Annual Reports

 
Quarterly Reports

  • 10-Q (Nov 12, 2008)
  • 10-Q (Aug 11, 2008)
  • 10-Q (May 19, 2008)
  • 10-Q (Nov 9, 2007)
  • 10-Q (Aug 16, 2007)
  • 10-Q (Aug 14, 2007)

 
8-K

 
Other

Grill Concepts 10-Q 2006

Documents found in this filing:

  1. 10-Q
  2. Ex-31.1
  3. Ex-31.2
  4. Ex-32.1
  5. Ex-32.2
  6. Ex-32.2
Unassociated Document
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549


FORM 10-Q

(Mark One)

x
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended September 24, 2006

OR

o
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from _______ to _______.

Commission File No. 0-23226

GRILL CONCEPTS, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
Delaware
13-3319172
(State or other jurisdiction
of incorporation or organization)
(IRS Employer
Identification No.)
 
11661 San Vicente Blvd., Suite 404, Los Angeles, California 90049
(Address of principal executive offices)(Zip code)

(310) 820-5559
(Registrant's telephone number, including area code)

_______________________________________________________________
(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x No o
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer an accelerated filer or a non-accelerated filer.  See definition of “accelerated filer and large accelerated filer” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):
 
Large accelerated filer o  Accelerated filer o    Non-accelerated filer x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

Yes o  No x
 
As of October 31, 2006, 6,393,716 shares of Common Stock of the issuer were outstanding.


 
GRILL CONCEPTS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

INDEX
 
 
 
 Page
Number
 
        
PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION
       
         
Item 1. Financial Statements
       
         
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets -
       
September 24, 2006 (unaudited) and December 25, 2005
   
3
 
 
       
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations -
       
For the three months and nine months ended September
       
24, 2006 and September 25, 2005 (both unaudited)
   
5
 
         
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows -
       
For the nine months ended September 24, 2006 and
       
September 25, 2005 (both unaudited)
   
6
 
         
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
   
8
 
         
Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition
       
 and Results of Operations
   
22
 
         
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
   
38
 
         
Item 4. Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
   
38
 
         
PART II - OTHER INFORMATION
       
         
Item 1. Legal Proceedings
   
39
 
         
Item 1A. Risk Factors
   
39
 
         
Item 6. Exhibits
   
39
 
 
       
SIGNATURES
   
40
 
 
2

 
PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


GRILL CONCEPTS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

ASSETS
(in thousands, except share data)
 
     
September 24, 2006
   
December 25, 2005
 
     
(Unaudited)
   
 
 
Current assets:
             
Cash
 
$
2,180
 
$
3,161
 
Inventories
   
819
   
727
 
Receivables, net of reserve ($300 in
             
2006 and $238 in 2005)
   
747
   
784
 
Note receivable - current portion
   
12
   
11
 
Reimbursable costs receivable
   
853
   
912
 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
   
855
   
401
 
               
Total current assets
   
5,466
   
5,996
 
               
Furniture, equipment, and improvements, net
   
15,454
   
13,372
 
               
Restricted cash
   
1,192
   
1,042
 
Note receivable
   
66
   
79
 
Liquor licenses
   
411
   
426
 
Deferred tax asset
   
3,945
   
577
 
Non-compete agreement, net
   
2,945
   
-
 
Other assets
   
589
   
276
 
Goodwill, net
   
205
   
205
 
               
Total assets
 
$
30,273
 
$
21,973
 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

3

 
GRILL CONCEPTS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(Continued)
LIABILITIES, MINORITY INTEREST AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY
(in thousands, except share data)
 
     
September 24, 2006
   
December 25, 2005
 
     
(unaudited)
       
Current liabilities:
             
Accounts payable
 
$
1,582
 
$
1,457
 
Accrued expenses
   
5,322
   
4,533
 
Accrued managed outlets operating expenses
   
853
   
912
 
Payable to Hotel Restaurant Properties, Inc.
   
3,020
   
 
Current portion of long-term debt
   
84
   
48
 
Current portion of notes payable - related parties
   
155
   
312
 
Current portion of liability for debt extinguishment
   
50
   
 
               
Total current liabilities
   
11,066
   
7,262
 
               
Long-term debt
   
1,612
   
206
 
Notes payable - related parties
   
   
671
 
Liability for debt extinguishment
   
100
   
 
Other long-term liabilities
   
8,831
   
7,398
 
               
Total liabilities
   
21,609
   
15,537
 
               
Minority interest
   
1,509
   
1,630
 
               
Stockholders' equity:
             
Preferred Stock, 1,000,000 shares authorized,
             
995,935 shares undesignated in 2006 and 2005
   
   
 
Series II, 10% Convertible Preferred Stock, $.001 par
             
value; 500 shares authorized, 500 shares
             
issued and outstanding in 2006 and 2005
   
   
 
Common stock, $.00004 par value; 12,000,000 shares
             
authorized in 2006 and 2005, 6,403,212 shares
             
issued and outstanding in 2006, 5,728,495 shares
             
issued and outstanding in 2005
   
   
 
Additional paid-in capital
   
14,488
   
13,686
 
Accumulated deficit
   
(7,333
)
 
(8,880
)
               
Total stockholders' equity
   
7,155
   
4,806
 
Total liabilities, minority interest and
             
stockholders' equity
 
$
30,273
 
$
21,973
 
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.
 
4

 
GRILL CONCEPTS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(Unaudited)
(in thousands, except share data)
 
     
Three Months Ended
   
Nine Months Ended
 
     
September 24, 2006
   
September 25, 2005
   
September 24, 2006
   
September 25, 2005
 
             
 
     
Revenues:
                         
Sales
 
$
14,792
 
$
13,298
 
$
44,366
 
$
40,102
 
Cost reimbursements
   
3,921
   
3,675
   
11,535
   
10,264
 
Management and license fees
   
491
   
402
   
1,329
   
1,127
 
Total revenues
   
19,204
   
17,375
   
57,230
   
51,493
 
                           
Operating expenses:
                         
Cost of sales
   
4,298
   
3,743
   
12,576
   
11,295
 
Restaurant operating
   
9,039
   
8,256
   
26,544
   
23,987
 
Reimbursed costs
   
3,921
   
3,675
   
11,535
   
10,264
 
General and administrative
   
1,443
   
1,147
   
4,305
   
3,417
 
Depreciation and amortization
   
749
   
660
   
1,810
   
1,603
 
Pre-opening costs
   
242
   
11
   
440
   
272
 
Total operating expenses
   
19,692
   
17,492
   
57,210
   
50,838
 
                           
Income (loss) from operations
   
(488
)
 
(117
)
 
20
   
655
 
                           
Interest, net
   
(90
)
 
(43
)
 
(197
)
 
(123
)
Debt extinguishment costs
   
   
   
(279
)
 
 
                           
Income (loss) before benefit (provision) for
                         
income taxes and minority interest
   
(578
)
 
(160
)
 
(456
)
 
532
 
                           
Benefit (provision) for income taxes
   
163
   
(68
)
 
2,138
   
(277
)
Minority interest in net (profit)
                         
loss of subsidiaries
   
(30
)
 
40
   
(135
)
 
364
 
                           
Net income (loss)
   
(445
)
 
(188
)
 
1,547
   
619
 
Preferred dividends accrued
   
(13
)
 
(13
)
 
(38
)
 
(38
)
                           
Net income (loss) applicable to
                         
common stock
 
$
(458
)
$
(201
)
$
1,509
 
$
581
 
                           
Net income (loss) per share applicable
                         
to common stock:
                         
Basic net income (loss)
 
$
(0.07
)
$
(0.04
)
$
0.25
 
$
0.10
 
Diluted net income (loss)
 
$
(0.07
)
$
(0.04
)
$
0.24
 
$
0.09
 
                           
Weighted average shares outstanding:
                         
Basic
   
6,350,827
   
5,652,230
   
5,980,299
   
5,679,752
 
Diluted
   
6,350,827
   
5,652,230
   
6,474,678
   
6,217,285
 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

5

 
GRILL CONCEPTS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
  CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Unaudited)
(in thousands)
 
     
Nine Months Ended
 
     
September 24, 2006
   
September 25, 2005
 
               
Cash flows from operating activities:
             
Net income
 
$
1,547
 
$
619
 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash
             
provided by operating activities:
             
Depreciation and amortization
   
1,810
   
1,603
 
Amortized deferred rent and lease incentives
   
(609
)
 
(484
)
Amortized debt issuance costs
   
57
   
 
Deferred tax asset
   
(3,368
)
 
 
Stock based compensation
   
153
   
 
Provision for doubtful accounts
   
62
   
60
 
Loss on debt extinguishment
   
219
   
 
Gain on sale of assets
   
(19
)
 
(5
)
Minority interest in net profit (loss) of subsidiaries
   
135
   
(364
)
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:
             
Inventories
   
(92
)
 
(22
)
Receivables
   
(25
)
 
5
 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
   
(244
)
 
103
 
Tenant improvement allowances
   
1,832
   
1,962
 
Non-compete agreement and other assets
   
(43
)
 
(65
)
Accounts payable
   
125
   
(804
)
Accrued expenses
   
686
   
619
 
               
Net cash provided by operating activities
   
2,226
   
3,227
 
               
Cash flows from investing activities:
             
Proceeds from disposal of assets
   
55
   
5
 
Collections on note receivable
   
15
   
15
 
Restricted cash
   
(150
)
 
(160
)
Purchase of liquor license
   
(16
)
 
(71
)
Purchase of furniture, equipment and improvements
   
(3,480
)
 
(3,716
)
               
Net cash used in investing activities
   
(3,576
)
 
(3,927
)
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.
 
6

 
GRILL CONCEPTS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
  CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(Continued)
(Unaudited)
(in thousands)
 
Cash flows from financing activities:
             
Capital contributions from minority interests in LLC’s
 
$
125
 
$
1,274
 
Debt issuance costs
   
(413
)
 
 
Return of capital and profits to minority shareholder
   
(282
)
 
(186
)
Proceeds from line of credit and equipment financing
   
1,233
   
118
 
Proceeds from exercise of stock options and warrants
   
649
   
33
 
Payments on notes payable - to member of Chicago Grill
   
(902
)
 
(104
)
Payments on long-term debt
   
(41
)
 
(183
)
               
Net cash provided by financing activities
   
369
   
952
 
               
Net increase (decrease) in cash
   
(981
)
 
252
 
Cash, beginning of period
   
3,161
   
1,407
 
               
Cash, end of period
 
$
2,180
 
$
1,659
 
               
Supplemental cash flow information:
             
Cash paid during the period for:
             
Interest
 
$
232
 
$
141
 
Income taxes
   
709
   
263
 
               
Non-cash investing and financing items:
             
Non-compete agreement
 
$
3,020
   
 
Capital lease equipment financing
   
250
   
 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

7


GRILL CONCEPTS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 (Unaudited)

1.  
INTERIM FINANCIAL PRESENTATION

The interim condensed consolidated financial statements of Grill Concepts, Inc. (the “Company”) are prepared pursuant to the requirements for reporting on Form 10-Q. These financial statements have not been audited by our independent registered public accounting firm. The December 25, 2005 balance sheet data was derived from audited financial statements but does not include all disclosures required by generally accepted accounting principles. The interim financial statements and notes thereto should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and notes included in the Company’s Form 10-K for the year ended December 25, 2005. In the opinion of management, these interim financial statements reflect all adjustments of a normal recurring nature necessary for a fair presentation of the results for the interim periods presented. The current period results of operations are not necessarily indicative of results, which ultimately will be reported for the full year ending December 31, 2006.

All revenues reported in the condensed consolidated statements of operations are net of all sales and use taxes that are collected from customers and remitted to the appropriate taxing authorities.

Certain reclassifications have been made to the prior period financials to make them comparable to the current period results.


2.  
PREPAID EXPENSES AND OTHER CURRENT ASSETS

Most lease agreements contain one or more of the following: tenant improvement allowances, rent holidays, rent escalation clauses and/or contingent rent provisions.
 
Rent is recognized on a straight-line basis, including the restaurant build-out period. This period is normally prior to the commencement of rent payments and is commonly called the rent holiday period. The build-out period generally begins when the Company enters the space and begins to make improvements in preparation for intended use. The Company expenses rent on a straight-line basis during the build-out period. Tenant improvement allowances are also recognized on a straight-line basis beginning at the same time as the commencement of the straight-line rent expense.

Prepaid expenses and other current assets at September 24, 2006 and December 25, 2005 were comprised of:

(in thousands)
   
2006
   
2005
 
               
Lease incentives receivable
 
$
210
 
$
 
Prepaid expenses, other
   
645
   
401
 
Total prepaid expenses and other current assets
 
$
855
 
$
401
 
 
8

 
3.  
RESTRICTED CASH

In January 2006 a $1,010,000 certificate of deposit was established at Union Bank to act as collateral for the Stand By Letter of Credit opened to support our workers’ compensation insurance policy. Other restricted cash consisted of $72,000 held in escrow for the Daily Grill at Continental Park in El Segundo, California and $110,000 that was placed in escrow with our insurance claims processor in 2004 for workers’ compensation claims.

At December 25, 2005 restricted cash consisted of a $860,000 certificate of deposit serving as collateral for our Stand By Letter of Credit, $72,000 held in escrow for the Daily Grill at Continental Park in El Segundo, California and $110,000 that was placed in escrow with our insurance claims processor in 2004 for workers’ compensation claims.

4.  
INCOME TAXES

During the nine months ended September 24, 2006, the Company determined, based on an analysis of its taxable income over the preceding three years and the projected taxable income for the next three years, that it is more likely than not that the Company will recover the majority of its existing net deferred tax asset. Accordingly, during the period, most of the previously recorded valuation allowance with respect to the Company’s deferred tax asset was eliminated. As a result of the elimination of the valuation allowance, the Company realized a net tax benefit of about $2.1 million during the nine months ended September 24, 2006 and the Company’s condensed consolidated balance sheets reflected a deferred tax asset of $3.9 million at September 24, 2006.

As of September 25, 2005, the amount of the valuation allowance was $1.3 million, which represents a decrease of about $2.0 million from December 25, 2005, and consists of $0.7 million for general business credits and $0.6 million for net operating loss carryforwards (“NOL’s”). These differences have been allowed for due to the limitations on usage. The NOL’s have not been used to reduce current taxable income due to the Company not completing its analysis regarding limitations on usage. The Company intends to complete its analysis by year-end as to the portion of NOL’s that can be utilized. The Company reviews all of the available evidence, both positive and negative, in evaluating adequacy of the valuation allowance each quarter.


5.  
LONG-TERM DEBT

In March 2006, the Company signed a new financing agreement with Diamond Creek Investment Partners, LLC, (the “Lender”) at which time the Company’s previous line of credit was terminated. The Credit Agreement provides for a revolving term loan (the “Loan” or “Credit Agreement”) to the Company of the lesser of (a) $8.0 million, or (b) 2.25 times the Company’s trailing 12 month EBITDA. Funds may be borrowed under the Credit Agreement, subject to satisfaction of all conditions of funding, in monthly advances in minimum increments of $500,000. Proceeds of the Loan may be used to pay expenses of the Loan and for general corporate purposes. The interest rate on the Loan is, at the option of the Company and subject to certain limitations on the use of London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) based loans, equivalent to either (a) prime rate, but not less than 7%, plus an applicable margin, or (b) the LIBOR, but not less than 4%, plus an applicable margin. The margin, in each case, varies based upon the Company’s leverage ratio (funded debt to EBITDA, each as defined) and ranges from 2.75% to 3.50% with respect to prime rate loans and 5.50% to 6.25% with respect to LIBOR loans. The interest rate at September 24, 2006 was equal to 11.2% and was adjusted to 10.8% effective October 13, 2006.
 
9

 
The Credit Agreement provides that the Company will pay all expenses incurred in connection with the Loan, including expenses incurred by the Lender. By separate agreement, the Company agreed to pay certain fees associated with the Loan, including a loan initiation fee of $120,000, an unused line fee of 0.5% of the unused portion of the credit facility payable monthly and a loan servicing fee of $3,000 per month. In March 2006, we borrowed $210,000 under the line of credit to pay costs associated with obtaining the financing.
 
On March 31, 2006, the Company borrowed $1 million under the terms of the Credit Agreement with the Lender. The borrowed funds were primarily used to retire $874,192 of collateralized subordinated notes and manditorily redeemable capital obligations owed to MAG by the Company’s subsidiary, Chicago Grill, $5,940 of interest and $50,000 for the first annual penalty payment, all of which were guaranteed by the Company, with the balance used for general working capital purposes. The retired obligations related to the initial funding provided by MAG, as a member/investor in Chicago Grill, with respect to the Company’s The Grill on the Alley restaurant in Chicago.
 
The Loan matures, and is payable in full, on March 9, 2011 subject to mandatory prepayment to the extent, if any, that the outstanding principal balance of the Loan exceeds 2.25 times trailing 12 month EBITDA or upon the occurrence of certain defined extraordinary events. The Company may prepay amounts owing under the Credit Agreement subject to payment of a prepayment premium of (a) 3% with respect to prepayments occurring on or before March 9, 2007, and (b) 1% with respect to prepayments occurring after March 9, 2007 and on or before March 9, 2008.

The Company’s obligations under the Credit Agreement are secured by a first lien on all of the Company’s assets, including all of the capital stock and other equity interests held by the Company in its subsidiaries, subject to existing liens on such assets. The Loan requires the Company to comply with certain ordinary lending covenants. These include, among others, financial covenants relating to maximum debt to EBITDA ratio, minimum EBITDA and maximum capital expenditures. The Company must also comply with certain information requirements, including providing periodic financial statements and projections as well as notices of defaults, litigation and other matters, maintenance of insurance and compliance with laws as well as limitations on liens and encumbrances, indebtedness, dispositions, dividends and retirement of capital stock, consolidations and mergers, changes in nature of business and other operating, financial and structural limitations.

Events of default in the Credit Agreement include, among others, (a) the failure to pay when due the obligations owing under the Credit Agreement, (b) the failure to perform and not timely remedy certain covenants, (c) certain cross defaults or cross accelerations, (d) the occurrence of bankruptcy or insolvency events, (e) the failure to make certain payments, or the occurrence of certain events, relating to retirement plans, (f) certain adverse judgments against the Company or any of its subsidiaries, (g) certain changes in ownership of the Company’s stock or the board of directors, or (h) the occurrence of, and failure to remedy, a Material Adverse Effect (as defined in the Credit Agreement). Upon the occurrence of an event of default, the Lender may terminate the Loan commitment and declare the Loan due and payable in full.
 
10

 
6.  
LIABILITY FOR DEBT EXTINGUISHMENT

In March 2006, the Company retired the collateralized subordinated notes and mandatorily redeemable capital obligations owed to the Michigan Avenue Group (“MAG”) a member of Chicago Grill on the Alley, LLC (the “Chicago Grill”). As a result of the prepayment, MAG required a $200,000 penalty for earlier extinguishment of the obligations. The penalty is payable in four annual installments of $50,000, the first which was paid upon repayment of the obligations. The Company guaranteed the payment of the debt extinguishment penalty. The balance due to MAG as of September 24, 2006 is $150,000, which is included in current and long-term liabilities in the condensed consolidated balance sheets.

The penalty on early extinguishment will be deemed to be a cash distribution of the Chicago Grill to MAG if the lease for the restaurant location of the Chicago Grill on the Alley is renewed. After renewal, the Company will receive the next $200,000 of cash distributions from the Chicago Grill, prior to any distributions being made to MAG. The Company will record this cash distribution when received.

7.  
OTHER LONG-TERM LIABILITIES

In connection with certain of the Company's leases, the landlord has provided the Company with tenant improvement allowances. These lease incentives have been recorded as long-term liabilities and are being amortized over the life of the lease. Additionally, the Company records deferred rent where lease payments are lower than rental expense recognized on a straight-line basis.

Other Long-Term Liabilities at September 24, 2006 and December 25, 2005 were comprised of:

(in thousands)
   
2006
   
2005
 
               
Lease Incentives
 
$
6,726
 
$
5,140
 
Deferred Rent
   
2,105
   
2,258
 
Total Other Long-Term Liabilities
 
$
8,831
 
$
7,398
 


8.  
PER SHARE DATA

Pursuant to SFAS No. 128, “Earnings Per Share,” basic net income per share is computed by dividing the net income attributable to common shareholders by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted net income per share is computed by dividing the net income attributable to common shareholders by the weighted-average number of common and common equivalent shares outstanding during the period. Common share equivalents included in the diluted computation represent shares issuable upon assumed exercise of stock options, warrants and convertible preferred stocks using the treasury stock method.
 
11

 
A reconciliation of earnings available to common stockholders and diluted earnings available to common stockholders and the related weighted average shares for the three and nine-month periods ended September 24, 2006 and September 25, 2005 follows:


 
Three months
 
 
2006
 
 
2005
 
(in thousands, except share data)
 
Earnings
 
Shares
 
Earnings
 
Shares
 
Net loss
 
$
(445
)
     
$
(188
)
     
Less: preferred stock dividends
   
(13
)
       
(13
)
     
Earnings available for common stockholders
   
(458
)
 
6,350,827
   
(201
)
 
5,652,230
 
Dilutive earnings available to common stockholders
 
$
(458
)
 
6,350,827
 
$
(201
)
 
5,652,230
 

For the three months ended September 24, 2006; 857,925 options and 500 shares of convertible preferred stock were excluded from the calculation because they were anti-dilutive. For the three months ended September 25, 2005, 726,675 options; 1,359,896 warrants; and 500 shares of convertible preferred stock were excluded from the calculation because they were anti-dilutive.

Nine months
 
2006
 
2005
 
(in thousands, except share data)
 
 Earnings
 
 Shares
 
 Earnings
 
Shares
 
Net income
 
$
1,547
       
$
619
       
Less: preferred stock dividends
   
(38
)
       
(38
)
     
Earnings available for common stockholders
   
1,509
   
5,980,299
   
581
   
5,679,752
 
Dilutive securities:
                         
Stock options
   
   
96,487
   
   
126,111
 
Warrants
   
   
272,892
   
— 
   
411,422
 
Convertible Preferred Stocks
   
   
125,000
   
   
 
Dilutive earnings available to common stockholders
 
$
1,509
   
6,474,678
 
$
581
   
6,217,285
 

For the nine months ended September 24, 2006, 428,825 options were excluded from the calculation because they were anti-dilutive. For the nine months ended September 25, 2005, 324,625 options; 203,645 warrants; and 500 shares of convertible preferred stock were excluded from the calculation because they were anti-dilutive.

9.  
ISSUANCES OF COMMON STOCK

During the nine months ended September 24, 2006, the Company issued 642,317 shares of common stock pursuant to the exercise, by 17 holders, of 1,333,334 warrants originally issued in a 2001 private placement. The Company received $612,749 from the exercise of 272,333 warrants at $2.25 per share. The remaining 369,984 shares were issued pursuant to the cashless exercise of 666,667 warrants at $2.00 and 394,334 warrants at $2.25 per share.
 
12

 
During the nine months ended September 24, 2006, the Company issued 32,400 shares of common stock pursuant to the exercise of stock options for the aggregate consideration of $35,812.


10.  
STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION

We maintain performance incentive plans under which incentive stock options and non-qualified stock options may be granted to employees, consultants and non-employee directors.  To date, we have granted both qualified and non-qualified stock options under these plans.  Stock options are granted at the market price on the date of grant, generally vest at 20% per year, and generally expire ten years from the date of grant.  We issue new shares of common stock upon exercise of stock options.

In March 2006, the Company’s board of directors adopted the Grill Concepts, Inc. 2006 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2006 Plan”). The shareholders approved the 2006 Plan in June 2006. Under the 2006 Plan, 500,000 shares are reserved for issuance pursuant to the exercise of stock options and awards of restricted stock, stock appreciation rights and other similar equity based award grants. At September 24, 2006, there were 316,250 shares available for grant under the 2006 Plan and an additional 35,825 shares available for grant under predecessor plans.
 
Effective December 26, 2005, the first day of our 2006 fiscal year, we adopted Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Statement No. 123(R), “Share-Based Payment” (“SFAS 123R”), using the modified prospective transition method, and as a result, did not retroactively adjust results from prior periods.  Under this transition method, stock-based compensation was recognized for expenses related to the options vesting in the first nine months of 2006 based on the grant date fair value estimated in accordance with the provisions of SFAS 123R.  The Company applies the Black-Scholes valuation model in determining the fair value of share-based payments to employees, consultants and non-employee directors.  The resulting compensation expense is recognized over the requisite service period, which is generally the option vesting term of five years.  Options issued to non-employee directors are vested 100% at grant date. Prior to fiscal 2006, stock-based compensation was included as a pro forma disclosure in the Notes to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements as permitted by SFAS 123.
 
Compensation expense is recognized only for those options expected to vest, with forfeitures estimated based on our historical experience and future expectations.  Prior to the adoption of SFAS 123R, the effect of forfeitures on the pro forma expense amounts were recognized as the forfeitures occurred. 
 
As a result of adopting SFAS 123R, the impact to the Condensed Consolidated Statement of Operations for the nine months ended September 24, 2006 on income before income taxes and net loss was $153,000 and $92,000, respectively, and $0.02 and $0.01 on basic and diluted earnings per share, respectively. 

The pro forma table below reflects net income (loss) and basic and diluted net income (loss) per share for the three and nine month periods ended September 25, 2005, had we applied the fair value recognition provisions of SFAS 123R:

13

 
   
Three Months Ended
 
Nine Months Ended
 
(in thousands, except per share amounts)
 
September 25, 2005
 
September 25, 2005
 
           
Net income (loss), as reported
 
$
(201
)
$
581
 
Deduct: stock compensation expense under fair value method, net of taxes
   
(125
)
 
(201
)
               
Net income (loss), pro forma
 
$
(326
)
$
380
 
Net income (loss) per share, as reported:
           
Basic
 
$
(0.04
)
$
0.10
 
Diluted
 
$
(0.04
)
$
0.09
 
Net income (loss) per share, pro forma:
             
Basic
 
$
(0.06
)
$
0.07
 
Diluted
 
$
(0.06
)
$
0.06
 
 
Pro forma disclosures for the three and nine months ended September 24, 2006 are not presented because the amounts are recognized in the condensed consolidated financial statements.
 
There were 30,000 options granted in the third quarter of 2006 and 122,250 granted in the third quarter of 2005. There were 183,750 options granted in the first nine months of 2006 and 122,250 options granted in the first nine months of 2005. For all of 2005 and 2006 we have utilized the Black-Scholes option pricing model for estimating our stock-based compensation cost.  The weighted average fair value cost for options granted in 2006 and 2005 was $2.13 and $3.09 per share, respectively.
 
 
The Company has adopted the simplified method for determining the expected term of the options.  For fiscal 2006, expected stock price volatility is based on the historical volatility of our stock. The risk-free interest rate is based on the U.S. Treasury yield in effect at the time of grant with an equivalent remaining term. The Company has not paid dividends in the past and does not currently plan to pay any dividends in the near future. 
 
The fair value of each option grant issued is estimated at the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model with the following weighted average assumptions:
 
     
For the nine months ended
 
     
September 24, 2006
   
September 25, 2005
 
               
Expected volatility
   
68.40
%
 
66.71
%
               
Risk free interest rate
   
5.15
%
 
4.05
%
               
Expected option life
   
6.3 years
   
8.67 years
 
               
Dividend yield
   
0
%
 
0
%
               
Fair value cost of options granted
 
$
2.13
 
$
3.09
 
 
14

 
    Stock options activity during the nine months ended September 24, 2006 was as follows:
 
   
 
 
Shares
 
Weighted Average Exercise Price
 
Weighted Average Remaining Contractual Life (in years)
 
Aggregate
Intrinsic
Value
 
                   
Outstanding at December 25, 2005
   
713,275
 
$
2.89
             
                           
Granted
   
183,750
   
3.17
             
                           
Exercised
   
(32,400
)
 
2.18
             
                           
Cancelled
   
(25,200
)
 
3.10
             
                           
Outstanding at September 24, 2006
   
839,425
 
$
2.98
   
6.2
   
462,663
 
                           
Exercisable at September 24, 2006
   
485,075
   
2.86
   
4.6
   
347,037
 
 
The aggregate intrinsic value in the table above represents the total pretax intrinsic value (the difference between our closing stock price on September 22, 2006 of $3.30 and the exercise price, multiplied by the number of in-the-money options) that would have been received by the option holders had all option holders exercised their options on September 24, 2006.  This amount changes based on the fair market value of our stock.  Total intrinsic value of options exercised for the nine months ended September 24, 2006 was $36,258----.  As of September 24, 2006, total unrecognized stock-based compensation expense related to non-vested stock options was $543,412, which is expected to be recognized over a weighted average period of approximately 3 years.  As of September 24, 2006 there were 352,075 shares of common stock available for issuance pursuant to future stock option grants.
 
Additional information regarding options outstanding as of September 24, 2006 is as follows:
 
   
Options Outstanding .
 
Options Exercisable .
 
 
 
Range of
Exercise Price
 
Number
Outstanding at
September 24,
  2006 .
 
Weighted-
Average
Remaining
Contractual Life
 
 
Weighted-
Average
Exercise Price
 
Number
Outstanding at
September 24,
2006 .
 
 
Weighted-
Average
Exercise Price
 
                       
$ 1.25
   
1,750
   
3.7
 
$
1.25
   
1,750
 
$
1.25
 
$ 1.55
   
41,000
   
4.0
 
$
1.55
   
41,000
 
$
1.55
 
$ 1.65
   
86,500
   
4.9
 
$
1.65
   
70,800
 
$
1.65
 
$ 1.70
   
34,750
   
6.7
 
$
1.70
   
20,050
 
$
1.70
 
$ 2.19
   
49,050
   
4.9
 
$
2.19
   
49,050
 
$
2.19
 
$ 2.23
   
50,000
   
7.8
 
$
2.23
   
20,000
 
$
2.23
 
$ 2.46
   
14,000
   
0.9
 
$
2.46
   
14,000
 
$
2.46
 
$ 2.86
   
64,250
   
6.2
 
$
2.86
   
37,850
 
$
2.86
 
$ 3.14
   
25,000
   
2.6
 
$
3.14
   
10,000
 
$
3.14
 
$ 3.16
   
203,750
   
3.6
 
$
3.16
   
121,000
 
$
3.16
 
$ 3.19
   
50,000
   
9.5
 
$
3.19
   
 
$
3.19
 
$ 3.20
   
30,000
   
9.8
 
$
3.20
   
 
$
3.20
 
$ 3.45
   
25,000
   
9.1
 
$
3.45
   
 
$
3.45
 
$ 4.00 to $ 4.68
   
146,750
   
6.2
 
$
4.20
   
81,950
 
$
4.17
 
$ 5.36 to $14.00
   
17,625
   
0.3
 
$
6.40
   
17,625
 
$
6.40
 
                                 
Total      839,425                 485,075        
 
15

    
11.  
RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

In July 2006, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued FASB Interpretation ("FIN") No. 48, "Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes - an interpretation of FASB Statement No. 109." This interpretation prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement attribute for the financial statement recognition and measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return, and provides guidance on recognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure, and transition. This Interpretation will be effective for the Company on January 1, 2007, with the cumulative effect of the change in accounting principle recorded as an adjustment to opening retained earnings. The Company is currently assessing the impact of the adoption of the Interpretation on its financial statements.

In June 2006, the FASB ratified the Emerging Issues Task Force’s Abstract (“EITF”) 06-3 “How Taxes Collected from Customers and Remitted to Governmental Authorities Should Be Presented in the Income Statement” (“EITF 06-3”). EITF 06-3 requires disclosure of the Company’s method for presenting the taxes in the income statement. This disclosure is required for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2006. The Company reports revenues net of all sales and use taxes (excluded from revenues). Adoption of EITF 06-3 will not impact the Company’s financial statements.

In November 2005, the FASB issued FASB Staff Position (“FSP”) FAS 123R-3, “Transition Election to Accounting for the Tax Effects of Share-Based Payment Awards”.  This FSP requires an entity to follow either the transition guidance for the additional-paid-in-capital pool as prescribed in SFAS 123R, Share-Based Payment, or the alternative transition method as described in the FSP.  An entity that adopts SFAS 123R using the modified prospective application may make a one-time election to adopt the transition method described in this FSP.  An entity may take up to one year from the later of its initial adoption of SFAS 123R or the effective date of this FSP to evaluate its available transition alternatives and make its one-time election.  This FSP became effective in November 2005. The Company has until December 31, 2006 to make its election.  We continue to evaluate the impact that the adoption of this FSP could have on our financial statements.

In October 2005, the FASB posted FASB Staff Position (“FSP”) 13-1, which requires that rental costs incurred during and after a construction period for the right to control the use of a leased asset during and after construction of a lessee asset to be recognized as rental expense. The provisions of FSP 13-1 shall be applied to the first reporting period beginning after December 15, 2005. The Company’s existing accounting policy for rental costs incurred during and after the construction period conforms to FSP 13-1. The adoption of FSP 13-1 did not have a material impact on the Company’s condensed consolidated financial statements.

In May 2005, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 154, “Accounting Changes and Error Corrections” (“SFAS 154”), which requires retroactive application of a voluntary change in accounting principle to prior period financial statements unless it is impractical. SFAS 154 also requires that a change in method of depreciation, amortization or depletion for long-lived, non-financial assets be accounted for as a change in accounting estimate that is affected by a change in accounting principle. SFAS 154 replaces APB Opinion 20, “Accounting Changes,” and SFAS 3, “Reporting Accounting Changes in Interim Financial Statements.” The Company will adopt the provisions of SFAS 154, effective in 2007. Management currently believes that adoption of the provisions of SFAS 154 will not have a significant impact on the Company’s condensed consolidated financial statements.
 
16

 
12.  
RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

Terms of the Michigan Avenue Group Extinguishment Obligations

In March 2006, the Company retired the collateralized subordinated notes and mandatorily redeemable capital obligations owed to the Michigan Avenue Group (“MAG”) a member of Chicago Grill on the Alley, LLC (the “Chicago Grill”). As a result of the prepayment, MAG required a $200,000 penalty for earlier extinguishment of the obligations. The penalty is payable in four annual installments of $50,000, the first which was paid upon repayment of the obligations. The Company guaranteed the payment of the debt extinguishment penalty. The balance due to MAG as of September 24, 2006 is $150,000, which is included in current and long-term liabilities in the condensed consolidated balance sheets.

The penalty on early extinguishment will be deemed to be a cash distribution of the Chicago Grill to MAG if the lease for the restaurant location of the Chicago Grill on the Alley is renewed. After renewal, the Company will receive the next $200,000 of cash distributions from the Chicago Grill, prior to any distributions being made to MAG. The Company will record this cash distribution when received.

Amendment to Starwood Development Agreement

On June 21, 2006, the Company entered into a First Amendment to the Development Agreement (the “First DA Amendment”) with Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide, Inc. (“Starwood”). The First DA Amendment amends the Company’s July 27, 2001 Development Agreement with Starwood to (1) eliminate the Company’s obligation to issue warrants to Starwood following the opening of ten, fifteen and twenty restaurants under the terms of the Development Agreement and (2) modify the exercise price of warrants issued following the opening of five restaurants under the terms of the Development Agreement.

Under the terms of the First DA Amendment, if a fifth restaurant is opened under the terms of the Development Agreement before April 1, 2008, the Company will issue to Starwood warrants to purchase a number of shares of common stock equal to 4% of the then outstanding shares of the Company’s common stock. If the fifth restaurant is opened after April 1, 2008, the Company will issue to Starwood warrants to purchase a number of shares of common stock equal to 4% of the shares outstanding at December 25, 2005.

The warrants will have an exercise price equal to (1) if the fair market value of the common stock as of the date of issuance of the warrants (the “Threshold Date Value”) is greater than the fair market value of the common stock as of the date of the original Development Agreement (the “Closing Date Value”), the greater of (a) 75% of the Threshold Date Value, or (b) the Closing Date Value, or (2) if the Threshold Date Value of the common stock is less than the Closing Date Value, the Threshold Date Value.
 
17

 
Amendment to Starwood Stockholders’ Agreement

On June 21, 2006, the Company entered into a First Amendment to Stockholders’ Agreement (the “First SA Amendment”) with Starwood. The First SA Amendment amends the July 27, 2001 Stockholders’ Agreement between the Company, Starwood and certain stockholders of the Company to (1) eliminate the Company’s obligation to cause at least two nominees of Starwood to be elected to the Company’s board of directors if ten or more restaurants are operated under the Development Agreement, and (2) modify certain provisions limiting the size of the Company’s board of directors.

Under the terms of the First SA Amendment, so long as Starwood continues to hold at least 333,334 shares of the Company’s common stock, the Company shall take all actions reasonably necessary to assure that at least one nominee of Starwood is elected to the board of directors and to limit the size of the board of directors to no more than nine persons.
 
Purchase of Contract Rights from Hotel Restaurant Properties

On September 1, 2006, the Company entered into an Agreement for Purchase and Sale of Assets (the “Purchase Agreement”) with Hotel Restaurant Properties, Inc. (“HRP”), Hotel Restaurant Properties II, Inc., Hotel Restaurant Properties II Management, Inc., Keith Wolff and Adam Keller (collectively, the “Sellers”).

Pursuant to the terms of the Purchase Agreement, the Sellers agreed to sell to the Company and the Company agreed to purchase from the Sellers certain rights and interests of the Sellers relating to the current and future operation of Company restaurants in hotel properties pursuant to the terms of an Agreement, dated August 27, 1998, as amended (the “HRP Agreement”). Under the terms of the HRP Agreement, the Sellers had the exclusive right to obtain hotel-based locations for Company restaurants and were entitled to receive a portion of the net income, management fees, licensing fees or similar fees of the Company from the operation of such hotel-based restaurants. The Company, at the date of the Purchase Agreement, operated seven restaurants subject to the HRP Agreement in Skokie, Illinois; San Francisco, California; Houston, Texas; Washington D.C.; Burbank, California; Portland, Oregon, and Long Beach, California.

Under the Purchase Agreement, the Sellers agreed to transfer to the Company all of the rights in the management agreements (the “Transferred Agreements”) relating to the San Francisco; Houston; Washington, D.C.; and Portland restaurants as well as ownership of the Houston liquor license.

Pursuant to the Purchase Agreement, the HRP Agreement was amended, effective June 30, 2006 (the ”Effective Date”), to eliminate exclusivity provisions under which the Company would use the Sellers as the exclusive parties to identify potential hotel locations and to eliminate certain provisions under which the Sellers could cause the Company to purchase HRP and the Company could acquire HRP. Under the Purchase Agreement, the Sellers also agreed to relinquish any rights to fees or other compensation relating to Company restaurants opened in hotels pursuant to management, license or lease agreements entered into on or after March 29, 2006, including any fees relating to restaurants proposed to be opened in Memphis, Tennessee and Seattle, Washington.

The Sellers will retain their rights in the management contracts relating to the Burbank, Skokie and Long Beach restaurants subject to the continuing terms of the HRP Agreement, as amended, and subject to the rights of the Company to terminate operations of the Skokie and Long Beach restaurants.
 
18

 
The purchase price of the acquired assets under the Purchase Agreement is $2,771,133 (the “Purchase Price”). Closing of the purchase and sale shall occur on the effective date of June 30, 2006 (the “Closing Date”), and the Purchase Price is payable, on the earlier of June 30, 2007 (the “Outside Closing Date”) or a mutually agreeable date not more than 10 days after the date on which the aggregate payments (the “Income Stream Payments”) received by the Sellers, after the Effective Date and prior to closing, under the Transferred Agreements equal $294,151 (the “Maximum Income Stream Payments”). From and after the Effective Date the Income Stream Payments shall not exceed the Maximum Income Stream Payments after the payments of which no further payments shall be made to the Sellers with respect to the Transferred Agreements. In the event that the Sellers shall not have received the Maximum Income Stream Payments by the Outside Closing Date, the Purchase Price shall be increased by the excess of the Maximum Income Stream Payments over the actual Income Stream Payments as of the Closing Date.

On the Closing Date, the HRP Agreement will be further amended to eliminate the license granted thereunder for the Sellers to operate managed outlets under the HRP Agreement, eliminate restrictions on the Seller’s ability to provide similar hotel restaurant location services to parties other than the Company and to eliminate other provisions relating to the Transferred Agreements.

At closing, the Sellers shall enter into a Non-Competition Agreement pursuant to which the Sellers, for a period of 5 years from the Closing Date, will not assist any owner, operator, franchisor or franchisee of a branded restaurant in entering into a lease, license or management agreement to operate a restaurant, provide room service or provide food or banquet room events at any hotel (the “Restricted Business”), provided, however, that the Sellers shall not be prohibited from (a) owning up to 10% of any publicly traded company engaged in the Restricted Business, (b) engaging in the Restricted Business with respect to hotel properties owned by the Sellers or affiliates of the Sellers and managed by the Sellers or the affiliates of the Sellers or (c) engaging in the Restricted Business with up to 3 additional hotels. Branded restaurants, for purposes of the Non-Competition Agreement, mean a restaurant operated in ten or more locations under a single brand name.

Pursuant to the Purchase Agreement, the Company has agreed to indemnify the Sellers with respect to any additional tax that may be incurred, as well as related penalties and interest, in the event that the goodwill allocated to the sale is reduced for tax purposes on audit or other adjustment.

The Company recorded the Non-Compete Agreement as of June 30, 2006 as a noncurrent asset. The asset is being amortized on a straight-line basis over the five-year term of the agreement. A corresponding Payable to HRP was recorded and is presented in the condensed consolidated balance sheets net of amortization and Income Stream Payments made during the quarter.

The Company entered into the Purchase Agreement in order to eliminate current and future financial restrictions for fees payable to HRP as the Company grows it business of hotel-based restaurants.
 
19

 
13.  
DISTRIBUTION OF CAPITAL AND PREFERRED RETURNS
 
The Company’s San Jose Grill, Chicago Grill on the Alley, The Grill on Hollywood, South Bay Daily Grill and Downtown Daily Grill restaurants are each owned by limited liability companies (the “LLC’s”) in which the Company serves as manager and owns a controlling interest. Each of the LLC’s has minority interest owners (“Members”) some of whom have participating rights in the joint venture such as the ability to approve operating and capital budgets and the borrowing of money. In connection with the financing of each of the LLC’s, the minority members may have certain rights to priority distributions of capital until they have received a return of their initial investments (“Return of Member Capital”) as well as rights to receive defined preferred returns on their invested capital (“Preferred Return”).
 
The Universal CityWalk Daily Grill is owned by a partnership (the “CityWalk Partnership”) for which we serve as manager. Our partner has certain rights to priority distributions of capital from the CityWalk Partnership until they have received their initial investment.

The following tables set forth a summary for each of the LLC’s and the CityWalk Partnership of (a) the distributions of capital to the Members and/or the Company during the nine months ended September 24, 2006, (b) the unreturned balance of the capital contributions of the Members and/or the Company at September 24, 2006, and (c) the accrued, but unpaid, preferred returns due to the Members and/or the Company at September 24, 2006:


(in thousands)
 
San Jose Grill, LLC
 
Chicago Grill On The Alley, LLC
 
The Grill On Hollywood, LLC
 
   
Members
 
Company
 
Members
 
Company
 
Members
 
Company
 
                           
Distributions of profit and note repayments
     during the nine months ended
     September 24, 2006:
 
$
255
 
$
255
 
$
972 (a
)
 
   
   
 
Unreturned Initial Capital Contributions at
     September 24, 2006:
   
   
   
— 
   
 
$
1,200
 
$
250
 
Preferred Return rate:
   
10
%
 
10
%
 
8
%
 
   
12
%
 
12
%
Accrued but unpaid Preferred Returns at
     September 24, 2006:
   
   
   
   
   
(b
)
 
(b
)

20

 
   
South Bay Daily Grill
(Continental Park, LLC)
 
Universal Citywalk Daily Grill
 
Downtown Daily Grill
(612 Flower Daily Grill, LLC)
 
   
Members
 
Company
 
Members
 
Company
 
Members
 
Company
(d)
 
                           
Distributions of profit during the nine months
     ended September 24, 2006:
   
   
   
   
 
$
27
 
$
9
 
Unreturned Initial and Additional Capital
     Contributions at September 24, 2006:
 
$
1,100
 
$
450
 
$
1,496
 
$
296
 
$
1,373
 
$
304
 
Preferred Return rate:
   
10
%
 
10% (c
)
 
   
   
9
%
 
9
%
Accrued but unpaid Preferred Returns at
     September 24, 2006:
   
(b
)
 
(b
)
 
(b
)
 
 
$
39
 
$
7
 

(a)  
Distribution of capital and note repayments as of September 24, 2006 includes $902,000 of retirement of collateralized subordinated notes and mandatorily redeemable capital obligations and $70,000 of interest and preferred return.
(b)  
Due to the under performance of the restaurants the preferred return is not being accrued. The Company is not liable to pay the preferred return distributions, such that they represent a non-recourse obligation of the subsidiary entity. If preferred returns were accrued for The Grill on Hollywood the member would have an accrued preferred return of $950,000 and the Company would have an accrued preferred return of $198,000. If preferred returns were accrued for the South Bay Daily Grill the member would have an accrued preferred return of $466,000 and the Company would have an accrued preferred return of $183,000. If preferred returns were accrued for the CityWalk Partnership the Member would have an accrued preferred return of $627,000. 
(c)   The Company’s preferred return with respect to the South Bay Daily Grill is based on unrecovered capital contribution and accrued but unpaid management fees.
(d)   The Company is a non-managing member, and a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company is the manager of this restaurant.
 
21

 
14.  
LITIGATION CONTINGENCIES AND COMMITMENTS
 
Litigation Contingencies
 
In June 2004, one of our former hourly restaurant employees filed a class action lawsuit against the Company in the Superior Court of California of Orange County. We requested, and were granted, a motion to move the suit from Orange County to Los Angeles County. The lawsuit was then filed in the Superior Court of California of Los Angeles in December 2004. The plaintiff has alleged violations of California labor laws with respect to providing meal and rest breaks. The lawsuit sought unspecified amounts of penalties and other monetary payments on behalf of the plaintiffs and other purported class members. We believe that all of our employees were provided with the opportunity to take all required meal and rest breaks. The case has been placed in a stay status pending the outcome of a review by the California Supreme Court of appealed cases of the same nature that is expected to happen in the first half of 2007. We intend to vigorously defend our position in all of these matters although the outcome cannot be ascertained at this time.
 
A Class Action complaint was filed against us in the Superior Court of the State of California for the County of Los Angeles on March 15, 2006.  The plaintiff and those similarly situated (Servers) complain that the Company has violated the labor code by having Servers "Tip Out" Bartenders and Expeditors a percentage of their tips to these employees who provide no direct table service.  The complaint has labeled this act as "Tip-pooling."  At a hearing on August 25, 2006 the case was dismissed without prejudice and the plaintiff’s counsel stipulated that an appeal will not be filed.

Commitments

In June 2006, the Company signed a management agreement for a hotel-based Daily Grill to open at the Sheraton Seattle, in Seattle, Washington. The restaurant owner will pay substantially all construction and pre-opening costs, other than approximately $450,000 of remodeling costs to be contributed by the Company if the total construction costs exceed $1.5 million. The Company will receive management and incentive fees and will be entitled to receive a 9% preferred return on any capital contribution. The restaurant is scheduled to open in the summer of 2007.

Item 2. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with the Company’s financial statements and notes thereto included elsewhere in this Form 10-Q. Except for the historical information contained herein, the discussion in this Form 10-Q contains certain forward looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties, such as statements of the Company’s plans, objectives, expectations and intentions. The cautionary statements made in this Form 10-Q should be read as being applicable to all related forward looking statements wherever they appear in this Form 10-Q. The Company’s actual results could differ materially from those discussed here. For a discussion of certain factors that could cause actual results to be materially different, refer to the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 25, 2005.

Current Year Developments

Restaurant Openings, Leasing and Management. The Company opened one new restaurant during the nine months ended September 24, 2006. On July 17, 2006, the Company opened a Grill on the Alley restaurant in Dallas, Texas. This was the first opening of a Grill on the Alley concept restaurant since 2001.
 
22

 
In April 2006, the Company signed a management agreement for a hotel-based Daily Grill to open at the Westin Memphis Beale Street in Memphis, Tennessee. The restaurant owner will pay all construction and pre-opening costs. The Company will receive a management fee with an annual guaranteed minimum fee of $130,000. The restaurant is scheduled to open in the spring of 2007.

In June 2006, the Company signed a management agreement for a hotel-based Daily Grill to open at the Sheraton Seattle, in Seattle, Washington. The restaurant owner will pay substantially all construction and pre-opening costs, other than approximately $450,000 of remodeling costs to be contributed by the Company if the total construction costs exceed $1.5 million. The Company will receive management and incentive fees and will be entitled to receive a 9% preferred return on any capital contribution. The restaurant is scheduled to open in the summer of 2007.

Credit Facility. In March 2006, the Company entered into a financing agreement with Diamond Creek Investment Partners, LLC, at which time the Company’s previous line of credit was terminated. The Credit Agreement provides for a revolving term loan (the “Loan”) to the Company of the lesser of (a) $8.0 million, or (b) 2.25 times the Company’s trailing 12 month EBITDA. Funds may be borrowed under the Credit Agreement, subject to satisfaction of all conditions of funding, in monthly advances in minimum increments of $500,000. Proceeds of the Loan may be used to pay expenses of the Loan and for general corporate purposes. The interest rate on the Loan is, at the option of the Company and subject to certain limitations on the use of LIBOR based loans, equivalent to either (a) the prime rate, but not less than 7%, plus an applicable margin, or (b) the London Interbank Offered Rate, but not less than 4%, plus an applicable margin. The margin, in each case, varies based upon the Company’s leverage ratio (funded debt to EBITDA, each as defined) and ranges from 2.75% to 3.50% with respect to prime rate loans and 5.50% to 6.25% with respect to LIBOR loans. The interest rate at September 24, 2006 was equal to 11.2% and was adjusted to 10.8% effective October 13, 2006.

The Credit Agreement provides that the Company will pay all expenses incurred in connection with the Loan, including expenses incurred by the Lender. By separate agreement, the Company agreed to pay certain fees associated with the Loan, including a loan initiation fee of $120,000, an unused line fee of 0.5% of the unused portion of the credit facility payable monthly and a loan servicing fee of $3,000 per month. In March 2006, we borrowed $210,000 under the line of credit to pay costs associated with obtaining the financing.

The Loan matures, and is payable in full, on March 9, 2011 subject to mandatory prepayment to the extent, if any, that the outstanding principal balance of the Loan exceeds 2.25 times trailing 12 month EBITDA or upon the occurrence of certain defined extraordinary events. The Company may prepay amounts owing under the Credit Agreement subject to payment of a prepayment premium of (a) 3% with respect to prepayments occurring on or before March 9, 2007, and (b) 1% with respect to prepayments occurring after March 9, 2007 and on or before March 9, 2008.

The Company’s obligations under the Credit Agreement are secured by a first lien on all of the Company’s assets, including all of the capital stock and other equity interests held by the Company in its subsidiaries, subject to existing liens on such assets. The Loan requires the Company to comply with certain ordinary lending covenants. These include, among others, financial covenants relating to maximum debt to EBITDA ratio, minimum EBITDA and maximum capital expenditures. The Company must also comply with certain information requirements, including providing periodic financial statements and projections as well as notices of defaults, litigation and other matters, maintenance of insurance and compliance with laws as well as limitations on liens and encumbrances, indebtedness, dispositions, dividends and retirement of capital stock, consolidations and mergers, changes in nature of business and other operating, financial and structural limitations.
 
23

 
On March 31, 2006, the Company borrowed $1 million under the terms of the Credit Agreement with the Lender. The borrowed funds were primarily used to retire $874,192 of collateralized subordinated notes and manditorily redeemable capital obligations owed to MAG by the Company’s subsidiary Chicago Grill, $5,940 of interest and $50,000 for the first annual penalty payment, all of which amounts were guaranteed by the Company, with the balance used for general working capital. The retired obligations related to the initial funding provided by MAG, as a member/investor in Chicago Grill LLC, with respect to the Company’s The Grill on the Alley restaurant in Chicago.

Management Changes. In June 2006, following the Company’s annual stockholders meeting, Robert Spivak retired as the Company’s President and Chief Executive Officer and Philip Gay, the Company’s Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, assumed the positions of President and Chief Executive Officer. Mr. Spivak continues to provide services to the Company in a consulting capacity and as a director. In July 2006, Wayne Lipschitz was hired and appointed as Vice President and Chief Financial Officer.

Income Taxes. During the nine-months ended September 24, 2006, the Company determined, based on an analysis of its taxable income over the preceding three years and the projected taxable income for the next three years, that it is more likely than not that the Company will recover the majority of its existing net deferred tax asset. Accordingly, during the period, most of the previously recorded valuation allowance with respect to the Company’s deferred tax asset was eliminated. As a result of the elimination of the valuation allowance, the Company realized a net tax benefit of about $2.0 million during the nine-months ended September 24, 2006 and the Company’s condensed consolidated balance sheets reflected a deferred tax asset of $3.9 million at September 24, 2006.

The Company still has a valuation allowance of $1.3 million consisting of $0.7 million for general business credits and $0.6 million for net operating losses (“NOL’s”). There is still some analysis to be done as to whether the Company can utilize all of the NOL’s and the general business credits as both of these have limitations. The Company will continue to review the valuation allowance each quarter to see if any further adjustments are necessary.

Issuances of Common Stock. During the nine months ended September 24, 2006, the Company issued 642,317 shares of restricted common stock pursuant to the exercise, by 17 holders, of 1,333,334 warrants originally issued in a 2001 private placement. The Company received $612,749 from the exercise of 272,333 warrants at $2.25 per share. The remaining 369,984 shares were issued pursuant to the cashless exercise of 666,667 warrants at $2.00 and 394,334 warrants at $2.25 per share.

During the nine months ended September 24, 2006, the Company issued 32,400 shares of common stock pursuant to the exercise of stock options for the aggregate consideration of $35,812.

Stock Based Compensation.. Effective December 26, 2005, the first day of the Company’s 2006 fiscal year, the Company adopted Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Statement No. 123(R), “Share-Based Payment” (“SFAS 123R”), using the modified prospective transition method, and as a result, did not retroactively adjust results from prior periods.  Under this transition method, stock-based compensation was recognized for expenses related to the options vesting in the first nine months of 2006 based on the grant date fair value estimated in accordance with the provisions of SFAS 123R.  The Company applies the Black-Scholes valuation model in determining the fair value of share-based payments to employees, consultants and non-employee directors.  The resulting compensation expense is recognized over the requisite service period, which is generally the option vesting term of five years. Options issued to non-member directors are vested 100% at grant date. Prior to fiscal 2006, stock-based compensation was included as a pro forma disclosure in the Notes to the condensed consolidated financial statements as permitted by SFAS 123.
 
24

 
As a result of the adoption of SFAS 123R, during the nine months ended September 24, 2006, the Company recorded compensation expense relating to stock option grants of $153,000. The Company recorded no compensation expense during the fiscal 2005 period relating to stock option grants. Had the Company reported stock based compensation expense under SFAS 123R during 2005, the Company’s pro forma compensation expense associated with option grants during the nine months ended September 25, 2005 would have been $201,000.

There were no modifications made to outstanding share options prior to the adoption of SFAS 123R. There have been no changes made to the quantity or type of incentive awards granted since the adoption of SFAS 123R. Terms for incentive compensation awards have remained the same in 2006 as they were in 2005.

As of September 24, 2006, total unrecognized stock-based compensation expense related to non-vested stock options was $543,412, which is expected to be recognized over a weighted average period of approximately 3 years.

In March 2006, the Company’s board of directors adopted the Grill Concepts, Inc. 2006 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2006 Plan”). The shareholders approved the 2006 Plan in June 2006. Under the 2006 Plan, 500,000 shares are reserved for issuance pursuant to the exercise of stock options and awards of restricted stock, stock appreciation rights and other similar equity based award grants. There were 183,750 and 122,250 options granted in the first three quarters of 2006 and 2005 respectively.  At September 24, 2006, there were 316,250 shares available for grant under the 2006 Plan and an additional 35,825 shares available for grant under predecessor plans.

Amendment of Starwood Agreements. On June 21, 2006, the Company entered into a First Amendment to the Development Agreement (the “First DA Amendment”) with Starwood Hotels and Resorts Worldwide, Inc. (“Starwood”). The First DA Amendment amends the Company’s July 27, 2001 Development Agreement with Starwood to (1) eliminate the Company’s obligation to issue warrants to Starwood following the opening of ten, fifteen and twenty restaurants under the terms of the Development Agreement and (2) modify the exercise price of warrants issued following the opening of five restaurants under the terms of the Development Agreement.

Under the terms of the First DA Amendment, if a fifth restaurant is opened under the terms of the Development Agreement before April 1, 2008, the Company will issue to Starwood warrants to purchase a number of shares of common stock equal to 4% of the then outstanding shares of the Company’s common stock. If the fifth restaurant is opened after April 1, 2008, the Company will issue to Starwood warrants to purchase a number of shares of common stock equal to 4% of the shares outstanding at December 25, 2005.

The warrants will have an exercise price equal to (1) if the fair market value of the common stock as of the date of issuance of the warrants (the “Threshold Date Value”) is greater than the fair market value of the common stock as of the date of the original Development Agreement (the “Closing Date Value”), the greater of (a) 75% of the Threshold Date Value, or (b) the Closing Date Value, or (2) if the Threshold Date Value of the common stock is less than the Closing Date Value, the Threshold Date Value.

On June 21, 2006, the Company entered into a First Amendment to Stockholders’ Agreement (the “First SA Amendment”) with Starwood. The First SA Amendment amends the July 27, 2001 Stockholders’ Agreement between the Company, Starwood and certain stockholders of the Company to (1) eliminate the Company’s obligation to cause at least two nominees of Starwood to be elected to the Company’s board of directors if ten or more restaurants are operated under the Development Agreement, and (2) modify certain provisions limiting the size of the Company’s board of directors.

25

 
Under the terms of the First SA Amendment, so long as Starwood continues to hold at least 333,334 shares of the Company’s common stock, the Company shall take all actions reasonably necessary to assure that at least one nominee of Starwood is elected to the board of directors and to limit the size of the board of directors to no more than nine persons.

Purchase of HRP Contract Rights. On September 1, 2006, the Company entered into an Agreement for Purchase and Sale of Assets (the “Purchase Agreement”) with Hotel Restaurant Properties, Inc. (“HRP”), Hotel Restaurant Properties II, Inc., Hotel Restaurant Properties II Management, Inc., Keith Wolff and Adam Keller (collectively, the “Sellers”).

Pursuant to the terms of the Purchase Agreement, the Sellers agreed to sell to the Company and the Company agreed to purchase from the Sellers certain rights and interests of the Sellers relating to the current and future operation of Company restaurants in hotel properties pursuant to the terms of an Agreement, dated August 27, 1998, as amended (the “HRP Agreement”). Under the terms of the HRP Agreement, the Sellers had the exclusive right to obtain hotel-based locations for Company restaurants and were entitled to receive a portion of the net income, management fees, licensing fees or similar fees of the Company from the operation of such hotel-based restaurants. The Company, at the date of the Purchase Agreement, operated seven restaurants subject to the HRP Agreement in Skokie, Illinois; San Francisco, California; Houston, Texas; Washington D.C.; Burbank, California; Portland, Oregon; and Long Beach, California.

Under the Purchase Agreement, the Sellers agreed to transfer to the Company all of the rights in the management agreements (the “Transferred Agreements”) relating to the San Francisco; Houston; Washington, D.C.; and Portland restaurants as well as ownership of the Houston liquor license.

Pursuant to the Purchase Agreement, the HRP Agreement was amended, effective June 30, 2006 (the ”Effective Date”), to eliminate exclusivity provisions under which the Company would use the Sellers as the exclusive parties to identify potential hotel locations and to eliminate certain provisions under which the Sellers could cause the Company to purchase HRP and the Company could acquire HRP. Under the Purchase Agreement, the Sellers also agreed to relinquish any rights to fees or other compensation relating to Company restaurants opened in hotels pursuant to management, license or lease agreements entered into on or after March 29, 2006, including any fees relating to restaurants proposed to be opened in Memphis, Tennessee and Seattle, Washington.

The Sellers will retain their rights in the management contracts relating to the Burbank, Skokie and Long Beach restaurants subject to the continuing terms of the HRP Agreement, as amended, and subject to the rights of the Company to terminate operations of the Skokie and Long Beach restaurants.

The purchase price of the acquired assets under the Purchase Agreement is $2,771,133 (the “Purchase Price”). Closing of the purchase and sale shall occur on the Effective Date of June 30, 2006 (the “Closing Date”), and the Purchase Price is payable, on the earlier of June 30, 2007 (the “Outside Closing Date”) or a mutually agreeable date not more than 10 days after the date on which the aggregate payments (the “Income Stream Payments”) received by the Sellers, after the Effective Date, and prior to closing, under the Transferred Agreements equal $294,151 (the “Maximum Income Stream Payments”). From and after the Effective Date the Income Stream Payments shall not exceed the Maximum Income Stream Payments after the payments of which no further payments shall be made to the Sellers with respect to the Transferred Agreements. In the event that the Sellers shall not have received the Maximum Income Stream Payments by the Outside Closing Date, the Purchase Price shall be increased by the excess of the Maximum Income Stream Payments over the actual Income Stream Payments as of the Closing Date.
 
26

 
On the Closing Date, the HRP Agreement will be further amended to eliminate the license granted thereunder for the Sellers to operate managed outlets under the HRP Agreement, eliminate restrictions on the Seller’s ability to provide similar hotel restaurant location services to parties other than the Company and to eliminate other provisions relating to the Transferred Agreements.

At closing, the Sellers shall enter into a Non-Competition Agreement pursuant to which the Sellers, for a period of 5 years from the Closing Date, will not assist any owner, operator, franchisor or franchisee of a branded restaurant in entering into a lease, license or management agreement to operate a restaurant, provide room service or provide food or banquet room events at any hotel (the “Restricted Business”), provided, however, that the Sellers shall not be prohibited from (a) owning up to 10% of any publicly traded company engaged in the Restricted Business, (b) engaging in the Restricted Business with respect to hotel properties owned by the Sellers or affiliates of the Sellers and managed by the Sellers or the affiliates of the Sellers or (c) engaging in the Restricted Business with up to 3 additional hotels. Branded restaurants, for purposes of the Non-Competition Agreement, mean a restaurant operated in ten or more locations under a single brand name.

Pursuant to the Purchase Agreement, the Company has agreed to indemnify the Sellers with respect to any additional tax that may be incurred, as well as related penalties and interest, in the event that the goodwill allocated to the sale is reduced for tax purposes on audit or other adjustment.
 
27

 
Results of Operations

The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, information derived from the Company's condensed consolidated statements of operations expressed as a percentage of total revenues:

     
Three Months Ended
   
Nine Months Ended
 
     
September
24, 2006
   
September
 25, 2005 
   
September 24, 2006 
   
September 
25, 2005
 
                           
Revenues:
   
%
 
%
 
%
 
%
 
Sales
   
77.0
   
76.5
   
77.5
   
77.9
 
Cost reimbursements
   
20.4
   
21.2
   
20.2
   
19.9
 
Management and license fees
   
2.6
   
2.6
   
2.3
   
2.2
 
Total revenues
   
100.0
   
100.0
   
100.0
   
100.0
 
                           
Operating expenses:
                         
Cost of sales
   
22.4
   
21.5
   
22.0
   
21.9
 
Restaurant operating
   
47.1
   
47.5
   
46.3
   
46.6
 
Reimbursed costs
   
20.4
   
21.2
   
20.2
   
19.9
 
General and administrative
   
7.5
   
6.6
   
7.5
   
6.6
 
Depreciation and amortization
   
3.9
   
3.8
   
3.2
   
3.1
 
Pre-opening costs
   
1.2
   
0.1
   
0.8
   
0.5
 
Total operating expenses
   
102.5
   
100.7
   
100.0
   
98.7
 
                           
Income (loss) from operations
   
(2.5
)
 
(0.7
)
 
(0.0
)
 
1.3
 
                           
Interest, net
   
(0.5
)
 
(0.3
)
 
(0.3
)
 
(0.2
)
Debt extinguishment costs
   
(0.0
)
 
   
(0.5
)
 
 
                           
Income (loss) before benefit (provision)
                         
for income taxes and minority interest
   
(3.0
)
 
(1.0
)
 
(0.8
)
 
1.1
 
                           
Benefit (provision) for income taxes
   
0.8
   
(0.4
)
 
3.7
   
(0.5
)
Minority interest in net (profit) loss of
                         
subsidiaries
   
(0.1
)
 
0.3
   
(0.2
)
 
0.7
 
                           
Net income (loss)
   
(2.3
)
 
(1.1
)
 
2.7
   
1.3
 

The following table sets forth, for the periods indicated, information derived from the Company’s condensed consolidated financial statements of operations expressed as a percentage of total restaurant sales:
 
     
Three Months Ended
   
Nine Months Ended
 
 
 
 
 September 24, 2006
   
September 25, 2005
   
September 24, 2006
   
 September 25, 2005
 
           
 
         
 
 
Revenues:
   
%
 
%
 
%
 
%
 
Sales
   
100.0
   
100.0
   
100.0
   
100.0
 
Cost of sales
   
29.1
   
28.1
   
28.3
   
28.2
 
Restaurant operating expenses
   
61.1
   
62.1
   
59.8
   
59.8
 
                    
28

 
The following tables set forth certain financial information and other restaurant data relating to Company owned restaurants and Company managed and/or licensed restaurants.
 
     
Third Quarter
Openings
   
Year-to-date
Openings
   
Total open at
End of Quarter
 
     
  2006
   
  2005
   
 2006
   
2005
   
  2006
   
 2005
 
Daily Grill restaurants:
                                     
Company owned
   
-
   
(1
)
 
-
   
1
   
12
   
12
 
Managed and/or licensed
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
8
   
8
 
Grill on the Alley restaurants:
                                     
Company owned
   
1
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
5
   
4
 
Total
   
1
   
(1
)
 
-
   
1
   
25
   
24
 
 
 
   
Three Months Ended
 
Nine Months Ended
 
   
September
24, 2006
 
September
25, 2005
 
September
24, 2006
 
September
25, 2005
 
Weighted average weekly sales
                         
per Company owned restaurant:
                         
Daily Grill
 
$
59,814
 
$
55,344
 
$
63,248
 
$
58,735
 
Grill on the Alley
   
87,167
   
81,969
   
85,867
   
81,207
 
                           
Change in comparable restaurant sales (1):
                         
Daily Grill
   
5.4
%
 
1.1
%
 
5.3
%
 
0.0
%
Grill on the Alley
   
12.1
%
 
13.0
%
 
11.2
%
 
10.7
%
                           
Total sales (in thousands):
                         
Daily Grill
 
$
9,331
 
$
9,036
 
$
29,599
 
$
27,434
 
Grill on the Alley
   
5,461
   
4,262
   
14,767
   
12,668
 
Total consolidated sales
 
$
14,792
 
$
13,298
 
$
44,366
 
$
40,102
 
 
(1)
When computing comparable restaurant sales, restaurants open for at least 12 months are compared from period to period.
 
We also earn revenues from management and license fees based on a percentage of gross sales at restaurants under management and licensing arrangements. Our management and license fee revenue typically is earned at a rate of five to eight percent of reported sales at these restaurants. The sales of managed and licensed restaurants are not included in our condensed consolidated statements of operations. However, we consider the disclosure of these sales to be a key indicator of brand strength and important to understanding how changes in sales at the managed and licensed restaurants impact our revenue.

Sales at non-Company owned Grill Concepts-branded restaurants, categorized as, managed and licensed restaurants were as follows:

29

 
   
Three Months Ended
 
 Nine Months Ended
 
(in thousands)
 
September
24, 2006
 
September
25, 2005
 
September
24, 2006
 
September
25, 2005
 
                   
Managed Daily Grills
 
$
5,444
 
$
4,830
 
$
15,941
 
$
14,039
 
Licensed Daily Grills
   
1,801
   
2,173
   
5,486
   
5,943
 
   
$
7,245
 
$
7,003
 
$
21,427
 
$
19,982
 
                           
Management and license fees
 
$
491
 
$
402
 
$
1,329
 
$
1,127
 
Percent of gross sales
   
6.8
%
 
5.7
%
 
6.2
%
 
5.6
%
 
Material Changes in Results of Operations for the Three and Nine Months Ended September 24, 2006 as compared to the Three and Nine Months Ended September 25, 2005

Revenues. Total revenues increased 10.5% to $19.2 million for the 2006 third quarter from $17.4 million in the 2005 third quarter and increased 11.1% to $57.2 million for the 2006 year-to-date period from $51.5 million for the 2005 year-to-date period. For the quarter, total revenues consisted of sales revenues of $14.8 million, up 11.2% from $13.3 million in the 2005 quarter, management and license fees of $0.5 million, up 22.1% from $0.4 million in the 2005 quarter, and reimbursed managed outlet expenses of $3.9 million, up 6.7% from $3.7 million in the 2005 quarter. For the year-to-date period, total revenues consisted of sales revenues of $44.4 million, up 10.6% from $40.1 million in the 2005 year-to-date period, management and license fees of $1.3 million, up 17.9% from $1.1 million in the 2005 year-to-date period, and reimbursed managed outlet expenses of $11.5 million, up 12.4% from $10.3 million in the 2005 year-to-date period.

Sales for Daily Grill restaurants increased by 3.3% from $9.0 million in the 2005 quarter to $9.3 million in the 2006 period. The increase in sales revenues for the Daily Grill restaurants from 2005 to 2006 was primarily attributable to an increase in same store sales of 5.4% ($0.4 million) for restaurants open for the entire 39 weeks in both 2005 and 2006 and an increase in sales at restaurants opened in 2005 ($0.1 million) partially offset by a decrease in sales at the La Cienega Daily Grill ($0.2 million) due to closure of the restaurant in July 2005 at the lease expiration.

Sales for Daily Grill restaurants increased by 7.9% from $27.4 million for the nine months in 2005 to $29.6 million in 2006. The increase in sales revenues for the Daily Grill restaurants from 2005 to 2006 was primarily due to the 2005 opening of the Santa Monica Daily Grill and the Downtown Daily Grill ($2.3 million) combined with improved sales at the comparable restaurants of 5.3% ($1.3 million) partially offset by a decrease at the La Cienega Daily Grill ($1.4 million) due to closure of the restaurant in July 2005. Management considers performance of same store or comparable store sales to be an important measure of growth when evaluating performance. Weighted average weekly sales at the Daily Grill restaurants increased 7.7% from $58,735 in 2005 to $63,248 in 2006. Comparable restaurant sales and weighted average weekly sales at the Daily Grill restaurants in 2006 reflected a menu price increase in the spring of 2006. The increase in same store sales was principally attributable to an increase in check averages.

Sales for Grill restaurants increased by 28.1% from $4.3 million in the 2005 quarter to $5.5 million in the 2006 quarter. The increase in sales revenues for the Grill restaurants from 2005 to 2006 was attributable to both the opening of the Dallas Grill in July 2006 ($0.7 million) and improved sales at comparable restaurants ($0.5 million). The improvement in same store sales was primarily attributable to increased guest counts.