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Helmerich & Payne 10-K 2011

Table of Contents

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

ý   ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE
SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

For the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011

 

 

OR

o

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE
SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from            to          

Commission file number 1-4221

HELMERICH & PAYNE, INC.
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

Delaware
(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
  73-0679879
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

1437 S. Boulder Ave., Suite 1400, Tulsa, Oklahoma
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

 

74119-3623
(Zip Code)

(918) 742-5531
Registrant's telephone number, including area code

         Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of Each Class   Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
Common Stock ($0.10 par value)   New York Stock Exchange
Preferred Stock Purchase Rights   New York Stock Exchange

         Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

         Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ý    No o

         Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o    No ý

         Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ý    No o

         Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ý    No o

         Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the Registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. o

         Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer" and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer ý   Accelerated filer o   Non-accelerated filer o
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
  Smaller reporting company o

         Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o    No ý

         At March 31, 2011 the aggregate market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates was $7,107,745,833

         Number of shares of common stock outstanding at November 17, 2011: 107,145,588                                    

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

         Certain portions of the following documents have been incorporated by reference into this Form 10-K as indicated:

Documents   10-K Parts
   

(1)    Annual Report to Stockholders for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011

  Parts I and II
   

(2)    Proxy Statement for Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held March 7, 2012

  Part III


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DISCLOSURE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

        THIS REPORT INCLUDES "FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS" WITHIN THE MEANING OF THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933, AS AMENDED, AND THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934, AS AMENDED. ALL STATEMENTS OTHER THAN STATEMENTS OF HISTORICAL FACTS INCLUDED IN THIS REPORT, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, STATEMENTS REGARDING THE REGISTRANT'S FUTURE FINANCIAL POSITION, BUSINESS STRATEGY, BUDGETS, PROJECTED COSTS AND PLANS AND OBJECTIVES OF MANAGEMENT FOR FUTURE OPERATIONS, ARE FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS. IN ADDITION, FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS GENERALLY CAN BE IDENTIFIED BY THE USE OF FORWARD-LOOKING TERMINOLOGY SUCH AS "MAY", "WILL", "EXPECT", "INTEND", "ESTIMATE", "ANTICIPATE", "BELIEVE", OR "CONTINUE" OR THE NEGATIVE THEREOF OR SIMILAR TERMINOLOGY. ALTHOUGH THE REGISTRANT BELIEVES THAT THE EXPECTATIONS REFLECTED IN SUCH FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS ARE REASONABLE, IT CAN GIVE NO ASSURANCE THAT SUCH EXPECTATIONS WILL PROVE TO BE CORRECT. IMPORTANT FACTORS THAT COULD CAUSE ACTUAL RESULTS TO DIFFER MATERIALLY FROM THE REGISTRANT'S EXPECTATIONS ARE DISCLOSED IN THIS REPORT UNDER THE CAPTION "RISK FACTORS" BEGINNING ON PAGE 6, AS WELL AS IN MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS ON, AND INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE TO, PAGES 4 THROUGH 36 OF THE COMPANY'S ANNUAL REPORT (EXHIBIT 13 TO THIS FORM 10-K). ALL SUBSEQUENT WRITTEN AND ORAL FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS ATTRIBUTABLE TO THE REGISTRANT, OR PERSONS ACTING ON ITS BEHALF, ARE EXPRESSLY QUALIFIED IN THEIR ENTIRETY BY SUCH CAUTIONARY STATEMENTS. EXCEPT AS REQUIRED BY LAW, THE REGISTRANT ASSUMES NO DUTY TO UPDATE OR REVISE ITS FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS BASED ON CHANGES IN INTERNAL ESTIMATES OR EXPECTATIONS OR OTHERWISE.

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Table of Contents

HELMERICH & PAYNE, INC.
FORM 10-K
YEAR ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2011
TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
   
  Page  
PART I  

Item 1.

 

Business

 

 

1

 

Item 1A.

 

Risk Factors

 

 

6

 

Item 1B.

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

 

 

11

 

Item 2.

 

Properties

 

 

12

 

Item 3.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

 

18

 

Item 4.

 

[Removed and Reserved.]

 

 

18

 

 

 

Executive Officers of the Company

 

 

19

 

PART II

 

Item 5.

 

Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

 

20

 

Item 6.

 

Selected Financial Data

 

 

20

 

Item 7.

 

Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

 

21

 

Item 7A.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

 

21

 

Item 8.

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

 

21

 

Item 9.

 

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

 

 

21

 

Item 9A.

 

Controls and Procedures

 

 

22

 

Item 9B.

 

Other Information

 

 

25

 

PART III

 

Item 10.

 

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

 

 

26

 

Item 11.

 

Executive Compensation

 

 

26

 

Item 12.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

 

 

26

 

Item 13.

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

 

 

26

 

Item 14.

 

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

 

 

26

 

PART IV

 

Item 15.

 

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

 

 

27

 

SIGNATURES

 

 

31

 

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Table of Contents

HELMERICH & PAYNE, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the
Securities Exchange Act of 1934
For the Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2011


PART I

Item 1.    BUSINESS

        Helmerich & Payne, Inc. (hereafter referred to as the "Company", "we", "us" or "our"), was incorporated under the laws of the State of Delaware on February 3, 1940, and is successor to a business originally organized in 1920. We are primarily engaged in contract drilling of oil and gas wells for others and this business accounts for almost all of our operating revenues.

        Our contract drilling business is composed of three reportable business segments: U.S. Land drilling, Offshore drilling and International Land drilling. Our U.S. Land drilling is conducted primarily in Oklahoma, California, Texas, Wyoming, Colorado, Louisiana, Mississippi, Pennsylvania, Utah, Arkansas, New Mexico, Alabama, Montana, North Dakota and West Virginia. Offshore drilling operations are conducted in the Gulf of Mexico, and offshore of California, Trinidad and Equatorial Guinea. Our International Land segment operated in six international locations during fiscal 2011: Ecuador, Colombia, Argentina, Mexico, Tunisia and Bahrain.

        We are also engaged in the ownership, development and operation of commercial real estate and the research and development of rotary steerable technology. Each of the businesses operates independently of the others through wholly-owned subsidiaries. This operating decentralization is balanced by centralized finance and legal organizations.

        Our real estate investments located exclusively within Tulsa, Oklahoma, include a shopping center containing approximately 441,000 leasable square feet, multi-tenant industrial warehouse properties containing approximately 990,000 leasable square feet and approximately 210 acres of undeveloped real estate.

        Our subsidiary, TerraVici Drilling Solutions, Inc. ("TerraVici"), is developing patented rotary steerable technology to enhance horizontal and directional drilling operations. We acquired TerraVici to complement our existing drilling rig technology. The process of drilling has become increasingly challenging as preferred well types deviate from simple vertical drilling. By combining this new technology with our existing capabilities, we expect to improve drilling productivity and reduce total well cost to the customer.

        On June 30, 2010, the Venezuelan government seized 11 rigs owned by our Venezuelan subsidiary and associated real and personal property. We have sued the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela and related governmental entities for damages sustained as a result of the seizure of our Venezuelan drilling business. We are also participating in two arbitrations against non-Venezuelan entities related to the seizure of our property in Venezuela (For further information, see Item 3. Legal Proceedings). We are currently unable to determine the timing or amounts we may receive, if any, or the likelihood of recovery. Our financial statements have been prepared with the net assets, results of operations, and cash flows of the Venezuelan operations presented as discontinued operations. The operations from our Venezuelan subsidiary were previously an operating segment within our International Land drilling segment.

CONTRACT DRILLING

        We believe that we are one of the major land and offshore platform drilling contractors in the western hemisphere. Operating principally in North and South America, we specialize in shallow to deep drilling in oil and gas producing basins of the United States and in drilling for oil and gas in international locations. In the United States, we draw our customers primarily from the major oil companies and the larger independent oil companies. In South America, our current customers include major international oil companies.

        In fiscal 2011, we received approximately 57 percent of our consolidated operating revenues from our ten largest contract drilling customers. Occidental Oil and Gas Corporation, Devon Energy Production Co. LP, and EOG Resources, Inc. (respectively, "Oxy", "Devon" and "EOG"), including their


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affiliates, are our three largest contract drilling customers. We perform drilling services for Oxy on a world-wide basis, for Devon in U.S. land operations, and for EOG in U.S. land and offshore operations. Revenues from drilling services performed for Oxy, Devon and EOG in fiscal 2011 accounted for approximately 12 percent, 11 percent and 8 percent, respectively, of our consolidated operating revenues for the same period.

        We provide drilling rigs, equipment, personnel and camps on a contract basis. These services are provided so that our customers may explore for and develop oil and gas from onshore areas and from fixed platforms, tension-leg platforms and spars in offshore areas. Each of the drilling rigs consists of engines, drawworks, a mast, pumps, blowout preventers, a drill string and related equipment. The intended well depth and the drilling site conditions are the principal factors that determine the size and type of rig most suitable for a particular drilling job. A land drilling rig may be moved from location to location without modification to the rig. A platform rig is specifically designed to perform drilling operations upon a particular platform. While a platform rig may be moved from its original platform, significant expense is incurred to modify a platform rig for operation on each subsequent platform. In addition to traditional platform rigs, we operate self-moving platform drilling rigs and drilling rigs to be used on tension-leg platforms and spars. The self-moving rig is designed to be moved without the use of expensive derrick barges. The tension-leg platforms and spars allow drilling operations to be conducted in much deeper water than traditional fixed platforms.

        In 1998, we put to work a new generation of highly mobile/depth flexible land drilling rigs (individually the "FlexRig®"). The FlexRig has been able to significantly reduce average rig move and drilling times compared to similar depth-rated traditional land rigs. In addition, the FlexRig allows greater depth flexibility and provides greater operating efficiency. The original rigs were designated as FlexRig1 and FlexRig2 rigs and were designed to drill wells with a depth of between 8,000 and 18,000 feet. In 2001, we announced that we would build the next generation of FlexRigs, known as "FlexRig3 rigs", which incorporated new drilling technology and new environmental and safety design. This new design included integrated top drive, AC electric drive, hydraulic BOP handling system, hydraulic tubular make-up and break-out system, split crown and traveling blocks and an enlarged drill floor that enables simultaneous crew activities. FlexRig3 rigs were designed to target well depths similar to prior generation FlexRigs.

        In 2006, we placed into service our first FlexRig4. While FlexRig4s are similar to our FlexRig3s, the FlexRig4s are designed to efficiently drill more shallow depth wells of between 4,000 and 14,000 feet. The FlexRig4 design includes a trailerized version and a skidding version, which incorporate additional environmental and safety design. This design permits the installation of a pipe handling system which allows the rig to be more efficiently operated and eliminates the need for a casing stabber in the mast. While the FlexRig4 trailerized version provides for more efficient well site to well site rig moves, the skidding version allows for drilling of up to 22 wells from a single pad which results in reduced environmental impact. In 2011, we announced the introduction of the FlexRig5 design. The FlexRig5 is suited for long lateral drilling of multiple wells from a single location, which is well suited for unconventional shale reservoirs. The new design preserves the key performance features of FlexRig3 combined with a bi-directional pad drilling system and equipment capacities suitable for wells in excess of 24,000 feet of measured depth.

        Since 1998, we have built and delivered 232 FlexRigs, including 129 FlexRig3s, 85 FlexRig4s, and 1 FlexRig5. Of the total Flexrigs built to date, 159 have been built in the last five years. As of November 17, 2011, an additional 47 new FlexRigs remained under construction.

        The effective use of technology is important to the maintenance of our competitive position within the drilling industry. We expect to continue to refine our existing technology and develop new technology in the future.

        We assemble new FlexRigs at our gulf coast facility near Houston, Texas. We also have a 123,000 square foot fabrication facility located on approximately 11 acres near Tulsa, Oklahoma.

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        Our drilling contracts are obtained through competitive bidding or as a result of negotiations with customers, and often cover multi-well and multi-year projects. Each drilling rig operates under a separate drilling contract. During fiscal 2011, all drilling services were performed on a "daywork" contract basis, under which we charge a fixed rate per day, with the price determined by the location, depth and complexity of the well to be drilled, operating conditions, the duration of the contract, and the competitive forces of the market. We have previously performed contracts on a combination "footage" and "daywork" basis, under which we charged a fixed rate per foot of hole drilled to a stated depth, usually no deeper than 15,000 feet, and a fixed rate per day for the remainder of the hole. Contracts performed on a "footage" basis involve a greater element of risk to the contractor than do contracts performed on a "daywork" basis. Also, we have previously accepted "turnkey" contracts under which we charge a fixed sum to deliver a hole to a stated depth and agree to furnish services such as testing, coring and casing the hole which are not normally done on a "footage" basis. "Turnkey" contracts entail varying degrees of risk greater than the usual "footage" contract. We have not accepted any "footage" or "turnkey" contracts in over ten years. We believe that under current market conditions, "footage" and "turnkey" contract rates do not adequately compensate us for the added risks. The duration of our drilling contracts are "well-to-well" or for a fixed term. "Well-to-well" contracts are cancelable at the option of either party upon the completion of drilling at any one site. Fixed-term contracts generally have a minimum term of at least one year but customarily provide for termination at the election of the customer, with an "early termination payment" to be paid to us if a contract is terminated prior to the expiration of the fixed term. However, under certain limited circumstances such as destruction of a drilling rig, our bankruptcy, sustained unacceptable performance by us or delivery of a rig beyond certain grace and/or liquidated damage periods, no early termination payment would be paid to us.

        Contracts generally contain renewal or extension provisions exercisable at the option of the customer at prices mutually agreeable to us and the customer. In most instances contracts provide for additional payments for mobilization and demobilization.

        As of September 30, 2011, we had 158 rigs under fixed term contracts. While the original duration for these current fixed term contracts are for six-month to seven-year periods, some fixed term and well-to-well contracts are expected to be extended for longer periods than the original terms. However, the contracting parties have no legal obligation to extend the contracts.

        Our contract drilling backlog, being the expected future revenue from executed contracts with original terms in excess of one year, as of September 30, 2011 and 2010 was $3,789 million and $2,449 million, respectively. The increase in backlog at September 30, 2011 from September 30, 2010, is primarily due to the execution of additional fixed-term contracts for the operation of new FlexRigs. Approximately 61.0 percent of the total September 30, 2011 backlog is not reasonably expected to be filled in fiscal 2012. A portion of the backlog represents term contracts for new rigs that will be constructed in the future.

        The following table sets forth the total backlog by reportable segment as of September 30, 2011 and 2010, and the percentage of the September 30, 2011 backlog not reasonably expected to be filled in fiscal 2012:

 
  Total Backlog Revenue    
 
  Percentage Not Reasonably
Expected to be Filled in Fiscal 2012
Reportable
Segment
  9/30/2011   9/30/2010
 
  (in millions)
   

U.S. Land

  $ 3,279   $ 1,999   60.2%

Offshore

    98     139   56.1%

International

    412     311   71.1%
             

  $ 3,789   $ 2,449    
             

        We obtain certain key rig components from a single or limited number of vendors or fabricators. Certain of these vendors or fabricators are thinly capitalized independent companies located on the Texas

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gulf coast. Therefore, disruptions in rig component deliveries may occur. Accordingly, the actual amount of revenue earned may vary from the backlog reported. For further information, see Item 1A. Risk Factors.

U.S. LAND DRILLING

        At the end of September 2011, 2010 and 2009, we had 248, 220 and 201, respectively, of our land rigs available for work in the United States. The total number of rigs at the end of fiscal 2011 increased by a net of 28 rigs from the end of fiscal 2010. The increase is due to 35 new FlexRigs being completed and placed into service, 5 transferred from international operations, 1 rig transferred to international operations, 4 rigs sold during fiscal 2011 and 7 mechanical highly mobile rigs being removed from service. Our U.S. Land operations contributed approximately 83 percent ($2,100.5 million) of our consolidated operating revenues during fiscal 2011, compared with approximately 75 percent ($1,412.5 million) of consolidated operating revenues during fiscal 2010 and approximately 78 percent ($1,441.2 million) of consolidated operating revenues during fiscal 2009. Rig utilization was approximately 86 percent in fiscal 2011 and approximately 73 percent in fiscal 2010, up from approximately 68 percent in fiscal 2009. Our fleet of FlexRigs increased to an average utilization of approximately 99 percent during fiscal 2011, while our conventional and highly mobile rigs had a combined average utilization of approximately 11 percent. A rig is considered to be utilized when it is operated or being mobilized or demobilized under contract. At the close of fiscal 2011, 224 land rigs were working out of 248 available rigs.

OFFSHORE DRILLING

        Our Offshore operations contributed approximately 8 percent in fiscal year 2011 ($201.4 million) of our consolidated operating revenue compared to 11 percent in both fiscal years 2010 and 2009 ($202.7 million and $204.7 million, respectively) of our consolidated operating revenues. Rig utilization in fiscal 2011 was approximately 77 percent compared to approximately 80 percent in fiscal 2010 and approximately 89 percent in fiscal 2009. At the end of fiscal 2011, we had eight of our nine offshore platform rigs under contract and continued to work under management contracts for three customer-owned rigs. Revenues from drilling services performed for our largest offshore drilling customer totaled approximately 53 percent of offshore revenues during fiscal 2011.

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        Our International Land operations contributed approximately 9 percent ($226.8 million) of our consolidated operating revenues during fiscal 2011, compared with approximately 13 percent ($247.2 million) of consolidated operating revenues during fiscal 2010 and 10 percent ($187.1 million) in fiscal 2009. Rig utilization in fiscal 2011 was 70 percent, 71 percent in fiscal 2010 and 70 percent in fiscal 2009.

        At the end of fiscal 2011, we had nine rigs in Argentina. Our utilization rate was approximately 49 percent during fiscal 2011, approximately 53 percent during fiscal 2010 and approximately 52 percent during fiscal 2009. Revenues generated by Argentine drilling operations contributed approximately 2 percent ($44.2 million) of our consolidated operating revenues during fiscal 2011 compared with approximately 3 percent ($55.9 million) in fiscal 2010 and 2 percent ($42.1 million) in fiscal 2009. Revenues from drilling services performed for our two largest customers in Argentina totaled approximately 1 percent of consolidated operating revenues and approximately 15 percent of international operating revenues during fiscal 2011. The Argentine drilling contracts are primarily with large international or national oil companies.

        At the end of fiscal 2011, we had six rigs in Colombia. Our utilization rate was approximately 83 percent during fiscal 2011, approximately 71 percent during fiscal 2010 and approximately 88 percent during fiscal 2009. Revenues generated by Colombian drilling operations contributed approximately 3 percent of our consolidated operating revenues during fiscal 2011 and 2010 ($74.5 million and $57.5 million in fiscal 2011 and 2010, respectively), compared with 4 percent ($77.3 million) of our consolidated operating revenues during fiscal 2009. Revenues from drilling services performed for our largest customer in Colombia totaled approximately 1 percent of consolidated operating revenues and approximately 12 percent of international operating revenues during fiscal 2011. The Colombian drilling contracts are primarily with large international or national oil companies.

        At the end of fiscal 2011, we had four rigs in Ecuador. The utilization rate in Ecuador was 85 percent in fiscal 2011, compared to 100 percent in fiscal 2010 and 2009. Revenues generated by Ecuadorian drilling operations contributed approximately 2 percent ($42.6 million) of our consolidated operating revenues during fiscal 2011 compared with approximately 3 percent in both fiscal years 2010 and 2009 ($52.1 million and $52.3 million in fiscal 2010 and 2009, respectively). Revenues from drilling services performed for the largest customer in Ecuador totaled approximately 1 percent of consolidated operating revenues and approximately 13 percent of international operating revenues during fiscal 2011. The Ecuadorian drilling contracts are primarily with large international or national oil companies.

        In addition to our operations discussed above, at the end of fiscal 2011 we had two rigs in Tunisia, and three rigs in Bahrain. An additional rig is en route to Bahrain subsequent to September 30, 2011.

FINANCIAL

        Information relating to revenues, total assets and operating income by reportable operating segments may be found on, and is incorporated by reference to, pages 71 through 75 of our Annual Report (Exhibit 13 to this Form 10-K).

EMPLOYEES

        We had 7,694 employees within the United States (17 of which were part-time employees) and 1,030 employees in international operations as of September 30, 2011.

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AVAILABLE INFORMATION

        Information relating to our internet address and information relating to our Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") filings may be found on, and is incorporated by reference to, page 77 of our Annual Report (Exhibit 13 to this Form 10-K).

Item 1A.    RISK FACTORS

        In addition to the risk factors discussed elsewhere in this Report, we caution that the following "Risk Factors" could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our offshore and land operations are subject to a number of operational risks, including environmental and weather risks, which could expose us to significant losses and damage claims. We are not fully insured against all of these risks and our contractual indemnity provisions may not fully protect us.

        Our drilling operations are subject to the many hazards inherent in the business, including inclement weather, blowouts, well fires, loss of well control, pollution, and reservoir damage. These hazards could cause significant environmental damage, personal injury, suspension of drilling operations, serious damage or destruction of equipment and property and substantial damage to producing formations and surrounding lands and waters. Our offshore drilling operations are also subject to potentially greater environmental liability, including pollution of offshore waters and related negative impact on wildlife and habitat, adverse sea conditions and platform damage or destruction due to collision with aircraft or marine vessels. Our offshore operations may also be negatively affected by blowouts or uncontrolled release of oil by third parties whose offshore operations are unrelated to our operations. We operate several platform rigs in the Gulf of Mexico. The Gulf of Mexico experiences hurricanes and other extreme weather conditions on a frequent basis, the frequency of which may increase with any climate change. Damage caused by high winds and turbulent seas could potentially curtail operations on such platform rigs for significant periods of time until the damage can be repaired. Moreover, even if our platform rigs are not directly damaged by such storms, we may experience disruptions in operations due to damage to customer platforms and other related facilities in the area. We have a new-build rig assembly facility located near the Houston, Texas ship channel, and our principal fabricator and other vendors are also located in the gulf coast region. Due to their location, these facilities are exposed to potentially greater hurricane damage.

        We have indemnification agreements with many of our customers and we also maintain liability and other forms of insurance. In general, our drilling contracts contain contractual rights to indemnity from our customer for, among other things, pollution and reservoir damage. However, our contractual rights to indemnification may be unenforceable or limited due to negligent or willful acts of commission or omission by us, our subcontractors and/or suppliers. Our customers may dispute, or be unable to meet, their contractual indemnification obligations to us. Accordingly, we may be unable to transfer these risks to our drilling customers by contract or indemnification agreements. Incurring a liability for which we are not fully indemnified or insured could have a material adverse effect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        With the exception of "named wind storm" risk in the Gulf of Mexico, we insure rigs and related equipment at values that approximate the current replacement cost on the inception date of the policy. However, we self-insure our deductible as well as a significant portion of the estimated replacement cost of our offshore rigs and our land rigs and equipment. We also carry insurance with varying deductibles and coverage limits with respect to offshore platform rigs and "named wind storm" risk in the Gulf of Mexico.

        We have insurance coverage for comprehensive general liability, automobile liability, worker's compensation and employer's liability, and certain other specific risks. Insurance is purchased over deductibles to reduce our exposure to catastrophic events. We retain a significant portion of our expected losses under our worker's compensation, general liability and automobile liability programs. The Company self-insures a number of other risks including loss of earnings and business interruption. We are unable to obtain significant amounts of insurance to cover risks of underground reservoir damage; however, we are generally indemnified under our drilling contracts from this risk.

        If a significant accident or other event occurs and is not fully covered by insurance or an enforceable or recoverable indemnity from a customer, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial

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condition and results of operations. Our insurance will not in all situations provide sufficient funds to protect us from all liabilities that could result from our drilling operations. Our coverage includes aggregate policy limits. As a result, we retain the risk for any loss in excess of these limits. No assurance can be given that all or a portion of our coverage will not be cancelled during fiscal 2012, that insurance coverage will continue to be available at rates considered reasonable or that our coverage will respond to a specific loss. Further, we may experience difficulties in collecting from our insurers or our insurers may deny all or a portion of our claims for insurance coverage.

Oil and natural gas prices are volatile, and low prices could negatively affect our financial results in the future.

        Our operations can be materially affected by low oil and gas prices. We believe that any significant reduction in oil and gas prices could depress the level of exploration and production activity and result in a corresponding decline in demand for our services. Worldwide military, political and economic events, including initiatives by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, may affect both the demand for, and the supply of, oil and gas. Fluctuations during the last few years in the demand and supply of oil and gas have contributed to, and are likely to continue to contribute to, price volatility. Any prolonged reduction in demand for our services could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

A sluggish global economy may affect our business.

        As a result of volatility in oil and natural gas prices and a continuing sluggish global economic environment, we are unable to determine whether our customers will maintain spending on exploration and development drilling or whether customers and/or vendors and suppliers will be able to access financing necessary to sustain their current level of operations, fulfill their commitments and/or fund future operations and obligations. The current global economic environment may impact industry fundamentals and result in reduced demand for drilling rigs. These conditions could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

The contract drilling business is highly competitive.

        Competition in contract drilling involves such factors as price, rig availability, efficiency, condition and type of equipment, reputation, operating safety, environmental impact, and customer relations. Competition is primarily on a regional basis and may vary significantly by region at any particular time. Land drilling rigs can be readily moved from one region to another in response to changes in levels of activity, and an oversupply of rigs in any region may result, leading to increased price competition.

        Although many contracts for drilling services are awarded based solely on price, we have been successful in establishing long-term relationships with certain customers which have allowed us to secure drilling work even though we may not have been the lowest bidder for such work. We have continued to attempt to differentiate our services based upon our FlexRigs and our engineering design expertise, operational efficiency, safety and environmental awareness. This strategy is less effective when lower demand for drilling services intensifies price competition and makes it more difficult or impossible to compete on any basis other than price. Also, future improvements in operational efficiency and safety by our competitors could negatively affect our ability to differentiate our services.

The loss of one or a number of our large customers could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        In fiscal 2011, we received approximately 57 percent of our consolidated operating revenues from our ten largest contract drilling customers and approximately 32 percent of our consolidated operating revenues from our three largest customers (including their affiliates). We believe that our relationship with all of these customers is good; however, the loss of one or more of our larger customers could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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International uncertainties and local laws could adversely affect our business.

        International operations are subject to certain political, economic and other uncertainties not encountered in U.S. operations, including increased risks of terrorism, kidnapping of employees, expropriation of equipment as well as expropriation of a particular oil company operator's property and drilling rights, taxation policies, foreign exchange restrictions, currency rate fluctuations and general hazards associated with foreign sovereignty over certain areas in which operations are conducted. On June 30, 2010, the Venezuelan government seized 11 rigs and associated real and personal property owned by our Venezuelan subsidiary.

        There can be no assurance that there will not be changes in local laws, regulations and administrative requirements or the interpretation thereof which could have a material adverse effect on the profitability of our operations or on our ability to continue operations in certain areas. Because of the impact of local laws, our future operations in certain areas may be conducted through entities in which local citizens own interests and through entities (including joint ventures) in which we hold only a minority interest or pursuant to arrangements under which we conduct operations under contract to local entities. While we believe that neither operating through such entities nor pursuant to such arrangements would have a material adverse effect on our operations or revenues, there can be no assurance that we will in all cases be able to structure or restructure our operations to conform to local law (or the administration thereof) on terms we find acceptable.

        Although we attempt to minimize the potential impact of such risks by operating in more than one geographical area, during fiscal 2011, approximately 9 percent of our consolidated operating revenues were generated from the international contract drilling business. During fiscal 2011, approximately 71 percent of the international operating revenues were from operations in South America. All of the South American operating revenues were from Argentina, Colombia and Ecuador.

We depend on a limited number of vendors, some of which are thinly capitalized and the loss of any of which could disrupt our operations.

        Certain key rig components are either purchased from or fabricated by a single or limited number of vendors, and we have no long-term contracts with many of these vendors. Shortages could occur in these essential components due to an interruption of supply or increased demands in the industry. If we are unable to procure certain of such rig components, we would be required to reduce our rig construction or other operations, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        If our principal fabricator, located on the Texas gulf coast, was unable or unwilling to continue fabricating rig components, then we would have to transfer this work to other acceptable fabricators. This transfer could result in significant delay in the completion of new FlexRigs. Any significant interruption in the fabrication of rig components could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

        Certain key rig components are obtained from vendors that are, in some cases, thinly capitalized, independent companies that generate significant portions of their business from us or from a small group of companies in the energy industry. These vendors may be disproportionately affected by any loss of business, downturn in the energy industry or reduction or unavailability of credit. Therefore, disruptions in rig component delivery may occur, and such disruptions and terminations could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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Our securities portfolio may lose significant value due to a decline in equity prices and other market-related risks, thus impacting our debt ratio and financial strength.

        At September 30, 2011, we had a portfolio of securities with a total fair value of $348 million. These securities are subject to a wide variety of market-related risks that could substantially reduce or increase the fair value of our holdings. Except for investments in limited partnerships carried at cost, the portfolio is recorded at fair value on our balance sheet with changes in unrealized after-tax value reflected in the equity section of our balance sheet. Any reduction in fair value would have an impact on our debt ratio and financial strength. At November 17, 2011, the fair value of the portfolio had increased to approximately $431.2 million.

Government regulations and environmental laws could adversely affect our business.

        Many aspects of our operations are subject to government regulation, including those relating to drilling practices, pollution, disposal of hazardous substances and oil field waste. The United States and various other countries have environmental regulations which affect drilling operations. The cost of compliance with these laws could be substantial. A failure to comply with these laws and regulations could expose us to substantial civil and criminal penalties. In addition, environmental laws and regulations in the United States impose a variety of requirements on "responsible parties" related to the prevention of oil spills and liability for damages from such spills. As an owner and operator of drilling rigs, we may be deemed to be a responsible party under these laws and regulations.

        We believe that we are in substantial compliance with all legislation and regulations affecting our operations in the drilling of oil and gas wells and in controlling the discharge of wastes. To date, compliance costs have not materially affected our capital expenditures, earnings, or competitive position, although compliance measures may add to the costs of drilling operations. Additional legislation or regulation may reasonably be anticipated, and the effect thereof on our operations cannot be predicted.

Regulation of greenhouse gases and climate change could have a negative impact on our business.

        Some scientific studies have suggested that emissions of certain gases, commonly referred to as "greenhouse gases" ("GHGs") and including carbon dioxide and methane, may be contributing to warming of the Earth's atmosphere and other climatic changes. In response to such studies, the issue of climate change and the effect of GHG emissions, in particular emissions from fossil fuels, is attracting increasing attention worldwide. We are aware of the increasing focus of local, state, national and international regulatory bodies on GHG emissions and climate change issues. The United States Congress is considering legislation to reduce GHG emissions. Although it is not possible at this time to predict whether proposed legislation or regulations will be adopted, any such future laws and regulations could result in increased compliance costs or additional operating restrictions. Any additional costs or operating restrictions associated with legislation or regulations regarding GHG emissions could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

New legislation and regulatory initiatives relating to hydraulic fracturing could result in increased costs and additional operating restrictions or delays.

        Members of the U.S Congress and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, or the EPA, are reviewing more stringent regulation of hydraulic fracturing, a technology which involves the injection of water, sand and chemicals under pressure into rock formations to stimulate oil and natural gas production. Both the U.S. Congress and the EPA are studying whether there is any link between hydraulic fracturing and soil or ground water contamination or any impact on public health. Legislation has been introduced before Congress to provide for federal regulation of hydraulic fracturing and to require disclosure of the chemicals used in the fracturing process. In addition, some states have and others are considering adopting regulations that could restrict hydraulic fracturing in certain circumstances. In the event we engage in any hydraulic fracturing activities, any new laws, regulation or permitting requirements regarding hydraulic fracturing could lead to operational delays, increased operating costs or third party or governmental claims, additional burdens that could serve to delay or limit the drilling services we provide to third parties whose drilling operations could be impacted by these regulations, increased costs of compliance and doing

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business, or delay in the development of unconventional gas resources from shale formations which are not commercial without the use of hydraulic fracturing.

Our business and results of operations may be adversely affected by foreign currency devaluation.

        Contracts for work in foreign countries generally provide for payment in U.S. dollars; however, government-owned petroleum companies may in the future require that a greater proportion of these payments be made in local currencies. Based upon current information, we believe that our exposure to potential losses from currency devaluation in foreign countries is immaterial. However, in the event of future payments in local currencies or an inability to exchange local currencies for U.S. dollars, we may incur currency devaluation losses which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Fixed term contracts may in certain instances be terminated without an early termination payment.

        Fixed term drilling contracts customarily provide for termination at the election of the customer, with an "early termination payment" to be paid to us if a contract is terminated prior to the expiration of the fixed term. However, under certain limited circumstances, such as destruction of a drilling rig, our bankruptcy, sustained unacceptable performance by us or delivery of a rig beyond certain grace and/or liquidated damage periods, no early termination payment would be paid to us. Even if an early termination payment is owed to us, the current global economic environment may affect the customer's ability to pay the early termination payment.

Shortages of drilling equipment and supplies could adversely affect our operations.

        The contract drilling business is highly cyclical. During periods of increased demand for contract drilling services, delays in delivery and shortages of drilling equipment and supplies can occur. These risks are intensified during periods when the industry experiences significant new drilling rig construction or refurbishment. Any such delays or shortages could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

New technologies may cause our drilling methods and equipment to become less competitive, resulting in an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

        Although we take measures to ensure that we use advanced oil and natural gas drilling technology, changes in technology or improvements in competitors' equipment could make our equipment less competitive or require significant capital investments to keep our equipment competitive. Any such changes in technology could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Competition for experienced personnel may negatively impact our operations or financial results.

        We utilize highly skilled personnel in operating and supporting our businesses. In times of high utilization, it can be difficult to retain, and in some cases find, qualified individuals. Although to date our operations have not been materially affected by competition for personnel, an inability to obtain or find a sufficient number of qualified personnel could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Improvements in or new discoveries of alternative energy technologies could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

        Since our business depends on the level of activity in the oil and natural gas industry, any improvement in or new discoveries of alternative energy technologies that increase the use of alternative forms of energy and reduce the demand for oil and natural gas could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

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Item 1B.    UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

        We have received no written comments regarding our periodic or current reports from the staff of the Securities and Exchange Commission that were issued 180 days or more preceding the end of our 2011 fiscal year and that remain unresolved.

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Item 2.    PROPERTIES

CONTRACT DRILLING

        The following table sets forth certain information concerning our U.S. land and offshore drilling rigs as of September 30, 2011:

Location   Rig   Optimum Depth (Feet)   Rig Type   Drawworks: Horsepower
FLEXRIGS                  

TEXAS

 

 

164

 

18,000

 

SCR (FlexRig1)

 

1,500
TEXAS     165   18,000   SCR (FlexRig1)   1,500
TEXAS     166   18,000   SCR (FlexRig1)   1,500
TEXAS     167   18,000   SCR (FlexRig1)   1,500
TEXAS     168   18,000   SCR (FlexRig1)   1,500
TEXAS     169   18,000   SCR (FlexRig1)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     179   18,000   SCR (FlexRig2)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     180   18,000   SCR (FlexRig2)   1,500
TEXAS     181   18,000   SCR (FlexRig2)   1,500
TEXAS     182   18,000   SCR (FlexRig2)   1,500
TEXAS     183   18,000   SCR (FlexRig2)   1,500
TEXAS     184   18,000   SCR (FlexRig2)   1,500
TEXAS     185   18,000   SCR (FlexRig2)   1,500
TEXAS     186   18,000   SCR (FlexRig2)   1,500
TEXAS     187   18,000   SCR (FlexRig2)   1,500
TEXAS     188   18,000   SCR (FlexRig2)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     189   18,000   SCR (FlexRig2)   1,500
TEXAS     210   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     211   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     212   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     213   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
NEW MEXICO     214   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
COLORADO     215   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     216   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
PENNSYLVANIA     217   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     218   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     219   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     220   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     221   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     222   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
NEW MEXICO     223   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     224   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
WEST VIRGINIA     225   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     226   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     227   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     229   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     230   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     231   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     232   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     233   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     234   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     235   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
CALIFORNIA     236   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     237   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     238   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     239   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
CALIFORNIA     240   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500

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Location   Rig   Optimum Depth (Feet)   Rig Type   Drawworks: Horsepower
NORTH DAKOTA     241   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     243   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     244   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     245   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     246   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
LOUISIANA     247   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     248   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     249   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     250   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     251   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     252   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     253   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     254   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     255   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     256   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     257   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     258   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     259   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     260   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
CALIFORNIA     261   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
CALIFORNIA     262   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     263   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     264   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     265   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     266   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     267   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     268   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     269   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
COLORADO     271   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
PENNSYLVANIA     272   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
WYOMING     273   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
TEXAS     274   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
WYOMING     275   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     276   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     277   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
COLORADO     278   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
TEXAS     279   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
COLORADO     280   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
TEXAS     281   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
TEXAS     282   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
TEXAS     283   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
PENNSYLVANIA     284   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
PENNSYLVANIA     285   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
WYOMING     286   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
PENNSYLVANIA     287   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
TEXAS     288   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
ARKANSAS     289   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
PENNSYLVANIA     290   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     293   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     294   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     295   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
TEXAS     296   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
TEXAS     297   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
UTAH     298   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
TEXAS     299   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500

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Location   Rig   Optimum Depth (Feet)   Rig Type   Drawworks: Horsepower
NEW MEXICO     300   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
TEXAS*     301   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
TEXAS     302   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
TEXAS     303   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
WYOMING     304   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
TEXAS     305   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
TEXAS     306   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
WYOMING     307   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
COLORADO     308   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     309   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
WYOMING     310   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
UTAH     311   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
TEXAS     312   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
TEXAS     313   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
TEXAS     314   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
COLORADO     315   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     316   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     317   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
WYOMING     318   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
UTAH     319   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
PENNSYLVANIA     320   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
COLORADO     321   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
COLORADO     322   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
COLORADO     323   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     324   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     325   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
WYOMING     326   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
TEXAS     327   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
ARKANSAS     328   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     329   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
COLORADO     330   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
TEXAS     331   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
TEXAS     332   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
TEXAS     340   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
TEXAS     341   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
ARKANSAS     342   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
COLORADO     343   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
TEXAS     344   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
TEXAS     345   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
TEXAS     346   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
TEXAS     347   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
CALIFORNIA     348   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
CALIFORNIA     349   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
TEXAS     351   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
TEXAS     352   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
COLORADO     353   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
WEST VIRGINIA     354   14,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,500
NEW MEXICO     355   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
TEXAS     356   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
NEW MEXICO     370   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
PENNSYLVANIA     371   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     372   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     373   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     374   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     375   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500

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Location   Rig   Optimum Depth (Feet)   Rig Type   Drawworks: Horsepower
OKLAHOMA     376   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     377   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     378   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     379   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
CALIFORNIA     380   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
CALIFORNIA     381   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     382   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     383   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     384   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
PENNSYLVANIA     385   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     386   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     387   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     388   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     389   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     390   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     391   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     392   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     393   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     394   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     395   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     396   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     397   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     398   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     399   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     415   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
NEW MEXICO     416   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     417   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     418   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     419   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     420   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     421   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
CALIFORNIA     422   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     423   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
CALIFORNIA     424   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     425   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
CALIFORNIA     426   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     427   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     428   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     429   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     430   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     431   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     432   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     433   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     434   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     435   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     436   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     437   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     438   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     439   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
CALIFORNIA     440   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     441   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     442   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     443   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
CALIFORNIA     444   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     445   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500

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Location   Rig   Optimum Depth (Feet)   Rig Type   Drawworks: Horsepower
NORTH DAKOTA     446   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     447   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     448   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
COLORADO     449   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
OKLAHOMA     450   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     453   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
NORTH DAKOTA     454   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
TEXAS     455   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
PENNSYLVANIA     500   20,000   AC (FlexRig5)   1,500

HIGHLY MOBILE RIGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OKLAHOMA

 

 

158

 

10,000

 

SCR

 

900
TEXAS     155   14,000   SCR   1,200
TEXAS     146   16,000   SCR   1,200
UTAH     154   16,000   SCR   1,500

CONVENTIONAL RIGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OKLAHOMA

 

 

110

 

12,000

 

SCR

 

700
OKLAHOMA     96   16,000   SCR   1,000
OKLAHOMA     118   16,000   SCR   1,200
OKLAHOMA#     119   16,000   SCR   1,200
TEXAS#     120   16,000   SCR   1,200
LOUISIANA     122   16,000   SCR   1,700
OKLAHOMA     162   18,000   SCR   1,500
LOUISIANA     79   20,000   SCR   2,000
TEXAS     80   20,000   SCR   1,500
OKLAHOMA     89   20,000   SCR   1,500
OKLAHOMA     92   20,000   SCR   1,500
OKLAHOMA     94   20,000   SCR   1,500
OKLAHOMA     98   20,000   SCR   1,500
TEXAS     137   26,000   SCR   2,000
TEXAS     149   26,000   SCR   2,000
LOUISIANA     72   30,000   SCR   3,000
OKLAHOMA     73   30,000   SCR   3,000
TEXAS     125   30,000   SCR   3,000
LOUISIANA     134   30,000   SCR   3,000
TEXAS     136   30,000   SCR   3,000
TEXAS     157   30,000   SCR   3,000
LOUISIANA     161   30,000   SCR   3,000
LOUISIANA     163   30,000   SCR   3,000

OFFSHORE PLATFORM RIGS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRINIDAD

 

 

203

 

20,000

 

Self-Erecting

 

2,500
GULF OF MEXICO     205   20,000   Self-Erecting   2,000
GULF OF MEXICO     206   20,000   Self-Erecting   1,500
LOUISIANA     100   30,000   Conventional   3,000
GULF OF MEXICO     105   30,000   Conventional   3,000
GULF OF MEXICO     107   30,000   Conventional   3,000
GULF OF MEXICO     201   30,000   Tension-leg   3,000
GULF OF MEXICO     202   30,000   Tension-leg   3,000
GULF OF MEXICO     204   30,000   Tension-leg   3,000

*
Rig moved to Bahrain in the first quarter of fiscal 2012

#
Rig sold subsequent to September 30, 2011

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        The following table sets forth information with respect to the utilization of our U.S. land and offshore drilling rigs for the periods indicated:

 
  Years ended September 30,  
 
  2007   2008   2009   2010   2011  

U.S. Land Rigs

                               
 

Number of rigs at end of period

    157     185     201     220     248  
 

Average rig utilization rate during period (1)

    97 %   96 %   68 %   73 %   86 %

U.S. Offshore Platform Rigs

                               
 

Number of rigs at end of period

    9     9     9     9     9  
 

Average rig utilization rate during period (1)

    65 %   75 %   89 %   80 %   77 %

(1)
A rig is considered to be utilized when it is operated or being moved, assembled or dismantled under contract.

        The following table sets forth certain information concerning our international drilling rigs as of September 30, 2011:

Location   Rig   Optimum Depth (Feet)   Rig Type   Drawworks: Horsepower
Argentina     335   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
Argentina     336   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
Argentina     337   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
Argentina     338   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
Argentina     123   26,000   SCR   2,100
Argentina     175   30,000   SCR   3,000
Argentina     177   30,000   SCR   3,000
Argentina     139   30,000+   SCR   3,000
Argentina     151   30,000+   SCR   3,000
Bahrain     291   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
Bahrain     292   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
Bahrain     339   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
Colombia     333   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
Colombia     334   8,000   AC (FlexRig4)   1,150
Colombia     176   18,000   SCR   1,500
Colombia     190   26,000   SCR   2,000
Colombia     133   30,000   SCR   3,000
Colombia     152   30,000+   SCR   3,000
Ecuador     132   18,000   SCR   1,500
Ecuador     121   20,000   SCR   1,700
Ecuador     117   26,000   SCR   2,500
Ecuador     138   26,000   SCR   2,500
Tunisia     228   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500
Tunisia     242   18,000   AC (FlexRig3)   1,500

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        The following table sets forth information with respect to the utilization of our international drilling rigs for the periods indicated:

 
  Years ended September 30,  
 
  2007   2008   2009   2010   2011  

Number of rigs at end of period

    16     19     33     28     24  

Average rig utilization rate during period (1)(2)

    89 %   72 %   70 %   71 %   70 %

(1)
A rig is considered to be utilized when it is operated or being moved, assembled or dismantled under contract.

(2)
Does not include rigs returned to the United States for major modifications and upgrades.

STOCK PORTFOLIO

        Information required by this item regarding our stock portfolio may be found on, and is incorporated by reference to, page 23 of our Annual Report (Exhibit 13 to this Form 10-K) under the caption, "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations."

Item 3.    LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

        1.     Pending Investigation by the U.S. Attorney.

        In May 2010, one of our employees reported certain possible choke manifold testing irregularities at one offshore platform rig. Operations were promptly suspended on that rig after receiving the employee's report. The Minerals Management Service (now known as the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement) was promptly notified of the employee's report and it conducted an initial investigation of this matter. Upon conclusion of the initial investigation, we were permitted to resume normal operations on the rig. Also, we promptly commenced an internal investigation of the employee's allegations. Our internal investigation found that certain employees on the rig failed to follow our policies and procedures, which resulted in termination of those employees. There were no spills or discharges to the environment.

        The U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Louisiana has commenced a grand jury investigation, which is ongoing. We received, and have complied with, a subpoena for documents in connection with that investigation. Certain of our employees have testified or are scheduled to testify before the grand jury. In late April 2011, the Company was advised that it is a subject of this investigation. Although we presently believe that this matter will not have a material adverse effect on the Company, we can provide no assurances as to the timing or eventual outcome of this investigation.

        2.     Venezuela Expropriation.

        Our wholly-owned subsidiaries, Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co. and Helmerich & Payne de Venezuela, C.A. filed a lawsuit in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia on September 23, 2011 against the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A. ("Petroleo") and PDVSA Petroleo, S.A. ("PDVSA"). We are seeking damages for the taking of our Venezuelan drilling business in violation of international law and for breach of contract. Additionally, we are participating in two arbitrations against third parties not affiliated with the Venezuelan government, Petroleo or PDVSA in an attempt to collect an aggregate $75 million relating to the seizure of our property in Venezuela. While there exists the possibility of realizing a recovery, we are currently unable to determine the timing or amounts we may receive, if any, or the likelihood of recovery.

Item 4.    [Removed and reserved.]

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OUR EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

        The following table sets forth the names and ages of our executive officers, together with all positions and offices held with the Company by such executive officers. Officers are elected to serve until the meeting of the Board of Directors following the next Annual Meeting of Stockholders and until their successors have been duly elected and have qualified or until their earlier resignation or removal.

W. H. Helmerich, III, 88   Chairman of the Board since 1987; Director since 1949

Hans Helmerich, 53

 

President and Chief Executive Officer since 1989; Director since 1987

John W. Lindsay, 50

 

Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer since 2010; Executive Vice President, U.S. and International Operations of Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co. since 2006; Vice President of U.S. Land Operations of Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co. from 1997 to 2006

Steven R. Mackey, 60

 

Executive Vice President, Secretary, General Counsel and Chief Administrative Officer since March 2010; Executive Vice President, Secretary and General Counsel from June 2008 to March 2010; Secretary since 1990; Vice President and General Counsel since 1988

Juan Pablo Tardio, 46

 

Vice President and Chief Financial Officer since April 2010; Director of Investor Relations from January 2008 to April 2010; Manager of Investor Relations from August 2005 to January 2008

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PART II

Item 5.    MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

        The principal market on which our common stock is traded is the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol "HP". The high and low sale prices per share for the common stock for each quarterly period during the past two fiscal years as reported in the NYSE-Composite Transaction quotations follow:

 
  2010   2011  
Quarter
  High   Low   High   Low  

First

  $ 46.24   $ 36.18   $ 49.46   $ 39.65  

Second

    49.13     36.23     69.72     47.53  

Third

    43.72     32.34     70.47     57.08  

Fourth

    42.03     35.56     73.40     40.60  

        We paid quarterly cash dividends during the past two fiscal years as shown in the following table:

 
  Paid per Share   Total Payment  
 
  Fiscal   Fiscal  
Quarter
  2010   2011   2010   2011  

First

  $ .05   $ .06   $ 5,286,530   $ 6,376,282  

Second

    .05     .06     5,300,194     6,408,617  

Third

    .05     .06     5,303,994     6,438,106  

Fourth

    .06     .07     6,363,377     7,518,604  

        Payment of future dividends will depend on earnings and other factors.

        As of November 17, 2011, there were 578 record holders of our common stock as listed by our transfer agent's records.

Item 6.    SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

        The following table summarizes selected financial information and should be read in conjunction with the Consolidated Financial Statements and the Notes thereto and the related Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations contained on pages 4 through 36 of our Annual Report (Exhibit 13 to this Form 10-K). Amounts for fiscal years 2007, 2008 and 2009 have been restated to reflect the Venezuelan operations as discontinued operations. Refer to Part I, Item 1 above for additional information regarding discontinued operations.

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Five-year Summary of Selected Financial Data

 
  2007   2008   2009   2010   2011  
 
  (in thousands except per share amounts)
 

Operating revenues

  $ 1,502,380   $ 1,869,371   $ 1,843,740   $ 1,875,162   $ 2,543,894  

Income from continuing operations

    415,924     420,258     380,546     286,081     434,668  

Income (loss) from discontinued operations

    33,337     41,480     (27,001 )   (129,769 )   (482 )

Net Income

    449,261     461,738     353,545     156,312     434,186  

Basic earnings per share from continuing operations

    4.03     4.02     3.61     2.70     4.06  

Basic earnings (loss) per share from discontinued operations

    0.32     0.40     (0.26 )   (1.23 )    

Basic earnings per share

    4.35     4.42     3.35     1.47     4.06  

Diluted earnings per share from continuing operations

    3.95     3.93     3.56     2.66     3.99  

Diluted earnings (loss) per share from discontinued operations

    0.32     0.39     (0.25 )   (1.21 )    

Diluted earnings per share

    4.27     4.32     3.31     1.45     3.99  

Total assets*

    2,885,369     3,588,045     4,161,024     4,265,370     5,003,891  

Long-term debt

    445,000     475,000     420,000     360,000     235,000  

Cash dividends declared per common share

    0.1800     0.1850     0.2000     0.2200     0.2600  

*
Total assets for all years include amounts related to discontinued operations

Item 7.    MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

        Information required by this item may be found on, and is incorporated by reference to, pages 4 through 36 of our Annual Report (Exhibit 13 to this Form 10-K) under the caption "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations."

Item 7A.    QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

        Information required by this item may be found under the caption "Risk Factors" beginning on page of this Report and on, and is incorporated by reference to, the following pages of our Annual Report (Exhibit 13 to this Form 10-K) under Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements:

Market Risk
  Page

•       Foreign Currency Exchange Rate Risk

  33-34

•       Commodity Price Risk

  34-35

•       Interest Rate Risk

  35-36

•       Equity Price Risk

  36

Item 8.    FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

        Information required by this item may be found on, and is incorporated by reference to, pages 38 through 76 of our Annual Report (Exhibit 13 to this Form 10-K).

Item 9.    CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

        None.

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Item 9A.    CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

    a)
    Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures.

      As of the end of the period covered by this Form 10-K, our management, under the supervision and with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) or 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended) as of September 30, 2011. Based on that evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that:

      our disclosure controls and procedures are effective at ensuring that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports we file or submit under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC's rules and forms; and

      our disclosure controls and procedures operate such that important information flows to appropriate collection and disclosure points in a timely manner and are effective to ensure that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, and made known to our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, particularly during the period when this Form 10-K was prepared, as appropriate to allow timely decision regarding the required disclosure.

    b)
    Management's Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting.

      Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) or 15d-15(f) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Our internal control over financial reporting is designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Our internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that:

      (i)
      pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of our assets;

      (ii)
      provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that our receipts and expenditures are being made only in accordance with authorizations of our management and the Board of Directors; and

      (iii)
      provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of our assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

      Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

      Management, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting based on the framework in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. This evaluation included review of the documentation of controls, evaluation of the design effectiveness of controls, testing of the operating effectiveness of controls and a conclusion on this evaluation. Although there are inherent limitations in the effectiveness of any system of internal control over financial reporting, based on this evaluation, management has concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of September 30, 2011.

      The independent registered public accounting firm that audited our financial statements, Ernst & Young LLP, has issued an attestation report on our internal control over financial reporting. This report appears below at the end of this Item 9A of Form 10-K.

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    c)
    Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

        There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting during our fourth fiscal quarter of 2011 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

* * *

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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

The Board of Directors and Shareholders
Helmerich & Payne, Inc.

        We have audited Helmerich & Payne, Inc.'s internal control over financial reporting as of September 30, 2011, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (the COSO criteria). Helmerich & Payne, Inc.'s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting, and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting included in the accompanying Management's Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the company's internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.

        We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk, and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

        A company's internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company's internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the company's assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

        Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

        In our opinion, Helmerich & Payne, Inc. maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of September 30, 2011, based on the COSO criteria.

        We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated balance sheets of Helmerich & Payne, Inc. as of September 30, 2011 and 2010 and the related consolidated statements of income, shareholders' equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended September 30, 2011 and our report dated November 23, 2011 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.

    /s/ Ernst & Young LLP

Tulsa, Oklahoma
November 23, 2011

 

 

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Item 9B.    OTHER INFORMATION

        None.

25


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PART III

Item 10.    DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

        The information required by this item is incorporated herein by reference to the material under the captions "Proposal 1—Election of Directors," "Corporate Governance" and "Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance" in our definitive Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held March 7, 2012, to be filed with the SEC not later than 120 days after September 30, 2011. Information required under this item with respect to executive officers under Item 401 of Regulation S-K appears under "Our Executive Officers" in Part I of this Form 10-K.

        We have adopted a Code of Ethics for Principal Executive Officer and Senior Financial Officers. The text of this code is located on our website under "Corporate Governance." Our Internet address is www.hpinc.com. We intend to disclose any amendments to or waivers from this code on our website.

Item 11.    EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

        The information required by this item regarding executive compensation, as well as director compensation and compensation committee interlocks and insider participation is incorporated herein by reference to the material beginning with the caption "Executive Compensation Discussion and Analysis" and ending with the caption "Potential Payments Upon Termination", as well as under the captions "Director Compensation in Fiscal 2011" and "Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation" in our definitive Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held March 7, 2012, to be filed with the SEC not later than 120 days after September 30, 2011.

Item 12.    SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

        The information required by this item is incorporated herein by reference to the material under the captions "Summary of All Existing Equity Compensation Plans," "Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners" and "Security Ownership of Management" in our definitive Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held March 7, 2012, to be filed with the SEC not later than 120 days after September 30, 2011.

Item 13.    CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

        The information required by this item is incorporated herein by reference to the material under the captions "Transactions With Related Persons, Promoters and Certain Control Persons" and "Corporate Governance" in our definitive Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held March 7, 2012, to be filed with the SEC not later than 120 days after September 30, 2011.

Item 14.    PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

        The information required by this item is incorporated herein by reference to the material under the caption "Audit Fees" in our definitive Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held March 7, 2012, to be filed with the SEC not later than 120 days after September 30, 2011.

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PART IV

Item 15.    EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

a)   1.     Financial Statements:    The following appear in our Annual Report to Stockholders (Exhibit 13 to this Form 10-K) on the pages indicated below and are incorporated herein by reference:  
 
   
   
   
  Page  

 

 

 

 

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

 

37

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Income for the Years Ended September 30, 2011, 2010 and 2009

 

 

38

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Balance Sheets at September 30, 2011 and 2010

 

 

39-40

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Shareholders' Equity for the Years Ended September 30, 2011, 2010 and 2009

 

 

41

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Years Ended September 30, 2011, 2010 and 2009

 

 

42

 

 

 

 

 

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

 

43-76

 

 

 

2.

 

 

Financial Statement Schedules:    All schedules are omitted as inapplicable or because the required information is contained in the financial statements or included in the notes thereto.

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.

 

 

Exhibits.    The following documents are included as exhibits to this Form 10-K. Exhibits incorporated by reference are duly noted as such.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.1

 

Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation of Helmerich & Payne, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 3.1 of the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K to the Securities & Exchange Commission for fiscal 2006, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.2

 

Amended and Restated By-Laws of the Company are incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 3.1 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on September 10, 2007, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.1

 

Rights Agreement dated as of January 8, 1996, between the Company and The Liberty National Bank and Trust Company of Oklahoma City, N.A. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 1 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on January 18, 1996, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.2

 

Amendment to Rights Agreement dated December 8, 2005, between the Company and UMB Bank, N.A. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 4 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on December 12, 2005, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

 

 

 

 

 

*10.1

 

Consulting Services Agreement between W. H. Helmerich, III and the Company dated March 30, 1990, is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.3 of the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K to the Securities and Exchange Commission for fiscal 1996, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

 

 

 

 

 

*10.2

 

Amendment to Consulting Services Agreement between W. H. Helmerich, III and the Company dated December 26, 1990, is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K to the Securities and Exchange Commission for fiscal 2006, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

 

 

 

 

 

*10.3

 

Second Amendment to Consulting Services Agreement between W. H. Helmerich, III and the Company dated September 11, 2006, is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company's Form 8-K filed September 13, 2006, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

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          *10.4   Helmerich & Payne, Inc. 2000 Stock Incentive Plan is incorporated herein by reference to Appendix "A" of the Company's Proxy Statement on Schedule 14A filed on January 26, 2001.  

 

 

 

 

 

*10.5

 

Form of Agreements for Helmerich & Payne, Inc. 2000 Stock Incentive Plan being (i) Restricted Stock Award Agreement, (ii) Incentive Stock Option Agreement and (iii) Nonqualified Stock Option Agreement are incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 to the Company's Registration Statement No. 333-63124 on Form S-8 dated June 15, 2001.

 

 

 

 

 

 

*10.6

 

Form of Director Nonqualified Stock Option Agreement for the Helmerich & Payne, Inc. 2000 Stock Incentive Plan is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q to the Securities and Exchange Commission for the quarter ended June 30, 2002, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

 

 

 

 

 

*10.7

 

Form of Change of Control Agreement for Helmerich & Payne, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.3 of the Company's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q to the Securities and Exchange Commission for the quarter ended June 30, 2002, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.8

 

Note Purchase Agreement dated as of August 15, 2002, among Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co., Helmerich & Payne, Inc. and various insurance companies is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.20 of the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K to the Securities and Exchange Commission for fiscal 2002, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.9

 

Credit Agreement dated December 18, 2006, among Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co., Helmerich & Payne, Inc. and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on December 20, 2006, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.10

 

Note Purchase Agreement dated as of June 15, 2009, among Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co., Helmerich & Payne, Inc. and various Note purchasers is incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on July 21, 2009, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.11

 

Office Lease dated May 30, 2003, between K/B Fund IV and Helmerich & Payne, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.18 of the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K to the Securities and Exchange Commission for fiscal 2003, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.12

 

First Amendment to Lease between ASP, Inc. and Helmerich & Payne, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of Form 8-K filed by the Company on May 29, 2008.

 

 

 

 

 

 

*10.13

 

Helmerich & Payne, Inc. Annual Bonus Plan for Executive Officers is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on December 7, 2009, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

 

 

 

 

 

*10.14

 

Helmerich & Payne, Inc. 2005 Long-Term Incentive Plan is incorporated herein by reference to Appendix "A" to the Company's Proxy Statement on Schedule 14A filed January 26, 2006.

 

 

 

 

 

 

*10.15

 

Form of Agreements for Helmerich & Payne, Inc. 2005 Long-Term Incentive Plan applicable to certain executives: (i) Nonqualified Stock Option Agreement, (ii) Incentive Stock Option Agreement, and (iii) Restricted Stock Award Agreement are incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on December 8, 2009, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

28


Table of Contents

          *10.16   Form of Agreements for the Helmerich & Payne, Inc. 2005 Long-Term Incentive Plan applicable to participants other than certain executives: Nonqualified Stock Option Agreement, Incentive Stock Option Agreement, and Restricted Stock Award Agreement are incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.3 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on December 8, 2009, SEC File No. 001-04221.  

 

 

 

 

 

*10.17

 

Form of Amendment to Nonqualified Stock Option Agreements and Amendment to Restricted Stock Award Agreements for the Helmerich & Payne, Inc. 2005 Long-Term Incentive Plan applicable to certain executive officers are incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.4 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on December 7, 2009, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

 

 

 

 

 

*10.18

 

Form of Amendment to Nonqualified Stock Option Agreements and Amendment to Restricted Stock Award Agreements for the Helmerich & Payne, Inc. 2005 Long-Term Incentive Plan applicable to participants other than certain executive officers are incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.5 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on December 7, 2009, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

 

 

 

 

 

*10.19

 

Helmerich & Payne, Inc. 2010 Long-Term Incentive Plan is incorporated herein by reference to Appendix "A" of the Company's Proxy Statement on Schedule 14A filed on January 26, 2011.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.20

 

Fabrication Contract between Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co. and Southeast Texas Industries, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on December 7, 2006, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.21

 

Contract dated July 18, 2007, between Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co. and Southeast Texas Industrial Services, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on July 18, 2007, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.22

 

Amendment to Contract dated August 8, 2008, between Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co. and Southeast Texas Industries, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.33 of the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K to the Securities and Exchange Commission for fiscal 2008, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.23

 

Amendment to Contract dated August 8, 2008, between Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co. and Southeast Texas Industrial Services, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.34 of the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K to the Securities and Exchange Commission for fiscal 2008, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.24

 

Second Amendment to Contract dated March 26, 2010, between Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co. and Southeast Texas Industries, Inc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.25

 

Second Amendment to Contract dated March 26, 2010, between Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co. and Southeast Texas Industrial Services, Inc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.26

 

Third Amendment to Contract dated August 4, 2011, between Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co. and Southeast Texas Industries, Inc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.27

 

Third Amendment to Contract dated August 4, 2011, between Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co. and Southeast Texas Industrial Services, Inc.

 

 

 

 

 

 

*10.28

 

Supplemental Retirement Income Plan for Salaried Employees of Helmerich & Payne, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q to the Securities and Exchange Commission for the quarter ended December 31, 2008, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

 

 

 

 

 

*10.29

 

Supplemental Savings Plan for Salaried Employees of Helmerich & Payne, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Company's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q to the Securities and Exchange Commission for the quarter ended December 31, 2008, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

29


Table of Contents

          *10.30   Helmerich & Payne, Inc. Director Deferred Compensation Plan is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.3 of the Company's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q to the Securities and Exchange Commission for the quarter ended December 31, 2008, SEC File No. 001-04221.  

 

 

 

 

 

13.

 

The Company's Annual Report to Stockholders for fiscal 2011.

 

 

 

 

 

 

21.

 

List of Subsidiaries of the Company.

 

 

 

 

 

 

23.1

 

Consent of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm.

 

 

 

 

 

 

31.1

 

Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

 

 

 

 

 

31.2

 

Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

 

 

 

 

 

32.

 

Certification of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

 

 

 

 

 

101.

 

Financial statements from the annual report on Form 10-K of Helmerich & Payne, Inc. for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011, filed on November 23, 2011, formatted in XBRL: (i) the Consolidated Statements of Income, (ii) the Consolidated Balance Sheets, (iii) the Consolidated Statements of Shareholders' Equity, (iv) the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows and (v) the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

*
Management or Compensatory Plan or Arrangement.

30


Table of Contents


SIGNATURES

        Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Company has duly caused this Report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized:

HELMERICH & PAYNE, INC.    

By

 

/s/ HANS HELMERICH

Hans Helmerich, President and
Chief Executive Officer
Date: November 23, 2011

 

 

        Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this Report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the Company and in the capacities and on the dates indicated:

By   /s/ WILLIAM L. ARMSTRONG

William L. Armstrong, Director
Date: November 23, 2011
  By   /s/ RANDY A. FOUTCH

Randy A. Foutch, Director
November 23, 2011

By

 

/s/ HANS HELMERICH

Hans Helmerich, Director & CEO
Date: November 23, 2011

 

By

 

/s/ W. H. HELMERICH, III

W. H. Helmerich, III, Director
Date: November 23, 2011

By

 

/s/ PAULA MARSHALL

Paula Marshall, Director
Date: November 23, 2011

 

By

 

/s/ FRANCIS ROONEY

Francis Rooney, Director
Date: November 23, 2011

By

 

/s/ EDWARD B. RUST, JR.

Edward B. Rust, Jr., Director
Date: November 23, 2011

 

By

 

/s/ JOHN D. ZEGLIS

John D. Zeglis, Director
Date: November 23, 2011

By

 

/s/ JUAN PABLO TARDIO

Juan Pablo Tardio
(Principal Financial Officer)
Date: November 23, 2011

 

By

 

/s/ GORDON K. HELM

Gordon K. Helm
(Principal Accounting Officer)
Date: November 23, 2011

31


Table of Contents


Exhibit Index

        The following documents are included as exhibits to this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Exhibits incorporated herein are duly noted as such.

Exhibit No.   Description
  3.1   Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation of Helmerich & Payne, Inc. is incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.1 of the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K to the Securities and Exchange Commission for fiscal 2006, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

3.2

 

Amended and Restated By-Laws of the Company are incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 3.1 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on September 10, 2007, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

4.1

 

Rights Agreement dated as of January 8, 1996, between the Company and The Liberty National Bank and Trust Company of Oklahoma City, N.A. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 1 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on January 18, 1996, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

4.2

 

Amendment to Rights Agreement dated December 8, 2005, between the Company and UMB Bank, N.A. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 4 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on December 12, 2005, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

*10.1

 

Consulting Services Agreement between W. H. Helmerich, III and the Company dated March 30, 1990, is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.3 of the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K to the Securities and Exchange Commission for fiscal 1996, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

*10.2

 

Amendment to Consulting Services Agreement between W. H. Helmerich, III and the Company dated December 26, 1990, is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K to the Securities and Exchange Commission for fiscal 2006, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

*10.3

 

Second Amendment to Consulting Services Agreement between W. H. Helmerich, III and the Company dated September 11, 2006, is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company's Form 8-K filed September 13, 2006, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

*10.4

 

Helmerich & Payne, Inc. 2000 Stock Incentive Plan is incorporated herein by reference to Appendix "A" of the Company's Proxy Statement on Schedule 14A filed on January 26, 2001.

 

*10.5

 

Form of Agreements for Helmerich & Payne, Inc. 2000 Stock Incentive Plan being (i) Restricted Stock Award Agreement, (ii) Incentive Stock Option Agreement and (iii) Nonqualified Stock Option Agreement are incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 to the Company's Registration Statement No. 333-63124 on Form S-8 dated June 15, 2001.

 

*10.6

 

Form of Director Nonqualified Stock Option Agreement for the Helmerich & Payne, Inc. 2000 Stock Incentive Plan is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q to the Securities and Exchange Commission for the quarter ended June 30, 2002, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

*10.7

 

Form of Change of Control Agreement for Helmerich & Payne, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.3 of the Company's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q to the Securities and Exchange Commission for the quarter ended June 30, 2002, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

10.8

 

Note Purchase Agreement dated as of August 15, 2002, among Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co., Helmerich & Payne, Inc. and various insurance companies is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.20 of the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K to the Securities and Exchange Commission for fiscal 2002, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

10.9

 

Credit Agreement dated December 18, 2006, among Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co., Helmerich & Payne, Inc. and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on December 20, 2006, SEC File No. 001-04221.

32


Table of Contents

Exhibit No.   Description
  10.10   Note Purchase Agreement dated as of June 15, 2009, among Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co., Helmerich & Payne, Inc. and various Note purchasers is incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on July 21, 2009, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

10.11

 

Office Lease dated May 30, 2003, between K/B Fund IV and Helmerich & Payne, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.18 of the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K to the Securities and Exchange Commission for fiscal 2003, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

10.12

 

First Amendment to Lease between ASP, Inc. and Helmerich & Payne, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of Form 8-K filed by the Company on May 29, 2008.

 

*10.13

 

Helmerich & Payne, Inc. Annual Bonus Plan for Executive Officers is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on December 7, 2009, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

*10.14

 

Helmerich & Payne, Inc. 2005 Long-Term Incentive Plan is incorporated herein by reference to Appendix "A" to the Company's Proxy Statement on Schedule 14A filed January 26, 2006.

 

*10.15

 

Form of Agreements for Helmerich & Payne, Inc. 2005 Long-Term Incentive Plan applicable to certain executives: (i) Nonqualified Stock Option Agreement, (ii) Incentive Stock Option Agreement, and (iii) Restricted Stock Award Agreement are incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on December 8, 2009, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

*10.16

 

Form of Agreements for the Helmerich & Payne, Inc. 2005 Long-Term Incentive Plan applicable to participants other than certain executives: Nonqualified Stock Option Agreement, Incentive Stock Option Agreement, and Restricted Stock Award Agreement are incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.3 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on December 8, 2009, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

*10.17

 

Form of Amendment to Nonqualified Stock Option Agreements and Amendment to Restricted Stock Award Agreements for the Helmerich & Payne, Inc. 2005 Long-Term Incentive Plan applicable to certain executive officers are incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.4 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on December 7, 2009, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

*10.18

 

Form of Amendment to Nonqualified Stock Option Agreements and Amendment to Restricted Stock Award Agreements for the Helmerich & Payne, Inc. 2005 Long-Term Incentive Plan applicable to participants other than certain executive officers are incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.5 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on December 7, 2009, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

*10.19

 

Helmerich & Payne, Inc. 2010 Long-Term Incentive Plan is incorporated herein by reference to Appendix "A" of the Company's Proxy Statement on Schedule 14A filed on January 26, 2011.

 

10.20

 

Fabrication Contract between Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co. and Southeast Texas Industries, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on December 7, 2006, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

10.21

 

Contract dated July 18, 2007, between Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co. and Southeast Texas Industrial Services, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company's Form 8-K filed on July 7, 2007, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

10.22

 

Amendment to Contract dated August 8, 2008, between Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co. and Southeast Texas Industries, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.33 of the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K to the Securities and Exchange Commission for fiscal 2008, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

10.23

 

Amendment to Contract dated August 8, 2008, between Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co. and Southeast Texas Industrial Services, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.34 of the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K to the Securities and Exchange Commission for fiscal 2008, SEC File No. 001-04221.

33


Table of Contents

Exhibit No.   Description
  10.24   Second Amendment to Contract dated March 26, 2010, between Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co. and Southeast Texas Industries, Inc.

 

10.25

 

Second Amendment to Contract dated March 26, 2010, between Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co. and Southeast Texas Industrial Services, Inc.

 

10.26

 

Third Amendment to Contract dated August 4, 2011, between Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co. and Southeast Texas Industries, Inc.

 

10.27

 

Third Amendment to Contract dated August 4, 2011, between Helmerich & Payne International Drilling Co. and Southeast Texas Industrial Services, Inc.

 

*10.28

 

Supplemental Retirement Income Plan for Salaried Employees of Helmerich & Payne, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q to the Securities and Exchange Commission for the quarter ended December 31, 2008, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

*10.29

 

Supplemental Savings Plan for Salaried Employees of Helmerich & Payne, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Company's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q to the Securities and Exchange Commission for the quarter ended December 31, 2008, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

*10.30

 

Helmerich & Payne, Inc. Director Deferred Compensation Plan is incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit 10.3 of the Company's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q to the Securities and Exchange Commission for the quarter ended December 31, 2008, SEC File No. 001-04221.

 

13.

 

The Company's Annual Report to Stockholders for fiscal 2011.

 

21.

 

List of Subsidiaries of the Company.

 

23.1

 

Consent of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm.

 

31.1

 

Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

31.2

 

Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, as adopted pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

32.

 

Certification of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

101.

 

Financial statements from the annual report on Form 10-K of Helmerich & Payne, Inc. for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2011, filed on November 23, 2011, formatted in XBRL: (i) the Consolidated Statements of Income, (ii) the Consolidated Balance Sheets, (iii) the Consolidated Statements of Shareholders' Equity, (iv) the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows and (v) the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

*
Management or Compensatory Plan or Arrangement.

34



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