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H&R Block 10-K 2005

Documents found in this filing:

  1. Form 10-K
  2. Form of 2003 Long-Term Executive Compensation Plan Award Agreement
  3. Form of 1989 Stock Option Plan for Outside Directors Stock Option Agreement
  4. Leasing Operations Supplier Agreement
  5. Second Amended and Restated Sale and Servicing Agreement
  6. Amended and Restated Note Purchase Agreement
  7. Amended and Restated Sale and Servicing Agreement
  8. Second Amended and Restated Sale and Servicing Agreement
  9. Indenture
  10. Amendment No. 4 To the Indenture
  11. Amendment No. 5 To the Indenture
  12. Amendment No. 6 To the Indenture
  13. Amended and Restated Note Purchase Agreement
  14. Amendment No. 1 To Amended and Restated Note Purchase Agreement
  15. Second Amended and Restated Sale and Servicing Agreement
  16. Indenture
  17. Amendment No. 5 To the Indenture
  18. Amendment No. 6 To the Indenture
  19. Amendment No. 6 To the Indenture
  20. Amended and Restated Note Purchase Agreement
  21. Amendment No. 1 To Amended and Restated Note Purchase Agreement
  22. Sale and Servicing Agreement
  23. Amendment No. 1 To Sale and Servicing Agreement
  24. Amendment No. 2 To Sale and Servicing Agreement
  25. Indenture
  26. Note Purchase Agreement
  27. Amendment No. 1 To Note Purchase Agreement
  28. Amendment No. 2 To Note Purchase Agreement
  29. Amendment No. 3 To Note Purchase Agreement
  30. Amendment No. 4 To Note Purchase Agreement
  31. Amendment No. 5 To Note Purchase Agreement
  32. Computation of Ratio of Earnings To Fixed Charges
  33. Subsidiaries of H&R Block, Inc.
  34. Consent of Kpmg Llp
  35. Consent of Pricewatercoopers Llp
  36. Certification Pursuant To Section 302 - CEO
  37. Certification Pursuant To Section 302 - Exec. Vp & CFO
  38. Certification Pursuant To Section 1350- CEO
  39. Certification Pursuant To Section 1350 - Exec. Vp & CFO
  40. Graphic
  41. Graphic
  42. Graphic
  43. Graphic
  44. Graphic
  45. Graphic
  46. Graphic
  47. Graphic
  48. Graphic
  49. Graphic
  50. Graphic
  51. Graphic
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  55. Complete submission text file
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Table of Contents



UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K
     
(Mark One)
   
þ
  ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
    For the fiscal year ended: April 30, 2005
OR
 
o
  TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
    For the transition period from           to
Commission File Number: 1-6089
(H&R BLOCK)
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
     
MISSOURI
  44-0607856
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  (I.R.S. Employer Identification Number)
4400 Main Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64111
(Address of principal executive offices, including zip code)
(816) 753-6900
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
     
Title of Each Class   Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
Common Stock, without par value
  New York Stock Exchange
    Pacific Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
Common Stock, without par value
(Title of Class)
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.     Yes þ         No o
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.    o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is an accelerated filer (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes þ         No o
The aggregate market value of the registrant’s Common Stock (all voting stock) held by non-affiliates of the registrant, computed by reference to the price at which the stock was sold on October 31, 2004, was $7,683,275,768.
Number of shares of registrant’s Common Stock, without par value, outstanding on June 30, 2005: 165,970,297.
Documents incorporated by reference
The definitive proxy statement relating to the registrant’s Annual Meeting of Shareholders, to be held September 7, 2005, is incorporated by reference in Part III to the extent described therein.
 
 




H&R BLOCK
2005 FORM 10-K AND ANNUAL REPORT
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
                       
         Introduction and Forward Looking Statements     1      
 PART I
 Item 1.    Business            
         General Development of Business     1      
         Description of the Business            
           Tax Services     2      
           Mortgage Services     6      
           Business Services     8      
           Investment Services     10      
         Service Marks, Trademarks and Patents     12      
         Employees     12      
         Risk Factors     12      
         Reports     16      
 Item 2.    Properties     15      
 Item 3.    Legal Proceedings     15      
 Item 4.    Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders     17      
 PART II
 Item 5.    Market for the Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities     17      
 Item 6.    Selected Financial Data     18      
 Item 7.    Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations     18      
 Item 7a.    Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk     39      
 Item 8.    Financial Statements and Supplementary Data     42      
 Item 9.    Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure     83      
 Item 9a.    Controls and Procedures     83      
 Item 9b.    Other Information     84      
 PART III
 Item 10.    Directors and Executive Officers of the Registrant     84      
 Item 11.    Executive Compensation     86      
 Item 12.    Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters     86      
 Item 13.    Certain Relationships and Related Transactions     86      
 Item 14.    Principal Accounting Fees and Services     86      
 PART IV
 Item 15.    Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules     87      
         Signatures     89      
         Exhibit Index     90      
 Form of 2003 Long-Term Executive Compensation Plan Award Agreement
 Form of 1989 Stock Option Plan for Outside Directors Stock Option Agreement
 Leasing Operations Supplier Agreement
 Second Amended and Restated Sale and Servicing Agreement
 Amended and Restated Note Purchase Agreement
 Amended and Restated Sale and Servicing Agreement
 Second Amended and Restated Sale and Servicing Agreement
 Indenture
 Amendment No. 4 to the Indenture
 Amendment No. 5 to the Indenture
 Amendment No. 6 to the Indenture
 Amended and Restated Note Purchase Agreement
 Amendment No. 1 to Amended and Restated Note Purchase Agreement
 Second Amended and Restated Sale and Servicing Agreement
 Indenture
 Amendment No. 5 to the Indenture
 Amendment No. 6 to the Indenture
 Amendment No. 6 to the Indenture
 Amended and Restated Note Purchase Agreement
 Amendment No. 1 to Amended and Restated Note Purchase Agreement
 Sale and Servicing Agreement
 Amendment No. 1 to Sale and Servicing Agreement
 Amendment No. 2 to Sale and Servicing Agreement
 Indenture
 Note Purchase Agreement
 Amendment No. 1 to Note Purchase Agreement
 Amendment No. 2 to Note Purchase Agreement
 Amendment No. 3 to Note Purchase Agreement
 Amendment No. 4 to Note Purchase Agreement
 Amendment No. 5 to Note Purchase Agreement
 Computation of Ratio of Earnings to Fixed Charges
 Subsidiaries of H&R Block, Inc.
 Consent of KPMG LLP
 Consent of PricewaterCoopers LLP
 Certification Pursuant to Section 302 - CEO
 Certification Pursuant to Section 302 - Exec. VP & CFO
 Certification Pursuant to Section 1350- CEO
 Certification Pursuant to Section 1350 - Exec. VP & CFO
 


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H&R BLOCK 2005 Form 10K


 
INTRODUCTION AND FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS
We have again chosen to combine our Annual Report on Form 10-K, which we are required to file annually with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), and our Annual Report to Shareholders. We hope that by including all of this information in one document, you will find this Annual Report more useful and informative.
   On June 7, 2005, we determined it was appropriate to restate our previously issued consolidated financial statements, including financial statements for the nine months ended January 31, 2005 and financial statements for the fiscal years ended April 30, 2004 and 2003 and all related interim periods. The details of the restatement, including the issues and amounts, are presented in Item 8, note 2 to our consolidated financial statements.
   Specified portions of our proxy statement, which will be filed in August 2005, are listed as “incorporated by reference” in response to certain items. Our proxy statement will be printed within our Annual Report and mailed to shareholders in August 2005 and will also be available on our website at www.hrblock.com.
   In this report, and from time to time throughout the year, we share our expectations for the Company’s future performance. These forward-looking statements are based upon current information, expectations, estimates and projections regarding the Company, the industries and markets in which we operate, and our assumptions and beliefs at that time. These statements speak only as of the date on which they are made, are not guarantees of future performance, and involve certain risks, uncertainties and assumptions, which are difficult to predict. Therefore, actual outcomes and results could materially differ from what is expressed, implied or forecast in these forward-looking statements. Words such as “believe,” “will,” “plan,” “expect,” “intend,” “estimate,” “approximate,” and similar expressions may identify such forward-looking statements.
 
 
ITEM 1. BUSINESS
GENERAL DEVELOPMENT OF BUSINESS ...
H&R Block is a diversified company with subsidiaries delivering tax, investment, mortgage and business services and products. For 50 years, we have been developing relationships with millions of tax clients and our strategy is to expand on these relationships. Our Tax Services segment provides income tax return preparation and other services and products related to tax return preparation to the general public in the United States, and in Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom. We also offer investment services and securities products through H&R Block Financial Advisors, Inc. (“HRBFA”). Our Mortgage Services segment offers a full range of home mortgage services through Option One Mortgage Corporation (“Option One”) and H&R Block Mortgage Corporation (“HRBMC”). RSM McGladrey Business Services, Inc. (“RSM”) is a national accounting, tax and consulting firm primarily serving mid-sized businesses.
“To help our clients achieve their financial objectives
by serving as their tax and financial partner.”
   Key to achieving our mission is the enhancement of client experiences through consistent delivery of valuable services and advice. Operating through multiple lines of business allows us to better meet the changing financial needs of our clients.
   H&R Block, Inc. was organized as a corporation in 1955 under the laws of the State of Missouri, and is a holding company with operating subsidiaries providing financial services and products to the general public. “H&R Block,” “the Company,” “we,” “our” and “us” are used interchangeably to refer to H&R Block, Inc. or to H&R Block, Inc. and its subsidiaries, as appropriate to the context.
   RECENT DEVELOPMENTS ... On October 26, 2004, we issued $400.0 million of 5.125% Senior Notes under our shelf registration statements. The Senior Notes are due on October 30, 2014. The proceeds from the notes were used to repay our $250.0 million in 63/4% Senior Notes, which were due on November 1, 2004. The remaining proceeds were used for working capital, capital expenditures, repayment of other debt and other general corporate purposes. As of April 30, 2005, we had $850.0 million available under our shelf registration statements.
   On June 8, 2005, our Board of Directors declared a two-for-one stock split of the Company’s Common Stock in the form of a 100% stock distribution, effective August 22, 2005, to shareholders of record as of the close of business on August 1, 2005.
   Developments during fiscal year 2005 within our operating segments are described below in “Description of Business.”
 
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H&R BLOCK 2005 Form 10K


 
FINANCIAL INFORMATION ABOUT INDUSTRY SEGMENTS
See discussion below and in Item 8, note 20 to our consolidated financial statements.
 
DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS
TAX SERVICES
GENERAL ... Our Tax Services segment is primarily engaged in providing tax return preparation and related services and products in the United States and its territories, Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom. Revenues include fees earned for services performed at company-owned retail tax offices, royalties from franchise retail tax offices, sales of Peace of Mind (“POM”) guarantees, sales of tax preparation and other software, fees from online tax preparation, and participation in refund anticipation loans (“RALs”). Segment revenues constituted 53.4% of our consolidated revenues for fiscal year 2005, 51.6% for 2004, and 52.2% for 2003.
   Retail income tax return preparation and related services are provided by tax professionals via a system of retail offices operated directly by us or by franchisees. In addition to our retail offices, we offer a number of digital tax preparation alternatives.
   TaxCut® from H&R Block enables do-it-yourself users to prepare their federal and state tax returns easily and accurately. Our software products may be purchased through third-party retail stores, direct mail or online.
   Clients also have many online options: multiple versions of do-it-yourself tax preparation, professional tax review, tax advice and tax preparation through a tax professional, whereby the client completes a tax organizer and sends it to a tax professional for preparation and/or signature.
   By offering professional and do-it-yourself tax preparation options through multiple channels, we can serve our clients in the manner in which they choose to be served.
   We also offer clients a number of options for receiving their income tax refund, including a check directly from the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”), an electronic deposit directly to their bank account, a refund anticipation check or a RAL.
   The following are some of the services we offer with our tax preparation service:
   PEACE OF MIND GUARANTEE ... The POM guarantee is offered to U.S. clients, whereby we (1) represent our clients if audited by the IRS, and (2) assume the cost, subject to certain limits, of additional taxes owed by a client resulting from errors attributable to one of our tax professionals. The POM program has a per client cumulative limit of $5,000 in additional taxes assessed with respect to the federal, state and local tax returns we prepared for the taxable year covered by the program.
   RALs ... RALs are offered to our U.S. clients by a designated bank through a contractual relationship with HSBC Holdings plc (“HSBC”). An eligible, electronic filing client may apply for a RAL at one of our offices. After meeting certain eligibility criteria, clients are offered the opportunity to apply for a loan from HSBC in amounts up to $9,999 based upon their anticipated federal income tax refund. We simultaneously transmit the income tax return information to the IRS and the lending bank. Within a few days or less after the filing date, the client receives a check or direct deposit in the amount of the loan, less the bank’s transaction fee, our tax return preparation fee and other fees for client-selected services. Additionally, qualifying electronic filing clients are eligible to receive their RAL proceeds, less applicable fees, in approximately one hour after electronic filing using the Instant Money service. For a RAL to be repaid, the IRS directly deposits the participating client’s federal income tax refund into a designated account at the lending bank. See related discussion of RAL participations below.
   RACs ... Refund Anticipation Checks (“RACs”) are offered to U.S. clients who may not wish to obtain a RAL or do not qualify for the RAL program, but who would like to either (1) receive their refund faster and do not have a bank account for the IRS to direct deposit their refund or (2) have their tax preparation fees paid directly out of their refund. A RAC is not a loan and is provided through a contractual relationship with HSBC.
   EASY PAY LOANS ... “EasyPay” revolving loans are offered through a contractual relationship with HSBC to clients whose tax returns reflect a balance due to the IRS. The loan has “same as cash” terms for approximately 90 days.
   EXPRESS IRAs ... Individual retirement accounts (“Express IRAs”), invested in FDIC-insured money market accounts, are offered to U.S. clients as a tax-advantaged retirement savings tool. HRBFA acts as custodian on the accounts, with the funds being invested at insured depository institutions paying competitive money market interest rates.
   TAX RETURN PREPARATION COURSES ... We offer income tax return preparation courses to the public, which teach taxpayers how to prepare income tax returns and provide us with a source of trained tax professionals.
   SOFTWARE PRODUCTS ... We develop and market TaxCut income tax preparation software, H&R Block DeductionProtm,
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Kiplinger’s Home and Business Attorney and Kiplinger’s WILLPowerSM software products.
   TaxCut offers a simple step-by-step tax preparation interview, data imports from money management software and tax preparation software, calculations, completion of the appropriate tax forms, checking for errors and, for an additional charge, electronic filing.
   H&R Block DeductionPro helps taxpayers track and accurately value their charitable deductions by providing fair-market valuations for hundreds of commonly donated household goods.
   ONLINE TAX PREPARATION ... We offer a comprehensive range of tax services and products, from tax advice to complete professional and do-it-yourself tax return preparation and electronic filing, through our website at www.hrblock.com and www.taxcut.com. These websites allow clients to prepare their federal and state income tax returns using the Online Tax Program (“OTP”), access tax tips, advice and tax-related news and use calculators for tax planning.
   Beginning with the fiscal year 2003 tax season, we participated in the Free File Alliance (“FFA”). This alliance was created by the tax return preparation industry and the IRS, and allows filers to prepare and file their federal return online at no charge. We feel that this program increases our visibility with new clients, while also providing an opportunity to offer our state return preparation services to these new clients at our regular prices.
   CASHBACK PROGRAM ... We offer a refund discount (“CashBack”) program to our customers in Canada. Canadian law specifies the procedures we must follow in conducting the program. In accordance with current Canadian regulations, if a customer’s tax return indicates the customer is entitled to a tax refund, we issue a check to the client. The client assigns to us the full amount of the tax refund to be issued by Revenue Canada and the refund check is then sent by Revenue Canada directly to us. In accordance with the law, the discount is deemed to include both the tax return preparation fee and the fee for tax refund discounting. This program is financed by short-term borrowings. The number of returns discounted under the CashBack program in fiscal year 2005 was approximately 581,000, compared to 552,000 in 2004 and 531,000 in 2003. See discussion of the Canadian tax season extension under “Seasonality of Business.”
   CLIENTS SERVED ... We, together with our franchisees, served approximately 21.4 million clients worldwide during fiscal year 2005, compared to 21.6 million in 2004 and 21.7 in 2003. See discussion of the Canadian tax season extension under “Seasonality of Business.” We served 19.1 million clients in the U.S. during fiscal year 2005, compared to 19.3 million in 2004 and 19.5 million in 2003. “Clients served” includes taxpayers for whom we prepared income tax returns in offices, federal software units sold, online completed and paid federal returns and paid online state returns when no federal return was purchased, as well as taxpayers for whom we provided only paid electronic filing services. Returns for our U.S. clients constituted 15.5% of an IRS estimate of total individual income tax returns filed as of April 29, 2005, compared to 15.7% in 2004 and 16.0% in 2003.
   OWNED AND FRANCHISED OFFICES ... A summary of our company-owned and franchise offices is as follows:
                             
 
April 30,   2005   2004   2003
 
U.S. OFFICES  ...
                       
 
Company-owned offices
    5,811       5,172       4,688  
 
Company-owned shared locations (1)
    1,296       996       607  
     
   
Total company-owned offices
    7,107       6,168       5,295  
     
 
Franchise offices
    3,528       3,418       3,967  
 
Franchise shared locations (1)
    526       323       95  
     
   
Total franchise offices
    4,054       3,741       4,062  
     
      11,161       9,909       9,357  
     
INTERNATIONAL OFFICES  ...
                       
 
Canada
    912       891       910  
 
Australia
    378       378       362  
 
Other
    10       7       6  
     
      1,300       1,276       1,278  
     
 
(1)  Shared locations include offices located within Wal-Mart, Sears or other third-party businesses.
 
   Offices in shared locations include 947 offices operated in Wal-Mart stores and 757 offices in Sears stores operated as “H&R Block at Sears.” The Wal-Mart agreement is in the process of being extended, with the new agreement expected to expire in May 2007, and the Sears license agreement expires in July 2007, both subject to termination rights.
   We offer franchises as a way to expand our presence in the market. Our franchise arrangements provide us with certain rights which are designed to protect our brand. Most of our franchisees receive signs, designated equipment, specialized forms, local advertising, initial training, and supervisory services, and pay us a percentage of gross tax return preparation and related service revenues as a franchise royalty.
   From time to time, we have acquired the territories of existing franchisees and other tax return preparation businesses, and will continue to do so if future conditions warrant and satisfactory terms can be negotiated. During fiscal year 2004, we made payments of $243.2 million related to the acquisition of primarily assets and stock in the franchise territories of ten of our former major franchisees. One franchisee is continuing litigation
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challenging the post-expiration restrictive covenants and also disputing the payment due under the franchise agreement terms.
   RAL PARTICIPATIONS AND 2003 TAX SEASON WAIVER ... Since July 1996, we have been a party to agreements with HSBC and its predecessors to participate in RALs provided by a lending bank to H&R Block tax clients. The 1996 agreement was amended and restated in January 2003 and again in June 2003. In the June 2003 agreement, we obtained the right to purchase a 49.9% participation interest in RALs obtained through company-owned and regular franchise offices and a 25% interest in RALs obtained through major franchise offices. The current agreement continues through June 2006. Our purchases of the participation interests are financed through short-term borrowings, and we bear all of the credit risk associated with our interests in the RALs. Revenue from our participation is calculated as the rate of participation multiplied by the fee paid by the borrower to the lending bank. Our RAL participation revenue was $182.8 million and $168.4 million in fiscal years 2005 and 2004, respectively.
   In January 2003, we entered into an agreement with Household Tax Masters, Inc. (“Household,” subsequently acquired by HSBC), whereby we waived our right to purchase any participation interests in and to receive fees related to RALs during the period January 1 through April 30, 2003. In consideration for waiving these rights, we received a series of payments from Household, subject to certain adjustments based on delinquency rates for the 2003 tax season. We recorded revenues totaling $138.2 million during fiscal year 2003. The initial payments were recognized as revenue over the waiver period. The waiver agreement only covered the 2003 tax season.
   SEASONALITY OF BUSINESS ... Because most of our clients file their tax returns during the period from January through April of each year, substantially all of our revenues from income tax return preparation and related services and products are received during this period. As a result, our tax segment generally operates at a loss through the first eight months of the fiscal year. Historically, these losses primarily reflect wages of year-round personnel, training of tax professionals, rental and furnishing of retail tax offices, and other costs and expenses relating to preparation for the upcoming tax season. Additionally, the tax business is affected by economic conditions and unemployment rates. Peak revenues occur during the applicable tax season, as follows:
             
 
    United States and Canada   January – April    
    Australia   July – October    
 
   This year Revenue Canada extended the Canadian tax season to May 2, 2005. Clients served in our Canadian operations in fiscal year 2005 includes approximately 47,500 returns in both company-owned and franchise offices which were accepted by the client on May 1 and 2, 2005. The revenues related to these returns will be recognized in fiscal year 2006.
   COMPETITIVE CONDITIONS ... The retail tax services business is highly competitive. There are a substantial number of tax return preparation firms and accounting firms offering tax return preparation services. Many tax return preparation firms and many firms not otherwise in the tax return preparation business are involved in providing electronic filing and RAL services to the public. Commercial tax return preparers and electronic filers are highly competitive with regard to price, service and reputation for quality. In terms of the number of offices and personal tax returns prepared and electronically filed in offices, online and via our software, we are the largest company providing direct tax return preparation and electronic filing services in the U.S. We also believe we operate the largest tax return preparation businesses in Canada and Australia.
   The Digital Tax Solutions businesses compete with a number of companies. Intuit, Inc. is the dominant supplier of tax preparation software and is also our primary competitor in the online tax preparation market. There are many smaller competitors in the online market, as well as free state-sponsored online filing programs. Price competition for tax preparation services increased in fiscal year 2005. In addition, we and Intuit, along with several other online companies participating in the FFA, began offering free online federal return preparation with no income limitations. As a result, the IRS indicated the number of free federal returns filed through the FFA increased 46%. We continue to believe the FFA offers us the opportunity to reach new clients; however, this year’s free offer captured new clients who may have otherwise paid for a return through our online business.
   GOVERNMENT REGULATION ... Primary efforts toward the regulation of U.S. commercial tax return preparers have historically been made at the federal level. Federal legislation requires income tax return preparers to, among other things, set forth their signatures and identification numbers on all tax returns prepared by them, and retain all tax returns prepared for three years. Federal laws also subject income tax return preparers to accuracy-related penalties in connection with the preparation of income tax returns. Preparers may be prohibited from further acting as income tax return preparers if they continuously and repeatedly engage in specified misconduct. With certain exceptions, the Internal Revenue Code also prohibits the use or disclosure by income tax return preparers of certain income tax return information without the prior written consent of the taxpayer. In addition, the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act and
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Federal Trade Commission regulations adopted thereunder require income tax preparers to adopt and disclose consumer privacy policies, and provide consumers a reasonable opportunity to “opt-out” of having personal information disclosed to unaffiliated third parties for marketing purposes. Some states have adopted or proposed strict “opt-in” requirements in connection with use or disclosure of consumer information.
   We believe the federal legislation regulating commercial tax return preparers and consumer privacy has not had and will not have a material adverse effect on the operations of H&R Block. In addition, no present state statutes of this nature have had a material adverse effect on our business. We cannot, however, predict what the effect may be of the enactment of new statutes or adoption of new regulations.
   The federal government regulates the electronic filing of income tax returns in part by requiring individuals and businesses to be accepted into the electronic filing program. Once accepted, electronic filers must comply with all publications and notices of the IRS applicable to electronic filing, provide certain information to the taxpayer, comply with advertising standards for electronic filers, and be subjected to possible monitoring by the IRS, penalties for disclosure or use of income tax return preparation and other preparer penalties, and suspension from the electronic filing program. States that have adopted electronic filing programs for state income tax returns have also enacted laws regulating electronic filers and the advertising and offering of electronic filing services.
   Federal statutes and regulations also regulate an electronic filer’s involvement in RALs. Electronic filers must clearly explain the RAL is a loan and not a substitute for or a quicker way of receiving an income tax refund. Federal laws place restrictions on the fees an electronic filer may charge in connection with RALs. In addition, some states and localities have enacted laws and adopted regulations for RAL facilitators and/or the advertising of RALs. There are also many states that have statutes regulating, through licensing and other requirements, the activities of brokering loans, providing credit services and offering “credit repair” services to consumers for a fee (“Loan Activity Statutes”). We believe the procedures under which we facilitate RALs are structured so our activities are not included within the scope of the activities regulated by these Loan Activity Statutes. There can be no assurances, however, that states with these Loan Activity Statutes will not contend successfully that these statutes apply to the RAL business and that we will need to become licensed under the Loan Activity Statutes, otherwise comply with statutory requirements, or modify procedures so that the Loan Activity Statutes are inapplicable.
   Many states have statutes requiring the licensing of persons offering contracts of insurance. We have received from certain state insurance regulators inquiries about our POM guarantee program and the applicability of the state insurance statutes. In states where the inquiries are closed, the regulators affirmed our position that the POM guarantee is not a contract of insurance and is therefore not subject to state insurance licensing laws. In the few states where inquiries are pending, we believe there are no insurance laws under which the POM guarantee constitutes a contract of insurance. There can be no assurances, however, that the product, or other similar products we may offer in the future, will not be scrutinized as potential insurance products and held to be subject to various insurance laws and regulations.
   Many of our income tax courses are regulated and licensed in select states. Failure to obtain a tax school license could limit our ability to develop interest in tax preparation as a career or obtain qualified tax professionals.
   We believe the federal, state and local laws and legislation regulating electronic filing, RALs and the facilitation of RALs, loan brokers, credit services, credit repair services, insurance products, and proprietary schools have not, and will not in the future, have a material adverse effect on our operations. We cannot predict, however, what the effect may be of the enactment of new statutes or the adoption of new regulations pertaining to these matters.
   As noted above under “Owned and Franchised Offices,” many of the income tax return preparation offices operating in the U.S. under the name “H&R Block” are operated by franchisees. Certain aspects of the franchisor/franchisee relationship have been the subject of regulation by the Federal Trade Commission and by various states. The extent of regulation varies, but relates primarily to disclosures to be made in connection with the grant of franchises and limitations on termination by the franchisor under the franchise agreement. To date, no such regulation has materially affected our business. We cannot predict, however, the effect of applicable statutes or regulations that may be enacted or adopted in the future.
   We also seek to determine the applicability of all government and self-regulatory organization statutes, ordinances, rules and regulations in the international countries in which we operate (collectively, “Foreign Laws”) and to comply with these Foreign Laws. We cannot predict what effect the enactment of future Foreign Laws, changes in interpretations of existing Foreign Laws, or the results of future regulator inquiries regarding the applicability of Foreign Laws may have on our segments, any particular subsidiary, or our consolidated financial statements.
   Statutes and regulations relating to income tax return preparers, electronic filing, franchising and other areas affecting
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the income tax business also exist in other countries in which we operate. In addition, the Canadian government regulates the refund-discounting program in Canada. These laws have not materially affected our international operations.
   See discussion in “Risk Factors” for additional information.
 
MORTGAGE SERVICES
GENERAL ... Our Mortgage Services segment originates mortgage loans, services non-prime mortgage loans and sells and securitizes mortgage loans and residual interests in the U.S. Revenues primarily consist of gains from sales and securitizations of mortgage assets, accretion on residual interests and servicing fee income. Segment revenues constituted 28.2% of our consolidated revenues for fiscal year 2005 and 31.2% for 2004 and 30.8% for 2003.
   We originate both non-prime and prime mortgage loans. Non-prime mortgages are those that may not be offered through government-sponsored loan agencies and typically involve borrowers with limited income documentation, high levels of consumer debt or past credit problems. Even though these borrowers have credit problems, they also tend to have equity in the property that will be used to secure the loan. Prime mortgages are those that may be offered through government sponsored loan agencies. We conduct business through four channels:
    Option One’s wholesale origination channel works with independent brokers throughout the U.S. to fund non-prime mortgage loans through a national branch network. Wholesale originations represent the majority of Option One’s total loan production.
    HRBMC originates residential mortgage loans directly to retail consumers through various sales channels, including 37 loan production offices, of which four are regional offices, in 26 states in fiscal year 2005.
    Option One’s national accounts channel forms partnerships with financial institutions, including national and regional banks, to allow them to offer non-prime loans.
    Option One’s bulk acquisitions channel specializes in the purchase of performing non-prime mortgage loan pools.
   Option One is headquartered in Irvine, California and operates in 48 states by serving 42,000 mortgage broker locations and through its network of 36 wholesale loan production branches and six national accounts branches. HRBMC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Option One, is a retail mortgage lender for prime, non-prime and government loans and is licensed to conduct business in all 50 states. HRBMC is an approved seller/servicer for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and is HUD authorized to originate and underwrite FHA and VA mortgage loans.
   LOAN ORIGINATION ... The following table details our originations by channel for fiscal years 2005, 2004 and 2003:
                             
(in 000s)    
 
Year Ended April 30,   2005   2004   2003    
 
Wholesale
  $ 21,841,783     $ 16,828,138     $ 11,434,138      
Retail
    4,023,914       3,105,021       2,918,378      
National accounts
    3,974,224       2,642,944       1,814,092      
Bulk acquisitions
    1,161,803       679,910       411,013      
     
    $ 31,001,724     $ 23,256,013     $ 16,577,621      
     
 
   Information regarding our non-prime loan originations is as follows:
                               
(dollars in 000s)    
 
Year Ended April 30,   2005   2004   2003    
 
Loan type:
                           
 
2-year ARM
    61.6%       63.4%       70.3%      
 
3-year ARM
    4.0%       5.2%       5.1%      
 
Fixed 1st
    17.7%       28.7%       23.9%      
 
Fixed 2nd
    3.8%       1.6%       0.7%      
 
Interest only 1st
    12.6%       0.7%       – %      
 
Other
    0.3%       0.4%       – %      
Loan purpose:
                           
 
Cash-out refinance
    63.5%       67.1%       64.9%      
 
Purchase
    30.8%       26.0%       26.9%      
 
Rate or term refinance
    5.7%       6.9%       8.2%      
Loan characteristics:
                           
 
Average loan size
  $ 160     $ 151     $ 144      
 
Weighted-average loan-to-value
    78.9%       78.1%       78.7%      
 
Weighted-average FICO score
    614       608       604      
 
   WHOLESALE. Wholesale loan originations involve an independent broker who assists the borrower in completing the loan application, which includes securing information regarding their assets, liabilities, income, credit history, employment history and personal information. We require a credit report on each applicant from an industry-recognized credit reporting company. In evaluating an applicant’s credit history, we use credit bureau risk scores, generally known as a FICO score, which is a statistical ranking of likely future credit performance developed by Fair, Isaac & Company and provided by the three national credit data repositories. Qualified independent appraisers are required to appraise mortgaged properties used to secure mortgage loans. The broker then identifies a lender who offers a loan product best suited to the borrower’s financial
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needs. No one broker currently originates more than 0.6% of our total non-prime production.
   Upon receipt of an application from a broker, a credit report and an appraisal report, one of our branch offices processes and underwrites the loan. Our underwriting guidelines require mortgage loans be underwritten in a standardized procedure that complies with federal and state laws and regulations. The guidelines are primarily intended to assess the value of the mortgaged property, evaluate the adequacy of the property as collateral for the mortgage loan, and assess the creditworthiness of the related borrower. Based upon this assessment, we advise the broker whether the loan application meets our underwriting guidelines and product description by issuing a loan approval or denial. In some cases, we issue a “conditional approval,” which requires the submission of additional information or clarification. The mortgage loans are underwritten with a view toward resale in the secondary market.
   RETAIL. HRBMC originates our retail mortgage loans. In fiscal year 2005, 75% of our retail originations were non-prime and 25% were prime, compared to 59% and 41%, respectively, in 2004. These loans are processed by loan officers in HRBMC offices. Approximately one-third of these offices are co-located with our retail tax offices. The co-located offices are key to working towards our mission of becoming our clients’ tax and financial partner. During fiscal year 2005, approximately 35% of HRBMC’s loans were made to existing H&R Block clients compared to 49% in 2004.
   The application and approval process in our retail locations is similar to those described above under “Wholesale.” Retail mortgage loans are originated with the intent to sell.
   SALE AND SECURITIZATION OF LOANS ... Substantially all non-prime mortgage loans are sold daily to qualifying special purpose entities (“Trusts”). See discussion of our loan sale and securitization process in Item 7, under “Off-Balance Sheet Financing Arrangements.”
   Substantially all of our retail prime mortgage loans are sold to Countrywide Home Loans, Inc. (“Countrywide”). The majority of mortgage loans sold to Countrywide are underwritten through an automated system under which Countrywide assumes our representations and warranties, which comply with Countrywide’s underwriting guidelines. This agreement allows us to achieve improved execution due to price, efficiencies in delivery, and elimination of redundancies in operations. We do not retain servicing rights related to the prime mortgage loans. HRBMC non-prime mortgage loans are sold to Option One. See discussion of our prime warehouse line in Item 7, under “Capital Resources and Liquidity by Segment.”
   SERVICING ... Loan servicing involves collecting and remitting mortgage loan payments, making required advances, accounting for principal and interest, holding escrow for payment of taxes and insurance and contacting delinquent borrowers. We receive loan-servicing fees monthly over the life of the mortgage loans. We only service non-prime mortgage loans. At the end of fiscal year 2005, we serviced 435,290 loans totaling $68.0 billion, compared to 324,364 loans totaling $45.3 billion at April 30, 2004 and 246,463 loans totaling $31.3 billion at April 30, 2003.
   The following table summarizes our servicing portfolio by origin and includes related mortgage servicing rights (“MSRs”) as of April 30, 2005 and the rate we earned on each type of servicing during fiscal year 2005:
                             
(dollars in 000s)    
 
Type of Servicing   Principal Balance   MSR Balance   Rate Earned    
 
Originated
  $ 47,376,295     $ 166,614       0.41%      
Sub-servicing
    20,450,482             0.22%      
Purchased
    167,687             0.51%      
               
Total
  $ 67,994,464     $ 166,614       0.36%      
               
 
   When non-prime loans are sold or securitized, we generally retain the right to service the loans, which results in MSR assets and liabilities being recorded on our balance sheet. Assumptions used in estimating the value of MSRs are discussed in Item 8, note 1 to our consolidated financial statements. In addition to servicing loans we originate, we also service non-prime loans originated by other lenders, designated in the above table as sub-servicing. MSRs are recorded only in conjunction with our originated or purchased loan-servicing portfolio.
   GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION ... The following table details the percent of non-prime loan origination volume and our loan origination branches by state, excluding our Retail channel, for fiscal years 2005 and 2004:
                                     
 
    2005   2004    
 
    Percent of   Number of   Percent of   Number of    
State   Volume   Branches   Volume   Branches    
 
California
    21.8%       8       18.8%       5      
New York
    11.5%       2       14.4%       2      
Massachusetts
    8.4%       2       10.2%       1      
Florida
    7.2%       4       6.4%       4      
New Jersey
    5.3%       3       5.1%       3      
Other
    45.8%       23       45.1%       25      
 
   COMPETITIVE CONDITIONS ... Both the non-prime and prime sectors of the residential mortgage loan market are highly competitive. The principal methods of competition are price, service and product differentiation. There are a substantial number of companies competing in the residential loan market, including mortgage banking companies, commercial banks,
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savings associations, credit unions and other financial institutions. There are also numerous companies competing in the business of servicing non-prime loans. No one firm is a dominant supplier of non-prime and prime mortgage loans or a dominant servicer of non-prime loans. Inside B&C Lending ranked Option One as the number seven originator, based on market share as of December 31, 2004, and the number four servicer, based on servicing volume as of December 31, 2004, of non-prime loans in the industry.
   SEASONALITY OF BUSINESS ... Residential mortgage volume is not subject to significant seasonal fluctuations. The mortgage business is cyclical, however, and directly affected by national economic conditions, trends in business and finance and is impacted by changes in interest rates.
   GOVERNMENT REGULATION ... Mortgage loans purchased, originated and/or serviced are subject to federal laws and regulations, including:
    The federal Truth-in-Lending Act, as amended, and Regulation Z promulgated thereunder;
    The Equal Credit Opportunity Act, as amended, and Regulation B promulgated thereunder;
    The Fair Credit Reporting Act, as amended;
    The federal Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act, as amended, and Regulation X promulgated thereunder;
    The Home Ownership Equity Protection Act (“HOEPA”);
    The Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Civil Relief Act of 1940, as amended;
    The Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (“HMDA”) and Regulation C promulgated thereunder;
    The federal Fair Housing Act;
    The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act and regulations adopted thereunder; and
    Certain other laws and regulations.
   Under environmental legislation and case law applicable in certain states, it is possible that liability for environmental hazards in respect of real property may be imposed on a holder of a deed to the property, which may impair the underlying collateral.
   Applicable state laws generally regulate interest rates and other charges pertaining to non-prime loans. These states also require certain disclosures and require originators of certain mortgage loans to be licensed unless an exemption is available. In addition, most states have other laws, public policies and general principles of equity relating to consumer protection, unfair and deceptive practices, and practices that may apply to the origination, servicing and collection of mortgage loans.
   In recent years, there has been a noticeable increase in state, county and municipal statutes, ordinances and regulations that prohibit or regulate so-called “predatory lending” practices. Predatory lending statutes such as HOEPA, regulate “high-cost loans,” which are defined separately by each state, county or municipal statute, regulation or ordinance, but generally include mortgage loans with interest rates exceeding a (1) specified margin over the Treasury Index for a comparable maturity, or (2) designated percentage of points and fees. Statutes, ordinances and regulations that regulate high-cost loans generally prohibit mortgage lenders from engaging in certain defined practices, or require mortgage lenders to implement certain practices, in connection with any mortgage loans that fit within the definition of a high-cost loan. We do not originate loans which meet the definition of high-cost loans under any law.
   Certain state laws restrict or prohibit prepayment penalties on mortgage loans, and we relied on the federal Alternative Mortgage Transactions Parity Act (“Parity Act”) and related rules issued in the past by the Office of Thrift Supervision (“OTS”) to preempt state limitations on prepayment penalties. In September 2003, the OTS released a new rule that reduced the scope of the Parity Act preemption effective July 1, 2004 and, as a result, we can no longer rely on the Parity Act to preempt state restrictions on prepayment penalties. The elimination of this federal preemption requires compliance with state restrictions on prepayment penalties. These restrictions prohibit us from charging any prepayment penalty in six states and restrict the amount or duration of prepayment penalties that we may impose in an additional eleven states. This places us at a competitive disadvantage relative to financial institutions that continue to enjoy federal preemption of such state restrictions. Such institutions can charge prepayment penalties without regard to state restrictions and, as a result, may be able to offer loans with interest rate and loan fee structures that are more attractive than the interest rate and loan fee structures that we are able to offer.
   See discussion in “Risk Factors” for additional information.
 
BUSINESS SERVICES
GENERAL ... Our Business Services segment offers middle-market companies accounting, tax and consulting services. We have continued to expand the services we offer our clients by adding wealth management, retirement resources, payroll services, corporate finance and financial process outsourcing. Segment revenues constituted 13.0% of our consolidated revenues for fiscal year 2005, 11.8% for 2004 and 11.6% for 2003.
   This segment consists primarily of RSM McGladrey, Inc., which provides tax, accounting, and business consulting services in
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more than 90 offices in 23 states and offers services in 18 of the top 25 U.S. markets.
   Services are also provided by the following wholly-owned subsidiaries:
    RSM McGladrey Retirement Resources administers retirement plans, helps clients design the best plan for their needs, and provides retirement plan investment advice, year-end compliance, tax reporting and consulting.
    RSM EquiCo, Inc. is an investment banking firm specializing in business valuations, acquisitions and divestitures for private middle-market businesses.
    RSM McGladrey Employer Services, Inc. (formerly known as “MyBenefitSource, Inc.”) is a provider of payroll and benefits administration services to middle-market businesses.
    RSM McGladrey Financial Process Outsourcing, Inc. is a provider of accounting, reporting, payroll and bill paying services to distributors/franchisors and their population of retailers/franchisees.
    PDI Global, Inc. provides marketing, communications and visibility programs, tax and financial planning guides, and marketing and management consulting services to accountants, consultants, lawyers, banks, insurers, and other financial service providers.
   RELATIONSHIP WITH MCGLADREY & PULLEN, LLP ... By regulation, we cannot provide audit and attest services. McGladrey & Pullen, LLP (“M&P”), a public accounting firm, provides audit and review services and other services in which M&P issues written reports on client financial statements. Through an administrative services agreement with M&P, we provide accounting, payroll, human resources and other administrative services to M&P and receive a management fee for these services. We also have a cost-sharing arrangement with M&P, whereby they reimburse us for the costs of certain items, mainly supplies and for the use of RSM owned property and equipment. M&P is a limited liability partnership with its own governing body and, accordingly, is a separate legal entity and is not an affiliate. Some partners and employees of M&P are also our employees.
   SEASONALITY OF BUSINESS ... Revenues for this segment are largely seasonal in nature, with peak revenues occurring during January through April.
   COMPETITIVE CONDITIONS ... The accounting, tax and consulting business is highly competitive. The principal methods of competition are price, service and reputation for quality. There are a substantial number of accounting firms offering similar services at the international, national, regional and local levels. As our focus is on middle-market businesses, our principal competition is with national and regional accounting firms. We believe we have a competitive advantage in the geographic areas in which we are currently located based on the breadth of services we can offer to these clients above and beyond what a traditional accounting firm can offer.
   GOVERNMENT REGULATION ... Many of the same federal and state regulations relating to tax preparers and the information concerning tax reform discussed above in the “Government Regulation” section of “Tax Services” apply to the Business Services segment as well. However, accountants are not subject to the same prohibition on the use or disclosure of certain income tax return information as tax professionals. Accounting firms are also subject to state and federal regulations governing accountants, auditors and financial planners. Various legislative and regulatory proposals have been made relating to auditor independence and accounting oversight, among others. Some of these proposals, if adopted, could have an impact on RSM’s operations. We believe current state and federal regulations and known legislative and regulatory proposals do not and will not have a material adverse effect on our operations, but we cannot predict what the effect of future legislation, regulations and proposals may be.
   Independence rules established by the SEC and the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (“PCAOB”) apply to M&P as a public accounting firm. In applying its auditor independence rules, the SEC views us and M&P as a single entity and requires that we abide by its independence rules for M&P to be deemed independent of any SEC audit client. The SEC regards any financial interest or business relationship we have with a client of M&P as a financial interest or business relationship between M&P and the client for purposes of applying its auditor independence rules.
   We and M&P have jointly developed and implemented policies, procedures and controls designed to safeguard M&P’s independence and integrity as an audit firm in compliance with applicable regulations and professional responsibilities. These policies, procedures and controls are designed to monitor and prevent violations of applicable independence rules and include, among others, (1) informing our officers, directors and other members of management concerning auditor independence matters, (2) procedures for monitoring securities ownership, (3) communicating with SEC audit clients regarding the SEC’s interpretation and application of relevant independence rules and guidelines, and (4) requiring RSM employees to comply with M&P’s independence and relationship policies (including M&P’s independence compliance questionnaire procedures). We believe these policies, procedures and controls are adequate, although there can be no assurances they will ensure compliance with applicable independence rules and requirements. Any
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noncompliance could cause M&P to lose the ability to perform audits of financial statements filed with the SEC.
   See discussion in “Risk Factors” for additional information.
 
INVESTMENT SERVICES
GENERAL ... Our Investment Services segment provides brokerage services and investment planning through HRBFA to our clients in the U.S. Services offered to our customers include traditional brokerage services, as well as annuities, insurance, fee-based accounts, online account access, equity research and focus lists, model portfolios, asset allocation strategies, and other investment tools and information. Segment revenues constituted 5.4% of our consolidated revenues for fiscal years 2005, 2004 and 2003.
   HRBFA is a registered broker-dealer with the SEC and is a member of the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”), other national securities exchanges, Securities Investor Protection Corporation (“SIPC”), and the National Association of Securities Dealers, Inc. (“NASD”). HRBFA is also a registered investment advisor.
   The integration of investment advice with our tax client base allows us to leverage an already established relationship. In the past two years, new service offerings have allowed us to shift our focus from a transaction-based client relationship to a more advice-based focus.
   CUSTOMER ACTIVITY ... Customer trades in fiscal year 2005 totaled approximately 0.9 million, compared to approximately 1.0 million in 2004 and approximately 0.9 million in 2003. Average revenue per trade increased to $123.33 in fiscal year 2005, up from $119.36 in 2004 and $120.15 in 2003. We had 431,749 traditional brokerage accounts at April 30, 2005, compared to 463,736 at 2004 and 501,001 at 2003.
   FINANCIAL SERVICES OFFERINGS ... We offer a full range of financial services, including financial planning, college savings products, flexible brokerage accounts with cash management features, and a comprehensive line of insurance annuity products. Clients may also open professionally managed accounts.
   As previously discussed in “Tax Services,” we offer our tax clients the opportunity to open an Express IRA through HRBFA as a part of the tax return preparation process. Clients opened approximately 106,500 Express IRAs during tax season 2005, approximately 145,400 in 2004 and approximately 105,400 in 2003.
   We act as a dealer in fixed income markets including corporate and municipal bonds, various U.S. Government and U.S. Government Agency securities and certificates of deposit.
   FINANCIAL ADVISORS ... Key to our future success is retention and recruiting productive financial advisors. One of our key initiatives in fiscal year 2005 was to build revenues through the addition of financial advisors. During fiscal years 2005 and 2004, we added 258 and 255 advisors, respectively. These additions were offset by attrition of 233 and 230 advisors, respectively. Our overall retention rate for fiscal year 2005 was approximately 77%, essentially flat with the prior year. The retention rate for our higher-producing advisors was approximately 92%, down slightly from 93% in 2004. Advisor productivity by recruitment class is as follows:
                       
    (in 000s)    
 
    Revenue   Total Production    
    Per Advisor   Revenues    
 
Fiscal year 2005 ...
                   
 
Pre-2003 class
  $ 230     $ 121,342      
 
2003 recruits
    114       16,416      
 
2004 recruits
    98       19,941      
 
2005 recruits
    65       8,203      
Fiscal year 2004 ...
                   
 
Pre-2003 class
  $ 216     $ 135,128      
 
2003 recruits
    84       17,717      
 
2004 recruits
    61       7,664      
 
   Financial advisors generally reach full productivity levels approximately 24 to 36 months after they join our company.
   PARTNERING WITH TAX PROFESSIONALS ... The H&R Block Preferred Partner Programsm facilitates strategic, referral-based partnerships between tax professionals and financial advisors. The program includes the Licensed Referral Tax Professional (“LRTP”) program and, new for fiscal year 2005, a non-licensed option, which allows non-licensed tax professionals to gain additional rewards and recognition when making qualified client referrals to financial advisor partners. The LRTP program helps tax professionals become licensed to sell securities, teaming them with a financial advisor and providing a commission to the LRTP for business referred to Investment Services.
   As of April 30, 2005, our Preferred Partner Program had 6,442 active tax partners, of which 686 were licensed. We had 461 licensed tax partners at the end of fiscal year 2004. As a result of this initiative, we added 18,164 new customer accounts and assets totaling $573.0 million during the current fiscal year. We will continue to increase the number of tax partners in the coming year.
   INTEGRATED ONLINE SERVICES ... We have an online investment center on our website at www.hrblock.com. Online users have the opportunity to open accounts, obtain research, create investment plans, buy and sell securities, and view the status of their accounts.
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   OFFICE LOCATIONS ... HRBFA is authorized to do business as a broker-dealer in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. At the end of fiscal year 2005, we operated 257 branch offices, compared to approximately 358 offices in 2004 and 600 in 2003. The reduced number of branch offices is primarily due to the evolution of our tax-partnering program, which now locates financial advisors in retail tax offices. At April 30, 2005, we had 94 offices co-located with retail tax and mortgage offices. We believe the existence of these locations contributes to our growth and client satisfaction.
   COMPETITIVE CONDITIONS ... HRBFA competes directly with a broad range of companies seeking to attract consumer financial assets, including full-service brokerage firms, discount and online brokerage firms, mutual fund companies, investment banking firms, commercial and savings banks, insurance companies and others. The financial services industry has become considerably more concentrated as numerous securities firms have been acquired by or merged into other firms. Some of these competitors have greater financial resources than HRBFA and offer additional financial services. In addition, we expect competition from domestic and international commercial banks and larger securities firms to continue to increase as a result of legislative and regulatory initiatives in the U.S., including the passage of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act in November 1999 and the implementation of the U.S.A. Patriot Act in April 2002. These initiatives strive to remove or relieve certain restrictions on mergers between commercial banks and other types of financial services providers and extend privacy provisions and anti-money laundering procedures across the financial services industry.
   Discount brokerage firms and online-only financial services providers compete vigorously with HRBFA with respect to commission charges. Some full-commission brokerage firms also offer greater product breadth, discounted commissions and more robust online services to selected retail brokerage customers. Additionally, some competitors in both the full-commission and discount brokerage industries have substantially increased their spending on advertising and direct solicitation of customers.
   Competition in the online trading business has become similarly intense as recent expansion and customer acceptance of conducting financial transactions online has attracted new brokerage firms to the market.
   We compete based on quality of service, breadth of services offered, prices, accessibility through delivery channels, technological innovation and expertise and integration with our tax services relationships.
   SEASONALITY OF BUSINESS ... The Investment Services segment does not, as a whole, experience significant seasonal fluctuations. The securities business is cyclical, however, and directly affected by national and global economic and political conditions, trends in business and finance and changes in the conditions of the securities markets in which our clients invest.
   GOVERNMENT REGULATION ... The securities industry is subject to extensive regulation covering all aspects of the securities business, including registration of our offices and personnel, sales methods, the acceptance and execution of customer orders, the handling of customer funds and securities, trading practices, capital structure, record keeping policies and practices, margin lending, execution and settlement of transactions, the conduct of directors, officers and employees, and the supervision of employees. The various governmental authorities and industry self-regulatory organizations that have supervisory and regulatory jurisdiction over us generally have broad enforcement powers to censure, fine, issue cease-and-desist orders or suspend or expel a broker-dealer or any of its officers or employees who violate applicable laws or regulations.
   The SEC is the federal agency responsible for the administration of the federal securities laws. The SEC has delegated much of the regulation of broker-dealers to self-regulatory organizations, principally the NASD, Inc., Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board and the NYSE, which has been designated as HRBFA’s primary regulator. These self-regulatory organizations adopt rules, subject to SEC approval, governing the industry and conduct periodic examinations of HRBFA’s brokerage operations and clearing activities. Securities firms are also subject to regulation by state securities administrators in states in which they conduct business.
   As a registered broker-dealer, HRBFA is subject to the Net Capital Rule (Rule 15c3-1) promulgated by the SEC and adopted through incorporation by reference in NYSE Rule 325. The Rule, which specifies minimum net capital requirements for registered brokers and dealers, is designed to measure the financial soundness and liquidity of a broker-dealer and requires at least a minimum portion of its assets be kept in liquid form. Additional discussion of this requirement and HRBFA’s calculation of net capital is located in Item 7, under “Capital Resources and Liquidity by Segment.”
   See discussion in “Risk Factors” for additional information.
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SERVICE MARKS, TRADEMARKS AND PATENTS ...
We have made a practice of selling our services and products under service marks and trademarks and of obtaining protection for these by all available means. Our service marks and trademarks are protected by registration in the U.S. and other countries where our services and products are marketed. We consider these service marks and trademarks, in the aggregate, to be of material importance to our business, particularly our business segments providing services and products under the “H&R Block” brand.
   We have no registered patents that are material to our business.
 
EMPLOYEES ...
We have approximately 13,400 regular full-time employees. The highest number of persons we employed during the fiscal year ended April 30, 2005, including seasonal employees, was approximately 133,800.
 
RISK FACTORS ...
In this report, and from time to time throughout the year, we share our expectations for the Company’s future performance. The following explains the critical risk factors impacting our business and reasons actual results may differ from our expectations. This discussion does not intend to be a comprehensive list and there may be other risks and factors that may have an effect on our business.
   LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL ... We use capital primarily to fund working capital requirements, pay dividends, repurchase shares of our common stock and acquire businesses. We are dependent on the use of our off-balance sheet arrangements to fund our daily non-prime originations and the secondary market to securitize and sell mortgage loans and residual interests. See Item 7, under “Off-Balance Sheet Financing Arrangements.” We are also dependent on commercial paper issuances and/or bank lines to fund RAL participations and seasonal working capital needs. A disruption in such markets could adversely affect our access to these funds. To meet our future financing needs, we may issue additional debt or equity securities.
   LITIGATION ... We are involved in lawsuits in the normal course of our business related to RALs, our Peace of Mind guarantee program, electronic filing of tax returns, Express IRAs, losses incurred by customers in their investment accounts, mortgage lending activities and other matters. Adverse outcomes related to litigation could result in substantial damages and could adversely affect our results of operations. Negative public opinion can also result from our actual or alleged conduct in such claims, possibly damaging our reputation and adversely affecting the market price of our stock. See Item 3, “Legal Proceedings” for additional information.
   PRIVACY OF CLIENT INFORMATION ... We manage highly sensitive client information in all of our operating segments, which is regulated by law. Problems with the safeguarding and proper use of this information could result in regulatory actions and negative publicity, which could adversely affect our reputation and results of operations.
   INTERNAL CONTROL CERTIFICATION ... We have documented and tested our internal control procedures in accordance with various SEC rules governing Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (“SOX 404”). SOX 404 requires us to assess the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting annually, and obtain an opinion on these controls from our Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm. We may encounter problems or delays in completing the review and evaluation, the implementation of improvements and the receipt of a positive attestation, or any attestation at all, by our independent auditors. Additionally, management’s assessment of our internal controls over financial reporting may identify deficiencies that need to be addressed in our internal controls over financial reporting or other matters that may raise concerns for investors. As a part of Management’s assessment of our internal controls over financial reporting as of April 30, 2005, a material weakness was identified in the Company’s accounting for income taxes. The material weakness in internal controls resulted from insufficient resources in the corporate tax function to accurately identify, evaluate and report, in a timely manner, non-routine and complex transactions. The Company also determined that it had not completed the requisite historical analysis and related reconciliations to ensure tax balances were appropriately stated prior to the completion of the Company’s internal control activities. These deficiencies resulted in errors in the Company’s accounting for income taxes. These errors were corrected prior to issuance of the consolidated financial statements as of and for the year ended April 30, 2005. As a result, KPMG has issued an adverse opinion with respect to our internal controls over financial reporting and their report is included in Item 8. Should we, or our independent auditors, determine in future periods that we have additional material weaknesses in our internal controls over financial reporting, our results of
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operations or financial condition may be adversely affected and the price of our common stock may decline.
   OPERATIONAL RISK ... There is a risk of loss resulting from inadequate or failed processes or systems, theft or fraud. These can occur in many forms including, among others, errors, business interruptions, inappropriate behavior of or misconduct by our employees or those contracted to perform services for us, and vendors that do not perform in accordance with their contractual agreements. These events can potentially result in financial losses or other damages. We rely on internal and external information and technological systems to manage our operations and are exposed to risk of loss resulting from breaches in the security, or other failures of these systems. Replacement of our major operational systems could have a significant impact on our ability to conduct our core business operations and increase our risk of loss resulting from disruptions of normal operating processes and procedures that may occur during the implementation of new information and transaction systems.
TAX SERVICES
COMPETITIVE POSITION ... Increased competition for tax preparation clients in our retail offices, online and software channels could adversely affect our current market share and limit our ability to grow our client base. See clients served statistics included in Item 7, under “Tax Services.”
   REFUND ANTICIPATION LOANS ... Changes in government regulation related to RALs could adversely affect our ability to offer RALs or our ability to purchase participation interests. Changes in IRS practices could adversely affect our ability to use the IRS debt indicator to limit our bad debt exposure. Changes in any of these, as well as possible litigation related to RALs, may adversely affect our results of operations. See discussion of RAL litigation in Item 3, “Legal Proceedings.”
MORTGAGE SERVICES
COMPETITIVE POSITION ... The majority of our mortgage loan applications are submitted through a network of brokers who have relationships with many other mortgage lenders. Unfavorable changes in our pricing, service or other factors could result in a decline in our mortgage origination volume. A decline in our servicer ratings could adversely affect our pricing and origination volume. Increased competition among mortgage lenders can also result in a decline in coupon rates offered to our borrowers, which in turn lowers margins and could adversely affect our gains on sales of mortgage loans.
   MARKET RISKS ... Our day-to-day operating activities of originating and selling mortgage loans have many aspects of interest rate risk. Additionally, the valuation of our retained residual interests and mortgage servicing rights includes many estimates and assumptions made by management surrounding interest rates, prepayment speeds and credit losses. Variation in interest rates or the factors underlying our assumptions could affect our results of operations. See Item 7A, under “Mortgage Services,” for discussion of interest rate risk, and Item 7, under “Critical Accounting Policies,” for discussion of our valuation methodology.
   LEGISLATION AND REGULATION ... Several states and cities are considering or have passed laws, regulations or ordinances aimed at curbing predatory lending and servicing practices. The federal government is also considering legislative and regulatory proposals in this regard. In general, these proposals involve lowering the existing federal HOEPA thresholds for defining a “high-cost” loan and establishing enhanced protections and remedies for borrowers who receive such loans. If unfavorable laws and regulations are passed, it could restrict our ability to originate loans. If rating agencies refuse to rate our loans, loan buyers may not want to purchase loans labeled as “high-cost,” and it could restrict our ability to sell our loans in the secondary market. Accordingly, all of these items could adversely affect our results of operations.
   In 2002, the Federal Reserve Board adopted changes to Regulation C promulgated under the HMDA. Among other things, the new regulations require lenders to report pricing data on loans with annual percentage rates that exceed the yield on treasury bills with comparable maturities by 3%. The expanded reporting takes effect in 2004 for reports filed in 2005. We anticipate that a majority of our loans would be subject to the expanded reporting requirements. The expanded reporting does not provide for additional loan information such as credit risk, debt-to-income ratio, loan-to-value ratio, documentation level or other salient loan features. However, reported information may lead to increased litigation as the information could be misinterpreted by third parties and could adversely affect our results of operations.
   COUNTERPARTY CREDIT RISK ... Derivative instruments involve counterparty credit risk, which is the risk that a counterparty may fail to perform on its contractual obligations. We manage this risk through the use of a policy that includes credit standard guidelines, counterparty diversification, monitoring of counterparty financial condition, use of master netting agreements with counterparties, and exposure limits based on counterparty credit, exposure amount and management risk tolerance. The policy is reviewed on an annual basis and as conditions warrant. See Item 7A, under “Mortgage Services,” and Item 8, note 9 to our consolidated financial statements for discussion of our derivative instruments.
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   REAL ESTATE MARKET ... Our residual interests and beneficial interest in Trusts are secured by mortgage loans, which are in turn secured by residential real estate. Any material decline in real estate values would likely result in higher delinquencies, defaults and foreclosures. Additionally, a significant portion of the mortgage loans we originate or service is secured by properties in California. A decline in the economy or the residential real estate market values, or the occurrence of a natural disaster not covered by standard homeowners’ insurance policies, such as an earthquake, hurricane or wildfire, could decrease the value of mortgaged properties in California. Any sustained period of increased delinquencies, foreclosures or losses could harm our ability to originate and sell loans, the prices we receive on our loans, or the values of our mortgage servicing rights and residual interests in securitizations, which could adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.
BUSINESS SERVICES
ALTERNATIVE PRACTICE STRUCTURE WITH M&P ... Our relationship with M&P requires us to comply with applicable auditor independence rules and requirements. In addition, our relationship with M&P closely links our RSM McGladrey brand with M&P. If M&P were to encounter problems concerning its independence as a result of its relationship with us or if significant litigation arose concerning M&P or its services, our brand reputation and our ability to realize the mutual benefits of our relationship, such as the ability to attract and retain quality professionals, could be impaired.
INVESTMENT SERVICES
REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT ... The broker-dealer industry has recently come under increased scrutiny by federal and state regulators and self-regulatory agencies and, as a result, more focus has been placed on compliance issues. If we do not comply with these regulations, it could result in regulatory actions and negative publicity, which could adversely affect our results of operations and our ability to recruit and retain qualified advisors. Negative public opinion about our industry could damage our reputation even if we are in compliance with such regulations.
   INTEGRATION INTO THE H&R BLOCK BRAND ... We are working to foster an advice-based relationship with our tax clients through our retail tax office network. This advice-based relationship is key to the integration of Investment Services into the H&R Block brand and deepening our current client relationships. If we are unable to successfully integrate, it may significantly impact our ability to differentiate our business from other tax providers and grow our client base.
   RECRUITING AND RETENTION OF FINANCIAL ADVISORS ... Attracting and retaining experienced financial advisors is extremely competitive in the investment industry. Additionally, in this industry, clients tend to follow their advisors, regardless of their affiliated investment firm. The inability to recruit and retain qualified and productive advisors, may adversely affect our results of operations.
   RECURRING OPERATING LOSSES ... Continuing operating losses in our Investment Services segment may impact the valuation of goodwill and intangible assets. Such losses could also necessitate additional capital contributions to comply with regulatory requirements. The inability to operate this segment in a profitable manner may adversely affect our results of operations.
 
AVAILABILITY OF REPORTS AND OTHER INFORMATION ...
Our annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and all amendments to those reports filed with or furnished to the SEC are available, free of charge, through our website at www.hrblock.com as soon as reasonably practicable after such reports are electronically filed with or furnished to the SEC.
   Copies of the following corporate governance documents are posted on our website: (1) The Amended and Restated Articles of Incorporation of H&R Block, Inc., (2) The Amended and Restated Bylaws of H&R Block, Inc., (3) The H&R Block, Inc. Corporate Governance Guidelines, (4) the H&R Block, Inc. Code of Business Ethics and Conduct, (5) the H&R Block, Inc. Audit Committee Charter, (6) the H&R Block, Inc. Governance and Nominating Committee Charter, and (7) the H&R Block, Inc. Compensation Committee Charter. If you would like a printed copy of any of these corporate governance documents, please send your request to the Office of the Secretary, H&R Block, Inc., 4400 Main Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64111.
   Information contained on our website does not constitute any part of this report.
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ITEM 2. PROPERTIES
We own our corporate headquarters, which are located in Kansas City, Missouri. We have leased additional office space for corporate, Tax Services and Investment Services personnel, as necessary, in Kansas City, Missouri.
   Most of our tax offices, except those in shared locations, are operated under leases throughout the U.S. Our Canadian executive offices are located in a leased office in Calgary, Alberta. Our Canadian tax offices are operated under leases throughout Canada.
   Option One’s executive offices are located in leased offices in Irvine, California. HRBMC is headquartered in leased offices in Lake Forest, California. Option One and HRBMC also lease offices for their loan origination and servicing centers and branch office operations throughout the U.S.
   The executive offices of HRBFA are located in leased offices in Detroit, Michigan. Branch offices are operated throughout the U.S., in a combination of leased and owned facilities.
   RSM’s executive offices are located in leased offices in Bloomington, Minnesota. Its administrative offices are located in leased offices in Davenport, Iowa. RSM also leases office space throughout the U.S.
   We began construction of new corporate headquarters during fiscal year 2005, which will allow us to consolidate the majority of our Kansas City-based personnel into one facility. The new building will be located in downtown Kansas City, Missouri and we expect it to be completed in fiscal year 2007.
   All current leased and owned facilities are in good repair and adequate to meet our needs.
 
ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
The information below should be read in conjunction with the information included in Item 8, note 18 to our consolidated financial statements.
   RAL LITIGATION ... We have been named as a defendant in numerous lawsuits throughout the country regarding our refund anticipation loan programs (collectively, “RAL Cases”). Plaintiffs in the RAL Cases have alleged, among other things, that disclosures in the RAL applications were inadequate, misleading and untimely; that the RAL interest rates were usurious and unconscionable; that we did not disclose that we would receive part of the finance charges paid by the customer for such loans; breach of state laws on credit service organizations; breach of contract; unjust enrichment; unfair and deceptive acts or practices; violations of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act; violations of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act; and that we owe, and breached, a fiduciary duty to our customers in connection with the RAL program. In many of the RAL Cases, the plaintiffs seek to proceed on behalf of a class of similarly situated RAL customers, and in certain instances the courts have allowed the cases to proceed as class actions. In other cases, courts have held that plaintiffs must pursue their claims on an individual basis, and may not proceed as a class action. The amounts claimed in the RAL Cases have been very substantial in some instances.
   We have successfully defended against numerous RAL Cases, although several of the RAL Cases are still pending. Of the RAL Cases that are no longer pending, some were dismissed on our motions for dismissal or summary judgment and others were dismissed voluntarily by the plaintiffs after denial of class certification. Other cases were settled, with one settlement resulting in a pretax expense of $43.5 million in fiscal year 2003 (the “Texas RAL Settlement”).
   We believe we have meritorious defenses to the RAL Cases and we intend to defend the remaining RAL Cases vigorously. There can be no assurances, however, as to the outcome of the pending RAL Cases individually or in the aggregate. Likewise, there can be no assurances regarding the impact of the RAL Cases on our financial statements. We have accrued our best estimate of the probable loss related to the RAL Cases. The following is updated information regarding the pending RAL Cases that are class actions or putative class actions:
   Lynne A. Carnegie, et al. v. Household International, Inc., H&R Block, Inc., et al., (formerly Joel E. Zawikowski, et al. v. Beneficial National Bank, H&R Block, Inc., Block Financial Corporation, et al.) Case No. 98 C 2178, United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, Eastern Division, instituted on April 18, 1998. In March 2004, the court either dismissed or decertified all of the plaintiffs’ claims other than part of one count alleging violations of the racketeering and conspiracy provisions of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act. On May 9, 2005, the parties agreed to a settlement, subject to court approval. The settlement agreement provided for (i) the defendants to pay $110 million in cash and $250 million face value in freely transferable rebate coupons and (ii) all persons who applied for and obtained a RAL through an H&R Block office or certain lenders from January 1, 1987 through April 29, 2005 (the “Carnegie Settlement Class”) to release all claims against us regarding RALs or certain services provided in
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connection with RALs. The settlement agreement also specified required business practices, procedures, disclosures and forms for use in making RALs and barred members of the Carnegie Settlement Class from commencing any other claims or actions against us regarding RALs made pursuant to such practices, procedures, disclosures and forms (the “Forward Looking Protections”). In negotiating the settlement, we ascribed significant value to the Forward-Looking Protections and the expanded class of plaintiffs to be covered by the settlement in determining the amount of consideration we were willing to pay in settling the case. On May 26, 2005, the court denied approval of the proposed settlement. As discussed in our Form 8-K dated May 9, 2005, we initially recorded litigation reserves of approximately $38.0 million, after taxes, based on the May 9, 2005 proposed settlement. As a result of the May 26, 2005 court ruling to deny the settlement, we reversed our legal reserves to amounts representing our assessment of our probable loss. This class action case is scheduled to go to trial on October 17, 2005. We intend to continue defending the case vigorously, but there are no assurances as to its outcome.
   Sandra J. Basile, et al. v. H&R Block, Inc., et al, April Term 1992 Civil Action No. 3246 in the Court of Common Pleas, First Judicial District of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia County, instituted on April 23, 1993. The court decertified the class on December 31, 2003. Plaintiffs appealed the decertification, and the Pennsylvania appellate court denied the plaintiff’s appeal. The Pennsylvania appellate court subsequently granted plaintiff’s motion for en banc review of its earlier denial of plaintiff’s appeal. Re-argument is expected to occur in September 2005.
   Levon and Geral Mitchell, et al. v. H&R Block and Ruth R. Wren, Case No.CV-95-2067, in the Circuit Court of Mobile County, Alabama, instituted on June 13, 1995. Plaintiffs’ motion for class certification was granted, and defendants appealed the certification. The appeal is pending before the Alabama Supreme Court.
   Deandra D. Cummins, et al. v. H&R Block, Inc., et al., Case No. 03-C-134 in the Circuit Court of Kanawha County, West Virginia, instituted on January 22, 2003. This class action case is scheduled to go to trial on October 17, 2005.
   Lynn Becker v. H&R Block, Case No. CV-2004-03-1680 in the Court of Common Pleas, Summit County, Ohio, instituted on April 15, 2004. The case was removed to federal court, and plaintiffs moved to remand the case back to state court. The case currently is stayed pending the U.S. District Court’s ruling on plaintiff’s motion to remand and defendant’s motion to compel arbitration.
   Joyce Green, et al. v. H&R Block, Inc., Block Financial Corporation, et al., Case No. 97195023, in the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, Maryland, instituted on July 14, 1997. This case is awaiting trial. No trial date has been set.
   PEACE OF MIND LITIGATION ... Lorie J. Marshall, et al. v. H&R Block Tax Services, Inc., et al., Civil Action 2003L000004, in the Circuit Court of Madison County, Illinois, is a class action case filed on January 18, 2003, that was granted class certification on August 27, 2003. Plaintiffs’ claims consist of five counts relating to the POM program under which the applicable tax return preparation subsidiary assumes liability for additional tax assessments attributable to tax return preparation error. The plaintiffs allege that the sale of POM guarantees constitutes (i) statutory fraud by selling insurance without a license, (ii) an unfair trade practice, by omission and by “cramming” (i.e., charging customers for the guarantee even though they did not request it or want it), and (iii) a breach of fiduciary duty. In August 2003, the court certified the plaintiff classes consisting of all persons who from January 1, 1997 to final judgment (i) were charged a separate fee for POM by “H&R Block” or a defendant H&R Block class member; (ii) reside in certain class states and were charged a separate fee for POM by “H&R Block” or a defendant H&R Block class member not licensed to sell insurance; and (iii) had an unsolicited charge for POM posted to their bills by “H&R Block” or a defendant H&R Block class member. Persons who received the POM guarantee through an H&R Block Premium office and persons who reside in Alabama are excluded from the plaintiff class. The court also certified a defendant class consisting of any entity with names that include “H&R Block” or “HRB,” or are otherwise affiliated or associated with H&R Block Tax Services, Inc., and that sold or sells the POM product. The trial court subsequently denied the defendants’ motion to certify class certification issues for interlocutory appeal. Discovery is proceeding. No trial date has been set.
   There is one other putative class action pending against us in Texas that involves the Peace of Mind guarantee. This case is being tried before the same judge that presided over the Texas RAL Settlement and involves the same plaintiffs attorneys that are involved in the Marshall litigation in Illinois and substantially similar allegations. No class has been certified in this case.
   We believe the claims in the POM action are without merit, and we intend to defend them vigorously. The amounts claimed in the POM actions are substantial, however, and there can be no assurances, as to the outcome of these pending actions individually or in the aggregate. Likewise, there can be no assurances regarding the impact of these actions on our consolidated financial statements.
   OTHER CLAIMS AND LITIGATION ... As reported in a current report on Form 8-K dated November 8, 2004, the NASD brought charges against HRBFA regarding the sale by HRBFA of
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Enron debentures in 2001. A hearing for this matter is scheduled for May 2006. Two private civil actions subsequently were filed against HRBFA concerning the matter raised in the NASD’s charges. Both of these private actions subsequently were dismissed without prejudice, although one of the actions has since been refiled. We intend to defend the NASD charges vigorously, although there can be no assurances regarding the outcome and resolution of the matter.
   As part of an industry-wide review, the IRS is investigating tax-planning strategies that certain RSM clients utilized during fiscal years 2000 through 2003. Specifically, the IRS is examining these strategies to determine whether RSM complied with tax shelter registration and listing regulations and whether such strategies were appropriate. If the IRS were to determine that these strategies were inappropriate, clients that utilized the strategies could face penalties and interest for underpayment of taxes. Some of these clients are seeking, or may attempt to seek, recovery from RSM. While there can be no assurance regarding the outcome of this matter, we do not believe its resolution will have a material adverse effect on our operations or consolidated financial statements.
   As reported in current report on Form 8-K dated December 12, 2003, the SEC informed our outside counsel on December 11, 2003 that the Commission had issued a Formal Order of Investigation concerning our disclosures, in and before November 2003, regarding RAL litigation to which we were and are a party. There can be no assurances as to the outcome and resolution of this matter.
   We have from time to time been party to claims and lawsuits not discussed herein arising out of our business operations. These claims and lawsuits include actions by individual plaintiffs, as well as cases in which plaintiffs seek to represent a class of similarly situated customers. The amounts claimed in these claims and lawsuits are substantial in some instances, and the ultimate liability with respect to such litigation and claims is difficult to predict. Some of these claims and lawsuits pertain to RALs, the electronic filing of customers’ income tax returns and the POM guarantee program. We believe we have meritorious defenses to each of these claims, and we are defending or intend to defend them vigorously, although there is no assurance as to their outcome.
   In addition to the aforementioned types of cases, we are parties to claims and lawsuits that we consider to be ordinary, routine litigation incidental to our business, including claims and lawsuits (“Other Claims”) concerning investment products, the preparation of customers’ income tax returns, the fees charged customers for various products and services, losses incurred by customers with respect to their investment accounts, relationships with franchisees, denials of mortgage loans, contested mortgage foreclosures, other aspects of the mortgage business, intellectual property disputes, and contract disputes. We believe we have meritorious defenses to each of the Other Claims, and we are defending, or intend to defend, them vigorously. While we cannot provide assurance that we will ultimately prevail in each instance, we believe the amount, if any, we are required to pay in the discharge of liabilities or settlements in these Other Claims will not have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial statements.
 
ITEM 4.  SUBMISSION OF MATTERS TO A VOTE OF SECURITY HOLDERS
No matters were submitted to a vote of security holders during the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2005. Information regarding executive officers is contained in Item 10 of this report.
 
 
ITEM 5.  MARKET FOR THE REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
H&R Block’s common stock is traded principally on the NYSE and is also traded on the Pacific Exchange. The information called for by this item with respect to H&R Block’s common stock appears in Item 8, note 21 to our consolidated financial statements. The remaining information called for by this item relating to “Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans” is reported in Item 8, note 13 to our consolidated financial statements. On July 5, 2005, there were 30,909 shareholders of record and the closing stock price on the NYSE was $58.73 per share.
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A summary of our purchases of H&R Block common stock during the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2005 is as follows:
                                     
    (shares in 000s)    
 
    Total Number of   Maximum Number    
    Total   Average   Shares Purchased as   of Shares that May Be    
    Number of Shares   Price Paid   Part of Publicly Announced   Purchased Under the    
    Purchased(2)   per Share   Plans or Programs(1)   Plans or Programs(1)    
 
February 1 – February 28
    1     $ 50.82             15,104      
March 1 – March 31
    2     $ 51.87             15,104      
April 1 – April 30
    1     $ 50.70             15,104      
 
(1)  On June 11, 2003, our Board of Directors approved the repurchase of 20 million shares of H&R Block common stock. This authorization has no expiration date. On June 9, 2004, our Board of Directors approved the additional repurchase of 15 million shares of H&R Block common stock. This authorization has no expiration date.
(2)  The total number of shares purchased were purchased in connection with funding employee income tax withholding obligations arising upon the exercise of stock options or the lapse of restrictions on restricted shares.
 
ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
We derived the selected historical consolidated financial data presented below as of and for each of the five years in the period ended April 30, 2005 from our consolidated financial statements. The data for the periods prior to fiscal year 2005 has been restated to reflect corrections to gain on sale accounting, incentive compensation accruals, lease accounting, capitalization of certain branch office costs, acquisition accounting and income taxes as more fully described in Item 8, note 2 to our consolidated financial statements. The data set forth below should be read in conjunction with Item 7 and our consolidated financial statements.
   The impact of the restatement on fiscal year 2002 resulted in an increase in net income of $6.9 million, or $.04 per basic and diluted share, and a decrease of $9.5 million in total assets. The impact on fiscal year 2001 resulted in an increase in net income of $1.5 million, or $.01 per basic and diluted share, and an increase of $4.9 million in total assets.
                                               
    (in 000s, except per share amounts)    
 
    Restated   Restated   Restated   Restated    
April 30,   2005   2004   2003   2002   2001    
 
Revenues
  $ 4,420,019     $ 4,247,880     $ 3,731,126     $ 3,311,943     $ 2,982,157      
Net income before change in accounting principle
    635,857       715,608       477,615       441,287       278,211      
Net income
    635,857       709,249       477,615       441,287       282,625      
 
Basic earnings per share:
                                           
 
Net income before change in accounting principle
  $ 3.83     $ 4.04     $ 2.66     $ 2.41     $ 1.51      
 
Net income
    3.83       4.01       2.66       2.41       1.54      
Diluted earnings per share:
                                           
 
Net income before change in accounting principle
  $ 3.77     $ 3.96     $ 2.59     $ 2.34     $ 1.50      
 
Net income
    3.77       3.92       2.59       2.34       1.53      
 
Total assets
  $ 5,539,283     $ 5,232,732     $ 4,666,502     $ 4,396,731     $ 4,170,980      
Long-term debt
    923,073       545,811       822,302       868,387       870,974      
 
Dividends per share
  $ .86     $ .78     $ .70     $ .63     $ .59      
 
ITEM 7.  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
The accompanying Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations reflects the restatement of previously issued financial statements, as discussed in Item 8, note 2 to our consolidated financial statements.
   We are a diversified company with subsidiaries delivering tax, investment, mortgage and business services and products. We are the only major company offering a full range of software, online and in-office tax preparation solutions, combined with personalized financial advice concerning retirement savings, home ownership and other opportunities to help clients build a better financial future.
   Our key strategic priorities can be summarized as follows:
    Tax Services – continue expanding our office network, improve our client service and satisfaction scores, focus on
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  advice that supports client growth and increased brand loyalty.
    Mortgage Services – continue growing origination volumes while lowering our cost of origination, distinguish our service quality, minimize risk and volatility in performance and optimize value from secondary markets.
    Business Services – continue expansion of our national accounting, tax and consulting business, add extended services to middle-market companies and enhance our client service culture.
    Investment Services – work to align the segment’s cost structure with its revenues, attract and retain productive advisors, serve the broad consumer market through advisory relationships and integrate the Tax Services client base into this segment.
OVERVIEW ...
A summary of our fiscal year 2005 results is as follows:
    Revenues grew 4.1% over the prior year, primarily due to our Tax Services and Business Services segments, with this growth somewhat offset by a revenue decline at our Mortgage Services segment.
    Diluted earnings per share declined 3.8% from fiscal year 2004 to $3.77, primarily due to lower profitability in our Mortgage Services segment. Current year results included a non-operating gain of $0.06 per diluted share for legal recoveries.
    Tax Services fell short of its target client levels, although increases in our pricing and the complexity of returns prepared allowed the segment’s revenue growth to continue. Segment revenues increased 7.6% over the prior year and segment pretax income increased $25.0 million, or 3.9%.
    Mortgage Services’ origination volumes of $31.0 billion were at record levels, but margin compression drove gains on sales of mortgage assets to decline 10.5% to $822.1 million.
    Business Services revenues and pretax income increased 14.8% and 54.7%, respectively, over the prior year. The increase was primarily due to higher demand for traditional accounting, tax and consulting services.
    Investment Services reported a pretax loss of $75.4 million compared to $75.6 million in the prior year. Operating results for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2005 showed marked improvement, which we hope will continue into the fiscal year 2006.
                             
 
Consolidated Results of Operations   (in 000s, except per share amounts)    
 
    Restated   Restated    
Year ended April 30,   2005   2004   2003    
 
REVENUES ...
                           
Tax Services
  $ 2,358,293     $ 2,191,177     $ 1,946,763      
Mortgage Services
    1,246,018       1,323,709       1,150,080      
Business Services
    573,316       499,210       434,140      
Investment Services
    239,244       229,470       200,794      
Corporate
    3,148       4,314       (651 )    
     
    $ 4,420,019     $ 4,247,880     $ 3,731,126      
     
PRETAX INCOME (LOSS) ...
Tax Services
  $ 663,518     $ 638,493     $ 556,703      
Mortgage Services
    496,093       688,523       656,324      
Business Services
    29,871       19,312       (16,033 )    
Investment Services
    (75,370 )     (75,614 )     (219,421 )    
Corporate
    (96,397 )     (107,739 )     (122,009 )    
      1,017,715       1,162,975       855,564      
     
Income taxes
    381,858       447,367       377,949      
Net income before change in accounting principle
    635,857       715,608       477,615      
Cumulative effect of change in accounting principle
          (6,359 )          
     
Net income
  $ 635,857     $ 709,249     $ 477,615      
     
Basic earnings per share
  $ 3.83     $ 4.01     $ 2.66      
Diluted earnings per share
    3.77       3.92       2.59      
 
 
CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES ... 
We consider the policies discussed below to be critical to securing an understanding of our financial statements, as they require the use of significant judgment and estimation in order to measure, at a specific point in time, matters that are inherently uncertain. Specific risks for these critical accounting policies are described in the following paragraphs. For all of these policies, we caution that future events rarely develop precisely as forecasted, and estimates routinely require adjustment and may require material adjustment.
   REVENUE RECOGNITION ... We have many different revenue sources, each governed by specific revenue recognition policies. Our revenue recognition policies can be found in Item 8, note 1 to our consolidated financial statements. Additional discussion of our recognition of gains on sales of mortgage assets follows.
   GAINS ON SALES OF MORTGAGE ASSETS ... We sell substantially all of the non-prime mortgage loans we originate to the Trusts, which are qualifying special purpose entities (“QSPEs”), with servicing rights generally retained. Prime mortgage loans are sold in whole loan sales, servicing released, to third-party buyers. Gains on sales of mortgage assets are recognized when control of the assets is surrendered (when loans
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are sold to Trusts) and are based on the difference between cash proceeds and the allocated cost of the assets sold.
   We determine the allocated cost of assets sold based on the relative fair values of cash proceeds, MSRs and the beneficial interest in Trusts, which represents the ultimate expected outcome from the Trusts’ disposition of the loans. The relative fair value of the MSRs and the beneficial interest in Trust is determined using discounted cash flow models, which require various management assumptions, limited by the ultimate expected outcome from the disposition of the loans by the Trusts (see discussion below in “Valuation of Residual Interests” and “Valuation of Mortgage Servicing Rights”). The following is an example of a hypothetical gain on sale calculation:
                 
    (in 000s)    
 
Acquisition cost of underlying mortgage loans
  $ 1,000,000      
Fair values:
           
 
Net proceeds
  $ 990,000      
 
Beneficial interest in Trusts
    20,000      
 
MSRs
    9,000      
     
    $ 1,019,000      
     
Computation of gain on sale:
           
 
Net proceeds
  $ 990,000      
 
Less allocated cost ($990,000/$1,019,000 × $1,000,000)
    971,541      
     
   
Recorded gain on sale
  $ 18,459      
     
Recorded beneficial interest in Trusts
($20,000/$1,019,000 × $1,000,000)
  $ 19,627      
     
Recorded value of MSRs ($9,000/$1,019,000 × $1,000,000)
  $ 8,832      
     
 
Variations in the assumptions we use affect the estimated fair values, which would affect the reported gains on sales. Gains on sales of mortgage loans totaled $772.1 million, $915.6 million and $792.1 million for fiscal years 2005, 2004 and 2003, respectively.
See discussion in “Off-Balance Sheet Financing Arrangements” related to the disposition of the loans by the Trusts and subsequent securitization by the Company.
   VALUATION OF RESIDUAL INTERESTS ... We use discounted cash flow models to determine the estimated fair values of our residual interests. We develop our assumptions for expected losses, prepayment speeds, discount rates and interest rates based on historical experience and third-party market sources. Variations in our assumptions could materially affect the estimated fair values, which may require us to record impairments or unrealized gains. In addition, variations will also affect the amount of residual interest accretion recorded on a monthly basis. Residual interests valued at $205.9 million and $211.0 million were recorded as of April 30, 2005 and 2004, respectively. We recorded $95.9 million in net write-ups in other comprehensive income and $12.2 million in impairments in the income statement related to our residual interests during fiscal year 2005 as actual performance differed from our assumptions. See Item 8, note 1 to our consolidated financial statements for our methodology used in valuing residual interests. See Item 8, note 6 to our consolidated financial statements for current assumptions and a sensitivity analysis of those assumptions. See Item 7A for sensitivity analysis related to interest rates.
   VALUATION OF MORTGAGE SERVICING RIGHTS ... MSRs are carried at the lower of cost or fair value. We use discounted cash flow models to determine the estimated fair values of our MSRs. Fair values take into account the historical prepayment activity of the related loans and our estimates of the remaining future cash flows to be generated through servicing the underlying mortgage loans. Variations in our assumptions could materially affect the estimated fair values, which may require us to record impairments.
   Prepayment speeds are somewhat correlated with the movement of market interest rates. As market interest rates decline there is a corresponding increase in actual and expected borrower prepayments as customers refinance existing mortgages under more favorable interest rate terms. This in turn reduces the anticipated cash flows associated with servicing resulting in a reduction, or impairment, to the fair value of the capitalized MSR. Prepayment rates are estimated based on historical experience and third-party market sources. Many non-prime loans have a prepayment penalty in place for the first two to three years, which has the effect of making prepayment speeds more predictable, regardless of market interest rate movements. If actual prepayment rates prove to be higher than the estimate made by management, impairment of the MSRs could occur.
   MSRs valued at $166.6 million and $113.8 million were recorded as of April 30, 2005 and 2004, respectively. See Item 8, note 1 to our consolidated financial statements for our methodology used in stratifying and valuing MSRs. See Item 8, note 6 to our consolidated financial statements for current assumptions and a sensitivity analysis of those assumptions.
   VALUATION OF GOODWILL ... Our goodwill impairment analysis is based on a discounted cash flow approach and market comparables, when available. This analysis, at the reporting unit level, requires significant management judgment with respect to revenue and expense growth rates, changes in working capital, and the selection and application of an appropriate discount rate. Changes in the projections or assumptions could materially affect fair values. The use of different assumptions would increase or decrease estimated discounted future operating cash flows and could increase or decrease any impairment charge.
   Our goodwill balance was $1.0 billion as of April 30, 2005 and $993.5 million as of April 30, 2004. No goodwill impairments were identified during fiscal years 2005 or 2004. In fiscal year 2003, a
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goodwill impairment charge of $108.8 million was recorded in the Investment Services segment due to unsettled market conditions. Also during 2003, our annual impairment test resulted in an impairment of $13.5 million for a reporting unit within the Business Services segment. No other impairments were identified.
   LITIGATION ... Our policy is to routinely assess the likelihood of any adverse judgments or outcomes related to legal matters, as well as ranges of probable losses. A determination of the amount of the reserves required, if any, for these contingencies is made after thoughtful analysis of each known issue and an analysis of historical experience in accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 5, “Accounting for Contingencies,” and related pronouncements. Therefore, we have recorded reserves related to certain legal matters for which it is probable that a loss has been incurred and the range of such loss can be estimated. With respect to other matters, we have concluded that a loss is only reasonably possible or remote and, therefore, no liability is recorded.
   STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION ... Stock-based compensation expense is determined based on the grant-date fair value and the number of equity instruments that vest. We use the Black-Scholes model to calculate the fair value for stock options and employee stock purchase plan (“ESPP”) shares using the following assumptions: stock volatility, expected life, risk-free interest rate and dividend yield. The fair value of restricted shares is the stock price on the date of the grant. We also estimate, based on historical data, the percent of equity instruments expected to vest. Variations in the assumptions used to calculate fair value could either positively or negatively affect the recorded expense. Variations between actual performance and the estimate of vesting could result in timing adjustments recorded at the end of the vesting period. Additionally, changes in accounting rules related to stock-based compensation could result in changes to our assumptions of fair value and expense recognition.
   We began expensing all stock-based compensation awards under the prospective transition method beginning on May 1, 2003. Therefore, our income statements do not fully reflect the expense related to all of our stock options and restricted shares outstanding. We recorded $44.1 million, $25.7 million and $2.1 million in stock-based compensation expense during fiscal years 2005, 2004 and 2003, respectively.
   INCOME TAXES ... We calculate our current and deferred tax provision based on estimates and assumptions that could differ from the actual results reflected in income tax returns filed during the applicable calendar year. Adjustments based on filed returns are recorded when identified. We file a consolidated federal tax return on a calendar year basis, generally in the second fiscal quarter of the subsequent year.
   We record a valuation allowance to reduce our deferred tax assets to the amount that is more likely than not to be realized. We have considered taxable income in carry-back periods, historical and forecasted earnings, future taxable income, the mix of earnings in the jurisdictions in which we operate, and tax planning strategies in determining the need for a valuation allowance against our deferred tax assets. In the event we were to determine that we would not be able to realize all or part of our deferred tax assets in the future, an adjustment to the deferred tax assets would be charged to earnings in the period in which we make such determination. Likewise, if we later determine that it is more likely than not that the deferred tax assets would be realized, we would reverse the applicable portion of the previously provided valuation allowance.
   The amount of income taxes we pay is subject to ongoing audits by federal, state and foreign tax authorities, which may result in proposed assessments. Our estimate for the potential outcome for any uncertain tax issue is highly judgmental. We believe we have adequately provided for any reasonably foreseeable outcome related to these matters. However, our future results may include favorable or unfavorable adjustments to our estimated tax liabilities in the period the assessments are made or resolved or when statutes of limitation on potential assessments expire. As a result, our effective tax rate may fluctuate on a quarterly basis. As discussed in Item 9A, “Controls and Procedures,” we reported a material weakness in our internal controls over accounting for income taxes as of April 30, 2005.
   OTHER SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES ... Other significant accounting policies, not involving the same level of measurement uncertainties as those discussed above, are nevertheless important to an understanding of the financial statements. These policies require difficult judgments on complex matters that are often subject to multiple sources of authoritative guidance. Certain of these matters are among topics currently under reexamination by accounting standard setters and regulators. Although no specific conclusions reached by these standard setters appear likely to cause a material change in our accounting policies, outcomes cannot be predicted with confidence. Also see Item 8, note 1 to our consolidated financial statements, which discusses accounting policies we have selected when there are acceptable alternatives.
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RESULTS OF OPERATIONS ...
Our business is divided into four reportable segments: Tax Services, Mortgage Services, Business Services and Investment Services.
 
TAX SERVICES
This segment primarily consists of our income tax preparation businesses – retail, online and software. The previously reported U.S. Tax Operations has been aggregated with the International Tax Operations segment in the Tax Services segment.
                                 
 
Tax Services – Operating Statistics   (in 000s, except average fee)    
 
Year ended April 30,   2005   2004(1)    
            2003(1)    
 
Clients served ... 
                           
 
United States:
                           
   
Company-owned offices
    10,608       10,627       10,105      
   
Franchise offices
    5,428       5,460       6,488      
     
      16,036       16,087       16,593      
     
 
Digital tax solutions:
                           
   
Software (2)
    1,804       2,027       1,963      
   
Online (3)
    1,213       1,207       920      
     
      19,053       19,321       19,476      
 
International(4)
    2,333       2,253       2,227      
     
      21,386       21,574       21,703      
     
Average fee per client served (5) ...                     
 
Company-owned offices
  $ 158.19     $ 146.34     $ 137.16      
 
Franchise offices
    135.98       127.91       118.05      
     
    $ 150.67     $ 140.09     $ 129.69      
     
RALs (6) ... 
                           
 
Company-owned offices
    2,667       2,713       2,768      
 
Franchise offices
    1,499       1,508       1,790      
 
Digital tax solutions:
                           
   
Software
    2       5            
   
Online
    32       57       75      
     
      4,200       4,283       4,633      
     
 
(1)  Company-owned and franchise data for fiscal years 2004 and 2003 have not been restated for franchise acquisitions.
(2)  Includes TaxCut federal units sold.
(3)  Includes online completed and paid federal returns, and state returns only when no payment was made for a federal return.
(4)  The end of the Canadian tax season was extended from April 30 to May 2, 2005. Clients served in our international operations in fiscal year 2005 includes approximately 47,500 returns in both company-owned and franchise offices which were accepted by the client on May 1 and 2, 2005. The revenues related to these returns will be recognized in fiscal year 2006.
(5)  Calculated as gross tax preparation and related fees divided by clients served (U.S. only).
(6)  Data is for tax season (January 1 – April 30) only.
 
                                 
 
Tax Services – Financial Results   (in 000s)    
 
    Restated   Restated    
Year ended April 30,   2005   2004   2003    
 
Service revenues:
                           
 
Tax preparation and related fees
  $ 1,718,867     $ 1,589,439     $ 1,437,835      
 
Online tax services
    49,515       44,915       25,892      
 
Other service revenues
    143,648       127,602       97,794      
     
      1,912,030       1,761,956       1,561,521      
Royalties
    197,551       184,882       174,659      
RAL participation fees
    182,784       168,375       896      
RAL waiver fees
          6,548       138,242      
Software sales
    44,419       43,823       39,314      
Other
    21,509       25,593       32,131      
     
   
Total revenues
    2,358,293       2,191,177       1,946,763      
     
Cost of services:
                           
 
Compensation and benefits
    726,654       672,066       591,556      
 
Occupancy
    281,772       255,516       225,045      
 
Depreciation and amortization
    54,579       48,808       42,505      
 
Supplies
    47,703       40,792       40,992      
 
Bad debt
    33,046       27,328       32,653      
 
Other
    103,560       92,137       125,653      
     
      1,247,314       1,136,647       1,058,404      
Cost of software sales
    37,819       41,895       34,842      
Selling, general and administrative
    409,642       374,142       296,814      
     
   
Total expenses
    1,694,775       1,552,684       1,390,060      
     
Pretax income
  $ 663,518     $ 638,493     $ 556,703      
     
 
FISCAL 2005 COMPARED TO FISCAL 2004 ... 
Tax Services’ revenues increased $167.1 million, or 7.6%, compared to the prior year. Fiscal year 2005 was the first year of a multi-year strategy to expand our retail distribution network, to increase client growth by providing more convenient access to our services and to react to increased competition in the tax preparation market. In the U.S., we opened a net 1,252 new offices, 609 of which were part of the expansion of our company-owned retail distribution network. This expansion contributed incremental revenues of $24.9 million and pretax
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losses of $18.9 million. Clients served in our U.S. company-owned offices declined 0.2% from the prior year.
   Tax preparation and related fees increased $129.4 million, or 8.1%. This increase is primarily due to an 8.1% increase in the average fee per U.S. client served, resulting from increases in our pricing and the complexity of returns prepared.
   Online service revenues increased $4.6 million, or 10.2%, primarily as a result of a shift in the mix of services to those with higher prices. Increased competition in the online market, including national marketing campaigns and lower pricing by our competitors, coupled with a 46% increase in returns prepared through the FFA, limited our growth in online paid clients.
   Other service revenues increased $16.0 million, or 12.6%, primarily as a result of additional revenues associated with RACs and Express IRAs.
   Royalty revenues increased $12.7 million, or 6.9%, primarily due to a 6.3% increase in the average fee per client served at our franchise offices.
   Revenues earned during the current year in connection with RAL participations increased $14.4 million, or 8.6%, over the prior year. This increase is primarily due to an increase in the dollar amount of loans in which we purchased participation interests, resulting from an increase in the fee charged by the lender, an increase in our clients’ average refund size and the maximum loan amount allowed by the lender.
   A total of 3.3 million software units were sold during fiscal year 2005, a decrease of 13.5% compared to the prior year. Software units include TaxCut Federal, TaxCut State, DeductionPro, WillPower and Legal Advisor. The decline in unit sales was due to increased competition, but was offset by pricing increases and a shift to our premium product lines, which resulted in a 1.4% increase in revenues from software sales.
   Cost of services for fiscal year 2005 increased $110.7 million, or 9.7%, over the prior year. Compensation and benefits increased $54.6 million primarily due to increased revenues and an increase in the number of tax professionals and support staff needed in new office locations. Stock-based compensation related to our seasonal associates also increased $4.1 million. Occupancy expenses increased $26.3 million, or 10.3%, as a result of an 11.4% increase in U.S. company-owned offices under lease, which also drove increases in depreciation and amortization and supply costs. Of the total increase in occupancy expenses, $10.7 million was due to our real estate expansion. Other cost of services increased $11.4 million primarily due to additional expenses associated with our POM guarantee and Express IRAs.
   Selling, general and administrative expenses increased $35.5 million over the prior year primarily due to increased spending related to an $18.8 million increase in allocations from support departments and additional legal expenses of $10.2 million.
   Pretax income of $663.5 million for fiscal year 2005 represents a 3.9% increase from the prior year. The segment’s operating margin declined 100 basis points to 28.1% in fiscal year 2005.
FISCAL 2006 OUTLOOK ... In fiscal year 2006, we plan to continue our office expansion initiative by adding between 500 and 700 more offices across our company-owned and franchise network. We believe by investing in our office network, we will attract potential clients who are primarily motivated by convenience. Although we expect the additional tax offices to result in incremental clients and revenues during fiscal year 2006, due to the cost of expansion we expect incremental pretax losses from these newly added offices. We expect the performance of offices added during fiscal year 2005 to improve in the upcoming year.
   We also plan to be more aggressive in our digital tax solutions marketing efforts to better compete in the market. We believe our multi-channel strategy not only allows clients to choose how they want to be served, but also allows us to appeal to a different client base than we do through our offices.
   We expect overall revenue growth in this segment to be less than ten percent in the upcoming year, and we will continue to focus on cost containment to improve the segment’s operating margin.
FISCAL 2004 COMPARED TO FISCAL 2003 ... Tax Services’ revenues increased $244.4 million, or 12.6%, for fiscal year 2004.
   Tax preparation and related fees increased $151.6 million, or 10.5%, compared to fiscal year 2003. This increase is due to a 6.7% increase in the average fee per client served in U.S. offices, coupled with a 5.2% increase in clients served. The average fee per client served increased due to increases in our pricing and the complexity of returns prepared. Clients served in company-owned offices increased to 10.6 million as a result of the acquisition of businesses in former major franchise territories. Excluding the impact of our acquisitions of former major franchises, clients served declined 2.5%.
   Online tax preparation revenues increased $19.0 million, or 73.5%, as a result of an increase in the average price and an increase in clients served.
   Other service revenues for fiscal year 2004 increased $29.8 million, or 30.5%, primarily due to a change in accounting principle relating to our POM guarantee.
   The average fee per client at our franchise offices increased 8.4%, while clients served declined 15.9%. The decline is due to the former major franchise territories being operated as company-owned for the majority of fiscal year 2004. This, coupled with the re-franchising of certain former major franchise territories at higher royalty rates, resulted in a 5.9% increase in royalty revenue.
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   Revenues earned during fiscal year 2004 in connection with RAL participations totaled $168.4 million. These revenues are approximately $30.1 million higher than waiver fees earned during fiscal year 2003. See discussion of the waiver below. Our RAL participation revenues benefited from the new company-owned operations in former major franchise territories. We participate in RALs at a rate of nearly 50% for company-owned offices compared to 25% in major franchise offices. This increased participation rate caused our revenues to increase, although the number of RALs declined.
   During fiscal year 2003, we entered into an agreement with Household, whereby we waived our right to purchase any participation interests in and receive license fees for RALs during the period January 1 through April 30, 2003. In consideration for waiving these rights we received a series of payments from Household in fiscal year 2003, subject to certain adjustments in fiscal year 2004 based on delinquency rates. See discussion in Item 1, “RAL Participations and 2003 Tax Season Waiver.”
   A total of 3.8 million software units were sold during fiscal year 2004, an increase of 11.2% compared to 3.4 million units in 2003. Revenues from software sales in fiscal year 2004 increased 11.5% as a result of the higher sales volume.
   Cost of services for fiscal year 2004 increased $78.2 million, or 7.4%, from 2003. This increase was partially attributable to the operation of former major franchise territories as company-owned. Compensation and benefits increased $80.5 million as a result of the former major franchise acquisitions, increased field wages during the later part of the tax season and $13.7 million in expenses for stock options awarded to seasonal tax associates. Occupancy and equipment costs increased $30.5 million due primarily to a 5.7% increase in the average rent and a 3.4% increase in the number of U.S. offices under lease. Depreciation and amortization increased as a result of additional equipment purchased for new office locations opened during the period.
   Selling, general and administrative expenses increased $77.3 million over 2003 due to $33.3 million in bad debt expense associated with RAL participations, which was not incurred in the prior year due to the waiver agreement. Intangible amortization increased $9.0 million from the acquisition of assets of former major franchisees. Marketing costs increased $20.7 million as a result of additional brand advertising campaigns. Allocated information technology costs increased $13.9 million as a result of additional technology projects. These increases were partially offset by a $62.4 million decrease in legal expenses, which is primarily a result of the Texas RAL litigation settlement and other cases in the prior year. See discussion in “RAL Litigation” below.
   Pretax income for fiscal year 2004 increased $81.8 million, or 14.7%, over 2003. The segment’s operating margin improved fifty basis points to 29.1% in fiscal year 2004. Excluding the 2003 RAL litigation reserve, pretax income increased 6.7% and our operating margin declined 160 basis points.
RAL LITIGATION ... In fiscal year 2003, we announced a settlement had been reached in the cases Ronnie and Nancy Haese, et al. v. H&R Block, Inc., et al., Case No. CV96-4213, District Court of Kleberg County, Texas (Haese I) and Ronnie and Nancy Haese, et al. v. H&R Block, Inc., et al., Case No. CV-99-314-D, District Court of Kleberg County, Texas (Haese II), filed originally as one action on July 30, 1996. As a result of that settlement, we recorded a liability and pretax expense of $43.5 million during fiscal year 2003. This represented our best estimate of our share of the settlement, plaintiff class legal fees and expenses, tax products and associated mailing expenses. Our share of the settlement is less than the total amount awarded due to amounts recoverable from a co-defendant in the case.
   We have been named as a defendant in a number of lawsuits alleging that we engaged in wrongdoing with respect to the RAL program. We believe we have strong defenses to the various RAL Cases and will vigorously defend our position. Nevertheless, the amounts claimed by the plaintiffs are, in some instances, very substantial, and there can be no assurances as to the ultimate outcome of the pending RAL Cases, or as to the impact of the RAL Cases on our financial statements. See Item 3, “Legal Proceedings,” for additional information.
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MORTGAGE SERVICES
This segment is primarily engaged in the origination of non-prime mortgage loans through an independent broker network, the origination of non-prime and prime mortgage loans through a retail office network, the sale and securitization of mortgage loans and residual interests, and the servicing of non-prime loans.
                                 
 
Mortgage Services – Operating Statistics   (dollars in 000s)    
 
Year Ended April 30,   2005   2004   2003    
 
Volume of loans originated ...
                           
 
Wholesale (non-prime)
  $ 26,977,810     $ 20,150,992     $ 13,659,243      
 
Retail: Non-prime
    3,005,168       1,846,674       1,220,563      
   
Prime
    1,018,746       1,258,347       1,697,815      
     
      $ 31,001,724     $ 23,256,013     $ 16,577,621      
     
Loan Characteristics ...                    
 
Weighted average FICO score (1)
    614       608       604      
 
Weighted average interest rate for borrowers (“WAC”) (1)
    7.36%       7.39%       8.15%      
 
Weighted average loan-to-value (1)
    78.9%       78.1%       78.7%      
 
Percentage of first mortgage loans owner-occupied
    92.6%       92.9%       93.0%      
 
Percentage with prepayment penalty
    70.8%       73.7%       79.9%      
 
Percentage of fixed-rate mortgages
    22.1%       30.4%       24.4%      
 
Percentage of adjustable-rate mortgages
    77.9%       69.6%       75.6%      
 
Origination margin
(% of origination volume) (2) ...
                           
 
Loan sale premium
    2.77%       4.21%       4.87%      
 
Accretion on beneficial interest in Trusts
    0.63%       0.72%       0.65%      
 
Gain (loss) on derivatives
    0.15%       (0.05% )     (0.02% )    
 
Loan sale repurchase reserves
    (0.13% )     (0.20% )     (0.13% )    
 
MSR gain on sale
    0.44%       0.36%       0.36%      
     
        3.86%       5.04%       5.73%      
 
Cost of acquisition
    (0.54% )     (0.50% )     (0.36% )    
 
Direct origination expenses
    (0.68% )     (0.65% )     (0.62% )    
     
 
Net gain on sale – gross margin (3) ...
    2.64%       3.89%       4.75%      
 
Other revenues
    0.03%       0.01%       (0.01% )    
 
Other cost of origination
    (1.55% )     (1.68% )     (1.91% )    
     
 
Net margin
    1.12%       2.22%       2.83%      
     
   
Total cost of origination
    2.23%       2.33%       2.53%      
 
Total cost of origination and acquisition
    2.77%       2.83%       2.89%      
Loan delivery ...
                           
 
Loan sales
  $ 30,975,523     $ 23,234,935     $ 17,225,774      
 
Execution price: (4) ...
                           
   
Loans originated and sold
    3.01%       4.09%       4.63%      
   
Loans acquired and sold
                .18%      
     
        3.01%       4.09%       4.46%      
 
(1)  Represents non-prime production.
(2)  As restated. See “Reconciliation of Non-GAAP Financial Information” at the end of Item 7.
(3)  Defined as gain on sale of mortgage loans (including gain or loss on derivatives, mortgage servicing rights and net of direct origination and acquisition expenses) divided by origination volume.
(4)  Defined as total premium received divided by total balance of loans delivered to third-party investors or securitization vehicles (excluding mortgage servicing rights and the effect of loan origination expenses).
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Mortgage Services – Financial Results   (in 000s)    
 
    Restated   Restated    
Year Ended April 30,   2005   2004   2003    
 
Components of gains on sales:
                           
 
Gain on mortgage loans
  $ 772,061     $ 915,628     $ 792,072      
 
Gain (loss) on derivatives
    46,853       (11,957 )     (4,141 )    
 
Gain on sales of residual interests
    15,396       40,689       93,307      
 
Impairment of residual interests
    (12,235 )     (26,063 )     (54,111 )    
     
        822,075       918,297       827,127      
     
Interest income:
                           
 
Accretion-residual interests
    137,610       186,466       146,343      
 
Other
    11,850       5,064       5,421      
     
          149,460       191,530       151,764      
     
Loan-servicing revenue
    273,056       211,710       168,351      
Other
    1,427       2,172       2,838      
     
 
Total revenues
    1,246,018       1,323,709       1,150,080      
     
Cost of services
    221,300       193,018       141,419      
Cost of non-service revenues:
                           
 
Compensation and benefits
    218,544       190,499       146,907      
 
Occupancy
    33,155       25,635       22,701      
 
Other
    72,803       71,634       74,332      
     
      324,502       287,768       243,940      
     
Selling, general and administrative
    204,123       154,400       108,397      
     
   
Total expenses
    749,925       635,186       493,756      
     
Pretax income
  $ 496,093     $ 688,523     $ 656,324      
     
 
FISCAL 2005 COMPARED TO FISCAL 2004 ... Mortgage Services’ revenues decreased $77.7 million, or 5.9%, compared to the prior year. Revenues decreased primarily as a result of a decline in gains on sales of mortgage loans.
   The following table summarizes the key drivers of gains on sales of mortgage loans:
                       
        (dollars in 000s)    
 
Year Ended April 30,   2005   2004    
 
Application process:
                   
 
Total number of applications
    335,203       269,267      
 
Number of sales associates (1)
    3,526       2,812      
 
Closing ratio (2)
    58.3%       57.7%      
Originations:
                   
 
Total number of originations
    195,392       155,339      
 
WAC
    7.36%       7.39%      
 
Average loan size (all loans)
  $ 159     $ 150      
 
Total originations
  $ 31,001,724     $ 23,256,013      
 
Non-prime origination ratio
    96.7%       94.6%      
 
Direct origination and acquisition expenses, net
  $ 378,674     $ 278,785      
Revenue (loan value):
                   
 
Net gain on sale – gross margin
    2.64%       3.89%      
(1)  Includes all direct sales and back office sales support associates.
(2)  Percentage of loans funded divided by total applications in the period.
 
   Although origination volumes increased 33.3% over the prior year, gains on sales of mortgage loans declined $143.6 million as a result of increased price competition and poorer execution in the secondary market. As a result, our net margin declined to 1.12% from 2.22% in the prior year.
   The average market interest rate for a 2-year swap increased to 3.32% in fiscal year 2005 from 1.97% in 2004, while our WAC decreased to 7.36% from 7.39% for the same periods. Because our WAC did not increase as quickly as market rates, our gross margin declined 125 basis points from last year. To mitigate the risk of short-term changes in market interest rates, we use interest rate swaps, interest rate caps and forward loan sale commitments. During the current year, we recorded $46.9 million in net gains, compared to a net loss of $12.0 million in the prior year, related to derivative instruments. See Item 8, note 9 to the consolidated financial statements.
   For the year ended April 30, 2004, we reclassified $167.7 million from interest income to gains on sales of mortgage assets representing excess cash received from our beneficial interest in Trusts. The beneficial interest in Trusts is reported at fair value at each balance sheet date. Changes in its fair value are included in current period earnings. The excess cash received together with the and mark-to-market adjustment for each period have been classified as gain on sale of mortgage loans. This change had no impact on our net income as previously reported.
   In fiscal year 2005, we completed a sale of residual interests and recorded a gain of $15.4 million. This sale accelerated cash flows from these residual interests, effectively realizing previously recorded unrealized gains included in other
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comprehensive income. We recorded a gain of $40.7 million in the prior year on similar transactions.
   Impairments of residual interests in securitizations of $12.2 million were recognized during the year compared with $26.1 million in the prior year. The prior year impairments were due primarily to loan performance of older residuals and changes in assumptions to more closely align with the economic and interest rate environment.
   Total accretion of residual interests decreased $48.9 million from the prior year. This decrease is primarily due to the sale of previously securitized residual interests during fiscal year 2004, which eliminated future accretion on those residual interests.
   During fiscal year 2005, our residual interests continued to perform better than expected compared to internal valuation models. As a result of this performance, our residuals have produced, or are expected to produce, more cash proceeds than projected in previous valuation models. We recorded favorable pretax mark-to-market adjustments, which increased the fair value of our residual interests $154.3 million during the year. These adjustments were recorded, net of write-downs of $58.3 million and deferred taxes of $36.6 million, in other comprehensive income and will be accreted into income throughout the remaining life of the residual interests. Future changes in interest rates, actual loan pool performance or other assumptions could cause additional favorable or unfavorable adjustments to the fair value of the residual interests and could cause changes to the accretion of these residual interests in future periods. Additionally, sales of residual interests results in decreases to accretion income in future periods.
   The following table summarizes the key drivers of loan-servicing revenues:
                       
    (dollars in 000s)    
 
Year Ended April 30,   2005   2004    
 
Average servicing portfolio:
                   
 
With related MSRs
  $ 41,021,448     $ 32,039,811      
 
Without related MSRs
    13,838,769       6,481,069      
     
    $ 54,860,217     $ 38,520,880      
     
 
Number of loans serviced
    435,290       324,364      
 
Average delinquency rate
    4.85%       6.04%      
 
Weighted average FICO score
    610       596      
 
Value of MSRs
  $ 166,614     $ 113,821      
 
   Loan-servicing revenues increased $61.3 million, or 29.0%, over the prior year. The increase reflects a higher average loan-servicing portfolio. The average servicing portfolio for fiscal year 2005 increased 42.4%.
   Cost of services increased $28.3 million, or 14.7%, as a result of a higher average servicing portfolio, particularly loans with MSRs, which also resulted in an increase in MSR amortization.
   Cost of non-service revenues increased $36.7 million, or 12.8%, over the prior year. Compensation and benefits increased $28.0 million as a result of a 25.4% increase in the number of employees, reflecting resources needed to support higher loan production volumes.
   Selling, general and administrative expenses increased $49.7 million, or 32.2%, due to $12.1 million in increased retail marketing expenses and $7.4 million in additional consulting expenses.
   Pretax income decreased $192.4 million, or 27.9%, for fiscal year 2005.
We believe we can continue to grow our origination volumes in fiscal year 2006. Lowering our cost of origination will be a key priority for the upcoming year and we have begun to implement new technologies to enhance the underwriting and origination processes.
   Based upon these assumptions, we expect loan origination growth to exceed 20% at net margins in the range of .90% to 1.15% in fiscal year 2006.
   Based on these assumptions, we expect loan origination growth of at least 15% at net margins in the range of 1.00% to 1.25% in fiscal year 2006.
Mortgage Services’ revenues increased $173.6 million, or 15.1%, compared to fiscal year 2003. This increase was primarily a result of increased production volumes, higher servicing income and accretion.
   Gains on sales of mortgage loans increased $123.6 million, or 15.6%, for the year ended April 30, 2004. The increase over the prior year is a result of a significant increase in loan origination volume, an increase in the average loan size and the closing ratio, partially offset by a decrease in our gross margin and increased loan sale repurchase reserves. During 2004, we originated $23.3 billion in mortgage loans compared to $16.6 billion in 2003, an increase of 40.3%. Our gross margin decreased primarily due to lower WACs. The loan sale repurchase reserves, which are netted against gains on sales, increased $25.5 million over 2003. This increase is primarily a result of an increase in loan sales coupled with the increase in whole loan sales compared to securitizations, for which higher reserves are provided at the time of sale for estimated repurchases. As previously discussed, we reclassified $103.3 million from interest income to gains on sales for fiscal year 2003.
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   In November 2002, we completed the sale of previously securitized residual interests and recorded a gain of $93.3 million. Two smaller transactions were completed in fiscal year 2004, which resulted in gains of $40.7 million
   Impairments of residual interests in securitizations of $26.1 million were recognized during 2004 compared with $54.1 million in 2003. The impairments were due primarily to loan performance of older residuals and changes in assumptions to more closely align with the current economic and interest rate environment.
   Total accretion of residual interests increased $40.1 million over 2003. This improvement is the result of write-ups in the related asset values in fiscal years 2003 and 2004. Increases in fair value are realized in income through accretion over the remaining expected life of the residual interest.
   We recorded favorable pretax mark-to-market adjustments, which increased the fair value of our residual interests $199.7 million during 2004. These adjustments were recorded, net of write-downs of $32.6 million and deferred taxes of $63.8 million, in other comprehensive income.
   Loan-servicing revenues increased $43.4 million, or 25.8%, in fiscal year 2004. The increase reflects a higher average loan-servicing portfolio, which was partially offset by the reduction of certain of our ancillary fees previously charged to borrowers. The average servicing portfolio for fiscal year 2004 increased 38.9%.
   Cost of services increased $51.6 million, or 36.5%, as a result of a higher average servicing portfolio and the acceleration of amortization of certain MSRs.
   Cost of non-service revenues increased $43.8 million, or 18.0%, over the prior year. Compensation and benefits increased $43.6 million as a result of a 22.9% increase in the number of employees, reflecting resources needed to support higher loan production volumes. Occupancy expenses increased due to nine additional branch offices opened since October 2002.
   Selling, general and administrative expenses increased $46.0 million, primarily due to $10.4 million in increased marketing expenses for retail mortgage direct mail advertising, $13.5 million in increased allocated corporate and shared costs and $7.2 million in increased consulting expenses. Allocated costs increased due to higher insurance costs and the expensing of stock-based compensation.
   Pretax income increased $32.2 million, or 4.9%, for fiscal year 2004.
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BUSINESS SERVICES
This segment offers middle-market companies accounting, tax and consulting services, wealth management, retirement resources, payroll services, corporate finance and financial process outsourcing.
                               
 
Business Services – Operating Statistics
 
Year ended April 30,   2005   2004   2003    
 
Accounting, tax and consulting ...
                           
 
Chargeable hours (000s)
    2,898       2,598       2,584      
 
Chargeable hours per person
    1,430       1,414       1,388      
 
Net collected rate per hour
  $ 133     $ 124     $ 120      
 
Average margin per person
  $ 112,573     $ 102,496     $ 97,117      
 
                               
 
Business Services – Financial Results   (in 000s)    
 
    Restated   Restated    
Year ended April 30,   2005   2004   2003    
 
Service revenues:
                           
 
Accounting, tax and consulting
  $ 412,473     $ 353,750     $ 337,903      
 
Capital markets
    67,922       73,860       35,629      
 
Payroll, benefits and retirement services
    27,331       21,172       20,745      
 
Other services
    31,170       19,390       7,912      
     
      538,896       468,172       402,189      
Other
    34,420       31,038       31,951      
     
 
Total revenues
    573,316       499,210       434,140      
Cost of services:
                           
 
Compensation and benefits
    310,950       256,640       233,303      
 
Occupancy
    24,699       20,498       20,873      
 
Other
    36,672       33,080       32,562      
     
      372,321       310,218       286,738      
Impairment of goodwill
                13,459      
Selling, general and administrative
    171,124       169,680       149,976      
     
 
Total expenses
    543,445       479,898       450,173      
     
 
Pretax income (loss)
  $ 29,871     $ 19,312     $ (16,033 )    
     
 
Business Services’ revenues for fiscal year 2005 increased $74.1 million, or 14.8%, from the prior year. This increase was primarily due to a $58.7 million increase in accounting, tax and consulting revenues resulting from an 11.5% increase in chargeable hours and a 7.3% increase in the net collected rate per hour. The increase in chargeable hours is primarily due to strong demand for our tax and accounting services as well as our consulting and risk management services. This demand stems from the current business environment and the emphasis placed on the accounting industry.
   Capital markets revenues declined $5.9 million as a result of an 11.2% decrease in the number of business valuation projects. Payroll, benefits and retirement services revenues increased as a result of three acquisitions completed during the last half of the current year.
   Other service revenues increased $11.8 million due to the acquisition of our financial process outsourcing business in the second quarter of last year, coupled with overall growth in this business. Increases in reimbursable expenses and contractor revenues also contributed to higher revenues.
   Cost of services increased $62.1 million, or 20.0%, for fiscal year 2005 compared to the prior year. Compensation and benefits related to our services increased $54.3 million, primarily as a result of increases in the number of personnel and the average wage per employee. The increase in the average wage is being driven by marketplace competition for professional staff. Higher expenses are also attributable to investments we are making in early-stage businesses within this segment.
   Pretax income for the year ended April 30, 2005 was $29.9 million compared to $19.3 million in fiscal year 2004.
Our focus for fiscal year 2006 is growing the business within our current markets by expanding our services to existing clients. We will continue to support our national business development strategy and we expect the demand for risk management services and financial process outsourcing to continue. We also believe the demand and competition for qualified professional staff will continue.
   We expect this segment’s pretax income for fiscal year 2006 to increase by approximately 30%.
Business Services’ revenues for fiscal year 2004 improved $65.1 million, or 15.0%, over the prior year. This increase was primarily due to a $38.2 million increase in capital markets revenue resulting from a 38.3% increase in the number of business valuation projects. Revenues in accounting, tax and consulting increased $15.8 million over the prior year as a result of newly acquired tax businesses and increased productivity. The acquisition of Tax Services’ former major franchises allowed us to acquire certain tax businesses associated with the original M&P acquisition. We were previously unable to acquire and operate these businesses in direct competition with major franchise territories. The acquired tax businesses contributed $13.0 million in revenues in 2004. The remainder of the increase
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was driven primarily by a 3.3% increase in the net collected rate per hour.
   Cost of services increased $23.5 million, or 8.2%, over the prior year. Compensation and benefits increased $23.3 million, primarily as a result of increased activity in the capital markets business and increased costs in our accounting, tax and consulting business. A goodwill impairment charge of $13.5 million was recorded in the prior year. No such impairment was recorded in fiscal year 2004.
   Pretax income for the year ended April 30, 2004 was $19.3 million compared to a loss of $16.0 million in fiscal year 2003.
 
INVESTMENT SERVICES
This segment is primarily engaged in offering advice-based investment services. Our integration of investment advice and new service offerings has allowed us to shift our focus from a transaction-based client relationship to a more advice-based focus.
                                 
 
Investment Services – Operating Statistics
 
Year ended April 30,   2005   2004   2003    
 
Customer trades (1)
    885,796       1,004,235       860,784      
Customer daily average trades
    3,529       3,923       3,429      
Average revenue per trade (2)
  $ 123.33     $ 119.36     $ 120.15      
Customer accounts: (3)
                           
 
Traditional brokerage
    431,749       463,736       501,001      
 
Express IRAs
    380,539       366,040       216,351      
     
      812,288       829,776       717,352      
     
Ending balance of assets under administration (billions)
  $ 27.8     $ 26.7     $ 22.3      
Average assets per traditional brokerage account
  $ 63,755     $ 57,204     $ 43,991      
Average margin balances (millions)
  $ 597     $ 545     $ 577      
Average customer payables balances (millions)
  $ 975     $ 984     $ 819      
Number of advisors
    1,010       1,009       984      
Included in the numbers above are the following relating to fee-based accounts:
                           
   
Customer accounts
    7,668       6,964       4,680      
   
Average revenue per account
  $ 2,301     $ 1,572     $ 1,442      
   
Assets under administration (millions)
  $ 1,975     $ 1,494     $ 789      
   
Average assets per active account
  $ 260,238     $ 214,537     $ 168,522      
 
(1)  Includes only trades on which revenues are earned (“revenue trades”). Revenues are earned on both transactional and annuitized trades.
(2)  Calculated as total trade revenues divided by revenue trades.
(3)  Includes only accounts with a positive balance.
 
                                 
 
Investment Services – Financial Results   (in 000s)    
 
    Restated   Restated    
Year ended April 30,   2005   2004   2003    
 
Service revenues:
                           
 
Transactional revenue
  $ 88,516     $ 99,559     $ 91,587      
 
Annuitized revenue
    77,386       60,950       38,507      
     
   
Production revenue
    165,902       160,509       130,094      
 
Other service revenue
    29,206       35,619       34,311      
     
      195,108       196,128       164,405      
     
Margin interest revenue
    43,698       33,408       37,300      
Less: interest expense
    (3,114 )     (1,358 )     (4,830 )    
     
 
Net interest revenue
    40,584       32,050       32,470      
     
Other
    438       (66 )     (911 )    
     
   
Total revenues (1)
    236,130       228,112       195,964      
     
Cost of services:
                           
 
Compensation and benefits
    116,552       108,956       89,473      
 
Occupancy
    22,178       21,571       24,299      
 
Other
    19,555       24,091       25,604      
     
      158,285       154,618       139,376      
Impairment of goodwill
                108,792      
Selling, general and administrative
    153,215       149,108       167,217      
     
   
Total expenses
    311,500       303,726       415,385      
     
Pretax loss
  $ (75,370 )   $ (75,614 )   $ (219,421 )    
     
 
(1)  Total revenues, less interest expense
 
Investment Services’ revenues, net of interest expense, for fiscal year 2005 increased $8.0 million, or 3.5%. The increase is primarily due to higher margin interest revenue.
   Production revenue increased $5.4 million, or 3.4% over the prior year. Transactional revenue, which is based on individual securities transactions, decreased $11.0 million, or 11.1%, from the prior year due primarily to an 18.7% decline in transactional trading volume. This decline was partially offset by an increase in the average revenue per trade. Annuitized revenue, which consists of sales of mutual funds, insurance, fee-based products and unit investment trusts, increased $16.4 million, or 27.0%, due to increased sales of annuities, mutual funds and our fee-based wealth management accounts. Annuitized revenues represent
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46.6% of total production revenues for fiscal year 2005, compared to 38.0% in the prior year. Advisor productivity averaged approximately $166,000 in the current year, essentially flat compared to the prior year.
   Other service revenue declined $6.4 million, or 18.0%, from the prior year due to fewer fixed income underwriting offerings and Express IRA revenues now being recorded as part of Tax Services.
   Margin interest revenue increased $10.3 million, or 30.8%, from the prior year, which is primarily a result of higher interest rates earned, coupled with a 9.5% increase in average margin balances. Margin balances have increased from an average of $545.0 million in fiscal year 2004 to $597.0 million in the current year.
   Cost of services increased $3.7 million, or 2.4%, primarily due to $7.6 million of additional compensation and benefits resulting from a higher average commission rate than the prior year and other financial incentives for attracting new advisors. This increase was partially offset by declines in depreciation and other expenses.
   Selling, general and administrative expenses increased $4.1 million, or 2.8%, over the prior year primarily as the result of $6.8 million in additional legal expenses, partially offset by gains of $4.6 million on the disposition of certain assets.
   The pretax loss for Investment Services for fiscal year 2005 was $75.4 million compared to a loss of $75.6 million last year.
We believe the key to this segment’s profitability in the near-term is aligning the segment’s cost structure with its revenue. Our focus in the upcoming fiscal year will be on reducing costs and attracting productive advisors. In the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2005, we implemented a series of actions, which are not production dependent, to reduce costs and enhance performance. We have also implemented strict advisor production standards.
   Although we still expect to report an operating loss for fiscal year 2006, we anticipate that loss will be approximately $25 to $35 million less than the loss recorded in 2005.
Investment Services’ revenues, net of interest expense, for fiscal year 2004 increased $32.1 million, or 16.4%, over fiscal year 2003. The improvement is primarily due to the increase in annuitized revenues.
   Production revenue increased $30.4 million, or 23.4% over fiscal year 2003. Transactional revenue increased $8.0 million, or 8.7%, from 2003 due to an increase in transactional trading activity, partially offset by a slight decline in average revenue per trade. Annuitized revenues increased $22.4 million, or 58.3%, due to increased sales of annuities and mutual funds and an increase in advisor productivity. Productivity averaged approximately $166,000 per advisor in fiscal year 2004 compared to $122,000 in 2003.
   Margin interest revenue declined $3.9 million, or 10.4%, from 2003 primarily as a result of a 5.5% decline in average margin balances coupled with lower interest rates. Margin balances declined from an average of $577.0 million in fiscal year 2003 to $545.0 million in 2004. Accordingly, interest expense for fiscal year 2004 declined $3.5 million, or 71.9%, from fiscal year 2003.
   Cost of services increased $15.2 million over 2003 primarily due to a $19.5 million increase in compensation and benefits, resulting from an increase in customer trading and higher average commissions.
   A goodwill impairment charge of $108.8 million was recorded in fiscal year 2003 due to unsettled market conditions. This charge includes an additional impairment of $84.8 million as a result of the restatement of previously issued financial statements.
   Selling, general and administrative expenses decreased $18.1 million primarily as a result of a reduction in consulting and legal expenses.
   The pretax loss for Investment Services for fiscal year 2004 was $75.6 million compared to a loss of $219.4 million in 2003.
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CORPORATE
This segment consists primarily of corporate support departments, which provide services to our operating segments. These support departments consist of marketing, information technology, facilities, human resources, executive, legal, finance, government relations and corporate communications. Support department costs are generally allocated to our operating segments. Our captive insurance and franchise financing subsidiaries are also included within this segment, as was our small business initiatives subsidiary in fiscal years 2004 and 2003.
                               
 
Corporate – Financial Results   (in 000s)    
 
    Restated   Restated    
Year Ended April 30,   2005   2004   2003    
 
Operating revenues
  $ 13,592     $ 12,532     $ 6,448      
Eliminations
    (10,444 )     (8,218 )     (7,099 )    
     
Total revenues
    3,148       4,314       (651 )    
     
Corporate expenses:
                           
 
Interest expense
    72,701       69,300       74,482      
 
Other
    51,262       50,476       56,008      
     
      123,963       119,776       130,490      
     
Support departments:
                           
 
Marketing
    117,303       110,507       88,819      
 
Information technology
    107,306       110,569       92,899      
 
Finance
    34,498       33,829       30,232      
 
Other
    107,562       78,593       65,734      
     
      366,669       333,498       277,684      
     
Allocation of support departments
    (366,742 )     (336,639 )     (280,677 )    
Other income, net
    24,345       4,582       6,139      
     
Pretax loss
  $ (96,397 )   $ (107,739 )   $ (122,009 )    
     
 
Corporate expenses increased $4.2 million primarily due to higher interest expense, resulting from higher interest rates and higher average debt balances.
   Marketing department expenses increased $6.8 million, or 6.1%, primarily due to additional marketing efforts in the current year. Other support department expenses increased $29.0 million, primarily due to $15.1 million of additional stock-based compensation expenses, increases in the cost of employee insurance and supplies.
   Other income increased $19.8 million primarily as a result of $17.3 million in legal recoveries.
   The pretax loss was $96.4 million, compared with last year’s loss of $107.7 million.
   Our effective income tax rate for fiscal year 2005 decreased to 37.5% compared to 38.5% in fiscal year 2004. The decrease is due to tax benefits realized on net operating loss carryforwards and their related benefits.
Corporate revenues increased $5.0 million primarily as a result of operating capital gains of $1.0 million in 2004 compared to a $2.0 million write-off of investments at our captive insurance subsidiary and improved results from our small business subsidiary.
   Corporate expenses declined $10.7 million, or 8.2%, due primarily to lower interest expense. Interest expense declined as a result of lower financing costs and a scheduled debt payment of $45.1 million in August 2003.
   Marketing department expenses increased $21.7 million, or 24.4%, primarily as a result of marketing initiatives for Tax Services directed toward our brand repositioning and raising consumer awareness of our advice offerings. Information technology department expenses increased $17.7 million, or 19.0%, primarily due to additional resources needed to support additional projects on behalf of the operating segments and other support departments.
   The pretax loss was $107.7 million, compared with a loss of $122.0 million in fiscal year 2003.
   Our effective income tax rate for fiscal year 2004 decreased to 38.5% compared to 44.2% in fiscal year 2003, primarily as a result of non-deductible goodwill impairment charges recorded in the prior year.
 
CAPITAL RESOURCES & LIQUIDITY BY SEGMENT
Our sources of capital include cash from operations, issuances of common stock and debt. We use capital primarily to fund working capital requirements, pay dividends, repurchase shares of our common stock and acquire businesses.
   CASH FROM OPERATIONS ... Operating cash flows totaled $513.8 million, $852.5 million and $689.7 million in fiscal years 2005, 2004 and 2003, respectively. Operating cash flows in fiscal year 2005 decreased from fiscal year 2004 due to decreased cash flows from both Mortgage Services and Tax Services and increased income tax payments. Tax Services and Mortgage Services contributed $529.0 million and $98.3 million, respectively, to cash from operations in the current year. Income
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tax payments totaled $437.4 million this year, compared to $331.6 million in fiscal year 2004.
   ISSUANCES OF COMMON STOCK ... We issue shares of our common stock in accordance with our stock-based compensation plans out of our treasury shares. Proceeds from the issuance of common stock totaled $136.1 million, $120.0 million and $126.3 million in fiscal years 2005, 2004 and 2003, respectively.
   DEBT ... In August 2004 we filed an additional shelf registration statement with the SEC for up to $1.0 billion in debt securities. On October 26, 2004, we issued $400.0 million of 5.125% Senior Notes under our shelf registration statements. The proceeds from the notes were used to repay our $250.0 million in 63/4% Senior Notes, which were due on November 1, 2004. The remaining proceeds were used for working capital, capital expenditures, repayment of other debt and other general corporate purposes.
   DIVIDENDS ... We have consistently paid quarterly dividends. Dividends paid totaled $143.0 million, $138.4 million and $125.9 million in fiscal years 2005, 2004 and 2003, respectively.
   SHARE REPURCHASES ... On June 9, 2004, our Board of Directors approved an authorization to repurchase an additional 15 million shares. This authorization is in addition to the authorization of 20 million shares on June 11, 2003. During fiscal year 2005, we repurchased 11.2 million shares pursuant to these authorizations at an aggregate price of $527.5 million or an average price of $46.98 per share. There were 15.0 million shares remaining under the 2004 authorization and 0.1 million shares remaining under the 2003 authorization at the end of fiscal year 2005.
   We plan to continue to purchase shares on the open market in accordance with the existing authorizations, subject to various factors including the price of the stock, the availability of excess cash, our ability to maintain liquidity and financial flexibility, securities laws restrictions, targeted capital levels and other investment opportunities available.
   ACQUISITIONS ... From time to time we acquire businesses that are viewed to be a good strategic fit to our organization. Total cash paid for acquisitions was $37.6 million, $280.9 million and $26.4 million during fiscal years 2005, 2004 and 2003, respectively. Significant acquisitions during fiscal year 2004 were the former major franchise territories we now operate as company-owned. Cash paid in fiscal year 2004 related to the acquisition of these territories totaled $243.2 million.
   RESTRICTED CASH ... We hold certain cash balances that are restricted as to use. Cash and cash equivalents – restricted totaled $516.9 million at fiscal year end. Investment Services held $465.0 million of this total segregated in a special reserve account for the exclusive benefit of customers pursuant to Rule 15c3-3 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Restricted cash of $28.1 million at April 30, 2005 held by Business Services is related to funds held to pay payroll taxes on behalf of its customers. Restricted cash held by Mortgage Services totaled $23.8 million at April 30, 2005 for outstanding commitments to fund mortgage loans.
   FISCAL YEAR 2006 OUTLOOK ... We began construction on a new world headquarters facility during fiscal year 2005. Estimated construction costs during fiscal year 2006 of $103.5 million will be financed from operating cash flows.
   Our Board of Directors approved an increase of the quarterly cash dividend from 22 cents to 25 cents per share, a 13.6% increase, effective with the quarterly dividend payment on October 3, 2005 to shareholders of record on September 12, 2005.
   A condensed consolidating statement of cash flows by segment for the fiscal year ended April 30, 2005 follows. Generally, interest is not charged on intercompany activities between segments. Detailed consolidated statements of cash flows are located in Item 8.
                                                       
    (in 000s)    
 
    Tax   Mortgage   Business   Investment       Consolidated    
Fiscal Year 2005   Services   Services   Services   Services   Corporate   H&R Block    
 
Cash provided by (used in):
                                                   
 
Operations
  $ 528,990     $ 98,303     $ 44,657     $ (32,408 )   $ (125,749 )   $ (513,793 )    
 
Investing
    (83,534 )     99,906       (37,816 )     7,618       (44,584 )     (58,410 )    
 
Financing
    3,482       (15,126 )     (23,223 )     (1,686 )     (391,362 )     (427,915 )    
 
Net intercompany
    (448,912 )     (184,156 )     13,725       19,965       599,378            
 
   Net intercompany activities are excluded from investing and financing activities within the segment cash flows. We believe that by excluding intercompany activities, the cash flows by segment more clearly depicts the cash generated and used by each segment. Had intercompany activities been included, those segments in a net lending situation would have been included in investing activities, and those in a net borrowing situation would have been included in financing activities.
   TAX SERVICES ... Tax Services has historically been our largest provider of annual operating cash flows. The seasonal
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nature of Tax Services generally results in a large positive operating cash flow in the fourth quarter. Tax Services generated $529.0 million in operating cash flows primarily related to net income, as cash is generally collected from clients at the time services are rendered. Prior year cash requirements for investing activities included $243.2 million paid to acquire former major franchisees.
   HSBC and its designated bank provide funding of all RALs offered pursuant to a contract that expires in June 2006. If HSBC and its designated bank do not continue to provide funding for RALs, we could seek other RAL lenders to continue offering RALs to our clients or consider alternative funding strategies. We believe that a number of suitable lenders would be available to replace HSBC should the need arise.
   We also believe that the RAL program is productive for the Company and a useful service for our customers. The RAL program is regularly reviewed both from a business perspective and to ensure compliance with applicable state and federal laws. It is our intention to continue to offer the RAL program in the foreseeable future.
   Loss of the RAL program could adversely affect our operating results. In addition to the loss of revenues and income directly attributable to the RAL program, the inability to offer RALs could indirectly result in the loss of retail tax clients and associated tax preparation revenues, unless we were able to take mitigating actions. Total revenues related to the RAL program (including revenues from participation interests) were $182.6 million for the year ended April 30, 2005, representing 4.1% of consolidated revenues and contributed $101.3 million to the segment’s pretax results. Revenues related to the RAL program totaled $174.2 million for the year ended April 30, 2004, representing 4.1% of consolidated revenues.
   Our international operations are generally self-funded. Cash balances are held in Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom independently in local currencies. H&R Block Canada, Inc. (“Block Canada”) has a commercial paper program for up to $125.0 million (Canadian). At April 30, 2005, there was no commercial paper outstanding. The peak borrowing during fiscal year 2005 was $124.0 million (Canadian).
   MORTGAGE SERVICES ... This segment primarily generates cash as a result of the sale and securitization of mortgage loans and residual interests and as its residual interests mature. Mortgage Services provided $98.3 million in cash from operating activities primarily due to the sale of mortgage loans. This segment also generated $99.9 million in cash from investing activities primarily related to cash received from the maturity and sales of residual interests. We regularly sell loans as a source of liquidity. Loan sales in fiscal year 2005 were $31.0 billion compared with $23.2 billion in fiscal year 2004. Additionally, Block Financial Corporation (“BFC”) provides a line of credit of at least $150 million for working capital needs. At the end of fiscal year 2005 there was no outstanding balance on this facility.
   GAINS ON SALES ... Gains on sales of mortgage assets totaled $822.1 million, which was primarily recorded as operating activities. The percentage of cash proceeds we receive from our capital market transactions is calculated as follows:
                               
    (in 000s)    
 
    Restated   Restated    
Year ended April 30,   2005   2004   2003    
 
Cash proceeds:
                           
 
Whole loans sold by the Trusts
  $ 737,417     $ 741,233     $ 368,305      
 
Residual cash flows from Beneficial interest in Trusts
    193,639       167,705       103,294      
 
Loans securitized
    69,665       198,226       389,449      
 
Sale of previously securitized residuals
    15,396       40,689       93,307      
 
Gain (loss) on derivative instruments
    45,298       (2,578 )     (2,056 )    
     
      1,061,415       1,145,275       952,299      
     
Non-cash:
                           
 
Retained mortgage servicing rights
    137,510       84,274       60,078      
 
Additions (reductions) to balance sheet (1)
    15,885       11,490       (10,829 )    
     
      153,395       95,764       49,249      
     
Portion of gain on sale from capital market transactions
  $ 1,214,810     $ 1,241,039     $ 1,001,548      
     
Other items included in gain on sale:
                           
 
Changes in beneficial interest in Trusts
    36,281       37,918       74,987      
 
Impairments to fair value of residual interests
    (12,235 )     (26,063 )     (54,111 )    
 
Net change in fair value of derivative instruments
    1,555       (9,379 )     (2,085 )    
Direct origination and acquisition expenses, net
    (378,674 )     (278,785 )     (182,216 )    
 
Loan sale repurchase reserves
    (39,662 )     (46,820 )     (21,295 )    
 
Other
          387       10,299      
     
      (392,735 )     (322,742 )     (174,421 )    
     
Reported gains on sales of mortgage assets
  $ 822,075     $ 918,297     $ 827,127      
     
% of gain on sale from capital market transactions received as cash (2)
    87%       92%       95%      
 
(1)  Includes residual interests and interest rate caps.
(2)  Cash proceeds divided by portion of gain on sale related to capital market transactions.
 
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   WAREHOUSE FUNDING ... To finance our prime originations, we use a warehouse facility with capacity up to $25 million. This annual facility bears interest at one-month LIBOR plus 140 to 200 basis points. As of April 30, 2005 and 2004, the balance outstanding under this facility was $4.4 million and $4.0 million, respectively, and is included in accounts payable, accrued expenses and other on the consolidated balance sheets.
   See discussion of our non-prime warehouse facilities below in “Off-Balance Sheet Financing Arrangements.”
   We believe the sources of liquidity available to the Mortgage Services segment are sufficient for its needs. Risks to the stability of these sources include, but are not limited to, adverse changes in the perception of the non-prime industry, adverse changes in the regulation of non-prime lending, changes in the rating criteria of non-prime lending by third-party rating agencies and, to a lesser degree, reduction in the availability of third parties that provide credit enhancement. Past performance of the securitizations will also impact the segment’s future participation in these markets. The off-balance sheet warehouse facilities used by the Trusts are subject to annual renewal, each at a different time during the year, and any of the above events could lead to difficulty in renewing the lines. These risks are mitigated by a staggering of the renewal dates related to these warehouse lines and through the use of multiple lending institutions to secure these lines.
   BUSINESS SERVICES ... Business Services funding requirements are largely related to receivables for completed work and “work in process.” We provide funding sufficient to cover their working capital needs. Business Services also has future obligations and commitments, which are summarized in the tables below under “Contractual Obligations and Commercial Commitments.”
   This segment generated $44.7 million in operating cash flows primarily related to net income. Additionally, Business Services used $37.8 million in investing activities primarily related to contingent payments on prior acquisitions, and $23.2 million in financing activities as a result of payments on acquisition debt.
   INVESTMENT SERVICES ... Investment Services, through HRBFA, is subject to regulatory requirements intended to ensure the general financial soundness and liquidity of broker-dealers.
   HRBFA is required to maintain minimum net capital as defined under Rule 15c3-1 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and complies with the alternative capital requirement, which requires a broker-dealer to maintain net capital equal to the greater of $250,000 or 2% of the combined aggregate debit balances arising from customer transactions. The net capital rule also provides that equity capital may not be withdrawn or cash dividends paid if resulting net capital would be less than the greater of 5% of combined aggregate debit items or 120% of the minimum required net capital. At the end of fiscal year 2005, HRBFA’s net capital of $121.2 million, which was 19.2% of aggregate debit items, exceeded its minimum required net capital of $12.6 million by $108.6 million. During fiscal year 2005 and 2004, we contributed additional capital of $27.0 million and $32.0 million, respectively, even though HRBFA was in excess of the minimum net capital requirement, and we may continue to do so in the future.
   In fiscal year 2005, Investment Services used $32.4 million in its operating activities primarily due to operating losses.
   To manage short-term liquidity, BFC provides HRBFA a $300 million unsecured credit facility. At the end of fiscal year 2005 there was no outstanding balance on this facility.
   HRBFA has letters of credit with a financial institution with a credit limit of $125.0 million. There were no commitments outstanding on these letters of credit at any time during fiscal year 2005 or 2004.
   Liquidity needs relating to client trading and margin-borrowing activities are met primarily through cash balances in client brokerage accounts and working capital. We believe these sources of funds will continue to be the primary sources of liquidity for Investment Services. Stock loans have historically been used as a secondary source of funding and could be used in the future, if warranted.
   Securities borrowed and securities loaned transactions are generally reported as collateralized financings. These transactions require us to deposit cash and/or collateral with the lender. Securities loaned consist of securities owned by customers, which were purchased on margin. When loaning securities, we receive cash collateral approximately equal to the value of the securities loaned. The amount of cash collateral is adjusted, as required, for market fluctuations in the value of the securities loaned. Interest rates paid on the cash collateral fluctuate as short-term interest rates change.
   To satisfy the margin deposit requirement of client option transactions with the Options Clearing Corporation (“OCC”), Investment Services pledges customers’ margined securities. Pledged securities at the end of fiscal year 2005 totaled $44.6 million, an excess of $7.9 million over the margin requirement. Pledged securities at the end of fiscal year 2004 totaled $46.3 million, an excess of $7.9 million over the margin requirement.
   We believe the funding sources for Investment Services are stable. Liquidity risk within this segment is primarily limited to maintaining sufficient capital levels to obtain securities lending liquidity to support margin borrowing by customers.
 
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OFF-BALANCE SHEET FINANCING ARRANGEMENTS
We are party to various transactions with an off-balance sheet component, including loan commitments and QSPEs, or Trusts.
   We have commitments to fund mortgage loans in our pipeline of $3.9 billion at April 30, 2005, which are subject to conditions and loan contract verification. There is no commitment on the part of the borrower to close on the mortgage loan at this stage of the lending process and external market forces impact the probability of these loan commitments being closed. Therefore, total commitments outstanding do not necessarily represent future cash requirements. If the loan commitments are exercised, they will be funded as described below.
   Our relationships with the Trusts serve to reduce our capital investment in our non-prime mortgage operations. These arrangements are primarily used to sell mortgage loans, but a portion may also be used to sell servicing advances and finance residual interests. Additionally, these arrangements have freed up cash and short-term borrowing capacity, improved liquidity and flexibility, and reduced balance sheet risk, while providing stability and access to liquidity in the secondary market for mortgage loans.
   Substantially all non-prime mortgage loans we originate are sold daily to the Trusts. The Trusts purchase the loans from us using five warehouse facilities, arranged by us, totaling $9.0 billion. These facilities are subject to various Option One performance triggers, limits and financial covenants, including tangible net worth and leverage ratios. In addition, these facilities contain cross-default features in which a default in one facility would trigger a default under the other facilities as well. These various facilities bear interest at one-month LIBOR plus 50 to 400 basis points and expire on various dates during the year. In addition, some of the facilities provide for the payment of minimum usage fees.
   Subsequent to April 30, 2005, we increased the Trusts’ warehouse capacity by adding an additional $1.0 billion facility. This facility bears interest at one-month LIBOR plus 45 to 345 basis points.
   When we sell loans to the Trusts, we remove the mortgage loans from our balance sheet and record the gain on the sale, cash and a beneficial interest in Trusts, which represents the ultimate expected outcome from the disposition of the loans. Our beneficial interest in Trusts totaled $215.4 million and $153.8 million at April 30, 2005 and 2004, respectively.
   Subsequently, the Trusts, as directed by their third-party beneficial interest holders, either sell the loans directly to third-party investors or back to us to pool the loans for securitization. The decision to complete a whole loan sale or a securitization is dependent on market conditions.
   For fiscal year 2005, the final disposition of loans sold to the Trusts was 92% whole loan sales and 8% securitizations. For fiscal year 2004, the final disposition was 76% whole loan sales and 24% securitizations. The current year shift to whole loan sales is due to the more favorable pricing in the whole loan market. Increased whole loan sale transactions result in cash being received earlier. Additionally, whole loan sales do not add residual interests to our balance sheet, and therefore, we do not retain balance sheet risk.
   If the Trusts sell the mortgage loans in a whole loan sale, we receive cash for our beneficial interest in Trusts. In a securitization transaction, the Trusts transfer the loans and the corresponding right to receive all payments on the loans to our consolidated special purpose entity, after which we transfer our beneficial interest in Trusts and the loans to a securitization trust. The securitization trust meets the definition of a QSPE and is therefore not consolidated. The securitization trust issues bonds, which are supported by the cash flows from the pooled loans, to third-party investors. We retain an interest in the loans in the form of a residual interest and, therefore, usually assume the first risk of loss for credit losses in the loan pool. As the cash flows of the underlying loans and market conditions change, the value of our residual interests may also change, resulting in potential write-ups or impairment of our residual interests.
   At the settlement of each securitization, we record cash received and our residual interests. Additionally, we reverse the beneficial interest in Trusts. These residual interests are classified as trading securities. See Item 8, note 1 to our consolidated financial statements for our methodology used in valuing our residual interests.
   To accelerate the cash flows from our residual interests, we securitize the majority of our residual interests in net interest margin (“NIM”) transactions. In a NIM transaction, the residual interests are transferred to another QSPE (“NIM trust”), which then issues bonds to third-party investors. The proceeds from the bonds are returned to us as payment for the residual interests. The bonds are secured by the pooled residual interests and are obligations of the NIM trust. We retain a subordinated interest in the NIM trust, and receive cash flows on our residual interest generally after the NIM bonds issued to the third-party investors are paid in full.
   At the settlement of each NIM transaction, we remove the residual interests sold from our consolidated balance sheet and record the cash received and the new residual interest retained.
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These residual interests are classified as available-for-sale securities.
   Residual interests retained from NIM securitizations may also be sold in a subsequent securitization or sale transaction.
   Loans totaling $6.7 billion and $3.2 billion were held by the Trusts as of April 30, 2005 and 2004, respectively, and were not recorded on our consolidated balance sheets.
   In connection with the sale of mortgage loans, we provide certain representations and warranties allowing the purchaser the option of returning the purchased loans to us under certain conditions. We may recognize losses as a result of the repurchase of loans under these arrangements. We maintain reserves for the repurchase of loans based on historical trends. See Item 8, note 17 to our consolidated financial statements.
   The Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) intends to reissue the exposure draft, “Qualifying Special Purpose Entities and Isolation of Transferred Assets, an Amendment of FASB Statement No. 140,” during the third quarter of calendar year 2005. The purpose of the proposal is to provide more specific guidance on the accounting for transfers of financial assets to a QSPE.
   Provisions in the first exposure draft, as well as tentative decisions reached by the FASB during its deliberations, may require us to consolidate our current QSPEs (the Trusts) established in our Mortgage Services segment. As of April 30, 2005, the Trusts had both assets and liabilities of $6.7 billion. The provisions of the exposure draft are subject to FASB due process and are subject to change. We will continue to monitor the status of the exposure draft, and consider changes, if any, to current structures as a result of the proposed rules.
 
COMMERCIAL PAPER ISSUANCE
We participate in the U.S. and Canadian commercial paper (“CP”) markets to meet daily cash needs and fund mortgage loans. CP is issued by BFC and Block Canada, wholly-owned subsidiaries of the Company. The following chart provides the debt ratings for BFC as of April 30, 2005 and 2004:
                     
 
    Short-term   Long-term    
 
Fitch
    F1       A      
Moody’s
    P2       A3      
S&P
    A2       BBB+       
 
   The following chart provides the debt ratings for Block Canada as of April 30, 2005 and 2004:
                             
 
    Short-term   Corporate   Trend    
 
DBRS
    R-1 (low)       A       Stable      
Moody’s
    P2                      
 
   We use capital primarily to fund working capital requirements, pay dividends, repurchase our shares and acquire businesses. Commercial paper borrowings peaked at $2.1 billion in February 2005 related to funding of our participation interests in RALs. No CP was outstanding at April 30, 2005 or 2004.
   U.S. CP issuances are supported by unsecured committed lines of credit (“CLOCs”). During fiscal year 2005, we replaced our single $2.0 billion CLOC with two $1.0 billion CLOCs. The two CLOCs are from a consortium of thirty-one banks. The first $1.0 billion CLOC is subject to annual renewal in August 2005, has a one-year term-out provision with a maturity date in August 2006 and has an annual facility fee of ten basis points per annum. The second $1.0 billion CLOC has a maturity date of August 2009 and has an annual facility fee of twelve basis points per annum. These lines are subject to various affirmative and negative covenants, including a minimum net worth covenant.
   An additional line of credit of $750.0 million was put into place for the period of January 26 to February 25, 2005 as an alternative to CP issuance during the peak RAL season. This line is subject to various covenants, substantially similar to the primary CLOCs.
   These CLOCs were undrawn at April 30, 2005. There are no rating contingencies under the CLOCs.
   The Canadian issuances are supported by a credit facility provided by one bank in an amount not to exceed $125.0 million (Canadian). The Canadian CLOC is subject to annual renewal in December 2005. This CLOC was undrawn at April 30, 2005.
   We believe the CP market to be stable. Risks to the stability of our CP market participation would be a short-term rating downgrade, adverse changes in our financial performance, non-renewal or termination of the CLOCs, adverse publicity and operational risk within the CP market. We believe if any of these events were to occur, the CLOCs, to the extent available, could be used for an orderly exit from the CP market, though at a higher cost to us. Additionally, we could turn to other sources of liquidity, including cash, debt issuance under the existing shelf registration and asset sales or securitizations.
 
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CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS AND COMMERCIAL COMMITMENTS
A summary of our obligations to make future payments as of April 30, 2005 is as follows:
                                             
    (in 000s)
 
    Less Than       After    
    Total   1 Year   1 – 3 Years   4 – 5 Years   5 Years    
 
Debt
  $ 897,046     $ 45     $ 498,916     $ 91     $ 397,994      
Long-term obligation to government
    213,360       106,680       106,680                  
Acquisition payments
    38,022       25,159       12,863                  
Pension obligation assumed
    15,929       2,625       4,545       3,698       5,061      
Capital lease obligation
    13,550       341       730       997       11,482      
Operating leases
    708,611       229,768       313,264       124,945       40,634      
     
Total contractual cash obligations
  $ 1,886,518     $ 364,618     $ 936,998     $ 129,731     $ 455,171      
     
 
   In October 2004, we issued $400.0 million of 5.125% Senior Notes, due 2014. The Senior Notes are not redeemable by the bondholders prior to maturity. The net proceeds of this transaction were used to repay the $250.0 million in 63/4% Senior Notes, which were due November 1, 2004. The remaining proceeds were used for working capital, capital expenditures, repayment of other debt and other general corporate purposes.
   In April 2000, we issued $500.0 million of 81/2% Senior Notes, due 2007. The Senior Notes are not redeemable prior to maturity. The net proceeds of this transaction were used to repay a portion of the short-term borrowings that initially funded the acquisition of OLDE.
   Future payments related to Business Services acquisitions and capital lease obligations are included in long-term debt on our consolidated balance sheets. Our debt to total capital ratio was 32.4% at April 30, 2005, compared with 31.1% at April 30, 2004.
   As of April 30, 2005, we had $850.0 million remaining under our shelf registration available for additional debt issuance.
   In connection with our acquisition of the non-attest assets of M&P in August 1999, we assumed certain pension liabilities related to M&P’s retired partners. We make payments in varying amounts on a monthly basis, which are included in other noncurrent liabilities.
   Operating leases, although requiring future cash payments, are not included in our consolidated balance sheets.
   A summary of our commitments as of April 30, 2005, which may or may not require future payments, expire as follows:
                                             
(in 000s)    
 
    Less Than       After    
    Total   1 Year   1 - 3 Years   4 - 5 Years   5 Years    
 
Commitments to fund mortgage loans
  $ 3,931,926     $ 3,931,926     $     $     $      
Commitments to sell mortgage loans
    8,707,000       8,707,000                        
Pledged securities
    44,609       44,609                        
Commitment to fund M&P
    75,000       75,000                        
Franchise Equity Lines of Credit
    68,949       20,122       20,476       28,351            
Mortgage loan repurchase obligations
    41,233       41,233                        
Construction of new building
    143,116       103,505       39,611                  
Other commercial commitments
    8,219       5,221       2,500       458       40      
     
Total commercial commitments
  $ 13,020,052     $ 12,928,616     $ 62,587     $ 28,809     $ 40      
     
 
   See discussion of commitments in Item 8, note 17 to our consolidated financial statements.
 
REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT
The U.S., various state, local, provincial and foreign governments and some self-regulatory organizations have enacted statutes and ordinances, and/or adopted rules and regulations, regulating aspects of our business. These aspects include, but are not limited to, commercial income tax return preparers, income tax courses, the electronic filing of income tax returns, the
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facilitation of RALs, loan originations and assistance in loan originations, mortgage lending, privacy, consumer protection, franchising, sales methods, brokers, broker-dealers and various aspects of securities transactions, financial planners, investment advisors, accountants and the accounting practice. We seek to determine the applicability of such statutes, ordinances, rules and regulations (collectively, “Laws”) and comply with those Laws.
   From time to time in the ordinary course of business, we receive inquiries from governmental and self-regulatory agencies regarding the applicability of Laws to our services and products. In response to past inquiries, we have agreed to comply with such Laws, convinced the authorities that such Laws were not applicable or that compliance already exists, and/or modified our activities in the applicable jurisdiction to avoid the application of all or certain parts of such Laws. We believe that the past resolution of such inquiries and our ongoing compliance with Laws have not had a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial statements. We cannot predict what effect future Laws, changes in interpretations of existing Laws, or the results of future regulator inquiries with respect to the applicability of Laws may have on our consolidated financial statements.
 
NEW ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS
See Item 8, note 1 to our consolidated financial statements for a discussion of recently issued accounting pronouncements.
 
RECONCILIATION OF NON-GAAP FINANCIAL INFORMATION
We report our financial results in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”). However, we believe certain non-GAAP performance measures and ratios used in managing the business may provide additional meaningful comparisons between current year results and prior periods, by excluding certain items that do not represent results from our basic operations. Reconciliations to GAAP financial measures are provided below. These non-GAAP financial measures should be viewed in addition to, not as an alternative for, our reported GAAP results.
                               
 
Origination Margin   (in 000s)    
 
    Restated   Restated    
Year Ended April 30,   2005   2004   2003    
 
Total expenses
  $ 749,925     $ 635,186     $ 493,756      
Add: Expenses netted against gain on sale revenues
    378,304       267,780       162,332      
Less:
                           
 
Cost of services
    221,300       193,018       141,419      
 
Cost of acquisition
    169,621       114,707       59,637      
 
Allocated support departments
    24,161       21,124       7,630      
 
Other
    20,323       31,378       28,238      
     
    $ 692,824     $ 542,739     $ 419,164      
     
Divided by origination volume
  $ 31,001,724     $ 23,256,013     $ 16,577,621      
Total cost of origination
    2.23%       2.33%       2.53%      
 
 
ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
GENERAL
INTEREST RATE RISK ... We have established a formal investment policy to help minimize the market risk exposure of our cash equivalents and available-for-sale securities, which are primarily affected by credit quality and movements in interest rates. These guidelines focus on managing liquidity and preserving principal and earnings. Most of our interest rate-sensitive assets and liabilities are managed at the subsidiary level.
   Our cash equivalents are primarily held for liquidity purposes and are comprised of high quality, short-term investments, including qualified money market funds. As of April 30, 2005, our non-restricted cash and cash equivalents had an average maturity
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of less than three months with an average credit quality of AAA. With such a short maturity, our portfolio’s market value is relatively insensitive to interest rate changes. We hold investments in fixed income securities at our captive insurance subsidiary. See the table below for sensitivities to changes in interest rates. See additional discussion of interest rate risk included below in Mortgage Services and Investment Services.
   At April 30, 2005, no commercial paper was outstanding. For fiscal year 2005, the average issuance term was 29 days and the average outstanding balance was $388.2 million. As commercial paper and bank borrowings are seasonal, interest rate risk typically increases through our third fiscal quarter and declines to zero by fiscal year-end. See Item 7, “Financial Condition” for additional information.
   Our current portion of long-term debt and long-term debt at April 30, 2005 consists primarily of fixed-rate Senior Notes; therefore, a change in interest rates would have no impact on consolidated pretax earnings. See Item 8, note 10 to our consolidated financial statements.
   EQUITY PRICE RISK ... We have exposure to the equity markets in several ways. The largest exposures are through our deferred compensation plans and equity investments at our captive insurance subsidiary. Within the deferred compensation plans we have mismatches in asset and liability amounts and investment choices (both fixed-income and equity). At April 30, 2005 and 2004, the impact of a 10% market value change in the combined equity assets held by our deferred compensation plans and our captive insurance subsidiary would be approximately $9.3 million and $8.9 million, respectively, assuming no offset for the liabilities.
TAX SERVICES
FOREIGN EXCHANGE RATE RISK ... Our operations in international markets are exposed to movements in currency exchange rates. The currencies involved are the Canadian dollar, the Australian dollar and the British pound. We translate revenues and expenses related to these operations at the average of exchange rates in effect during the period. Assets and liabilities of foreign subsidiaries are translated into U.S. dollars at exchange rates prevailing at the end of the year. Translation adjustments are recorded as a separate component of other comprehensive income in stockholders’ equity. Translation of financial results into U.S. dollars does not presently materially affect, and has not historically materially affected, our consolidated financial results, although such changes do affect the year-to-year comparability of the operating results in U.S. dollars of our international businesses. We estimate a 10% change in foreign exchange rates by itself would impact consolidated pretax income in fiscal years 2005 and 2004 by approximately $1.3 million and cash balances at April 30, 2005 and 2004 by $4.7 million and $6.1 million, respectively.
MORTGAGE SERVICES
INTEREST RATE RISK – PRIME ORIGINATIONS ... We regularly enter into rate-lock commitments with our customers to fund prime mortgage loans within specified periods of time. The fair value of rate-lock commitments is calculated based on the current market pricing of short sales of FNMA, FHLMC and GNMA mortgage-backed securities and the coupon rates of the eligible loans. At April 30, 2005, we recorded an asset of $0.8 million related to rate-lock commitments.
   We sell short FNMA, FHLMC and GNMA mortgage-backed securities to reduce the risk related to our prime commitments to fund fixed-rate prime loans. The position on certain, or all, of the fixed-rate mortgage loans is closed approximately 10-15 days prior to standard Public Securities Association (“PSA”) settlement dates. At April 30, 2005 we recorded a liability of $0.8 million related to these instruments.
   To finance our prime originations, we use a warehouse facility with capacity up to $25 million, which bears interest at one-month LIBOR plus 140 to 200 basis points. As of April 30, 2005, the balance outstanding under this facility was $4.4 million.
   INTEREST RATE RISK – NON-PRIME ORIGINATIONS ... Interest rate changes impact the value of the loans in our origination pipeline, the beneficial interest in Trusts and forward loan sale commitments.
   We are exposed to interest rate risk associated with loans in our origination pipeline, consisting of fixed-and adjustable-rate loans, which are generally sold through whole loan sales or securitizations. We have binding and non-binding commitments to fund mortgage loans of $0.9 billion and $3.0 billion, respectively, at April 30, 2005, subject to conditions and loan contract verification. Of these commitments, we estimate only $2.0 billion will likely be originated.
   As a result of whole loan sales to the Trusts, we remove the mortgage loans from our balance sheet and record the gain on sale, cash and a beneficial interest in Trusts, which represents the ultimate expected outcome from the disposition of the loans. See Item 7, “Off-Balance Sheet Financing Arrangements.” At April 30, 2005, there were $6.7 billion of loans held in the Trusts and the value of our beneficial interest in Trusts was $215.4 million. Changes in interest rates and other market factors may result in a change in value of our beneficial interest in Trusts.
   We use forward loan sale commitments to reduce risk associated with loans in the pipeline. These commitments, which represent an obligation to sell a non-prime loan at a specific price in the future, increase in value as interest rates rise and decrease as rates fall. At April 30, 2005, there were $8.7 billion in forward
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loan sale commitments, and most of them give us the option to under- or over-deliver by five to ten percent. Forward loan sale commitments for non-prime loans are not considered derivative instruments and are therefore not recorded in our financial statements. Forward loan sale commitments lock in the execution price on the loans that will ultimately be delivered into a whole loan sale. With $8.7 billion of forward loan sale commitments at April 30, 2005 (and the option to adjust the commitment amount to between $7.8 billion and $9.6 billion), net of pipeline loans estimated at $2.0 billion and the anticipated sale of $6.7 billion in loans by the Trusts, we believe changes in interest rates will not have a material impact on the gains or losses we record on our commitments to fund and sell mortgage loans.
   We use interest rate swaps to reduce interest rate risk associated with non-prime loans. We generally enter into interest rate swap arrangements related to existing loan applications with rate-lock commitments and, beginning at the end of our second quarter, for rate-lock commitments we expect to make in the next 30 days. Interest rate swaps represent an agreement to exchange interest rate payments, effectively converting our fixed financing costs into a floating rate. These contracts increase in value as rates rise and decrease in value as rates fall. At April 30, 2005, we had a liability of $1.3 million on our balance sheet related to interest rate swaps. See table below for sensitivities to changes in interest rates for swaps.
   DELIVERY RISK ... We have exposure to delivery risk in our non-prime origination operations, which regularly enter into forward loan sale commitments prior to loans being originated. It is possible that we will be unable to originate the loans or that the loans originated will not meet the required characteristics of the forward loan sale commitments. Several remedies are available, although use of the remedies could reduce the execution price or the effectiveness of the forward loan sale commitment in reducing interest rate risk.
   RESIDUAL INTERESTS ... Relative to modeled assumptions, an increase or decrease in interest rates would impact the value of our residual interests and could affect accretion income related to our residual interests. Residual interests bear the interest rate risk embedded within the securitization due to an initial fixed-rate period on the loans versus a floating-rate funding cost. Residual interests also bear the on-going risk that the floating interest rate earned on the mortgage loans is different from the floating interest rate on the bonds sold in the securitization.
   We enter into interest rate caps to mitigate interest rate risk associated with mortgage loans that will be securitized and residual interests that are classified as trading securities because they will be sold in a subsequent NIM transaction. The caps enhance the marketability of the securitization and NIM transactions. An interest rate cap represents a right to receive cash if interest rates rise above a contractual strike rate, its value therefore increases as interest rates rise. The interest rate used in our interest rate caps is based on LIBOR. At April 30, 2005 we recorded an asset totaling $12.5 million related to interest rate caps.
   See table below for sensitivities to changes in interest rates for residual interests and caps. See Item 8, note 6 to the consolidated financial statements for additional analysis of interest rate risk and other financial risks impacting residual interests.
   It is our policy to use derivative instruments only for the purpose of offsetting or reducing the risk of loss associated with a defined or quantified exposure.
   MORTGAGE SERVICING RIGHTS ... Declining interest rates may cause increased refinancing activity, which reduces the life of the loans underlying the residual interests and MSRs, thereby reducing their fair value. The fair value of MSRs generally increases in a rising rate environment, although MSRs are recorded at the lower of cost or market value. Reductions in the fair value of these assets impact earnings through impairment charges. See Item 8, note 6 to our consolidated financial statements for further sensitivity analysis of other MSR valuation assumptions.
INVESTMENT SERVICES
INTEREST RATE RISK ... HRBFA holds interest bearing receivables from customers, brokers, dealers and clearing organizations, which consist primarily of amounts due on margin transactions and are generally short-term in nature. We fund these short-term assets with short-term variable rate liabilities from customers, brokers and dealers, including stock loan activity. Although there may be differences in the timing of the re-pricing related to these assets and liabilities, we believe we are not significantly exposed to interest rate risk in this area. As a result, any change in interest rates would not materially impact our consolidated earnings.
   Our fixed-income trading portfolio is affected by changes in market rates and prices. The risk is the loss of income arising from adverse changes in the value of the trading portfolio. We value the trading portfolio at quoted market prices and the market value of our trading portfolio at April 30, 2005 was approximately $6.3 million, net of $4.8 million in securities sold short. See table below for sensitivities to changes in interest rates. With respect to our fixed-income securities portfolio, we manage our market price risk exposure by limiting concentration risk, maintaining minimum credit quality and limiting inventory to anticipated retail demand and current market conditions.
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   The sensitivities of certain financial instruments to changes in interest rates as of April 30, 2005 and 2004 are presented below. The following table represents hypothetical instantaneous and sustained parallel shifts in interest rates and should not be relied on as an indicator of future expected results.
                                                                     
    (in 000s)    
 
    Basis Point Change
    Fair Value at    
    April 30, 2005   - 200   - 100   - 50   + 50   + 100   + 200   + 300    
 
Residual interests in securitizations – available-for-sale
  $ 205,936     $ 84,845     $ 30,417     $ 13,637     $ (13,520 )   $ (28,174 )   $ (51,466 )   $ (75,296 )    
Interest rate caps
    12,458             205       4,580       20,746       29,262       46,751       64,195      
Investments at captive insurance subsidiary
    9,968       1,079       522       256       (248 )     (487 )     (942 )     (1,368 )    
Fixed income – trading (net)
    6,252       1,958       893       426       (390 )     (749 )     (1,383 )     (1,921 )    
Interest rate swaps
    (1,325 )     (84,723 )     (43,024 )     (19,524 )     19,524       43,024       84,723       123,771      
 
                                                                     
 
    Basis Point Change
    Fair Value at        
    April 30, 2004           - 50   + 50   + 100   + 200   + 300    
 
Residual interests in securitizations – available-for-sale
  $ 210,973                     $ 45,449     $ (18,563 )   $ (32,709 )   $ (46,527 )   $ (48,090 )    
Investments at captive insurance subsidiary
    44,667                       1,079       (1,069 )     (1,591 )     (3,146 )     (4,667 )    
Fixed income – trading (net)
    13,639                       677       (637 )     (1,228 )     (2,271 )     (3,164 )    
 
 
ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
 
DISCUSSION OF FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY ...
We at H&R Block are guided by our core values of client focus, integrity, excellence, respect and teamwork. These values govern the manner in which we serve clients and each other, and are embedded in the execution and delivery of our responsibilities to our shareholders. H&R Block’s Management is responsible for the integrity and objectivity of the information contained in this document. Management is responsible for the consistency of reporting this information and for ensuring that accounting principles generally accepted in the United States are used. In discharging this responsibility, Management maintains an extensive program of internal audits and require the management teams of our individual subsidiaries to certify their respective financial information. Our system of internal control over financial reporting also includes formal policies and procedures, including a Code of Business Ethics and Conduct program designed to encourage and assist all employees and directors in living up to high standards of integrity.
   The Audit Committee of the Board of Directors, composed solely of outside and independent directors, meets periodically with management, the independent auditors and the chief internal auditor to review matters relating to our financial statements, internal audit activities, internal accounting controls and non-audit services provided by the independent auditors. The independent auditors and the chief internal auditor have full access to the Audit Committee and meet, both with and without management present, to discuss the scope and results of their audits, including internal control, audit and financial matters.
   KPMG LLP audited our 2005 and 2004 consolidated financial statements and PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP audited our 2003 consolidated financial statements. Their audits were conducted in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (U.S.).
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MANAGEMENT’S REPORT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING ...
Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f). Under the supervision and with the participation of management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, we conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting based on the framework in “Internal Control – Integrated Framework” issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (“COSO”) as of April 30, 2005.
   Based on our assessment, management determined that a material weakness existed in the Company’s internal controls over accounting for income taxes as of April 30, 2005. Specifically, the Company did not maintain sufficient resources in the corporate tax function to accurately identify, evaluate and report, in a timely manner, non-routine and complex transactions. In addition, the Company had not completed the requisite historical analysis and related reconciliations to ensure tax balances were appropriately stated prior to the completion of the Company’s internal control activities. These deficiencies resulted in errors in the Company’s accounting for income taxes. These errors were corrected prior to issuance of the consolidated financial statements as of and for the year ended April 30, 2005. In the aggregate, these deficiencies represent a material weakness in internal control over financial reporting on the basis that there is a more than remote likelihood that a material misstatement of the Company’s annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected by its internal control over financial reporting. Because of this material weakness in internal control over financial reporting, management concluded that, as of April 30, 2005, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting was not effective based on the criteria set forth by COSO.
-s- Mark A. Ernst
Mark A. Ernst
Chairman of the Board, President and Chief Executive Officer
-s- William L. Trubeck
William L. Trubeck
Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
 
REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM ...
The Board of Directors and Stockholders of H&R Block, Inc.:
   We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of H&R Block, Inc. and its subsidiaries (the Company) as of April 30, 2005 and 2004, and the related consolidated statements of income and comprehensive income, stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended April 30, 2005. These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits.
   We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
   In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of H&R Block, Inc. and its subsidiaries as of April 30, 2005 and 2004, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended April 30, 2005, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.
   As discussed in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company changed its method of accounting to adopt Emerging Issues Task Force Issue No. 00-21, “Revenue Arrangements with Multiple Deliverables,” and Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 148, “Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation – Transition and Disclosure” during the year ended April 30, 2004.
   As discussed in Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company restated its financial statements for its fiscal year ended April 30, 2004.
   We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of April 30, 2005, based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the
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Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (“COSO”), and our report dated July 29, 2005 expressed an unqualified opinion on management’s assessment of, and an adverse opinion on the effective operation of, internal control over financial reporting.
-s- KPMG
Kansas City, Missouri
July 29, 2005
 
REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM ...
The Board of Directors and Stockholders of H&R Block, Inc.:
   We have audited management’s assessment, included in the accompanying Management’s Report On Internal Control Over Financial Reporting (Item 9A(b)),that H&R Block, Inc. and subsidiaries (the Company) did not maintain effective internal control over financial reporting as of April 30, 2005, because of the effect of the material weakness identified in management’s assessment that the Company’s controls and procedures over accounting for income taxes were ineffective, based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (“COSO”). The Company’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on management’s assessment and an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.
   We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, evaluating management’s assessment, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control, and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
   A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
   Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
   A material weakness is a control deficiency, or combination of control deficiencies, that results in more than a remote likelihood that a material misstatement of the annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected. The following material weakness has been identified and included in management’s assessment: The Company did not maintain sufficient resources in the corporate tax function to accurately identify, evaluate and report, in a timely manner, nonroutine and complex transactions. In addition, the Company had not completed the requisite historical analysis and related reconciliations to ensure tax balances were appropriately stated prior to the completion of the Company’s internal control activities. These deficiencies resulted in errors in the Company’s accounting for income taxes. Because of these deficiencies, there is more than a remote likelihood that a material misstatement in the Company’s annual or interim financial statements due to errors in accounting for income taxes could occur and not be prevented or detected by its internal control over financial reporting.
   We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated balance sheets of H&R Block, Inc. and subsidiaries as of April 30, 2005 and 2004, and the related consolidated statements of income and comprehensive income, stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended April 30, 2005. The aforementioned material weakness was considered in determining the nature, timing, and extent of audit tests applied in our audit of the fiscal year 2005 consolidated financial statements, and this report does not affect our report dated July 29, 2005, which expressed an unqualified opinion on those consolidated financial statements.
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   In our opinion, management’s assessment that H&R Block, Inc. and subsidiaries did not maintain effective internal control over financial reporting as of April 30, 2005, is fairly stated, in all material respects, based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (“COSO”). Also, in our opinion, because of the effect of the material weakness described above on the achievement of the objectives of the control criteria, the Company has not maintained effective internal control over financial reporting as of April 30, 2005, based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (“COSO”).
-s- KPMG
Kansas City, Missouri
July 29, 2005
 
REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM ...
To the Board of Directors and Shareholders of H&R Block, Inc.:
   In our opinion, the accompanying consolidated statements of income and comprehensive income, of cash flows and of stockholders’ equity present fairly, in all material respects, the results of operations and cash flows of H&R Block, Inc. and its subsidiaries (the “Company”) for the year ended April 30, 2003 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management; our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit of these statements in accordance with standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, and evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
   As described in Note 2, the financial statements have been restated for the year ended April 30, 2003.
-s- PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
June 10, 2003, except for Note 2
as to which the date is July 29, 2005
Kansas City, Missouri
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CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME AND
                                 
    (Amounts in 000s, except per share amounts)    
 
    Restated(1)   Restated(1)    
Year ended April 30,   2005   2004   2003    
 
REVENUES ...
                           
 
Service revenues
  $ 2,920,586     $ 2,639,367     $ 2,295,936      
 
Other revenues:
                           
   
Gains on sales of mortgage assets, net
    822,075       918,297       827,127      
   
Product and other revenues
    478,443       460,421       412,995      
   
Interest income
    198,915       229,795       195,068      
     
      4,420,019       4,247,880       3,731,126      
     
OPERATING EXPENSES ...
                           
 
Cost of service revenues
    1,999,220       1,794,501       1,625,937      
 
Cost of other revenues
    416,421       380,365       300,749      
 
Impairment of goodwill
                122,251      
 
Selling, general and administrative
    952,125       848,675       760,864      
     
      3,367,766       3,023,541       2,809,801      
     
Operating income
    1,052,253       1,224,339       921,325      
Interest expense
    62,367       71,218       76,723      
Other income, net
    27,829       9,854       10,962      
     
Income before taxes
    1,017,715       1,162,975       855,564      
Income taxes
    381,858       447,367       377,949      
     
Net income before change in accounting principle
    635,857       715,608       477,615      
Cumulative effect of change in accounting principle
for multiple deliverable revenue arrangements,
less tax benefit of $4,031
          (6,359 )          
     
NET INCOME
  $ 635,857     $ 709,249     $ 477,615      
     
BASIC EARNINGS PER SHARE ...
                           
 
Before change in accounting principle
  $ 3.83     $ 4.04     $ 2.66      
 
Cumulative effect of change in accounting principle
          (.03 )          
     
 
Net income
  $ 3.83     $ 4.01     $ 2.66      
     
DILUTED EARNINGS PER SHARE ...
                           
 
Before change in accounting principle
  $ 3.77     $ 3.96     $ 2.59      
 
Cumulative effect of change in accounting principle
          (.04 )          
     
 
Net income
  $ 3.77     $ 3.92     $ 2.59      
     
COMPREHENSIVE INCOME ...
                           
 
Net income
  $ 635,857     $ 709,249     $ 477,615      
 
Unrealized gains on securities, net of taxes:
                           
   
Unrealized holding gains arising during the period, less
taxes of $36,670, $64,174, and $70,983
    59,409       103,886       114,885      
   
Reclassification adjustment for gains included in income, less
taxes of $40,661, $67,561 and $72,370
    (65,848 )     (109,385 )     (117,073 )    
 
Change in foreign currency translation adjustments
    8,946       12,355       17,415      
     
    $ 638,364     $ 716,105     $ 492,842      
     
 
See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.
(1)  See note 2.
46  


Table of Contents


H&R BLOCK 2005 Form 10K


 
                         
(Amounts in 000s, except share and per share amounts)    
 
    Restated(1)    
April 30,   2005   2004    
 

ASSETS
                   
CURRENT ASSETS ...
                   
 
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 1,100,213     $ 1,072,745      
 
Cash and cash equivalents – restricted
    516,909       545,428      
 
Receivables from customers, brokers, dealers and clearing organizations, less allowance for doubtful accounts of $1,151 and $1,103
    590,226       625,076      
 
Receivables, less allowance for doubtful accounts of $38,879 and $53,418
    418,788       329,219      
 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
    444,498       381,024      
     
   
Total current assets
    3,070,634       2,953,492      
 
Residual interests in securitizations – available-for-sale
    205,936       210,973      
 
Beneficial interest in Trusts – trading
    215,367       153,818      
 
Mortgage servicing rights
    166,614       113,821      
 
Property and equipment, net
    330,150       273,303      
 
Intangible assets, net
    247,092       293,477      
 
Goodwill, net
    1,015,947       993,467      
 
Other assets
    287,543       240,381      
     
   
Total assets
  $ 5,539,283     $ 5,232,732      
     

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
                   
LIABILITIES ...
                   
 
Current portion of long-term debt
  $ 25,545     $ 275,669      
 
Accounts payable to customers, brokers and dealers
    950,684       1,065,793      
 
Accounts payable, accrued expenses and other
    564,749       461,640      
 
Accrued salaries, wages and payroll taxes
    318,644       280,367      
 
Accrued income taxes
    349,298       413,868      
     
   
Total current liabilities
    2,208,920       2,497,337      
 
Long-term debt
    923,073       545,811      
 
Other noncurrent liabilities
    430,919       369,769      
     
   
Total liabilities
    3,562,912       3,412,917      
     
COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
                   
STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY ...
                   
 
Common stock, no par, stated value $.01 per share, 800,000,000 shares authorized, 217,945,398 shares issued at April 30, 2005 and 2004
    2,179       2,179      
 
Convertible preferred stock, no par, stated value $.01 per share, 500,000 shares authorized
               
 
Additional paid-in capital
    600,568       545,065      
 
Accumulated other comprehensive income
    68,718       66,211      
 
Retained earnings
    3,188,785       2,695,916      
 
Less treasury shares, at cost
    (1,883,879 )     (1,489,556 )    
     
   
Total stockholders’ equity
    1,976,371       1,819,815      
     
   
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
  $ 5,539,283     $ 5,232,732      
     
 
See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.
(1)  See note 2.
  47


Table of Contents


H&R BLOCK 2005 Form 10K


 
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
                                     
    (Amounts in 000s)    
 
    Restated(1)   Restated(1)    
Year Ended April 30,   2005   2004   2003    
 
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES ... 
                           
 
Net income
  $ 635,857     $ 709,249     $ 477,615      
 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
                           
   
Depreciation and amortization
    183,867       179,131       169,092      
   
Provision for bad debt
    52,221       53,663       49,748      
   
Provision for deferred taxes on income
    (42,345 )     (986 )     (29,944 )    
   
Accretion of residual interests in securitizations
    (137,610 )     (186,466 )     (146,343 )    
   
Impairment of residual interests in securitizations
    12,235       26,063       54,111      
   
Realized gain on sale of previously securitized residual interests
    (15,396 )     (40,689 )     (93,307 )    
   
Additions to trading securities – residual interests in securitizations
    (115,657 )     (327,996 )     (542,544 )    
   
Proceeds from net interest margin transactions
    98,743       310,358       541,791      
   
Additions to mortgage servicing rights
    (137,510 )     (84,274 )     (65,345 )    
   
Amortization of mortgage servicing rights
    84,191       69,718       47,107      
   
Net change in beneficial interest in Trusts
    (61,549 )     (17,222 )     (84,655 )    
   
Impairment of goodwill
                122,251      
   
Tax benefit from stock option exercises
    10,961       23,957       37,304      
   
Stock-based compensation
    44,139       25,718       2,079      
   
Cumulative effect of change in accounting principle
          6,359            
   
Changes in assets and liabilities, net of acquisitions:
                           
     
Cash and cash equivalents – restricted
    28,519       (107,186 )     (286,069 )    
     
Receivables for customers, brokers dealers and clearing organizations
    33,892       (108,846 )     326,824      
     
Receivables
    (121,177 )     26,294       (72,423 )    
     
Mortgage loans held for sale:
                           
       
Originations and purchases
    (31,003,456 )     (23,255,483 )     (17,827,828 )    
       
Sales and principal repayments
    30,990,566       23,246,815       17,837,323      
     
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
    (53,858 )     26,978       43,818      
     
Accounts payable to customers, brokers and dealers
    (115,109 )     203,099       (40,507 )    
     
Accounts payable, accrued expenses and other
    113,419       (104,563 )     60,454      
     
Accrued salaries, wages and payroll taxes
    38,277       70,521       (42,911 )    
     
Accrued income taxes
    (29,906 )     93,770       111,822      
     
Other, net
    20,479       14,481       40,272      
     
       
Net cash provided by operating activities
    513,793       852,463       689,735      
     
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES ... 
                           
 
Available-for-sale securities:
                           
   
Purchases of available-for-sale securities
    (10,175 )     (11,434 )     (14,614 )    
   
Cash received from residual interests in securitizations
    136,045       193,606       140,795      
   
Cash proceeds from sale of previously securitized residuals
    16,485       53,391       142,486      
   
Sales of other available-for-sale securities
    9,752       15,410       14,081      
 
Purchases of property and equipment, net
    (209,458 )     (123,826 )     (148,706 )    
 
Payments made for business acquisitions, net of cash acquired
    (37,621 )     (280,865 )     (26,408 )    
 
Other, net
    36,562       26,332       19,895      
     
       
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities
    (58,410 )     (127,386 )     127,529      
     
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES ... 
                           
 
Repayments of commercial paper
    (5,191,623 )     (4,618,853 )     (9,925,516 )    
 
Proceeds from issuance of commercial paper
    5,191,623       4,618,853       9,925,516      
 
Repayments of Senior Notes
    (250,000 )                
 
Proceeds from issuance of Senior Notes
    395,221                  
 
Payments on acquisition debt
    (25,664 )     (59,003 )     (57,469 )    
 
Dividends paid
    (142,988 )     (138,397 )     (125,898 )    
 
Acquisition of treasury shares
    (530,022 )     (519,862 )     (317,570 )    
 
Proceeds from issuance of common stock
    136,102       119,956       126,325      
 
Other, net
    (10,564 )     31,681       (2,572 )    
     
       
Net cash used in financing activities
    (427,915 )     (565,625 )     (377,184 )    
     
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents
    27,468       159,452       440,080      
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the year
    1,072,745       913,293       473,213      
     
Cash and cash equivalents at end of the year
  $ 1,100,213     $ 1,072,745     $ 913,293      
     
 
See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.
(1)  See note 2.
48  


Table of Contents


H&R BLOCK 2005 Form 10K


 
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
                                                                                       
    (Amounts in 000s, except per share amounts)    
 
        Convertible   Accumulated            
    Common Stock   Preferred Stock   Additional   Other       Treasury Stock    
            Paid-In   Comprehensive   Retained       Total    
    Shares   Amount   Shares   Amount   Capital   Income (Loss)   Earnings   Shares   Amount   Equity    
 
Balances at April 30, 2002 (1)
    217,945     $ 2,179           $     $ 468,052     $ 44,128     $ 1,767,702       (36,820 )   $ (912,641 )   $ 1,369,420      
Prior year adjustment (2)
                                        5,645                   5,645      
     
Balances at April 30, 2002 (2)
    217,945       2,179                   468,052       44,128       1,773,347       (36,820 )     (912,641 )     1,375,065      
Net income (2)
                                        477,615                   477,615      
Unrealized translation gain
                                  17,415                         17,415      
Change in net unrealized gain on marketable securities (2)
                                  (2,188 )                       (2,188 )    
Shares issued for:
                                                                                   
 
Stock options
                            27,241                   5,070       135,409       162,650      
 
Restricted shares
                            5                   (64 )     (1,306 )     (1,301 )    
 
ESPP
                            1,095                   94       2,515       3,610      
Acquisition of treasury shares
                                              (6,624 )     (317,570 )     (317,570 )    
Cash dividends paid – $.70 per share
                                        (125,898 )                 (125,898 )    
     
Balances at April 30, 2003 (2)
    217,945       2,179                   496,393       59,355       2,125,064       (38,344 )     (1,093,593 )     1,589,398      
Net income (2)
                                        709,249                   709,249      
Unrealized translation gain
                                  12,355                         12,355      
Change in net unrealized gain on marketable securities (2)
                                  (5,499 )                       (5,499 )    
Stock-based compensation expense
                            25,718                               25,718      
Shares issued for:
                                                                                   
 
Stock options
                            21,585                   3,928       117,975       139,560      
 
Restricted shares
                            385                   72       2,103       2,488      
 
ESPP
                            984                   127       3,821       4,805      
Acquisition of treasury shares
                                              (10,633 )     (519,862 )     (519,862 )    
Cash dividends paid – $.78 per share
                                        (138,397 )                 (138,397 )    
     
Balances at April 30, 2004 (2)
    217,945       2,179                   545,065       66,211       2,695,916       (44,850 )     (1,489,556 )     1,819,815      
Net income
                                        635,857                   635,857      
Unrealized translation gain
                                  8,946                         8,946      
Change in net unrealized gain on marketable securities
                                  (6,439 )                       (6,439 )    
Stock-based compensation expense
                            44,139                               44,139      
Shares issued for:
                                                                                   
 
Stock options
                            15,892                   3,479       124,263       140,155      
 
Restricted shares
                            (5,718 )                 176       6,098       380      
 
ESPP
                            1,190                   151       5,338       6,528      
Acquisition of treasury shares
                                              (11,281 )     (530,022 )     (530,022 )    
Cash dividends paid – $.86 per share
                                        (142,988 )                 (142,988 )    
     
Balances at April 30, 2005
    217,945     $ 2,179           $     $ 600,568     $ 68,718     $ 3,188,785       (52,325 )   $ (1,883,879 )   $ 1,976,371      
     
 
See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.
(1)  As previously reported.
(2)  As restated, see note 2.
  49


Table of Contents


H&R BLOCK 2005 Form 10K


 
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
NOTE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
NATURE OF OPERATIONS ... Our operating subsidiaries provide a variety of financial services to the general public, principally in the U.S. Specifically, we offer tax return preparation; origination, sale and servicing of non-prime and prime mortgages; investment services through a broker-dealer; tax preparation and related software; refund anticipation loans offered by a third-party lending institution; and accounting, tax and consulting services to business clients. Tax preparation services are also provided in Canada, Australia and the United Kingdom.
   PRINCIPLES OF CONSOLIDATION ... The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and our wholly-owned and majority-owned subsidiaries. All material intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated.
   Some of our subsidiaries operate in regulated industries, and their underlying accounting records reflect the policies and requirements of these industries.
   RECLASSIFICATIONS ... Certain reclassifications have been made to prior year amounts to conform to the current year presentation. The previously reported International Tax Operations segment has been aggregated with U.S. Tax Operations in the Tax Services segment.
   We have modified our income statement to present aggregate costs related to our revenue categories, rather than presenting operating expenses by their natural classification. All direct costs, both fixed and variable, of revenues are included in these categories.
   We reclassified $167.7 million and $103.3 million for fiscal years 2004 and 2003, respectively, from interest income to gain on sale, representing excess cash received from our beneficial interest in Trusts. The beneficial interest in Trusts is reported at fair value at each balance sheet date. Changes in its fair value are included in current period earnings. The excess cash received together with the and mark-to-market adjustment for each period have been classified as gain on sale of mortgage loans. We also increased gains on sales of mortgage for fiscal years 2004 and 2003, related to the reclassification of certain compensation and benefits expenses previously presented net in revenues.
   Deferred taxes and taxes payable have been reclassified for a change in method of income tax reporting we initiated during fiscal year 2004 resulting in a decrease to total assets and liabilities of $101.3 million at April 30, 2004.
   These reclassifications had no effect on the results of operations or stockholders’ equity as previously reported. Adjustments related to the restatement of previously issued financial statements are detailed in note 2.
   MANAGEMENT ESTIMATES ... The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting periods. Actual results could differ from those estimates.
   CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS ... Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand, cash due from banks and securities purchased under agreements to resell. For purposes of the consolidated balance sheets and consolidated statements of cash flows, all non-restricted