HPQ » Topics » If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.

This excerpt taken from the HPQ 10-Q filed Mar 11, 2010.

If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.

        Many of the industries in which we compete are characterized by rapid technological advances in hardware performance and software features and functionality; frequent introduction of new products; short product life cycles; and continual improvement in product price characteristics relative to product performance. Among the risks associated with the introduction of new products and services are delays in development or manufacturing, variations in costs, delays in customer purchases or reductions in price of existing products in anticipation of new introductions, difficulty in predicting customer demand for the new offerings and effectively managing inventory levels so that they are in line with anticipated demand, risks associated with customer qualification and evaluation of new products and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects or may not be supported adequately by application software. If we do not make an effective transition from existing products and services to future offerings, our revenue may decline.

        Our revenue and gross margin also may suffer due to the timing of product or service introductions by our suppliers and competitors. This is especially challenging when a product has a short life cycle or a competitor introduces a new product just before our own product introduction. Furthermore, sales of our new products and services may replace sales, or result in discounting of some of our current offerings, offsetting the benefit of even a successful introduction. There also may be overlaps in the current products and services of HP and portfolios acquired through mergers and acquisitions that we must manage. In addition, it may be difficult to ensure performance of new customer contracts in accordance with our revenue, margin and cost estimates and to achieve operational efficiencies embedded in our estimates. Given the competitive nature of our industry, if any of these risks materializes, future demand for our products and services and our results of operations may suffer.

This excerpt taken from the HPQ 10-K filed Dec 17, 2009.

If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.

        Many of the industries in which we compete are characterized by rapid technological advances in hardware performance and software features and functionality; frequent introduction of new products; short product life cycles; and continual improvement in product price characteristics relative to product performance. Among the risks associated with the introduction of new products and services are delays in development or manufacturing, variations in costs, delays in customer purchases or reductions in price of existing products in anticipation of new introductions, difficulty in predicting customer demand for the new offerings and effectively managing inventory levels so that they are in line with anticipated demand, risks associated with customer qualification and evaluation of new products and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects or may not be supported adequately by application software. If we do not make an effective transition from existing products and services to future offerings, our revenue may decline.

        Our revenue and gross margin also may suffer due to the timing of product or service introductions by our suppliers and competitors. This is especially challenging when a product has a short life cycle or a competitor introduces a new product just before our own product introduction. Furthermore, sales of our new products and services may replace sales, or result in discounting of some of our current offerings, offsetting the benefit of even a successful introduction. There also may be overlaps in the current products and services of HP and portfolios acquired through mergers and acquisitions that we must manage. In addition, it may be difficult to ensure performance of new customer contracts in accordance with our revenue, margin and cost estimates and to achieve operational efficiencies embedded in our estimates. Given the competitive nature of our industry, if any

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of these risks materializes, future demand for our products and services and our results of operations may suffer.

This excerpt taken from the HPQ 10-Q filed Jun 5, 2009.

If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.

        Many of the industries in which we compete are characterized by rapid technological advances in hardware performance and software features and functionality; frequent introduction of new products; short product life cycles; and continual improvement in product price characteristics relative to product performance. Among the risks associated with the introduction of new products and services are delays in development or manufacturing, variations in costs, delays in customer purchases or reductions in price of existing products in anticipation of new introductions, difficulty in predicting customer demand for the new offerings and effectively managing inventory levels so that they are in line with anticipated demand, risks associated with customer qualification and evaluation of new products and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects or may not be supported adequately by application software. If we do not make an effective transition from existing products and services to future offerings, our revenue may decline.

        Our revenue and gross margin also may suffer due to the timing of product or service introductions by our suppliers and competitors. This is especially challenging when a product has a short life cycle or a competitor introduces a new product just before our own product introduction. Furthermore, sales of our new products and services may replace sales, or result in discounting of some of our current offerings, offsetting the benefit of even a successful introduction. There also may be overlaps in the current products and services of HP and portfolios acquired through mergers and acquisitions that we must manage. In addition, it may be difficult to ensure performance of new customer contracts in accordance with our revenue, margin and cost estimates and to achieve operational efficiencies embedded in our estimates. Given the competitive nature of our industry, if any of these risks materializes, future demand for our products and services and our results of operations may suffer.

This excerpt taken from the HPQ 10-Q filed Mar 10, 2009.

If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.

        Many of the industries in which we compete are characterized by rapid technological advances in hardware performance and software features and functionality; frequent introduction of new products; short product life cycles; and continual improvement in product price characteristics relative to product performance. Among the risks associated with the introduction of new products and services are delays in development or manufacturing, variations in costs, delays in customer purchases or reductions in price of existing products in anticipation of new introductions, difficulty in predicting customer demand for the new offerings and effectively managing inventory levels so that they are in line with anticipated demand, risks associated with customer qualification and evaluation of new products and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects or may not be supported adequately by application software. If we do not make an effective transition from existing products and services to future offerings, our revenue may decline.

        Our revenue and gross margin also may suffer due to the timing of product or service introductions by our suppliers and competitors. This is especially challenging when a product has a short life cycle or a competitor introduces a new product just before our own product introduction. Furthermore, sales of our new products and services may replace sales, or result in discounting of some of our current offerings, offsetting the benefit of even a successful introduction. There also may be overlaps in the current products and services of HP and portfolios acquired through mergers and acquisitions that we must manage. In addition, it may be difficult to ensure performance of new customer contracts in accordance with our revenue, margin and cost estimates and to achieve operational efficiencies embedded in our estimates. Given the competitive nature of our industry, if any

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of these risks materializes, future demand for our products and services and our results of operations may suffer.

These excerpts taken from the HPQ 10-K filed Dec 18, 2008.

If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.

        Many of the industries in which we compete are characterized by rapid technological advances in hardware performance and software features and functionality; frequent introduction of new products; short product life cycles; and continual improvement in product price characteristics relative to product performance. Among the risks associated with the introduction of new products and services are delays in development or manufacturing, variations in costs, delays in customer purchases or reductions in price of existing products in anticipation of new introductions, difficulty in predicting customer demand for the new offerings and effectively managing inventory levels so that they are in line with anticipated demand, risks associated with customer qualification and evaluation of new products and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects or may not be supported adequately by application software. If we do not make an effective transition from existing products and services to future offerings, our revenue may decline.

        Our revenue and gross margin also may suffer due to the timing of product or service introductions by our suppliers and competitors. This is especially challenging when a product has a short life cycle or a competitor introduces a new product just before our own product introduction. Furthermore, sales of our new products and services may replace sales, or result in discounting of some of our current offerings, offsetting the benefit of even a successful introduction. There also may be

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overlaps in the current products and services of HP and portfolios acquired through mergers and acquisitions that we must manage. In addition, it may be difficult to ensure performance of new customer contracts in accordance with our revenue, margin and cost estimates and to achieve operational efficiencies embedded in our estimates. Given the competitive nature of our industry, if any of these risks materializes, future demand for our products and services and our results of operations may suffer.

If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.



        Many of the industries in which we compete are characterized by rapid technological advances in hardware performance and software
features and functionality; frequent introduction of new products; short product life cycles; and continual improvement in product price characteristics relative to product performance. Among the
risks associated with the introduction of new products and services are delays in development or manufacturing, variations in costs, delays in customer purchases or reductions in price of existing
products in anticipation of new introductions, difficulty in predicting customer demand for the new offerings and effectively managing inventory levels so that they are in line with anticipated
demand, risks associated with customer qualification and evaluation of new products and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects or may not be supported adequately by application
software. If we do not make an effective transition from existing products and services to future offerings, our revenue may decline.



        Our
revenue and gross margin also may suffer due to the timing of product or service introductions by our suppliers and competitors. This is especially challenging when a product has a
short life cycle or a competitor introduces a new product just before our own product introduction. Furthermore, sales of our new products and services may replace sales, or result in discounting of
some of our current offerings, offsetting the benefit of even a successful introduction. There also may be



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HREF="#bg72001a_main_toc">Table of Contents






overlaps
in the current products and services of HP and portfolios acquired through mergers and acquisitions that we must manage. In addition, it may be difficult to ensure performance of new customer
contracts in accordance with our revenue, margin and cost estimates and to achieve operational efficiencies embedded in our estimates. Given the competitive nature of our industry, if any of these
risks materializes, future demand for our products and services and our results of operations may suffer.



This excerpt taken from the HPQ 10-Q filed Sep 5, 2008.

If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.

        Many of the industries in which we compete are characterized by rapid technological advances in hardware performance and software features and functionality; frequent introduction of new products; short product life cycles; and continual improvement in product price characteristics relative to product performance. Among the risks associated with the introduction of new products and services are delays in development or manufacturing, variations in costs, delays in customer purchases or reductions in price of existing products in anticipation of new introductions, difficulty in predicting customer demand for the new offerings and effectively managing inventory levels so that they are in line with anticipated demand, risks associated with customer qualification and evaluation of new products and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects or may not be supported adequately by application software. If we do not make an effective transition from existing products and services to future offerings, our revenue may decline.

        Our revenue and gross margin also may suffer due to the timing of product or service introductions by our suppliers and competitors. This is especially challenging when a product has a short life cycle or a competitor introduces a new product just before our own product introduction. Furthermore, sales of our new products and services may replace sales, or result in discounting of some of our current offerings, offsetting the benefit of even a successful introduction. There also may be overlaps in the current products and services of HP and portfolios acquired through mergers and acquisitions that we must manage. In addition, it may be difficult to ensure performance of new customer contracts in accordance with our revenue, margin and cost estimates and to achieve operational efficiencies embedded in our estimates. Given the competitive nature of our industry, if any of these risks materializes, future demand for our products and services and our results of operations may suffer.

This excerpt taken from the HPQ 10-Q filed Jun 6, 2008.

If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.

        Many of the industries in which we compete are characterized by rapid technological advances in hardware performance and software features and functionality; frequent introduction of new products; short product life cycles; and continual improvement in product price characteristics relative to product performance. Among the risks associated with the introduction of new products and services are delays in development or manufacturing, variations in costs, delays in customer purchases or reductions in price of existing products in anticipation of new introductions, difficulty in predicting customer demand for the new offerings and effectively managing inventory levels so that they are in line with anticipated demand, risks associated with customer qualification and evaluation of new products and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects or may not be supported adequately by application software. If we do not make an effective transition from existing products and services to future offerings, our revenue may decline.

        Our revenue and gross margin also may suffer due to the timing of product or service introductions by our suppliers and competitors. This is especially challenging when a product has a short life cycle or a competitor introduces a new product just before our own product introduction. Furthermore, sales of our new products and services may replace sales, or result in discounting of some of our current offerings, offsetting the benefit of even a successful introduction. There also may be overlaps in the current products and services of HP and portfolios acquired through mergers and acquisitions that we must manage. In addition, it may be difficult to ensure performance of new customer contracts in accordance with our revenue, margin and cost estimates and to achieve operational efficiencies embedded in our estimates. Given the competitive nature of our industry, if any

67



of these risks materializes, future demand for our products and services and our results of operations may suffer.

This excerpt taken from the HPQ 10-K filed Dec 18, 2007.

If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.

        Many of the industries in which we compete are characterized by rapid technological advances in hardware performance and software features and functionality; frequent introduction of new products; short product life cycles; and continual improvement in product price characteristics relative to product performance. Among the risks associated with the introduction of new products and services are delays in development or manufacturing, variations in costs, delays in customer purchases or reductions in price of existing products in anticipation of new introductions, difficulty in predicting customer demand for the new offerings and effectively managing inventory levels so that they are in line with anticipated demand, risks associated with customer qualification and evaluation of new products and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects or may not be supported adequately by application software. If we do not make an effective transition from existing products and services to future offerings, our revenue may decline.

        Our revenue and gross margin also may suffer due to the timing of product or service introductions by our suppliers and competitors. This is especially challenging when a product has a short life cycle or a competitor introduces a new product just before our own product introduction. Furthermore, sales of our new products and services may replace sales, or result in discounting of some of our current offerings, offsetting the benefit of even a successful introduction. There also may be overlaps in the current products and services of HP and portfolios acquired through mergers and acquisitions that we must manage. In addition, it may be difficult to ensure performance of new customer contracts in accordance with our revenue, margin and cost estimates and to achieve operational efficiencies embedded in our estimates. Given the competitive nature of our industry, if any of these risks materializes, future demand for our products and services and our results of operations may suffer.

This excerpt taken from the HPQ 10-Q filed Sep 7, 2007.

If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.

        Many of the industries in which we compete are characterized by rapid technological advances in hardware performance and software features and functionality; frequent introduction of new products; short product life cycles; and continual improvement in product price characteristics relative to product performance. Among the risks associated with the introduction of new products and services are delays in development or manufacturing, variations in costs, delays in customer purchases or reductions in price of existing products in anticipation of new introductions, difficulty in predicting customer demand for the new offerings and effectively managing inventory levels so that they are in line with anticipated demand, risks associated with customer qualification and evaluation of new products and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects or may not be supported adequately by application software. If we do not make an effective transition from existing products and services to future offerings, our revenue may decline.

        Our revenue and gross margin also may suffer due to the timing of product or service introductions by our suppliers and competitors. This is especially challenging when a product has a short life cycle or a competitor introduces a new product just before our own product introduction. Furthermore, sales of our new products and services may replace sales, or result in discounting of some of our current offerings, offsetting the benefit of even a successful introduction. There also may be overlaps in the current products and services of HP and portfolios acquired through mergers and acquisitions that we must manage. In addition, it may be difficult to ensure performance of new customer contracts in accordance with our revenue, margin and cost estimates and to achieve operational efficiencies embedded in our estimates. Given the competitive nature of our industry, if any of these risks materializes, future demand for our products and services and our results of operations may suffer.

This excerpt taken from the HPQ 10-Q filed Jun 8, 2007.

If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.

        Many of the industries in which we compete are characterized by rapid technological advances in hardware performance and software features and functionality; frequent introduction of new products; short product life cycles; and continual improvement in product price characteristics relative to product performance. Among the risks associated with the introduction of new products and services are delays in development or manufacturing, variations in costs, delays in customer purchases or reductions in price of existing products in anticipation of new introductions, difficulty in predicting customer demand for the new offerings and effectively managing inventory levels so that they are in line with anticipated demand, risks associated with customer qualification and evaluation of new products and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects or may not be supported adequately by application software. If we do not make an effective transition from existing products and services to future offerings, our revenue may decline.

        Our revenue and gross margin also may suffer due to the timing of product or service introductions by our suppliers and competitors. This is especially challenging when a product has a short life cycle or a competitor introduces a new product just before our own product introduction. Furthermore, sales of our new products and services may replace sales, or result in discounting of some of our current offerings, offsetting the benefit of even a successful introduction. There also may be overlaps in the current products and services of HP and portfolios acquired through mergers and acquisitions that we must manage. In addition, it may be difficult to ensure performance of new customer contracts in accordance with our revenue, margin and cost estimates and to achieve operational efficiencies embedded in our estimates. Given the competitive nature of our industry, if any of these risks materializes, future demand for our products and services and our results of operations may suffer.

This excerpt taken from the HPQ 10-Q filed Mar 9, 2007.

If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.

Many of the industries in which we compete are characterized by rapid technological advances in hardware performance, Software functionality and features, frequent introduction of new products, short product life cycles, and continual improvement in product price characteristics relative to product performance. Among the risks associated with the introduction of new products and services are delays in development or manufacturing, variations in costs, delays in customer purchases or reductions in price of existing products in anticipation of new introductions, difficulty in predicting customer demand for the new offerings and effectively managing inventory levels so that they are in line with anticipated demand, risks associated with customer qualification and evaluation of new products and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects or may not be supported adequately by application software. The introduction of new products by our suppliers, such as the release of the Windows Vista™ operating system by Microsoft that occurred near the end of HP’s first fiscal quarter of 2007, also has made it difficult to predict customer demand. If we do not make an effective transition from existing products and services to future offerings, our revenue may decline.

Our revenue and gross margin also may suffer due to the timing of product or service introductions by our suppliers and competitors. This is especially challenging when a product has a short life cycle or a competitor introduces a new product just before our own product introduction. Furthermore, sales of our new products and services may replace sales, or result in discounting of some of our current offerings, offsetting the benefit of even a successful introduction. There also may be overlaps in the current products and services of HP and portfolios acquired through mergers and acquisitions that we must manage. In addition, it may be difficult to ensure performance of new customer contracts in accordance with our revenue, margin and cost estimates and to achieve operational efficiencies embedded in our estimates. Given the competitive nature of our industry, if any of these risks materializes, future demand for our products and services and our results of operations may suffer.

This excerpt taken from the HPQ 10-K filed Dec 22, 2006.

If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.

        Many of the industries in which we compete are characterized by rapid technological advances in hardware performance, software functionality and features, frequent introduction of new products, short product life cycles, and continual improvement in product price characteristics relative to product performance. Among the risks associated with the introduction of new products and services are delays in development or manufacturing, variations in costs, delays in customer purchases or reductions in price of existing products in anticipation of new introductions, difficulty in predicting customer demand for the new offerings and effectively managing inventory levels so that they are in line with anticipated demand, risks associated with customer qualification and evaluation of new products and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects or may not be supported adequately by application software. The introduction of new products by our suppliers, such as the release of the Windows Vista™ operating system by Microsoft during HP's first fiscal quarter of 2007, also may result in delays in customer purchases and difficulty in predicting customer demand. If we do not make an effective transition from existing products and services to future offerings, our revenue may decline.

        Our revenue and gross margin also may suffer due to the timing of product or service introductions by our suppliers and competitors. This is especially challenging when a product has a short life cycle or a competitor introduces a new product just before our own product introduction. Furthermore, sales of our new products and services may replace sales, or result in discounting of some of our current offerings, offsetting the benefit of even a successful introduction. There also may be overlaps in the current products and services of HP and portfolios acquired through mergers and acquisitions that we must manage. In addition, it may be difficult to ensure performance of new

17



customer contracts in accordance with our revenue, margin and cost estimates and to achieve operational efficiencies embedded in our estimates. Given the competitive nature of our industry, if any of these risks materializes, future demand for our products and services and our results of operations may suffer.

This excerpt taken from the HPQ 10-Q filed Sep 11, 2006.

If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.

        Many of the industries in which we compete are characterized by rapid technological advances in hardware performance, software functionality and features, frequent introduction of new products, short product life cycles, and continual improvement in product price characteristics relative to product performance. If we do not make an effective transition from existing products and services to future offerings, our revenue may decline. Among the risks associated with the introduction of new products and services are delays in development or manufacturing, variations in costs, delays in customer purchases or reductions in price of existing products in anticipation of new introductions, difficulty in predicting customer demand for the new offerings and effectively managing inventory levels so that they are in line with anticipated demand, risks associated with customer qualification and evaluation of new products and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects or may not be supported adequately by application software.

        Our revenue and gross margin also may suffer due to the timing of product or service introductions by our suppliers and competitors. This is especially challenging when a product has a short life cycle or a competitor introduces a new product just before our own product introduction. Furthermore, sales of our new products and services may replace sales, or result in discounting of some of our current offerings, offsetting the benefit of even a successful introduction. There also may be overlaps in the current products and services of HP and portfolios acquired through mergers and acquisitions that we must manage. In addition, it may be difficult to ensure performance of new customer contracts in accordance with our revenue, margin and cost estimates and to achieve operational efficiencies embedded in our estimates. Given the competitive nature of our industry, if any

67



of these risks materializes, future demand for our products and services and our results of operations may suffer.

This excerpt taken from the HPQ 10-Q filed Jun 8, 2006.

If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.

        Many of the industries in which we compete are characterized by rapid technological advances in hardware performance, software functionality and features, frequent introduction of new products, short product life cycles, and continual improvement in product price characteristics relative to product performance. If we do not make an effective transition from existing products and services to future offerings, our revenue may decline. Among the risks associated with the introduction of new products and services are delays in development or manufacturing, variations in costs, delays in customer purchases or reductions in price of existing products in anticipation of new introductions, difficulty in predicting customer demand for the new offerings and effectively managing inventory levels so that they are in line with anticipated demand, risks associated with customer qualification and evaluation of new products and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects or may not be supported adequately by application software. Our revenue and gross margin also may suffer due to the timing of product or service introductions by our suppliers and competitors. This is especially challenging when a product has a short life cycle or a competitor introduces a new product just before our own product introduction. Furthermore, sales of our new products and services may replace sales, or result in discounting of some of our current offerings, offsetting the benefit of even a successful introduction. There also may be overlaps in the current products and services of HP and portfolios acquired through mergers and acquisitions that we must manage. In addition, it may be difficult to ensure performance of new customer contracts in accordance with our revenue, margin and cost estimates and to achieve operational efficiencies embedded in our estimates. Given the competitive nature of our industry, if any of these risks materializes, future demand for our products and services and our results of operations may suffer.

This excerpt taken from the HPQ 10-Q filed Mar 10, 2006.

If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.

        Many of the industries in which we compete are characterized by rapid technological advances in hardware performance, software functionality and features, frequent introduction of new products, short product life cycles, and continual improvement in product price characteristics relative to product performance. If we do not make an effective transition from existing products and services to future offerings, our revenue may decline. Among the risks associated with the introduction of new products

56



and services are delays in development or manufacturing, variations in costs, delays in customer purchases or reductions in price of existing products in anticipation of new introductions, difficulty in predicting customer demand for the new offerings and effectively managing inventory levels so that they are in line with anticipated demand, risks associated with customer qualification and evaluation of new products and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects or may not be supported adequately by application software. Our revenue and gross margin also may suffer due to the timing of product or service introductions by our suppliers and competitors. This is especially challenging when a product has a short life cycle or a competitor introduces a new product just before our own product introduction. Furthermore, sales of our new products and services may replace sales, or result in discounting, of some of our current offerings, offsetting the benefit of even a successful introduction. There also may be overlaps in the current products and services of HP and portfolios acquired through mergers and acquisitions that we must manage. In addition, it may be difficult to ensure performance of new customer contracts in accordance with our revenue, margin and cost estimates and to achieve operational efficiencies embedded in our estimates. Given the competitive nature of our industry, if any of these risks materializes, future demand for our products and services and our results of operations may suffer.

This excerpt taken from the HPQ 10-K filed Dec 21, 2005.

If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.

        Many of the industries in which we compete are characterized by rapid technological advances in hardware performance, software functionality and features, frequent introduction of new products, short product life cycles, and continual improvement in product price characteristics relative to product performance. If we do not make an effective transition from existing products and services to future offerings, our revenue may decline. Among the risks associated with the introduction of new products and services are delays in development or manufacturing, variations in costs, delays in customer purchases or reductions in price of existing products in anticipation of new introductions, difficulty in predicting customer demand for the new offerings and effectively managing inventory levels so that they are in line with anticipated demand, risks associated with customer qualification and evaluation of new products and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects or may not be supported adequately by application software. Our revenue and gross margin also may suffer due to the timing of product or service introductions by our suppliers and competitors. This is especially challenging when a product has a short life cycle or a competitor introduces a new product just before our own product introduction. Furthermore, sales of our new products and services may replace sales, or result in discounting, of some of our current offerings, offsetting the benefit of even a successful introduction. There also may be overlaps in the current products and services of HP and portfolios acquired through mergers and acquisitions that we must manage. In addition, it may be difficult to ensure performance of new customer contracts in accordance with our revenue, margin and cost estimates and to achieve operational efficiencies embedded in our estimates. Given the competitive nature of our industry, if any of these risks materializes, future demand for our products and services and our results of operations may suffer.

This excerpt taken from the HPQ 10-Q filed Sep 8, 2005.

If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.

        Many of the industries in which we compete are characterized by rapid technological advances in hardware performance, software functionality and features; frequent introduction of new products; short product life cycles; and continual improvement in product price characteristics relative to product performance. If we do not make an effective transition from existing products and services to future offerings, our revenue may decline. Among the risks associated with the introduction of new products and services are delays in development or manufacturing, variations in costs, delays in customer purchases or reductions in price of existing products in anticipation of new introductions, difficulty in predicting customer demand for the new offerings and effectively managing inventory levels in line with anticipated demand, risks associated with customer qualification and evaluation of new products and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects or may not be supported adequately by application software. Our revenue and gross margin also may suffer due to the timing of product or service introductions by our suppliers and competitors. This is especially challenging when a product has a short life cycle or a competitor introduces a new product just before our own product introduction. Furthermore, sales of our new products and services may replace sales, or result in discounting, of some of our current offerings, offsetting the benefit of even a successful introduction. There also may be overlaps in the current products and services of HP and portfolios acquired through mergers and acquisitions that we must manage. In addition, it may be difficult to ensure performance

64



of new customer contracts in accordance with our revenue, margin and cost estimates, and to achieve operational efficiencies embedded in our estimates. Given the competitive nature of our industry, if any of these risks materialize, future demand for our products and services and our results of operations may suffer.

This excerpt taken from the HPQ 10-Q filed Jun 8, 2005.

If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.

        Many of the industries in which we compete are characterized by rapid technological advances in hardware performance, software functionality and features; frequent introduction of new products; short product life cycles; and continual improvement in product price characteristics relative to product performance. If we do not make an effective transition from existing products and services to future offerings, our revenue may decline. Among the risks associated with the introduction of new products and services are delays in development or manufacturing, variations in costs, delays in customer purchases in anticipation of new introductions, difficulty in predicting customer demand for the new offerings and effectively managing inventory levels in line with anticipated demand, risks associated with customer qualification and evaluation of new products and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects or may not be supported adequately by application software. Our revenue and gross margin also may suffer due to the timing of product or service introductions by our suppliers and competitors. This is especially challenging when a product has a short life cycle or a competitor introduces a new product just before our own product introduction. Furthermore, sales of our new products and services may replace sales, or result in discounting, of some of our current offerings, offsetting the benefit of even a successful introduction. There also may be overlaps in the current products and services of HP and portfolios acquired through mergers and acquisitions that we must manage. In addition, it may be difficult to ensure performance of new customer contracts in accordance with our revenue, margin and cost estimates, and to achieve operational efficiencies embedded in our estimates. Given the competitive nature of our industry, if any of these risks materialize, future demand for our products and services and our results of operations may suffer.

This excerpt taken from the HPQ 10-Q filed Mar 11, 2005.

If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.

        Many of the industries in which we compete are characterized by rapid technological advances in hardware performance, software functionality and features; frequent introduction of new products; short product life cycles; and continual improvement in product price characteristics relative to product performance. If we do not make an effective transition from existing products and services to future offerings, our revenue may decline. Among the risks associated with the introduction of new products and services are delays in development or manufacturing, variations in costs, delays in customer purchases in anticipation of new introductions, difficulty in predicting customer demand for the new offerings and effectively managing inventory levels in line with anticipated demand, risks associated with customer qualification and evaluation of new products and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects or may not be supported adequately by application software. Our revenue and gross margin also may suffer due to the timing of product or service introductions by our suppliers and competitors. This is especially challenging when a product has a short life cycle or a competitor introduces a new product just before our own product introduction. Furthermore, sales of our new products and services may replace sales, or result in discounting, of some of our current offerings, offsetting the benefit of even a successful introduction. There also may be overlaps in the current products and services of HP and portfolios acquired through mergers and acquisitions that we must manage. In addition, it may be difficult to ensure performance of new customer contracts in accordance with our revenue, margin and cost estimates, and to achieve operational efficiencies embedded in our estimates. Given the competitive nature of our industry, if any of these risks materialize, future demand for our products and services and our results of operations may suffer.

This excerpt taken from the HPQ 10-K filed Jan 14, 2005.

If we do not effectively manage our product and services transitions, our revenue may suffer.

        Many of the industries in which we compete are characterized by rapid technological advances in hardware performance, software functionality and features; frequent introduction of new products; short product life cycles; and continual improvement in product price characteristics relative to product performance. If we do not make an effective transition from existing products and services to future offerings, our revenue may decline. Among the risks associated with the introduction of new products and services are delays in development or manufacturing, variations in costs, delays in customer purchases in anticipation of new introductions, difficulty in predicting customer demand for the new offerings and effectively managing inventory levels in line with anticipated demand, risks associated with customer qualification and evaluation of new products and the risk that new products may have quality or other defects or may not be supported adequately by application software. Our revenue and gross margin also may suffer due to the timing of product or service introductions by our suppliers and competitors. This is especially challenging when a product has a short life cycle or a competitor introduces a new product just before our own product introduction. Furthermore, sales of our new products and services may replace sales, or result in discounting, of some of our current offerings, offsetting the benefit of even a successful introduction. There also may be overlaps in the current products and services of HP and portfolios acquired through mergers and acquisitions that we must

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manage. In addition, it may be difficult to ensure performance of new customer contracts in accordance with our revenue, margin and cost estimates, and to achieve operational efficiencies embedded in our estimates. Given the competitive nature of our industry, if any of these risks materialize, future demand for our products and services and our results of operations may suffer.

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