information Systems and Technology group was awarded one of two contracts to prepare a design and implementation plan for an initial service area of the Integrated Wireless Network (IWN). Following the design phase in 2007, the customer plans to select a single contractor to implement this system. IWN is a collaborative effort between the Departments of Justice, Homeland Security and the Treasury intended to provide secure, seamless, interoperable and reliable nationwide wireless voice, data and multimedia communications among 80,000 federal agents and law enforcement officers engaged in disaster response, law enforcement, protective services and homeland defense.

The group was awarded a contract extension in 2006 worth approximately $100 to continue its support of the U.S. Joint Forces Command’s Joint Experimentation Program and Joint Futures Lab, bringing the total contract value to over $275. Under this program, the group is providing engineering, technical and administrative services for joint force concept development.

The Army awarded the group two contracts worth a combined $125 to support the Joint Network Node (JNN) program, bringing the total contract value to date to $380. Under JNN, the company is installing and deploying a tactical communications network for the Army.

 

28    General Dynamics 2006 Annual Report


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The group also received an order worth approximately $190 under its JTRS HMS radio development contract. Under the JTRS contract, the group is developing small, lightweight software-defined radios for use by all branches of the U.S. military.

The Marine Corps awarded the group a contract valued at $230 for 165 Combat Operation Centers. These mobile command and control systems are intended to meet an urgent operational need for regiment- and battalion-level Marine Corps operations centers in Iraq.

The group’s backlog does not include approximately $9.2 billion of potential contract value associated with IDIQ contracts and unexercised options. The value of these arrangements grew by over 35 percent in 2006 and may be realized over the next 15 years. In 2006, funding under IDIQ contracts contributed over $2.5 billion to the group’s funded backlog.

The group was awarded several significant IDIQ contracts during 2006, including one of 16 contracts from the Army to provide services under the Information Technology Enterprise Solutions–2 Services (ITES-2S) program. ITES-2S is an IDIQ contract with a $20 billion program ceiling and a nine-year performance period. Under the ITES-2S contract, the participating contractors will provide information technology services to the Army in support of its enterprise infrastructure goals.

The Army selected the group for the first competitively awarded task order under the Total Engineering and Integration Services (TEIS) contract, an IDIQ multiple-award contract to provide IT engineering and technical support at customer sites worldwide. The TEIS contract has a ceiling value of approximately $800.

The Department of Homeland Security awarded the group one of 25 IDIQ contracts under its Enterprise Acquisition Gateway for Leading Edge Solutions (EAGLE) program. This contract is for the procurement of IT services under four functional categories, including engineering design, development, implementation and integration; operations and maintenance; software development; and management support services.

Information Systems and Technology was awarded one of six World-Wide Satellite Systems (WWSS) prime contracts to provide a family of military satellite communications terminals under a five-year IDIQ program worth up to $5 billion. The program is intended to support federal communications missions, including disaster relief and homeland security efforts.

In addition, the group was awarded a prime contract under the Design Engineering Support Program II (DESP II), a multiple-award IDIQ contract with a total potential value of $1.9 billion over five years. This contract is for design and engineering technical support services for Department of Defense mission weapon systems, components and support equipment.

This excerpt taken from the GD 8-K filed Jan 24, 2007.

Backlog

The company’s funded backlog grew by approximately $1 billion in the fourth quarter of 2006, to $32.7 billion; it increased $4.5 billion compared to year-end 2005. Total backlog at year-end 2006 was $43.7 billion.

This excerpt taken from the GD 10-K filed Mar 3, 2006.

Backlog

LOGO

The Aerospace group’s backlog exceeded $8 billion at the end of 2005, an increase of 18 percent over 2004. The group’s funded backlog grew 26 percent in 2005 to $5.9 billion at year end, representing almost 75 percent of the total backlog. The group received 124 orders in 2005, 28 percent more than the record number of orders received in 2004, excluding fractional activity. In the fourth quarter of 2005, the Aerospace group achieved a book-to-bill ratio (net orders divided by sales) greater than one for the sixth consecutive quarter.

The group’s backlog includes aircraft deliveries through 2011. A significant portion of the group’s backlog is with NetJets Inc. (NetJets), a unit of Berkshire Hathaway and the leader in the fractional aircraft market. NetJets purchases the aircraft for use in its fractional ownership program. The group’s funded backlog at year end included $1.6 billion with NetJets, representing firm contracts for 91 aircraft, including 15 green aircraft that are scheduled for delivery in 2006. The unfunded backlog included $1.4 billion for 100 aircraft options from NetJets, constituting all of the options in backlog. NetJets also represented 69 percent of the maintenance and support services in unfunded backlog. Deliveries of aircraft to NetJets are scheduled from 2006 through 2011 and represent as little as 4 percent and as much as 11 percent of projected new aircraft sales in those years.

The group’s remaining $4.3 billion of funded backlog at year-end 2005 consisted of contracts with a broad range of customers from a variety of industries and included approximately $470 of contracts with government customers.

This excerpt taken from the GD 10-Q filed May 5, 2005.

Backlog

 

The following table details the backlog and the total estimated contract value of each business group at the end of the first quarter of 2005 and fourth quarter of 2004:

 

April 3, 2005    Funded    Unfunded    Total
Backlog
   IDIQ
Contract
Value
   Total
Estimated
Contract
Value

Information Systems and Technology

   $ 7,466    $ 2,598    $ 10,064    $ 5,723    $ 15,787

Combat Systems

     8,060      2,099      10,159      89      10,248

Marine Systems

     10,396      6,849      17,245      —        17,245

Aerospace

     4,725      2,209      6,934      —        6,934

Resources

     228      58      286      —        286

Total

   $ 30,875    $ 13,813    $ 44,688    $ 5,812    $ 50,500

December 31, 2004                         

Information Systems and Technology

   $ 7,071    $ 2,276    $ 9,347    $ 6,301    $ 15,648

Combat Systems

     6,398      2,318      8,716      97      8,813

Marine Systems

     9,899      6,943      16,842      —        16,842

Aerospace

     4,652      2,192      6,844      —        6,844

Resources

     200      58      258      —        258

Total

   $ 28,220    $ 13,787    $ 42,007    $ 6,398    $ 48,405

 

This excerpt taken from the GD 10-K filed Mar 4, 2005.

BACKLOG

 

The company’s total backlog represents the estimated remaining sales value of work to be performed under firm contracts and includes funded and unfunded portions. For additional discussion of backlog, see Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations contained in Part II, Item 7, of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Summary backlog information for each business group follows:

 

December 31    2004              2003              2004 Total
Backlog Not
Expected to be
Completed in
2005
     Funded    Unfunded    Total    Funded    Unfunded    Total   

Information Systems and Technology

   $ 7,127    $ 2,287    $ 9,414    $ 5,950    $ 1,529    $ 7,479    $ 5,983

Combat Systems

     6,398      2,318      8,716      5,826      2,433      8,259      4,842

Marine Systems

     9,899      6,943      16,842      8,775      9,388      18,163      12,298

Aerospace

     4,652      2,192      6,844      4,127      2,397      6,524      4,416

Resources

     200      58      258      163      57      220      113
     $ 28,276    $ 13,798    $ 42,074    $ 24,841    $ 15,804    $ 40,645    $ 27,652

 

General Dynamics 2004 Annual Report    9


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