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H&R Block 10-Q 2009
10-Q
Table of Contents

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
 
 
 
 
     
(Mark One)    
[X]
  QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
    For the quarterly period ended January 31, 2009
OR
[  ]
  TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE
SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
    For the transition period from          to          
 
 
Commission file number 1-6089
 
(H & R BLOCK LOGO)
 
H&R BLOCK, Inc.
 
     
MISSOURI
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  44-0607856
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
 
One H&R Block Way
Kansas City, Missouri 64105
(Address of principal executive offices, including zip code)
 
(816) 854-3000
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
 
Yes   Ö    No        
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one) :
 
             
Large accelerated filer Ö 
  Accelerated filer        Non-accelerated filer         Smaller Reporting company     
     
    (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).
 
Yes          No   Ö  
 
The number of shares outstanding of the registrant’s Common Stock, without par value, at the close of business on February 28, 2009 was 339,666,500 shares.


Table of Contents

 
(H & R BLOCK LOGO)
 
Form 10-Q for the Period Ended January 31, 2009
 
 
 
             
        Page
 
           
PART I
 
Financial Information
       
           
      1  
           
        2  
           
        3  
           
        4  
           
        5  
           
      25  
           
      37  
           
      37  
           
PART II          
           
      38  
           
      41  
           
      42  
           
      42  
       
    43  
 
 EX-10.1
 EX-10.2
 EX-10.3
 EX-10.4
 EX-31.1
 EX-31.2
 EX-32.1
 EX-32.2


Table of Contents

 
(H & R BLOCK LOGO)
 
 
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS (amounts in 000s, except share and per share amounts)
 
                 
    January 31, 2009     April 30, 2008  
 
    (Unaudited)        
 
ASSETS
               
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 1,269,203     $ 664,897  
Cash and cash equivalents – restricted
    75,893       7,031  
Receivables, less allowance for doubtful accounts
of $85,327 and $120,155
    2,642,951       534,229  
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
    425,042       420,738  
Assets of discontinued operations, held for sale
    -       987,592  
                 
Total current assets
    4,413,089       2,614,487  
Mortgage loans held for investment, less allowance
for loan losses of $75,615 and $45,401
    781,755       966,301  
Property and equipment, at cost, less accumulated depreciation and amortization of $642,220 and $620,460
    383,704       363,664  
Intangible assets, net
    394,106       147,368  
Goodwill
    848,443       831,314  
Other assets
    480,795       700,291  
                 
Total assets
  $ 7,301,892     $ 5,623,425  
                 
                 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY                
Liabilities:
               
Short-term borrowings
  $ 690,485     $ -  
Customer banking deposits
    2,115,708       785,624  
Accounts payable, accrued expenses and other current liabilities
    734,755       739,887  
Accrued salaries, wages and payroll taxes
    206,959       365,712  
Accrued income taxes
    143,791       439,380  
Current portion of long-term debt
    9,030       7,286  
Federal Home Loan Bank borrowings
    104,000       129,000  
Liabilities of discontinued operations, held for sale
    -       644,446  
                 
Total current liabilities
    4,004,728       3,111,335  
Long-term debt
    2,002,647       1,031,784  
Other noncurrent liabilities
    454,512       492,488  
                 
Total liabilities
    6,461,887       4,635,607  
                 
Commitments and contingencies
               
Stockholders’ equity:
               
Common stock, no par, stated value $.01 per share,
800,000,000 shares authorized,
shares issued of 444,176,510 and 435,890,796
    4,442       4,359  
Additional paid-in capital
    835,329       695,959  
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)
    (16,614 )     2,486  
Retained earnings
    2,015,650       2,384,449  
Less treasury shares, at cost
    (1,998,802 )     (2,099,435 )
                 
Total stockholders’ equity
    840,005       987,818  
                 
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
  $ 7,301,892     $ 5,623,425  
                 
 
See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements


1


Table of Contents

 
(H & R BLOCK LOGO)
 
 
 
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF
OPERATIONS AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)
(unaudited, amounts in 000s,
except per share amounts)
 
                                 
    Three Months Ended January 31,     Nine Months Ended January 31,  
    2009     2008     2009     2008  
 
 
Revenues:
                               
Service revenues
  $ 799,687     $ 710,250     $ 1,356,744     $ 1,267,924  
Other revenues:
                               
Product and other revenues
    135,155       137,444       166,582       176,232  
Interest income
    58,604       47,110       93,498       101,358  
                                 
      993,446       894,804       1,616,824       1,545,514  
                                 
Operating expenses:
                               
Cost of services
    572,854       552,807       1,272,762       1,264,880  
Cost of other revenues
    111,713       96,234       216,890       194,929  
Selling, general and administrative
    208,814       247,320       464,054       514,403  
                                 
      893,381       896,361       1,953,706       1,974,212  
                                 
Operating income (loss)
    100,065       (1,557 )     (336,882 )     (428,698 )
Other income (expense), net
    1,674       1,973       (1,802 )     19,792  
                                 
Income (loss) from continuing operations before income taxes (benefit)
    101,739       416       (338,684 )     (408,906 )
Income taxes (benefit)
    34,909       (6,674 )     (143,930 )     (168,893 )
                                 
Net income (loss) from continuing operations
    66,830       7,090       (194,754 )     (240,013 )
Net loss from discontinued operations
    (19,467 )     (54,448 )     (26,476 )     (612,196 )
                                 
Net income (loss)
  $ 47,363     $ (47,358 )   $ (221,230 )   $ (852,209 )
                                 
Basic earnings (loss) per share:
                               
Net income (loss) from continuing operations
  $ 0.20     $ 0.02     $ (0.59 )   $ (0.74 )
Net loss from discontinued operations
    (0.06 )     (0.17 )     (0.08 )     (1.89 )
                                 
Net income (loss)
  $ 0.14     $ (0.15 )   $ (0.67 )   $ (2.63 )
                                 
Basic shares
    337,338       325,074       331,429       324,544  
                                 
Diluted earnings (loss) per share:
                               
Net income (loss) from continuing operations
  $ 0.20     $ 0.02     $ (0.59 )   $ (0.74 )
Net loss from discontinued operations
    (0.06 )     (0.16 )     (0.08 )     (1.89 )
                                 
Net income (loss)
  $ 0.14     $ (0.14 )   $ (0.67 )   $ (2.63 )
                                 
Diluted shares
    338,687       327,202       331,429       324,544  
                                 
Dividends per share
  $ 0.15     $ 0.14     $ 0.44     $ 0.42  
                                 
Comprehensive income (loss):
                               
Net income (loss)
  $ 47,363     $ (47,358 )   $ (221,230 )   $ (852,209 )
Change in unrealized gain on available-for-sale securities, net
    (1,707 )     381       (4,271 )     1,544  
Change in foreign currency translation adjustments
    (3,671 )     (1,860 )     (14,829 )     (572 )
                                 
Comprehensive income (loss)
  $ 41,985     $ (48,837 )   $ (240,330 )   $ (851,237 )
                                 
 
See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements


2


Table of Contents

 
(H & R BLOCK LOGO)
 
 
 
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS (unaudited, amounts in 000s)
 
                 
Nine Months Ended January 31,   2009     2008  
 
 
Cash flows from operating activities:
               
Net loss
  $ (221,230 )   $ (852,209 )
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:
               
Depreciation and amortization
    90,455       82,710  
Stock-based compensation
    20,364       30,131  
Change in participation in tax client loans receivable
    (1,048,993 )     (1,693,506 )
Operating cash flows of discontinued operations
    99,425       (34,297 )
Other, net of business acquisitions
    (1,363,583 )     (872,946 )
                 
Net cash used in operating activities
    (2,423,562 )     (3,340,117 )
                 
Cash flows from investing activities:
               
Principal repayments on mortgage loans held for investment, net
    72,150       106,721  
Purchases of property and equipment, net
    (73,913 )     (77,226 )
Payments made for business acquisitions, net of cash acquired
    (290,868 )     (23,835 )
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities of discontinued operations:
               
Proceeds from sale of operating unit, net
    303,983       -  
Other
    (48,917 )     (1,675 )
Other, net
    23,839       7,382  
                 
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities
    (13,726 )     11,367  
                 
Cash flows from financing activities:
               
Repayments of commercial paper
    -       (5,125,279 )
Proceeds from issuance of commercial paper
    -       4,133,197  
Repayments of other short-term borrowings
    (928,983 )     (2,161,177 )
Proceeds from other short-term borrowings
    2,565,281       5,097,662  
Proceeds from issuance of Senior Notes
    -       599,376  
Customer deposits, net
    1,326,584       828,872  
Dividends paid
    (147,569 )     (137,049 )
Acquisition of treasury shares
    (7,387 )     (7,237 )
Proceeds from exercise of stock options
    69,891       14,527  
Proceeds from issuance of common stock, net
    141,450       -  
Net cash provided by financing activities of discontinued operations
    4,783       634,208  
Other, net
    17,544       (32,331 )
                 
Net cash provided by financing activities
    3,041,594       3,844,769  
                 
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents
    604,306       516,019  
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the period
    664,897       816,917  
                 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of the period
  $ 1,269,203     $ 1,332,936  
                 
Supplementary cash flow data:
               
Income taxes paid, net of refunds received of $156,522 and $89,865
  $ (13,006 )   $ (55,975 )
Interest paid on borrowings
    70,891       129,694  
Interest paid on deposits
    11,484       39,498  
Non-cash investing activities:
               
Foreclosed assets
    62,774       -  
 
See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements


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Table of Contents

 
(H & R BLOCK LOGO)
 
 
 
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF
STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
(unaudited, amounts in 000s,
except per share amounts)
 
                                                                                 
                                  Accumulated
                         
                Convertible
    Additional
    Other
                         
    Common Stock     Preferred Stock     Paid-in
    Comprehensive
    Retained
    Treasury Stock     Total
 
    Shares     Amount     Shares     Amount     Capital     Income (Loss)     Earnings     Shares     Amount     Equity  
 
 
Balances at April 30, 2007
    435,891     $ 4,359       -     $ -     $ 676,766     $ (1,320 )   $ 2,886,440       (112,672 )   $ (2,151,746 )   $ 1,414,499  
Remeasurement of uncertain tax positions upon adoption of FIN 48
    -       -       -       -       -       -       (9,716 )     -       -       (9,716 )
Net loss
    -       -       -       -       -       -       (852,209 )     -       -       (852,209 )
Unrealized translation loss
    -       -       -       -       -       (572 )     -       -       -       (572 )
Change in net unrealized gain on available-for-sale securities
    -       -       -       -       -       1,544       -       -       -       1,544  
Stock-based compensation
    -       -       -       -       37,150       -       -       -       -       37,150  
Shares issued for:
                                                                               
Option exercises
    -       -       -       -       (8,815 )     -       -       1,072       20,478       11,663  
Nonvested shares
    -       -       -       -       (20,058 )     -       -       938       17,917       (2,141 )
ESPP
    -       -       -       -       (65 )     -       -       412       7,872       7,807  
Acquisitions
    -       -       -       -       35       -       -       8       158       193  
Acquisition of treasury shares
    -       -       -       -       -       -       -       (325 )     (7,237 )     (7,237 )
Cash dividends paid — $0.42 per share
    -       -       -       -       -       -       (137,049 )     -       -       (137,049 )
                                                                                 
Balances at January 31, 2008
    435,891     $ 4,359       -     $ -     $ 685,013     $ (348 )   $ 1,887,466       (110,567 )   $ (2,112,558 )   $ 463,932  
                                                                                 
Balances at April 30, 2008
    435,891     $ 4,359       -     $ -     $ 695,959     $ 2,486     $ 2,384,449       (109,880 )   $ (2,099,435 )   $ 987,818  
Net loss
    -       -       -       -       -       -       (221,230 )     -       -       (221,230 )
Unrealized translation loss
    -       -       -       -       -       (14,829 )     -       -       -       (14,829 )
Change in net unrealized gain on available-for-sale securities
    -       -       -       -       -       (4,271 )     -       -       -       (4,271 )
Proceeds from common stock issuance, net of expenses
    8,286       83       -       -       141,367       -       -       -       -       141,450  
Stock-based compensation-
            -       -       -       25,769       -       -       -       -       25,769  
Shares issued for:
                                                                               
Option exercises
    -       -       -       -       (7,023 )     -       -       4,341       82,954       75,931  
Nonvested shares
    -       -       -       -       (20,345 )     -       -       1,011       19,326       (1,019 )
ESPP
    -       -       -       -       (423 )     -       -       292       5,577       5,154  
Acquisitions
    -       -       -       -       25       -       -       9       163       188  
Acquisition of treasury shares
    -       -       -       -       -       -       -       (355 )     (7,387 )     (7,387 )
Cash dividends paid — $0.44 per share
    -       -       -       -       -       -       (147,569 )     -       -       (147,569 )
                                                                                 
Balances at January 31, 2009
    444,177     $ 4,442       -     $ -     $ 835,329     $ (16,614 )   $ 2,015,650       (104,582 )   $ (1,998,802 )   $ 840,005  
                                                                                 
 
See Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements


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Table of Contents

 
 
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (unaudited)
 
1.  Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
 
Basis of Presentation
The condensed consolidated balance sheet as of January 31, 2009, the condensed consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income (loss) for the three and nine months ended January 31, 2009 and 2008, the condensed consolidated statements of cash flows for the nine months ended January 31, 2009 and 2008, and the condensed consolidated statements of stockholders’ equity for the nine months ended January 31, 2009 and 2008 have been prepared by the Company, without audit. In the opinion of management, all adjustments, which include only normal recurring adjustments, necessary to present fairly the financial position, results of operations, cash flows and changes in stockholders’ equity at January 31, 2009 and for all periods presented have been made.
“H&R Block,” “the Company,” “we,” “our” and “us” are used interchangeably to refer to H&R Block, Inc. or to H&R Block, Inc. and its subsidiaries, as appropriate to the context.
Certain reclassifications have been made to prior year amounts to conform to the current year presentation. These reclassifications had no effect on our results of operations or stockholders’ equity as previously reported. Effective November 1, 2008, we sold H&R Block Financial Advisors, Inc. (HRBFA) to Ameriprise Financial, Inc. (Ameriprise). As of January 31, 2009, HRBFA and its direct corporate parent are presented as discontinued operations in the condensed consolidated financial statements. All periods presented have been reclassified to reflect our discontinued operations. See additional discussion in note 17.
Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles have been condensed or omitted. These condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and notes thereto included in our April 30, 2008 Annual Report to Shareholders on Form 10-K. All amounts presented herein as of April 30, 2008 or for the year then ended, are derived from our April 30, 2008 Annual Report to Shareholders on Form 10-K.
 
Management Estimates
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting periods. Actual results could differ from those estimates.
 
Seasonality of Business
Our operating revenues are seasonal in nature with peak revenues occurring in the months of January through April. Therefore, results for interim periods are not indicative of results to be expected for the full year.
 
Concentrations of Risk
Cash deposits in bank accounts in excess of insured or guaranteed limits are exposed to loss in the event of nonperformance by the financial institution. We had cash deposits in excess of these limits of approximately $30 million at January 31, 2009. We have not historically experienced any losses on bank deposits. In addition to cash deposits with financial institutions, we had investments totaling approximately $1 billion and $110 million in federal funds sold and money market funds, respectively, at January 31, 2009.
Our mortgage loans held for investment include concentrations of loans to borrowers in certain states, which may result in increased exposure to loss as a result of changes in real estate values and underlying economic or market conditions related to a particular geographical location. Approximately 50% of our mortgage loan portfolio consists of loans to borrowers located in the states of Florida, California and New York.


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Table of Contents

2.  Earnings (Loss) Per Share and Stockholders’ Equity
Basic and diluted loss per share is computed using the weighted average shares outstanding during each period. The dilutive effect of potential common shares is included in diluted earnings per share except in those periods with a loss from continuing operations. The computations of basic and diluted earnings (loss) per share from continuing operations are as follows:
                                 
                (in 000s, except
 
                per share amounts)  
   
    Three Months Ended
    Nine Months Ended
 
    January 31,     January 31,  
   
    2009     2008     2009     2008  
   
 
Net income (loss) from continuing operations
  $ 66,830     $ 7,090     $ (194,754 )   $ (240,013 )
                                 
Basic weighted average common shares
    337,338       325,074       331,429       324,544  
Potential dilutive shares from stock options and nonvested shares
    1,347       2,126       -       -  
Convertible preferred stock
    2       2       -       -  
                                 
Dilutive weighted average common shares
    338,687       327,202       331,429       324,544  
                                 
Earnings (loss) per share from continuing operations:
                               
Basic
  $ 0.20     $ 0.02     $ (0.59 )   $ (0.74 )
Diluted
    0.20       0.02       (0.59 )     (0.74 )
 
 
Diluted earnings per share excludes the impact of shares of common stock issuable upon the lapse of certain restrictions or the exercise of options to purchase 16.0 million shares and 18.0 million shares for the three months ended January 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively, as the effect would be antidilutive. Diluted earnings per share excludes the impact of shares of common stock issuable upon the lapse of certain restrictions or the exercise of options to purchase 20.2 million shares and 24.8 million shares for the nine months ended January 31, 2009 and 2008, respectively, as the effect would be antidilutive due to the net loss from continuing operations during each period.
The weighted average shares outstanding for the three and nine months ended January 31, 2009 increased to 337.3 million and 331.4 million, respectively, from 325.1 million and 324.5 million for the three and nine months ended January 31, 2008, respectively, primarily due to the issuance of shares of our common stock in October 2008. On October 27, 2008, we sold 8.3 million shares of our common stock, without par value, at a price of $17.50 per share in a registered direct offering through subscription agreements with selected institutional investors. We received net proceeds of $141.5 million, after deducting placement agent fees and other offering expenses.
During the nine months ended January 31, 2009 and 2008, we issued 5.7 million and 2.4 million shares of common stock, respectively, due to the exercise of stock options, employee stock purchases and vesting of nonvested shares.
During the nine months ended January 31, 2009, we acquired 0.4 million shares of our common stock, which represent shares swapped or surrendered to us in connection with the vesting of nonvested shares and the exercise of stock options, at an aggregate cost of $7.4 million. During the nine months ended January 31, 2008, we acquired 0.3 million shares of our common stock, which represent shares swapped or surrendered to us in connection with the vesting of nonvested shares and the exercise of stock options, at an aggregate cost of $7.2 million.
During the nine months ended January 31, 2009, we granted 5.1 million stock options and 1.0 million nonvested shares and units in accordance with our stock-based compensation plans. The weighted average fair value of options granted was $3.80 for manager options and $2.83 for options granted to our seasonal associates. At January 31, 2009, the total unrecognized compensation cost for options and nonvested shares and units was $12.2 million and $17.5 million, respectively.
 
3.  Business Combinations
Effective November 3, 2008, we acquired the assets and franchise rights of our last major independent franchise operator for an aggregate purchase price of $278.6 million. Results related to the acquired business have been included in our condensed consolidated financial statements since November 3, 2008. Pro forma results of operations have not been presented as the effects of this acquisition were not material


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to our results. The accompanying balance sheet reflects a preliminary allocation of the purchase price to assets acquired and liabilities assumed as follows:
 
             
    (in 000s)
 
 
Property and equipment
  $ 6,169      
Goodwill
    16,062      
Reacquired franchise rights
    177,386      
Franchise agreements
    54,977      
Customer relationships
    24,264      
Noncompete agreements
    756      
Other
    735      
Liabilities
    (1,740 )    
             
    $ 278,609      
             
 
 
Goodwill recognized in this transaction is included in the Tax Services segment and is deductible for tax purposes.
 
4.  Receivables
Receivables related to our continuing operations consist of the following:
 
                         
                (in 000s)  
   
    January 31, 2009     January 31, 2008     April 30, 2008  
   
 
Participation in tax client loans
  $ 1,122,347     $ 1,763,030     $ 73,354  
Emerald Advance lines of credit
    688,663       361,263       5,115  
Business Services accounts receivable
    335,893       257,010       320,377  
Receivables for tax-related fees
    309,379       117,328       47,301  
Royalties from franchisees
    80,603       68,573       1,784  
Loans to franchisees
    66,317       71,349       53,536  
Other
    125,076       119,740       152,917  
                         
      2,728,278       2,758,293       654,384  
Allowance for doubtful accounts
    (85,327 )     (78,847 )     (120,155 )
                         
    $ 2,642,951     $ 2,679,446     $ 534,229  
                         
 
 
 
5.  Mortgage Loans Held for Investment
The composition of our mortgage loan portfolio as of January 31, 2009 and April 30, 2008 is as follows:
 
                                 
                      (dollars in 000s)  
   
    January 31, 2009     April 30, 2008  
   
    Amount     % of Total     Amount     % of Total  
   
 
Adjustable-rate loans
  $ 566,475       67 %   $ 715,919       71 %
Fixed-rate loans
    284,727       33 %     288,721       29 %
                                 
      851,202       100 %     1,004,640       100 %
Unamortized deferred fees and costs
    6,168               7,062          
Less: Allowance for loan losses
    (75,615 )             (45,401 )        
                                 
    $ 781,755             $ 966,301          
                                 
 
 
Activity in the allowance for mortgage loan losses for the nine months ended January 31, 2009 and 2008 is as follows:
(in 000s)
                     
 
Nine Months Ended January 31,   2009     2008      
 
 
Balance at beginning of the period
  $ 45,401     $ 3,448      
Provision
    51,953       12,345      
Recoveries
    50       999      
Charge-offs
    (21,789 )     (932 )    
                     
Balance at end of the period
  $ 75,615     $ 15,860      
                     
 
 


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The loan loss provision increased significantly during the current period as a result of declining collateral values due to a decline in residential home prices, and increasing delinquencies occurring in our portfolio. Our loan loss reserve as a percent of mortgage loans was 8.82% at January 31, 2009, compared to 4.49% at April 30, 2008.
In cases where we modify a loan and in so doing grant a concession to a borrower experiencing financial difficulty, the modification is considered a troubled debt restructuring (TDR). TDR loans totaled $153.7 million and $37.2 million at January 31, 2009 and April 30, 2008, respectively.
Loans 60 days past due are considered impaired. Impaired and TDR loans at January 31, 2009 and April 30, 2008 totaled $258.2 million and $128.9 million, respectively.
 
6.  Goodwill and Intangible Assets
Changes in the carrying amount of goodwill of continuing operations for the nine months ended January 31, 2009 consist of the following:
(in 000s)
                                         
   
    April 30, 2008     Additions     Impairment     Other     January 31, 2009  
   
 
Tax Services
  $ 431,981     $ 19,820     $ (2,188 )   $ (3,506 )   $ 446,107  
Business Services
    399,333       3,003       -       -       402,336  
                                         
Total
  $ 831,314     $ 22,823     $ (2,188 )   $ (3,506 )   $ 848,443  
                                         
 
 
We test goodwill for impairment annually at the beginning of our fourth quarter, or more frequently if events occur indicating it is more likely than not the fair value of a reporting unit’s net assets has been reduced below its carrying value.
During the nine months ended January 31, 2009, we recorded a $2.2 million impairment in our Tax Services segment relating to the goodwill of a small digital business acquired in fiscal year 2005. No other events indicating possible impairment of goodwill were identified during the nine months ended January 31, 2009.
Intangible assets of continuing operations consist of the following:
                                                 
(in 000s)  
   
    January 31, 2009     April 30, 2008  
   
    Gross
                Gross
             
    Carrying
    Accumulated
          Carrying
    Accumulated
       
    Amount     Amortization     Net     Amount     Amortization     Net  
   
 
Tax Services:
                                               
Customer relationships
  $ 72,535     $ (24,462 )   $ 48,073     $ 46,479     $ (22,007 )   $ 24,472  
Noncompete agreements
    23,261       (20,587 )     2,674       22,966       (19,981 )     2,985  
Reacquired franchise rights
    177,386       -       177,386       -       -       -  
Franchise agreements
    54,977       (611 )     54,366       -       -       -  
Purchased technology
    12,500       (3,751 )     8,749       12,500       (2,283 )     10,217  
Trade name
    1,025       (192 )     833       1,025       (117 )     908  
Business Services:
                                               
Customer relationships
    146,040       (108,508 )     37,532       143,402       (100,346 )     43,056  
Noncompete agreements
    33,068       (19,344 )     13,724       32,303       (17,589 )     14,714  
Trade name – amortizing
    2,600       (2,600 )     -       3,290       (3,043 )     247  
Trade name – non-amortizing
    55,637       (4,868 )     50,769       55,637       (4,868 )     50,769  
                                                 
    $ 579,029     $ (184,923 )   $ 394,106     $ 317,602     $ (170,234 )   $ 147,368  
                                                 
 
 
Amortization of intangible assets of continuing operations for the three and nine months ended January 31, 2009 was $6.8 million and $20.4 million, respectively, and $5.5 million and $17.7 million for the three and nine months ended January 31, 2008, respectively. Estimated amortization of intangible assets for fiscal years 2009 through 2013 is $26.8 million, $29.9 million, $28.0 million, $25.2 million and $21.1 million, respectively.


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7.  Borrowings
Borrowings of continuing operations consist of the following:
(in 000s)
                         
   
    January 31, 2009     January 31, 2008     April 30, 2008  
   
 
Short-term borrowings:
                       
HSBC credit facility
  $ 690,485     $ 1,683,317     $ -  
Other credit facilities
    -       28,168       -  
                         
    $ 690,485     $ 1,711,485     $ -  
                         
Long-term borrowings:
                       
CLOC borrowings, due August 2010
  $ 970,813     $ 1,800,000     $ -  
Senior Notes, 7.875%, due January 2013
    599,507       599,383       599,414  
Senior Notes, 5.125%, due October 2014
    398,648       398,412       398,471  
Other
    42,709       23,948       41,185  
                         
      2,011,677       2,821,743       1,039,070  
Less: Current portion
    (9,030 )     (8,332 )     (7,286 )
                         
    $ 2,002,647     $ 2,813,411     $ 1,031,784  
                         
 
 
At January 31, 2009, we maintained $2.0 billion in revolving credit facilities to support commercial paper issuance and for general corporate purposes. These unsecured committed lines of credit (CLOCs), and outstanding borrowings thereunder, have a maturity date of August 2010 and an annual facility fee in a range of six to fifteen basis points per annum, based on our credit ratings. We had $970.8 million outstanding as of January 31, 2009 to support working capital requirements primarily arising from off-season operating losses, to pay dividends and acquire businesses. These borrowings are included in long-term debt on our condensed consolidated balance sheet due to their contractual maturity date. The CLOCs, among other things, require we maintain at least $650.0 million of net worth on the last day of any fiscal quarter. We had net worth of $840.0 million at January 31, 2009.
Lehman Brothers Bank, FSB (Lehman) is a participating lender in our $2.0 billion CLOCs, with a $50.0 million credit commitment. In September 2008, Lehman’s parent company declared bankruptcy. Since then, Lehman has not honored any funding requests under these facilities, thereby effectively reducing our available liquidity under our CLOCs to $1.95 billion. We do not expect this change to have a material impact on our liquidity.
We entered into a committed line of credit agreement with HSBC Finance Corporation (HSBC) effective January 14, 2009 for use as a funding source for the purchase of refund anticipation loan (RAL) participations. This line provides funding totaling $2.5 billion through March 30, 2009 and $120.0 million thereafter through June 30, 2009. This line is subject to various covenants that are similar to our primary CLOCs, and is secured by our RAL participations. At January 31, 2009, there was $690.5 million outstanding on this facility. Our contract with HSBC provides for them to fund RALs through 2011, with an option to renew, at our discretion, through 2013. We have also had a contract each of the last two years under which HSBC has funded our participation interest in RALs.
H&R Block Bank (HRB Bank) is a member of the Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB) of Des Moines, which extends credit to member banks based on eligible collateral. At January 31, 2009, HRB Bank had total FHLB advance capacity of $434.1 million. There was $104.0 million outstanding on this facility, leaving remaining availability of $330.1 million. Mortgage loans held for investment of $698.6 million serve as eligible collateral and are used to determine total capacity.
 
8.  Income Taxes
We file a consolidated federal income tax return in the United States and file tax returns in various state and foreign jurisdictions. Consolidated tax returns for the years 1999 through 2007 are currently under examination by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). Tax years prior to 1999 are closed by statute. Historically, tax returns in various foreign and state jurisdictions are examined and settled upon completion of the exam.


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During the three and nine months ended January 31, 2009, we accrued an additional $2.9 million and $6.9 million, respectively, of interest and penalties related to our uncertain tax positions. We had unrecognized tax benefits of $128.3 million and $137.6 million at January 31, 2009 and April 30, 2008, respectively. The unrecognized tax benefits decreased $9.3 million in the current year, due primarily to settlement payments. We have classified the liability for unrecognized tax benefits, including corresponding accrued interest, as long-term at January 31, 2009, which is included in other noncurrent liabilities on the condensed consolidated balance sheet. Amounts that we expect to pay, or for which statutes expire, within the next twelve months have been included in accounts payable, accrued expenses and other current liabilities on the condensed consolidated balance sheet.
During the third quarter of fiscal year 2009 we received tax refunds of $156.5 million, the majority of which was recorded as a receivable included in other assets on our condensed consolidated financial statements as of April 30, 2008.
Based upon the expiration of statutes of limitations, payments of tax and other factors in several jurisdictions, we believe it is reasonably possible that the total amount of previously unrecognized tax benefits may decrease by approximately $6 to $7 million within twelve months of January 31, 2009.
 
9.  Interest Income and Expense
The following table shows the components of interest income and expense of our continuing operations. Operating interest expense is included in cost of other revenues, and interest expense on acquisition debt is included in other income (expense), net on our condensed consolidated statements of operations.
(in 000s)
                                 
   
    Three Months Ended
    Nine Months Ended
 
    January 31,     January 31,  
    2009     2008     2009     2008  
   
 
Interest income:
                               
Mortgage loans, net
  $ 11,131     $ 17,198     $ 36,494     $ 60,140  
Emerald Advance lines of credit
    43,311       19,516       44,539       19,516  
Other
    4,162       10,396       12,465       21,702  
                                 
    $ 58,604     $ 47,110     $ 93,498     $ 101,358  
                                 
Operating interest expense:
                               
Borrowings
  $ 21,623     $ 21,014     $ 60,849     $ 41,674  
Deposits
    3,719       11,464       11,646       37,928  
FHLB advances
    1,326       1,349       3,981       4,709  
                                 
      26,668       33,827       76,476       84,311  
Interest expense – acquisition debt
    392       624       1,221       1,871  
                                 
Total interest expense
  $ 27,060     $ 34,451     $ 77,697     $ 86,182  
                                 
 
 
 
10.  Fair Value
On May 1, 2008, we adopted Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 157, “Fair Value Measurements” (SFAS 157). SFAS 157 defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value and expands disclosure requirements for fair value measurements. We elected to defer the application of SFAS 157 for nonfinancial assets and nonfinancial liabilities until fiscal year 2010, as provided for by FASB Staff Position FAS 157-2, “Effective Date of FASB Statement No. 157” (FSP 157-2). The adoption of SFAS 157 did not have an impact on our consolidated results of operations or financial position.
 
Fair Value Hierarchy
SFAS 157 establishes a fair value hierarchy that prioritizes the inputs used to measure fair value into three broad levels, considering the relative reliability of the inputs, as follows:
  n      Level 1 – Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities. An active market for the asset or liability is a market in which transactions for the asset or liability occur with sufficient frequency and volume to provide pricing information on an ongoing basis.


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  n      Level 2 – Quoted prices for similar instruments in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in markets that are not active, and model-based valuations in which all significant inputs are observable in the market.
  n      Level 3 – Valuation is modeled using significant inputs that are unobservable in the market. These unobservable inputs reflect our own estimates of assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability.
 
Estimation of Fair Value
The following is a description of the valuation methodologies used for assets and liabilities measured at fair value and the general classification of these instruments pursuant to the fair value hierarchy.
  n      Available-for-sale securities – Available-for-sale securities are carried at fair value on a recurring basis. When available, fair value is based on quoted prices in an active market and as such, would be classified as Level 1. If quoted market prices are not available, fair values are estimated using quoted prices of securities with similar characteristics, discounted cash flows or other pricing models. Available-for-sale securities that we classify as Level 2 include certain agency and non-agency mortgage-backed securities, U.S. states and political subdivisions debt securities and other debt and equity securities.
  n      Mortgage loans held for sale – The fair values of loans held for sale are generally based on observable market prices of securities that have loan collateral or interests in loans that are similar to the held-for-sale loans, or whole loan sale prices if formally committed. These loans are classified as Level 2.
  n      Residual interests in securitizations – Determination of the fair value of residual interests in securitizations requires the use of unobservable inputs. We value these securities using a discounted cash flow approach that incorporates expectations of prepayment speeds and expectations of delinquencies and losses. Risk-adjusted discount rates are based on quotes from third party sources. These assets are classified as Level 3.
 
Assets and Liabilities Measured at Fair Value on a Recurring Basis
The following table presents for each hierarchy level the financial assets of our continuing operations that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis at January 31, 2009:
(dollars in 000s)
                                 
   
    Total     Level 1     Level 2     Level 3  
   
 
Available-for-sale securities
  $ 45,640     $ 2,975     $ 42,665     $ -  
Mortgage loans held for sale
    9,596       -       9,596       -  
Residual interests in securitizations
    5,122       -       -       5,122  
                                 
    $ 60,358     $ 2,975     $ 52,261     $ 5,122  
                                 
As a percentage of total assets
    0.8%       0.0%       0.7%       0.1%  
 
 
The following table presents changes in Level 3 financial assets measured at fair value on a recurring basis:
(in 000s)
                     
 
    Three Months Ended
    Nine Months Ended
     
    January 31, 2009     January 31, 2009      
 
 
Fair value, beginning of period
  $ 9,487     $ 16,678      
Losses:
                   
Included in earnings
    (931 )     (6,153 )    
Included in other comprehensive income (loss)
    (2,604 )     (2,920 )    
Cash received
    (830 )     (2,483      
                     
Fair value, end of period
  $ 5,122     $ 5,122      
                     
 
 
Mortgage loans held for sale are included in prepaid expenses and other current assets, and available-for-sale securities and residual interests in securitizations are included in other assets on our condensed consolidated balance sheets.
 
Fair Value Option
We adopted Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 159, “The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities” (SFAS 159) on May 1, 2008. SFAS 159 permits an instrument by


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instrument irrevocable election to account for selected financial assets and financial liabilities at fair value. We did not elect to apply the fair value option to any eligible financial assets or financial liabilities on May 1, 2008 or during the nine months ended January 31, 2009. Subsequent to the initial adoption, we may elect to account for selected financial assets and financial liabilities at fair value. Such an election could be made at the time an eligible financial asset, financial liability or firm commitment is recognized or when certain specified reconsideration events occur.
 
11.  Other Noncurrent Assets and Liabilities
We have deferred compensation plans that permit directors and certain employees to defer portions of their compensation and accrue income on the deferred amounts. Included in other noncurrent liabilities is $122.3 million and $155.1 million at January 31, 2009 and April 30, 2008, respectively, reflecting our obligation under these plans.
We may purchase whole-life insurance contracts on certain director and employee participants to recover distributions made or to be made under the plans. The cash surrender value of the policies and other assets held by the Deferred Compensation Trust is recorded in other noncurrent assets and totaled $112.9 million and $163.1 million at January 31, 2009 and April 30, 2008, respectively. These assets are restricted, as they are only available to fund the related liability. The decrease in value of these assets and liabilities are primarily due to current market conditions. Losses on certain invested assets are not deductible for income taxes and therefore have had an impact on our income tax rates in the current fiscal year.
 
12.  Regulatory Requirements
HRB Bank and the Company are subject to various regulatory requirements, including capital guidelines for HRB Bank, administered by federal banking agencies. Failure to meet minimum capital requirements can trigger certain mandatory and possibly additional discretionary actions by regulators that, if undertaken, could have a direct material effect on HRB Bank and our consolidated financial statements. All savings associations are subject to the capital adequacy guidelines and the regulatory framework for prompt corrective action. HRB Bank must meet specific capital guidelines that involve quantitative measures of HRB Bank’s assets, liabilities and certain off-balance sheet items, as calculated under regulatory accounting practices. HRB Bank’s capital amounts and classification are also subject to qualitative judgments by the regulators about components, risk weightings and other factors. HRB Bank files its regulatory Thrift Financial Report (TFR) on a calendar quarter basis with the Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS).
Quantitative measures established by regulation to ensure capital adequacy require HRB Bank to maintain minimum amounts and ratios of tangible equity, total risk-based capital and Tier 1 capital, as set forth in the table below. In addition to these minimum ratio requirements, HRB Bank is required to continually maintain a 12.0% minimum leverage ratio as a condition of its charter-approval order through fiscal year 2009. This condition was extended through fiscal year 2012 as a result of a Supervisory Directive issued on May 29, 2007. As of January 31, 2009, HRB Bank’s leverage ratio was 13.8%.
As of December 31, 2008, our most recent TFR filing, HRB Bank was a “well capitalized” institution under the prompt corrective action provisions of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). The five capital categories are: (1) “well capitalized” (total risk-based capital ratio of 10%, Tier 1 Risk-based capital ratio of 6% and leverage ratio of 5%); (2) “adequately capitalized”; (3) “undercapitalized”; (4) “significantly undercapitalized”; and (5) “critically undercapitalized.” There are no conditions or events since December 31, 2008 that management believes have changed HRB Bank’s category.


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The following table sets forth HRB Bank’s regulatory capital requirements at December 31, 2008, as calculated in the most recently filed TFR:
                                                 
(dollars in 000s)  
   
                To Be Well
 
                Capitalized
 
          For Capital Adequacy
    Under Prompt
 
    Actual     Purposes     Corrective Action Provisions  
   
    Amount     Ratio     Amount     Ratio     Amount     Ratio  
   
 
Total risk-based capital ratio(1)
  $ 268,259       22.1%     $ 97,294       8.0%     $ 121,617       10.0%  
Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio(2)
  $ 252,471       20.8%       n/a       n/a     $ 72,970       6.0%  
Tier 1 capital ratio (leverage)(3)
  $ 252,471       13.3%     $ 228,368       12.0%     $ 95,153       5.0%  
Tangible equity ratio(4)
  $ 252,471       13.3%     $ 28,546       1.5%       n/a       n/a  
(1) Total risk-based capital divided by risk-weighted assets.
(2) Tier 1 (core) capital less deduction for low-level recourse and residual interest divided by risk-weighted assets.
(3) Tier 1 (core) capital divided by adjusted total assets.
(4) Tangible capital divided by tangible assets.
 
Block Financial LLC (BFC) made an additional capital contribution to HRB Bank of $245.0 million during the nine months ended January 31, 2009. This contribution was necessary for HRB Bank to meet its capital requirements due to seasonal fluctuations in its balance sheet. During the three months ended January 31, 2009, we submitted an application to the OTS requesting that HRB Bank be allowed to pay dividends to BFC in an amount that will not exceed the capital necessary to continuously maintain HRB Bank’s required 12.0% leverage ratio. The OTS approved our application on January 12, 2009.
 
13.  Commitments and Contingencies
Changes in the deferred revenue liability related to our Peace of Mind (POM) program, the current portion of which is included in accounts payable, accrued expenses and other current liabilities and the long-term portion of which is included in other noncurrent liabilities in the condensed consolidated balance sheets, are as follows:
                     
(in 000s)
 
Nine Months Ended January 31,   2009     2008      
 
 
Balance, beginning of period
  $ 140,583     $ 142,173      
Amounts deferred for new guarantees issued
    23,480       19,672      
Revenue recognized on previous deferrals
    (56,375 )     (56,881 )    
                     
Balance, end of period
  $ 107,688     $ 104,964      
                     
 
 
 
The following table summarizes certain of our other contractual obligations and commitments:
                     
(in 000s)
 
As of   January 31, 2009     April 30, 2008      
 
 
Franchise Equity Lines of Credit
  $ 83,863     $ 79,134      
Contingent business acquisition obligations
    29,103       24,288      
Media advertising purchase obligation
    59,715       19,043      
 
 
 
We routinely enter into contracts that include embedded indemnifications that have characteristics similar to guarantees. Other guarantees and indemnifications of the Company and its subsidiaries include obligations to protect counterparties from losses arising from the following: (1) tax, legal and other risks related to the purchase or disposition of businesses; (2) penalties and interest assessed by federal and state taxing authorities in connection with tax returns prepared for clients; (3) indemnification of our directors and officers; and (4) third-party claims relating to various arrangements in the normal course of business. Typically, there is no stated maximum payment related to these indemnifications, and the terms of the indemnities may vary and in many cases are limited only by the applicable statute of limitations. The likelihood of any claims being asserted against us and the ultimate liability related to any such claims, if any, is difficult to predict. While we cannot provide assurance we will ultimately prevail in the event any


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such claims are asserted, we believe the fair value of guarantees and indemnifications relating to our continuing operations is not material as of January 31, 2009.
 
Discontinued Operations
Sand Canyon Corporation (SCC), formerly Option One Mortgage Corporation, maintains recourse with respect to loans previously sold or securitized under indemnification of loss provisions relating to breach of representations and warranties made to purchasers or insurers. As a result, SCC may be required to repurchase loans or otherwise indemnify third-parties for losses. These representations and warranties and corresponding repurchase obligations generally are not subject to stated limits or a stated term and, therefore, may continue for the foreseeable future. SCC has established a liability related to potential losses under these indemnifications and monitors the adequacy of the repurchase liability on an ongoing basis. To the extent that future claim volumes differ from current estimates, or the value of mortgage loans and residential home prices change, future losses may be different than these estimates and those differences may be significant.
The following table summarizes SCC’s loan repurchase and indemnification activity:
 
                             
(in 000s)
 
    Nine Months Ended     Year Ended
     
    January 31, 2009     January 31, 2008     April 30, 2008      
 
 
Loan repurchase and indemnification
liability at end of period
  $ 213,120     $ 68,969     $ 243,066      
Loans repurchased and indemnification payments during the period
    38,290       480,943       515,370      
Reserves added during the period
    -       379,440       582,373      
 
 
As described more fully in note 17, we entered into indemnifications in connection with our November 2008 sale of HRBFA and recorded a liability with an estimated fair value of $15.5 million at January 31, 2009.
We have recorded a restructuring liability which primarily relates to estimated lease obligations for vacant space resulting from office closings and employee severance costs for our discontinued mortgage businesses. These liabilities are included in accounts payable, accrued expenses and other current liabilities and accrued salaries, wages and payroll taxes on our condensed consolidated balance sheet, respectively. Actual results could differ from these estimates. Changes in our restructuring liability during the nine months ended January 31, 2009 are as follows:
                                 
(in 000s)  
   
    Accrual Balance as of
    Cash
    Other
    Accrual Balance as of
 
    April 30, 2008     Payments     Adjustments     January 31, 2009  
   
 
Employee severance costs
  $ 4,807     $ (4,871 )   $ 428     $ 364  
Contract termination costs
    23,113       (12,054 )     1,779       12,838  
                                 
    $ 27,920     $ (16,925 )   $ 2,207     $ 13,202  
                                 
 
 
 
14.  Litigation and Related Contingencies
We are party to investigations, legal claims and lawsuits arising out of our business operations. We accrue our best estimate of the probable loss upon resolution of investigations, legal claims and lawsuits, which totaled $10.5 million and $11.5 million at January 31, 2009 and April 30, 2008, respectively. With respect to most of the matters described below, we have concluded that a loss is not probable and therefore no liability has been recorded.
 
RAL Litigation
We have been named as a defendant in numerous lawsuits throughout the country regarding our refund anticipation loan programs (collectively, “RAL Cases”). The RAL Cases have involved a variety of legal theories asserted by plaintiffs. These theories include allegations that, among other things: disclosures in the RAL applications were inadequate, misleading and untimely; the RAL interest rates were usurious and unconscionable; we did not disclose that we would receive part of the finance charges paid by the customer for such loans; untrue, misleading or deceptive statements in marketing RALs; breach of state


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laws on credit service organizations; breach of contract, unjust enrichment, unfair and deceptive acts or practices; violations of the federal Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act; violations of the federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and unfair competition regarding debt collection activities; and that we owe, and breached, a fiduciary duty to our customers in connection with the RAL program.
The amounts claimed in the RAL Cases have been very substantial in some instances, with one settlement resulting in a pretax expense of $43.5 million in fiscal year 2003 (the “Texas RAL Settlement”) and other settlements resulting in a combined pretax expense in fiscal year 2006 of $70.2 million. On December 31, 2008, we reached a settlement with the California attorney general in the case entitled The People of California v. H&R Block, Inc., H&R Block Services, Inc., H&R Block Enterprises, Inc., H&R Block Tax Services, Inc., Block Financial Corporation, HRB Royalty, Inc., and Does 1 through 50, Case No., CGC-06-449461, in the California Superior Court, San Francisco County (the “California AG Case”). Pursuant to the terms of the settlement, we agreed to pay $2.45 million in restitution to certain clients who obtained a refund anticipation loan or a refund anticipation check, $500,000 in civil penalties and $1.9 million in fees and costs.
Following settlement of the California AG Case, we have one remaining putative RAL class action. We believe we have meritorious defenses to this RAL Case and we intend to defend it vigorously. There can be no assurances, however, as to the outcome of the pending RAL Case or regarding the impact of the pending RAL Case on our financial statements. There were no other significant developments regarding the RAL Cases during the three months ended January 31, 2009.
 
Peace of Mind Litigation
We are defendants in lawsuits regarding our Peace of Mind program (collectively, the “POM Cases”), under which our applicable tax return preparation subsidiary assumes liability for additional tax assessments attributable to tax return preparation error. The POM Cases are described below.
Lorie J. Marshall, et al. v. H&R Block Tax Services, Inc., et al., Case No. 08-CV-591 in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Illinois, is a class action case originally filed in the Circuit Court of Madison County, Illinois on January 18, 2002, in which class certification was granted on August 27, 2003. The plaintiffs allege that the sale of POM guarantees constitutes (1) statutory fraud by selling insurance without a license, (2) an unfair trade practice, by omission and by “cramming” (i.e., charging customers for the guarantee even though they did not request it or want it), and (3) a breach of fiduciary duty. The court has certified plaintiff classes consisting of all persons who reside in 13 specified states and who from January 1, 1997 to final judgment (1) were charged a separate fee for POM by “H&R Block”; (2) were charged a separate fee for POM by an “H&R Block” entity not licensed to sell insurance; or (3) had an unsolicited charge for POM posted to their bills by “H&R Block.” Persons who received the POM guarantee through an H&R Block Premium office were excluded from the plaintiff class. In August 2008, we removed the case from state court in Madison County, Illinois to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Illinois. On December 17, 2008, the case was remanded back to state court. We have filed a petition to appeal this ruling.
There is one other putative class action pending against us in Texas that involves the POM guarantee. This case is pending before the same judge that presided over the Texas RAL Settlement, involves the same plaintiffs’ attorneys that are involved in the Marshall litigation in Illinois, and contains allegations similar to those in the Marshall case. No class has been certified in this case.
We believe we have meritorious defenses to the claims in the POM Cases, and we intend to defend them vigorously. The amounts claimed in the POM Cases are substantial, and there can be no assurances as to the outcome of these pending actions individually or in the aggregate.
 
Express IRA Litigation
On March 15, 2006, the New York Attorney General filed a lawsuit in the Supreme Court of the State of New York, County of New York (Index No. 06/401110) entitled The People of New York v. H&R Block, Inc. and H&R Block Financial Advisors, Inc. et al. The complaint alleged fraudulent business practices, deceptive acts and practices, common law fraud and breach of fiduciary duty with respect to the Express IRA product and sought equitable relief, disgorgement of profits, damages and restitution, civil penalties and punitive damages. On July 12, 2007, the Supreme Court of the State of New York issued a ruling that dismissed all defendants other than HRBFA and the claims of common law fraud. The intermediate


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appellate court reversed this ruling on January 6, 2009. We filed a petition for appeal with the highest state appellate court on January 30, 2009. We believe we have meritorious defenses to the claims in this case, and we intend to defend this case vigorously, but there are no assurances as to its outcome.
On January 2, 2008, the Mississippi Attorney General filed a lawsuit in the Chancery Court of Hinds County, Mississippi First Judicial District (Case No. G 2008 6 S 2) entitled Jim Hood, Attorney for the State of Mississippi v. H&R Block, Inc., et al. The complaint alleged fraudulent business practices, deceptive acts and practices, common law fraud and breach of fiduciary duty with respect to the Express IRA product and sought equitable relief, disgorgement of profits, damages and restitution, civil penalties and punitive damages. The defendants have filed a motion to dismiss. We believe we have meritorious defenses to the claims in this case, and we intend to defend this case vigorously, but there are no assurances as to its outcome.
In addition to the New York and Mississippi Attorney General actions, a number of civil actions were filed against HRBFA and us concerning the Express IRA product, the first of which was filed on March 17, 2006. Except for two cases pending in state court, all of the civil actions have been consolidated by the panel for Multi-District Litigation into a single action styled In re H&R Block, Inc. Express IRA Marketing Litigation in the United States District Court for the Western District of Missouri.
Although we sold HRBFA effective November 1, 2008, we remain responsible for the Express IRA litigation through an indemnification agreement with Ameriprise. See additional discussion in note 17. The amounts claimed in these cases are substantial. We believe we have meritorious defenses to the claims in these cases, and we intend to defend these cases vigorously, but there are no assurances as to their outcome.
 
Securities Litigation
On April 6, 2007, a putative class action styled In re H&R Block Securities Litigation was filed against the Company and certain of its officers in the United States District Court for the Western District of Missouri. The complaint alleges, among other things, deceptive, material and misleading financial statements and failure to prepare financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. The complaint sought unspecified damages and equitable relief. The court dismissed the complaint on February 19, 2008, and plaintiffs appealed the dismissal on March 18, 2008. In addition, plaintiffs in a shareholder derivative action that was consolidated into the securities litigation filed a separate appeal on March 18, 2008, contending that the derivative action was improperly consolidated. The derivative action is Iron Workers Local 16 Pension Fund v. H&R Block, et al., in the United States District Court for the Western District of Missouri, Case No.06-cv-00466-ODS (instituted on June 8, 2006) and was brought against certain of our directors and officers purportedly on behalf of the Company. The derivative action alleges breach of fiduciary duty, abuse of control, gross mismanagement, waste, and unjust enrichment pertaining to (1) our restatement of financial results in fiscal year 2006 due to errors in determining our state effective income tax rate and (2) certain of our products and business activities. We believe we have meritorious defenses to the claims in these cases and intend to defend this litigation vigorously. We currently do not believe that we will incur a material loss with respect to this litigation.
 
RSM McGladrey Litigation
RSM McGladrey Business Services, Inc. and certain of its subsidiaries are parties to a putative class action filed on July 11, 2006 and entitled Do Right’s Plant Growers, et al. v. RSM EquiCo, Inc., et al. Case No. 06 CC00137, in the California Superior Court, Orange County. The complaint contains allegations regarding business valuation services provided by RSM EquiCo, Inc., including fraud, negligent misrepresentation, breach of contract, breach of implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, breach of fiduciary duty and unfair competition and seeks unspecified damages, restitution and equitable relief. A hearing on plaintiffs’ motion for class certification is scheduled for March 6, 2009. We intend to defend this case vigorously. The amount claimed in this action is substantial and there can be no assurance regarding the outcome and resolution of this matter. It is reasonably possible that we could incur losses with respect to this litigation, although an estimate of such losses cannot be made in light of the early stage of the litigation.
RSM McGladrey, Inc. (RSM) has a relationship with certain public accounting firms (collectively, “the Attest Firms”) pursuant to which (1) some RSM employees are also partners or employees of the Attest Firms, (2) many clients of the Attest Firms are also RSM clients, and (3) our RSM McGladrey brand is


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closely linked to the Attest Firms. The Attest Firms are parties to claims and lawsuits (collectively, “Attest Firm Claims”) arising in the normal course of business. Judgments or settlements arising from Attest Firm Claims exceeding the Attest Firms’ insurance coverage could have a direct adverse effect on Attest Firm operations and could impair RSM’s ability to attract and retain clients and quality professionals. For example, accounting and auditing firms (including one of the Attest Firms) recently have become subject to claims based on losses their clients suffered from investments in investment funds managed by third parties. Although RSM may not have a direct liability for significant Attest Firm Claims, such Attest Firm Claims could have a material adverse effect on RSM’s operations and impair the value of our investment in RSM. There is no assurance regarding the outcome of the Attest Firm Claims.
 
Litigation and Claims Pertaining to Discontinued Mortgage Operations
Although mortgage loan origination activities were terminated and the loan servicing business was sold during fiscal year 2008, SCC remains subject to investigations, claims and lawsuits pertaining to its loan origination and servicing activities that occurred prior to such termination and sale. These investigations, claims and lawsuits include actions by state attorneys general, other state regulators, municipalities, individual plaintiffs, and cases in which plaintiffs seek to represent a class of others alleged to be similarly situated. Among other things, these investigations, claims and lawsuits allege discriminatory or unfair and deceptive loan origination and servicing practices, public nuisance, fraud, and violations of the Truth in Lending Act, Equal Credit Opportunity Act and the Fair Housing Act. In the current non-prime mortgage environment, the number of these investigations, claims and lawsuits has increased over historical experience and is likely to continue at increased levels. The amounts claimed in these investigations, claims and lawsuits are substantial in some instances, and the ultimate resulting liability is difficult to predict. In the event of unfavorable outcomes, the amounts SCC may be required to pay in the discharge of liabilities or settlements could be substantial and, because SCC’s operating results are included in our consolidated financial statements, could have a material adverse impact on our consolidated results of operations.
On June 3, 2008, the Massachusetts Attorney General filed a lawsuit in the Superior Court of Suffolk County, Massachusetts (Case No. 08-2474-BLS) entitled Commonwealth of Massachusetts v. H&R Block, Inc., et al., alleging unfair, deceptive and discriminatory origination and servicing of mortgage loans and seeking equitable relief, disgorgement of profits, restitution and statutory penalties. On November 10, 2008, the court granted a preliminary injunction limiting the ability of the owner of SCC’s former loan servicing business to initiate or advance foreclosure actions against certain loans originated by SCC or its subsidiaries without (1) advance notice to the Massachusetts Attorney General and (2) if the Attorney General objects to foreclosure, approval by the court. The preliminary injunction generally applies to loans meeting all of the following four characteristics: (1) adjustable rate mortgages with an introductory period of three years or less, (2) the borrower has a debt-to-income ratio generally exceeding 50 percent, (3) an introductory interest rate at least 2 percent lower than the fully indexed rate (unless the debt-to-income ratio is 55% or greater) and (4) loan-to-value ratio of 97 percent or certain prepayment penalties. We have appealed this preliminary injunction. We believe we have meritorious defenses to the claims in this case, and we intend to defend this case vigorously, but there are no assurances as to its outcome.
SCC also remains subject to potential claims for indemnification and loan repurchases pertaining to loans previously sold. In the current non-prime mortgage environment, it is likely that the frequency of repurchase and indemnification claims may increase over historical experience and give rise to additional litigation. In some instances, H&R Block, Inc. was required to guarantee SCC’s obligations. The amounts involved in these potential claims may be substantial, and the ultimate resulting liability is difficult to predict. In the event of unfavorable outcomes, the amounts SCC may be required to pay in the discharge or settlement of these claims could be substantial and, because SCC’s operating results are included in our consolidated financial statements, could have a material adverse impact on our consolidated results of operations.
 
Other Claims and Litigation
We are from time to time party to investigations, claims and lawsuits not discussed herein arising out of our business operations. These investigations, claims and lawsuits include actions by state attorneys


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general, other state regulators, individual plaintiffs, and cases in which plaintiffs seek to represent a class of others similarly situated. Some of these investigations, claims and lawsuits pertain to RALs, the electronic filing of customers’ income tax returns, the POM guarantee program, wage and hour claims and investment products. We believe we have meritorious defenses to each of these claims, and we are defending or intend to defend them vigorously. The amounts claimed in these claims and lawsuits are substantial in some instances, and the ultimate liability with respect to such litigation and claims is difficult to predict. In the event of an unfavorable outcome, the amounts we may be required to pay in the discharge of liabilities or settlements could be material.
In addition to the aforementioned types of cases, we are party to claims and lawsuits that we consider to be ordinary, routine litigation incidental to our business, including claims and lawsuits (collectively, “Other Claims”) concerning the preparation of customers’ income tax returns, the fees charged customers for various products and services, relationships with franchisees, intellectual property disputes, employment matters and contract disputes. While we cannot provide assurance that we will ultimately prevail in each instance, we believe the amount, if any, we are required to pay in the discharge of liabilities or settlements in these Other Claims will not have a material adverse effect on our consolidated operating results, financial position or cash flows.
 
15.  Segment Information
Results of our continuing operations by reportable operating segment are as follows:
                                 
(in 000s)  
   
    Three Months Ended
    Nine Months Ended
 
    January 31,     January 31,  
    2009     2008     2009     2008  
   
Revenues:
                               
Tax Services
  $ 761,735     $ 661,787     $ 936,104     $ 822,454  
Business Services
    185,177       191,884       592,873       623,755  
Consumer Financial Services
    45,195       39,305       80,980       89,608  
Corporate
    1,339       1,828       6,867       9,697  
                                 
    $ 993,446     $ 894,804     $ 1,616,824     $ 1,545,514  
                                 
Pretax income (loss):
                               
Tax Services
  $ 130,443     $ 45,879     $ (218,045 )   $ (325,559 )
Business Services
    10,695       6,614       23,481       16,489  
Consumer Financial Services
    (3,268 )     12,318       (36,014 )     12,751  
Corporate
    (36,131 )     (64,395 )     (108,106 )     (112,587 )
                                 
Income (loss) from continuing operations before income taxes (benefit)
  $ 101,739     $ 416     $ (338,684 )   $ (408,906 )
                                 
 
 
As of January 31, 2009, the financial results of HRBFA are presented as discontinued operations. Accordingly, all periods presented above for our Consumer Financial Services segment have been revised to exclude results for discontinued businesses, and now reflect only the results of HRB Bank.
 
16.  Accounting Pronouncements
In June 2008, FASB Staff Position on EITF 03-6-1, “Determining Whether Instruments Granted in Share-Based Payment Transactions are Participating Securities” (FSP 03-6-1) was issued. FSP 03-6-1 addresses whether instruments granted in share-based payment transactions are participating securities prior to vesting and, therefore, should be included in the process of allocating earnings for purposes of computing earnings per share. This guidance is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years and the related interim periods beginning after December 15, 2008. Early application is not permitted. The provisions of FSP 03-6-1 are effective for our first fiscal quarter of 2010. We are currently evaluating what effect FSP 03-6-1 will have on our consolidated financial statements.
In December 2007, Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 141(R), “Business Combinations,” (SFAS 141R), and Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 160, “Non-Controlling Interests in Consolidated Financial Statements – An Amendment of ARB No. 51” (SFAS 160) were issued. These


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standards will require an acquiring entity to recognize all the assets acquired and liabilities assumed in a transaction, including non-controlling interests, at the acquisition-date fair value with limited exceptions. SFAS 141R will require acquisition-related expenses to be expensed and will generally require contingent consideration to be recorded as a liability at the time of acquisition. Under SFAS 141R, subsequent changes to deferred tax valuation allowances relating to acquired businesses and acquired liabilities for uncertain tax positions will no longer be applied to goodwill but will instead be typically recognized as an adjustment to income tax expense. The provisions of these standards are effective as of the beginning of our fiscal year 2010.
We are currently evaluating what effect the adoption of SFAS 141R and SFAS 160 will have on our consolidated financial statements.
As discussed in note 10, we adopted SFAS 157 and SFAS 159 as of May 1, 2008.
 
17.  Discontinued Operations
Effective November 1, 2008, we sold HRB Financial Corporation, including our securities brokerage business formerly conducted through HRBFA, to Ameriprise. As a result of this transaction, we received cash proceeds, net of selling costs, of $304.0 million, plus repayment of net intercompany liabilities of $46.6 million. The carrying value of our investment in this business at the date of disposition was $293.7 million. We deferred recognition of a portion of the sale proceeds totaling $7.0 million, which represents the estimated value of an ongoing collaboration arrangement with our Tax Services businesses.
In connection with the sale, we indemnified Ameriprise against certain losses relating to pre-acquisition contingencies, including matters involving compliance with ERISA and the Fair Labor Standards Act, tax matters, and certain pending litigation. Certain indemnities are subject to a maximum aggregate payment of $31.5 million, while other indemnities are not subject to any stated limit. The indemnities are not subject to a stated term. FASB Interpretation No. 45, “Guarantor’s Accounting and Disclosure Requirements for Guarantees, Including Indirect Guarantees of Indebtedness of Others,” requires that we recognize a liability for the estimated fair value of guarantee and indemnification obligations at the inception of the arrangement. We have estimated an aggregate fair value of $15.5 million relating to the Ameriprise indemnifications and recorded a liability in that amount as of the date of sale. Subsequent changes in the estimated fair value of these indemnification obligations will be recorded in discontinued operations.
The transaction resulted in a capital loss for income tax purposes and, with the exception of benefits of approximately $10 million recorded during the quarter ended October 31, 2008, is not currently expected to result in a tax benefit. Net of selling expenses, deferrals, and indemnification liabilities, we recorded a loss during the quarter ended January 31, 2009 in connection with the disposition of this business totaling $12.2 million.
At January 31, 2009, HRBFA had $21.2 million invested in the Reserve Primary Fund (Reserve Fund), a money market fund. That balance was reduced to $14.5 million at February 20, 2009, reflecting an additional fund distribution as of that date. The Reserve Fund is currently in orderly liquidation under the supervision of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and its net asset value has fallen below its stated value of $1.00 per share. The most recent net asset values communicated by the Reserve Fund were $0.97 per share as of February 26, 2009. However, the Reserve Fund has indicated that it has established a “special reserve” for contingent damages and defense costs relating to pending litigation and, accordingly, fund distributions are currently being made at $0.917 per share. This asset was sold to Ameriprise in connection with the sale of HRBRA at a contractually agreed to value of $0.92 per share. Although this investment is no longer reported in our balance sheet we are subject to contingent gains or losses, through post-closing purchase price adjustments, to the extent ultimate redemptions from the Reserve Fund are greater or less than $0.92 per share. Assuming HRBFA recovered its invested principal in full, we would recognize a gain at that time of approximately $8 million. Assuming HRBFA received no further distributions from the Reserve Fund, we would ultimately record additional losses of approximately $7 million.
As of January 31, 2009, the results of operations of HRBFA and its direct corporate parent are presented as discontinued operations in the condensed consolidated financial statements. All periods presented reflect our discontinued operations.


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Overhead costs which would have previously been allocated to discontinued businesses totaled $4.6 million for the nine months ended January 31, 2009 and $4.0 million and $11.6 million for the three and nine months ended January 31, 2008, respectively. These amounts are included in continuing operations.
The financial results of discontinued operations are as follows:
 
                                     
(in 000s)
    Three Months Ended January 31,     Nine Months Ended January 31,      
    2009     2008     2009     2008      
 
 
Net revenue
  $ 609     $ 109,363     $ 130,205     $ (52,777 )    
                                     
Pretax loss
  $ (20,054 )   $ (93,440 )   $ (47,443 )   $ (978,000 )    
Income tax benefit
    (587 )     (38,992 )     (20,967 )     (365,804 )    
                                     
Net loss from discontinued operations
  $ (19,467 )   $ (54,448 )   $ (26,476 )   $ (612,196 )    
                                     
 
 
During fiscal year 2008, we exited the mortgage business operated through a subsidiary and sold the related loan servicing business. Our discontinued operations include pretax losses related to our mortgage business of $7.9 million and $17.5 million for the three and nine months ended January 31, 2009, respectively, compared to $97.0 million and $977.9 million, respectively, in the prior year.
 
18.  Condensed Consolidating Financial Statements
BFC is an indirect, wholly-owned consolidated subsidiary of the Company. BFC is the Issuer and the Company is the Guarantor of the Senior Notes issued on January 11, 2008 and October 26, 2004, our CLOCs, the $500.0 million credit facility entered into in April 2007 and other indebtedness issued from time to time. These condensed consolidating financial statements have been prepared using the equity method of accounting. Earnings of subsidiaries are, therefore, reflected in the Company’s investment in subsidiaries account. The elimination entries eliminate investments in subsidiaries, related stockholders’ equity and other intercompany balances and transactions.
 
                                         
   
Condensed Consolidating Income Statements     (in 000s)  
   
Three Months Ended
  H&R Block, Inc.
    BFC
    Other
          Consolidated
 
January 31, 2009   (Guarantor)     (Issuer)     Subsidiaries     Elims     H&R Block  
   
Total revenues
  $ -     $ 85,044     $ 908,466     $ (64 )   $ 993,446  
                                         
Cost of services
    -       10,615       562,233       6       572,854  
Cost of other revenues
    -       69,128       42,586       (1 )     111,713  
Selling, general and administrative
    -       44,125       164,791       (102 )     208,814  
                                         
Total expenses
    -       123,868       769,610       (97 )     893,381  
                                         
Operating income (loss)
    -       (38,824 )     138,856       33       100,065  
Other income (expense), net
    101,739       (1,968 )     3,610       (101,707 )     1,674  
                                         
Income (loss) from continuing operations before taxes (benefit)
    101,739       (40,792 )     142,466       (101,674 )     101,739  
Income taxes (benefit)
    34,909       (16,013 )     50,942       (34,929 )     34,909  
                                         
Net income (loss) from continuing operations
    66,830       (24,779 )     91,524       (66,745 )     66,830  
Net loss from discontinued operations
    (19,467 )     (20,113 )     -       20,113       (19,467 )
                                         
Net income (loss)
  $ 47,363     $ (44,892 )   $ 91,524     $ (46,632 )   $ 47,363  
                                         
 
 
 


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Three Months Ended
  H&R Block, Inc.
    BFC
    Other
          Consolidated
 
January 31, 2008   (Guarantor)     (Issuer)     Subsidiaries     Elims     H&R Block  
   
Total revenues
  $ -     $ 133,343     $ 774,765     $ (13,304 )   $ 894,804  
                                         
Cost of services
    -       18,742       534,018       47       552,807  
Cost of other revenues
    -       77,067       19,167       -       96,234  
Selling, general and administrative
    -       114,620       144,566       (11,866 )     247,320  
                                         
Total expenses
    -       210,429       697,751       (11,819 )     896,361  
                                         
Operating income (loss)
    -       (77,086 )     77,014       (1,485 )     (1,557 )
Other income, net
    416       9       1,964       (416 )     1,973  
                                         
Income (loss) from continuing operations before taxes (benefit)
    416       (77,077 )     78,978       (1,901 )     416  
Income taxes (benefit)
    (6,674 )     (33,637 )     27,299       6,338       (6,674 )
                                         
Net income (loss) from continuing operations
    7,090       (43,440 )     51,679       (8,239 )     7,090  
Net loss from discontinued
                                       
operations
    (54,448 )     (54,589 )     (2,622 )     57,211       (54,448 )
                                         
Net income (loss)
  $ (47,358 )   $ (98,029 )   $ 49,057     $ 48,972     $ (47,358 )
                                         
 
 
 
                                         
   
Nine Months Ended
  H&R Block, Inc.
    BFC
    Other
          Consolidated
 
January 31, 2009   (Guarantor)     (Issuer)     Subsidiaries     Elims     H&R Block  
   
Total revenues
  $ -     $ 124,145     $ 1,495,472     $ (2,793 )   $ 1,616,824  
                                         
Cost of services
    -       17,886       1,254,854       22       1,272,762  
Cost of other revenues
    -       154,301       62,621       (32 )     216,890  
Selling, general and administrative
    -       74,669       389,669       (284 )     464,054  
                                         
Total expenses
    -       246,856       1,707,144       (294 )     1,953,706  
                                         
Operating loss
    -       (122,711 )     (211,672 )     (2,499 )     (336,882 )
Other income (expense), net
    (338,684 )     (5,858 )     4,024       338,716       (1,802 )
                                         
Loss from continuing operations before tax benefit
    (338,684 )     (128,569 )     (207,648 )     336,217       (338,684 )
Income tax benefit
    (143,930 )     (50,553 )     (92,329 )     142,882       (143,930 )
                                         
Net loss from continuing operations
    (194,754 )     (78,016 )     (115,319 )     193,335       (194,754 )
Net loss from discontinued operations
    (26,476 )     (28,577 )     -       28,577       (26,476 )
                                         
Net loss
  $ (221,230 )   $ (106,593 )   $ (115,319 )   $ 221,912     $ (221,230 )
                                         
 
 
 
                                         
   
Nine Months Ended
  H&R Block, Inc.
    BFC
    Other
          Consolidated
 
January 31, 2008   (Guarantor)     (Issuer)     Subsidiaries     Elims     H&R Block  
   
Total revenues
  $ -     $ 260,871     $ 1,301,716     $ (17,073 )   $ 1,545,514  
                                         
Cost of services
    -       33,652       1,231,236       (8 )     1,264,880  
Cost of other revenues
    -       160,703       34,226       -       194,929  
Selling, general and administrative
    -       148,423       377,934       (11,954 )     514,403  
                                         
Total expenses
    -       342,778       1,643,396       (11,962 )     1,974,212  
                                         
Operating loss
    -       (81,907 )     (341,680 )     (5,111 )     (428,698 )
Other income (expense), net
    (408,906 )     (12 )     19,804       408,906       19,792  
                                         
Loss from continuing operations before tax benefit
    (408,906 )     (81,919 )     (321,876 )     403,795       (408,906 )
Income tax benefit
    (168,893 )     (36,432 )     (130,398 )     166,830       (168,893 )
                                         
Net loss from continuing operations
    (240,013 )     (45,487 )     (191,478 )     236,965       (240,013 )
Net loss from discontinued operations
    (612,196 )     (609,192 )     (6,212 )     615,404       (612,196 )
                                         
Net loss
  $ (852,209 )   $ (654,679 )   $ (197,690 )   $ 852,369     $ (852,209 )
                                         
 
 
 

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Condensed Consolidating Balance Sheets     (in 000s)  
   
    H&R Block, Inc.
    BFC
    Other
          Consolidated
 
January 31, 2009   (Guarantor)     (Issuer)     Subsidiaries     Elims     H&R Block  
   
Cash & cash equivalents
  $ -     $ 1,014,130     $ 255,411     $ (338 )   $ 1,269,203  
Cash & cash equivalents — restricted
    -       66,070       9,823       -       75,893  
Receivables, net
    1,175       1,866,003       775,773       -       2,642,951  
Mortgage loans held for investment
    -       781,755       -       -       781,755  
Intangible assets and goodwill, net
    -       -       1,242,549       -       1,242,549  
Investments in subsidiaries
    2,633,648       -       254       (2,633,648 )     254  
Other assets
    -       364,244       925,006       37       1,289,287  
                                         
Total assets
  $ 2,634,823     $ 4,092,202     $ 3,208,816     $ (2,633,949 )   $ 7,301,892  
                                         
Short-term borrowings
  $ -     $ 690,485     $ -     $ -     $ 690,485  
Customer deposits
    -       2,116,046       -       (338 )     2,115,708  
Long-term debt
    -       1,968,967       42,710       -       2,011,677  
FHLB borrowings
    -       104,000       -       -       104,000  
Other liabilities
    245       163,894       1,375,840       38       1,540,017  
Net intercompany advances
    1,794,573       (1,083,579 )     (710,993 )     (1 )     -  
Stockholders’ equity
    840,005       132,389       2,501,259       (2,633,648 )     840,005  
                                         
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
  $ 2,634,823     $ 4,092,202     $ 3,208,816     $ (2,633,949 )   $ 7,301,892  
                                         
 
 
 
                                         
   
    H&R Block, Inc.
    BFC
    Other
          Consolidated
 
April 30, 2008   (Guarantor)     (Issuer)     Subsidiaries     Elims     H&R Block  
   
Cash & cash equivalents
  $ -     $ 34,611     $ 630,933     $ (647 )   $ 664,897  
Cash & cash equivalents — restricted
    -       6,214       817       -       7,031  
Receivables, net
    139       122,756       411,334       -       534,229  
Mortgage loans held for investment
    -       966,301       -       -       966,301  
Intangible assets and goodwill, net
    -       -       978,682       -       978,682  
Investments in subsidiaries
    4,131,345       -       322       (4,131,345 )     322  
Assets of discontinued operations
    -       987,592       -       -       987,592  
Other assets
    -       514,463       969,896       12       1,484,371  
                                         
Total assets
  $ 4,131,484     $ 2,631,937     $ 2,991,984     $ (4,131,980 )   $ 5,623,425  
                                         
Customer deposits
  $ -     $ 786,271     $ -     $ (647 )   $ 785,624  
Long-term debt
    -       997,885       41,185       -       1,039,070  
FHLB borrowings
    -       129,000       -       -       129,000  
Liabilities of discontinued operations
    -       644,446       -       -       644,446  
Other liabilities
    2       466,236       1,571,178       51       2,037,467  
Net intercompany advances
    3,143,664       (632,522 )     (2,511,103 )     (39 )     -  
Stockholders’ equity
    987,818       240,621       3,890,724       (4,131,345 )     987,818  
                                         
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
  $ 4,131,484     $ 2,631,937     $ 2,991,984     $ (4,131,980 )   $ 5,623,425  
                                         
 
 
 

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