Annual Reports

  • 10-K (Mar 27, 2014)
  • 10-K (Mar 28, 2013)
  • 10-K (Mar 22, 2012)
  • 10-K (Mar 24, 2011)
  • 10-K (Mar 25, 2010)
  • 10-K (Apr 2, 2009)

 
Quarterly Reports

 
8-K

 
Other

Home Depot 10-K 2011
Form 10-K
Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-K

 

  x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended January 30, 2011

OR

 

  ¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Commission File Number 1-8207

THE HOME DEPOT, INC.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)

DELAWARE

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

95-3261426

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

2455 PACES FERRY ROAD, N.W., ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30339

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code: (770) 433-8211

SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OF THE ACT:

 

TITLE OF EACH CLASS

 

NAME OF EACH EXCHANGE

ON WHICH REGISTERED

Common Stock, $0.05 Par Value Per Share   New York Stock Exchange

SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(g) OF THE ACT: None

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes x No ¨

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ¨ No x

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x No ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes x No ¨

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of Registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer x   Accelerated filer ¨   

Non-accelerated filer ¨

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

  Smaller reporting company ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ¨ No x

The aggregate market value of the common stock of the Registrant held by non-affiliates of the Registrant on August 1, 2010 was $48.1 billion.

The number of shares outstanding of the Registrant’s common stock as of March 14, 2011 was 1,622,070,458 shares.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the Registrant’s proxy statement for the 2011 Annual Meeting of Shareholders are incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K to the extent described herein.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

THE HOME DEPOT, INC.

FISCAL YEAR 2010 FORM 10-K

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I

     

Item 1.

   Business      1   

Item 1A.

   Risk Factors      6   

Item 1B.

   Unresolved Staff Comments      9   

Item 2.

   Properties      10   

Item 3.

   Legal Proceedings      12   

Item 4.

   (Removed and Reserved)      12   

PART II

     

Item 5.

  

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

     13   

Item 6.

   Selected Financial Data      15   

Item 7.

   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations      16   

Item 7A.

   Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk      28   

Item 8.

   Financial Statements and Supplementary Data      29   

Item 9.

   Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure      54   

Item 9A.

   Controls and Procedures      54   

Item 9B.

   Other Information      54   

PART III

     

Item 10.

   Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance      55   

Item 11.

   Executive Compensation      56   

Item 12.

  

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

     56   

Item 13.

   Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence      56   

Item 14.

   Principal Accounting Fees and Services      56   

PART IV

     

Item 15.

   Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules      57   
   Signatures      61   


Table of Contents

CAUTIONARY STATEMENT PURSUANT TO THE PRIVATE SECURITIES LITIGATION REFORM ACT OF 1995

Certain statements regarding our future performance constitute “forward-looking statements” as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements may relate to, among other things, the demand for our products and services, net sales growth, comparable store sales, state of the economy, state of the residential construction, housing and home improvement markets, state of the credit markets, including mortgages, home equity loans and consumer credit, inventory and in-stock positions, commodity price inflation and deflation, implementation of store and supply chain initiatives, continuation of reinvestment plans, net earnings performance, earnings per share, stock-based compensation expense, capital allocation and expenditures, liquidity, the effect of adopting certain accounting standards, return on invested capital, management of our purchasing or customer credit policies, the effect of accounting charges, the planned recapitalization of the Company and the timing of its completion, the ability to issue debt securities on terms and at rates acceptable to us, store openings and closures and financial outlook.

Forward-looking statements are based on currently available information and our current assumptions, expectations and projections about future events. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on our forward-looking statements. These statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to future events, risks and uncertainties – many of which are beyond our control or are currently unknown to us – as well as potentially inaccurate assumptions that could cause actual results to differ materially from our expectations and projections. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, those described in Item 1A, “Risk Factors.”

Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they are made, and we do not undertake to update these statements other than as required by law. You are advised, however, to review any further disclosures we make on related subjects in our periodic filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”).

PART I

 

Item 1. Business.

Introduction

The Home Depot, Inc. is the world’s largest home improvement retailer based on Net Sales for the fiscal year ended January 30, 2011 (“fiscal 2010”). The Home Depot stores sell a wide assortment of building materials, home improvement and lawn and garden products and provide a number of services. The Home Depot stores average approximately 105,000 square feet of enclosed space, with approximately 24,000 additional square feet of outside garden area. As of the end of fiscal 2010, we had 2,248 The Home Depot stores located throughout the United States including the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the territories of the U.S. Virgin Islands and Guam, Canada, China and Mexico. When we refer to “The Home Depot,” the “Company,” “we,” “us” or “our” in this report, we are referring to The Home Depot, Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries.

The Home Depot, Inc. is a Delaware corporation that was incorporated in 1978. Our Store Support Center (corporate office) is located at 2455 Paces Ferry Road, N.W., Atlanta, Georgia 30339. Our telephone number is (770) 433-8211.

We maintain an Internet website at www.homedepot.com. We make available on our website, free of charge, our Annual Reports to shareholders, Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, Proxy Statements and Forms 3, 4 and 5 as soon as reasonably practicable after filing such documents with, or furnishing such documents to, the SEC.

We include our website addresses throughout this filing only as textual references. The information contained on our websites is not incorporated by reference into this report.

 

1


Table of Contents

Our Business

Operating Strategy.    In fiscal 2010, we continued to invest in our business and made solid progress against our key initiatives. During the year, we introduced new technologies, continued the transformation of our supply chain and enhanced our on-line presence to provide a more interconnected retail experience for our customers. We continued to eliminate tasks to give associates more time with customers and provide enhanced customer service. At the same time, we remained focused on offering every day values in the stores. Finally, we continued our focus on disciplined capital allocation, expense control and increasing shareholder returns.

Customers.    The Home Depot stores serve three primary customer groups:

 

   

Do-It-Yourself (“D-I-Y”) Customers: These customers are typically home owners who purchase products and complete their own projects and installations.

 

   

Do-It-For-Me (“D-I-F-M”) Customers: These customers are typically home owners who purchase materials themselves and hire third parties to complete the project or installation. We arrange for the installation of a variety of The Home Depot products through qualified independent contractors.

 

   

Professional Customers: These customers are primarily professional remodelers, general contractors, repairmen, small business owners and tradesmen. In many stores, we offer a variety of programs to these customers, including delivery and will-call services, dedicated staff and expanded credit programs, all of which we believe increase sales to these customers.

Products.    A typical Home Depot store stocks approximately 30,000 to 40,000 products during the year, including both national brand name and proprietary items. The following table shows the percentage of Net Sales of each major product group (and related services) for each of the last three fiscal years:

 

Product Group

   Percentage of Net Sales for
Fiscal Year Ended
 
   January 30,
2011
     January 31,
2010
     February 1,
2009
 

Plumbing, electrical and kitchen

     30.0      29.8      30.6

Hardware and seasonal

     29.4         29.1         28.7   

Building materials, lumber and millwork

     21.7         21.9         22.1   

Paint and flooring

     18.9         19.2         18.6   
                          

Total

     100.0      100.0      100.0
                          

In fiscal 2010, we continued to introduce a number of innovative and distinctive products to our customers at highly attractive values. Examples of these new products include EcoSmart® LED light bulbs, Commercial Electric® electrical tools, Husky® tool bags, Platinum Plus™ carpeting and Ryobi® outdoor tools.

To complement and enhance our product selection, we continued to form strategic alliances and exclusive relationships with selected suppliers to market products under a variety of well-recognized brand names. During fiscal 2010, we offered a number of proprietary and exclusive brands across a wide range of departments including, but not limited to, Behr Premium Plus® paint, Hampton Bay® lighting, Vigoro® lawn care products, Husky® hand tools, RIDGID® and Ryobi® power tools and Glacier Bay® bath fixtures. We also continued our partnership with Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia to offer an exclusive Martha Stewart Living brand of home improvement products in select categories including outdoor living, paint, cabinetry, flooring, and shelving and storage. We may consider additional strategic alliances and relationships with other suppliers and will continue to assess opportunities to expand the range of products available under brand names that are exclusive to The Home Depot.

 

2


Table of Contents

From our Store Support Center, we maintain a global sourcing merchandise program to source high-quality products directly from manufacturers around the world. Our merchant team identifies and purchases market leading innovative products directly for our stores. Additionally, we have three sourcing offices located in the Chinese cities of Shanghai, Shenzhen and Dalian, and offices in Gurgaon, India; Rome, Italy; Monterrey, Mexico and Toronto, Canada.

Services.    Our stores offer a variety of installation services. These services target D-I-F-M customers who select and purchase products and installation of those products from us. These installation programs include products such as carpeting, flooring, cabinets, countertops and water heaters. In addition, we provide professional installation of a number of products sold through our in-home sales programs, such as generators and furnace and central air systems.

Stores.

United States.    At the end of fiscal 2010, we were operating 1,976 The Home Depot stores in the U.S., including the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the territories of the U.S. Virgin Islands and Guam. During fiscal 2010, we opened two new The Home Depot stores in the U.S., including one relocation, and closed one store.

Canada.    At the end of fiscal 2010, we were operating 179 The Home Depot stores in ten Canadian provinces.

Mexico.    At the end of fiscal 2010, we were operating 85 The Home Depot stores in Mexico. Of these stores, six were opened during fiscal 2010.

China.    At the end of fiscal 2010, we were operating eight The Home Depot stores in four Chinese cities. We closed two stores in China during fiscal 2010.

Net Sales for the Company outside of the U.S. were $7.5 billion, $7.0 billion and $7.4 billion for fiscal 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively. Long-lived assets outside of the U.S. totaled $3.2 billion, $3.0 billion and $2.8 billion as of January 30, 2011, January 31, 2010 and February 1, 2009, respectively.

Store Support Services

Information Technologies.    During fiscal 2010, we continued to invest in our information technology to serve our customers more effectively and provide an improved overall shopping environment and experience. We also continued to invest in our supply chain and merchandising tools to improve inventory management capabilities.

With regard to our supply chain and merchandising activities, in fiscal 2010 we completed the roll out of a warehouse management system into our flow distribution network, reduced freight costs by implementing transportation planning systems for both inbound and outbound shipments and continued improving inventory management capabilities by implementing a new inventory forecasting solution. Further, we provided additional tools and made improvements to existing tools utilized in merchandising systems to simplify set-up processes and provide more effective management of our distribution network.

To better serve our customers and simplify store tasking, we completed deployment of our FIRST Phones across our stores in fiscal 2010, equipping our associates with devices that are at once portable computers, phones, walkie-talkies and portable registers that allow customers to check out using debit or credit cards. In addition, we are implementing new customer analytics capabilities to better understand customer behavior.

 

3


Table of Contents

Credit Services.    We offer private label credit products in our stores through a third-party credit provider to professional, D-I-Y and D-I-F-M customers. In fiscal 2010, approximately 2.5 million new The Home Depot private label credit accounts were opened, and the total number of The Home Depot active account holders was approximately 10 million. Private label credit card sales accounted for approximately 22% of store sales in fiscal 2010. In fiscal 2010, we also launched a home improvement loan program for D-I-F-M customers and introduced PayPal as a payment option for our online customers.

Logistics.    We continued our supply chain transformation in fiscal 2010 to ensure product availability for customers, effective use of our investment in inventory and optimal total supply chain costs. Across our supply chain operations in the U.S., we continued the restructuring of our distribution center network to meet the changing needs of our business, including our general distribution center space rationalization initiatives and the completion of the Rapid Deployment Center (“RDC”) roll out in the U.S. RDCs allow for aggregation of store product needs to a single purchase order, and then rapid allocation and deployment of inventory to individual stores upon arrival at the center. This process allows improved transportation, simplified order processing at suppliers and last minute reallocation from the time that product needs at stores are determined to actual replenishment.

As a result of the changes to our distribution network, in fiscal 2010 we added 2.9 million net square feet of distribution center space, primarily for new RDCs. At the end of fiscal 2010, we operated 30 bulk distribution centers and 34 conventional distribution centers in the U.S., Canada and Mexico. Additionally in fiscal 2010, we opened seven new RDCs in the U.S., bringing our total number of RDCs to 19. We now serve all of our U.S. stores from RDCs, with approximately 42% of our costs of sales on an annualized basis for those stores serviced through the RDCs. We remain committed to leveraging our supply chain capabilities to fully utilize and optimize our improved logistics network.

Associates.    At the end of fiscal 2010, we employed approximately 321,000 associates, of whom approximately 19,000 were salaried, with the remainder compensated on an hourly or temporary basis. Approximately 59% of our associates are employed on a full-time basis. We believe that our employee relations are very good. To attract and retain qualified personnel, we seek to maintain competitive salary and wage levels in each market we serve.

Intellectual Property.    Our business has one of the most recognized brands in North America. As a result, we believe that The Home Depot® trademark has significant value and is an important factor in the marketing of our products, e-commerce, stores and business. We have registered or applied for registration of trademarks, service marks, copyrights and internet domain names, both domestically and internationally, for use in our business. We also maintain patent portfolios relating to some of our products and services and seek to patent or otherwise protect innovations we incorporate into our products or business operations.

Quality Assurance Program.    We have both quality assurance and engineering resources that are dedicated to overseeing the quality of all of our products, whether they are directly imported, locally- or globally-sourced or proprietary branded products. Through these programs, we have established criteria for supplier and product performance that are designed to ensure that our products comply with federal, state and local safety, quality and performance standards and to allow us to measure and track the timeliness of shipments. We also have a Supplier Social and Environmental Responsibility Program designed to ensure that our suppliers adhere to the highest standards of social and environmental responsibility.

Environmental, Health & Safety (“EH&S”).    We are committed to maintaining a safe environment for our customers and associates and protecting the environment of the communities in which we do business. Our EH&S function in the field is directed by trained associates focused primarily on the execution of the EH&S programs. Additionally, we have a Store Support Center-based team of dedicated EH&S professionals who evaluate, develop, implement and enforce policies, processes and programs on a Company-wide basis.

 

4


Table of Contents

Environmental.    The Home Depot is committed to conducting business in an environmentally responsible manner. This commitment impacts all areas of our business, including store construction and maintenance, energy usage, supply chain, product selection and delivery of product knowledge to our customers.

In fiscal 2010, we continued to implement strict operational standards that establish energy efficient practices in all of our facilities. These include HVAC unit temperature regulation and adherence to strict lighting schedules, which are the largest sources of energy consumption in our stores, as well as using energy management systems in each store to monitor energy efficiency. We estimate that by implementing and utilizing these energy saving programs, we have saved over 3.5 billion kilowatt hours (kWh) since 2004, enough to power approximately 320,000 U.S. homes for one year. We have achieved over a 16 percent reduction in kWh per square foot in our U.S. stores since 2004, and our goal is to achieve a 20 percent reduction in our U.S. stores by 2015, through our energy conservation initiatives. We have also partnered with the U.S. Green Building Council and have built seven Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction (“LEED-NC”) certified and other similarly certified stores. In fiscal 2010, we began one of the largest retailer host solar programs in North America, installing solar panels on 62 of our North American store locations, capable of producing 21 megawatts.

Through our supply chain efficiencies created by the actions described above under “Logistics,” we are targeting a 20 percent reduction in our domestic supply chain greenhouse gas emissions from 2008 to 2015, which would equate to annual fuel savings of approximately 25 million gallons or approximately 8,000 trips around the earth’s circumference. We have been recognized by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency SmartWaySM Transport Partnership for our leadership in conserving energy and lowering greenhouse gas emission from our supply chain activities. In fiscal 2010, we also calculated our total carbon dioxide emissions for 2009 to allow us greater insight into our “carbon footprint” from the operation of our stores as well as from our transportation and supply chain activities.

As the world’s largest home improvement retailer, we are in a unique position to enable our customers to achieve energy savings through our products and services. Through our Eco Options® Program introduced in 2007, we have created product categories that allow consumers to easily identify environmentally preferred product selections in our stores. Our Eco Options® Program has certified approximately 4,000 products that meet specifications for energy efficiency, water conservation, healthy home, clean air and sustainable forestry. Through this program, we sell products such as Energy Star® refrigerators, dishwashers, compact fluorescent light bulbs, programmable thermostats, water heaters and other products, enabling our customers to save on their utility bills. We also help our customers save water through sales of WaterSense®-labeled bath faucets, aerators and toilets. Our Eco Options® page on our website offers consumer education on environmental impacts of various products as well as identifying easy “green” D-I-Y projects. This online experience, coupled with our D-I-Y in-store how-to clinics on “green” projects and our continual enhancement of our Eco Options® product categories, helps us to meet a growing customer demand for environmentally responsible and cost-saving products and projects.

We continue to offer our nationwide, in-store compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulb recycling program launched in June 2008. This service is offered to customers free of charge and is available in all U.S. stores. We also maintain an in-store rechargeable battery recycling program. Launched in 2001 in partnership with the Rechargeable Battery Recycling Corporation, this program is also available to customers free of charge in all U.S. and Canada stores. Through these recycling programs, in fiscal 2010 we helped recycle over 700,000 pounds of CFL bulbs and over 620,000 pounds of rechargeable batteries collected from our customers. In fiscal 2010, we also recycled over 120,000 lead acid batteries collected from our customers under our lead acid battery exchange program, as well as approximately 160,000 tons of cardboard through a nationwide cardboard recycling program across our U.S. stores.

Seasonality.    Our business is seasonal to a certain extent. Generally, our highest volume of sales occurs in our second fiscal quarter, and the lowest volume occurs during our fourth fiscal quarter.

 

5


Table of Contents

Competition.    Our business is highly competitive, based primarily on customer service, price, store location and assortment of merchandise. In each of the markets we serve, there are a number of other home improvement stores, electrical, plumbing and building materials supply houses and lumber yards. With respect to some products, we also compete with specialty design stores, showrooms, discount stores, local, regional and national hardware stores, mail order firms, warehouse clubs, independent building supply stores and, to a lesser extent, other retailers. Due to the variety of competition we face, we are unable to precisely measure the impact on our sales by our competitors.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors.

The risks and uncertainties described below could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations and could cause actual results to differ materially from our expectations and projections. The Risk Factors described below include the considerable risks associated with the current economic environment and the related potential adverse effects on our financial condition and results of operations. You should read these Risk Factors in conjunction with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in Item 7 and our Consolidated Financial Statements and related notes in Item 8. There also may be other factors that we cannot anticipate or that are not described in this report generally because we do not currently perceive them to be material. Those factors could cause results to differ materially from our expectations.

Sustained uncertainty regarding current economic conditions and other factors beyond our control could adversely affect demand for our products and services, our costs of doing business and our financial performance.

Our financial performance depends significantly on the stability of the housing, residential construction and home improvement markets, as well as general economic conditions, including changes in gross domestic product. Adverse conditions in or sustained uncertainty about these markets or the economy could adversely impact consumer confidence, causing our customers to delay purchasing or determine not to purchase home improvement products and services. Other factors – including high levels of unemployment and foreclosures, interest rate fluctuations, fuel and other energy costs, labor and healthcare costs, the availability of financing, the state of the credit markets, including mortgages, home equity loans and consumer credit, weather, natural disasters and other conditions beyond our control – could further adversely affect demand for our products and services, our costs of doing business and our financial performance.

Strong competition could adversely affect prices and demand for our products and services and could decrease our market share.

We operate in markets that are highly competitive. We compete principally based on customer service, price, store location and appearance, and quality, availability and assortment of merchandise. In each market we serve, there are a number of other home improvement stores, electrical, plumbing and building materials supply houses and lumber yards. With respect to some products and services, we also compete with specialty design stores, showrooms, discount stores, local, regional and national hardware stores, mail order firms, warehouse clubs, independent building supply stores and other retailers, as well as with installers of home improvement products. Intense competitive pressures from one or more of our competitors could affect prices or demand for our products and services. If we are unable to timely and appropriately respond to these competitive pressures, including through maintenance of superior customer service and customer loyalty, our financial performance and our market share could be adversely affected.

We may not timely identify or effectively respond to consumer needs, expectations or trends, which could adversely affect our relationship with customers, the demand for our products and services and our market share.

It is difficult to successfully predict the products and services our customers will demand. The success of our business depends in part on our ability to identify and respond promptly to evolving trends in demographics and

 

6


Table of Contents

consumer preferences, expectations and needs. Failure to maintain attractive stores and to timely identify or effectively respond to changing consumer tastes, preferences, expectations as to service levels, spending patterns and home improvement needs could adversely affect our relationship with customers, the demand for our products and services and our market share.

Our success depends upon our ability to attract, train and retain highly qualified associates while also controlling our labor costs.

Our customers expect a high level of customer service and product knowledge from our associates. To meet the needs and expectations of our customers, we must attract, train and retain a large number of highly qualified associates while at the same time controlling labor costs. Our ability to control labor costs is subject to numerous external factors, including prevailing wage rates, the impact of legislation or regulations governing labor relations or healthcare benefits, and health and other insurance costs. In addition, we compete with other retail businesses for many of our associates in hourly positions, and we invest significant resources in training and motivating them to maintain a high level of job satisfaction. These positions have historically had high turnover rates, which can lead to increased training and retention costs. There is no assurance that we will be able to attract or retain highly qualified associates in the future.

The inflation or deflation of commodity prices could affect our prices, demand for our products, our sales and our profit margins.

Prices of certain commodity products, including lumber and other raw materials, are historically volatile and are subject to fluctuations arising from changes in domestic and international supply and demand, labor costs, competition, market speculation, government regulations and periodic delays in delivery. Rapid and significant changes in commodity prices may affect the demand for our products, our sales and our profit margins.

We rely on third party suppliers. If we fail to identify and develop relationships with a sufficient number of qualified suppliers, or if our current suppliers experience financial difficulties, our ability to timely and efficiently access products that meet our high standards for quality could be adversely affected.

We buy our products from suppliers located throughout the world. Our ability to continue to identify and develop relationships with qualified suppliers who can satisfy our high standards for quality and our need to access products in a timely and efficient manner is a significant challenge. Our ability to access products also can be adversely affected by political instability, the financial instability of suppliers (particularly in light of continuing economic difficulties in various regions of the world), suppliers’ noncompliance with applicable laws, trade restrictions, tariffs, currency exchange rates, supply disruptions, shipping interruptions or cost, and other factors beyond our control.

If we are unable to effectively manage and expand our alliances and relationships with selected suppliers of brand name products, we may be unable to effectively execute our strategy to differentiate ourselves from our competitors.

As part of our focus on product differentiation, we have formed strategic alliances and exclusive relationships with selected suppliers to market products under a variety of well-recognized brand names. If we are unable to manage and expand these alliances and relationships or identify alternative sources for comparable products, we may not be able to effectively execute product differentiation.

If we do not maintain the security of customer, associate or company information, we could damage our reputation, incur substantial additional costs and become subject to litigation.

Any significant compromise or breach of customer, associate or company data security could significantly damage our reputation and result in additional costs, lost sales, fines and lawsuits. The regulatory environment related to information security and privacy is increasingly rigorous, with new and constantly changing requirements applicable to our business, and compliance with those requirements could result in additional costs. There is no guarantee that the procedures that we have implemented to protect against unauthorized access to secured data are adequate to safeguard against all data security breaches.

 

7


Table of Contents

A failure of a key information technology system or process could adversely affect our business.

We rely extensively on information technology systems, some of which are managed by third-party service providers, to analyze, process and manage transactions and data. We also rely heavily on the integrity of this data in managing our business. We or our service providers could experience errors, interruptions, delays or cessations of service in key portions of our information technology infrastructure, which could significantly disrupt our operations and be expensive, time consuming and resource-intensive to remedy.

The implementation of our supply chain and technology initiatives could disrupt our operations in the near term, and these initiatives might not provide the anticipated benefits or might fail.

We have made, and we plan to continue to make, significant investments in our supply chain and technology. These initiatives are designed to streamline our operations to allow our associates to continue to provide high quality service to our customers, while simplifying customer interaction and providing our customers with a more interconnected retail experience. The cost and potential problems and interruptions associated with the implementation of these initiatives, including those associated with managing third-party service providers and employing new web-based tools and services, could disrupt or reduce the efficiency of our operations in the near term. In addition, our improved supply chain and new or upgraded technology might not provide the anticipated benefits, it might take longer than expected to realize the anticipated benefits, or the initiatives might fail altogether.

Disruptions in our supply chain and other factors affecting the distribution of our merchandise could adversely impact our business.

A disruption within our logistics or supply chain network, including damage or destruction to our distribution centers, could adversely affect our ability to deliver inventory in a timely manner, which could impair our ability to meet customer demand for products and result in lost sales or damage to our reputation. Such a disruption could negatively impact our financial performance or financial condition.

Our costs of doing business could increase as a result of changes in, increased enforcement of, or adoption of new federal, state or local laws and regulations.

We are subject to various federal, state or local laws and regulations that govern different aspects of our business. Recently, there have been a large number of legislative and regulatory initiatives and reforms, as well as increased enforcement of existing laws and regulations by federal, state and local agencies. Changes in, increased enforcement of, or adoption of new federal, state or local laws and regulations governing minimum wage or living wage requirements, other wage or workplace regulations, the sale of some of our products, transportation, logistics, taxes, energy costs or environmental matters, could increase our costs of doing business or impact our store operations. Healthcare reform under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 enacted in March 2010 could adversely impact our labor costs and our ability to negotiate favorable terms under our benefit plans for our associates.

Our ability to obtain additional financing on favorable terms, if needed, could be adversely affected by the volatility in the capital markets.

We obtain and manage liquidity from the positive cash flow we generate from our operating activities and our access to capital markets, including our commercial paper programs supported by a back-up credit facility with a consortium of banks. Although we currently maintain a strong investment grade rating and had no outstanding commercial paper obligations as of the end of fiscal 2010, there is no assurance that our ability to obtain additional financing through the capital markets, if needed, will not be adversely impacted due to economic conditions. New or incremental tightening in the credit markets, low liquidity and volatility in the capital markets could result in diminished availability of credit, higher cost of borrowing and lack of confidence in the equity market, making it more difficult to obtain additional financing on terms that are favorable to us.

 

8


Table of Contents

If we cannot successfully manage the unique challenges presented by international markets, we may not be successful in our international operations.

Our ability to successfully operate in international markets is affected by many of the same operational risks we face in our U.S. operations, as well as unique costs and difficulties of managing international operations. Our international operations, including any expansion in international markets, may be adversely affected by our inability to identify and gain access to local suppliers as well as by local laws and customs, U.S. laws applicable to foreign operations, such as the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”), other legal and regulatory constraints, political and economic conditions and currency regulations of the countries or regions in which we currently operate or intend to operate in the future. Risks inherent in international operations also include, among others, adverse tax consequences, greater difficulty in enforcing intellectual property rights and risks associated with FCPA and local anti-bribery law compliance. Additionally, foreign currency exchange rates and fluctuations may have an impact on our future costs or on future cash flows from our international operations.

If we are unable to manage effectively our installation service business, we could be subject to fines and lawsuits.

We act as a general contractor to provide installation services to our D-I-F-M customers through third-party installers. As such, we are subject to regulatory requirements and risks applicable to general contractors, which include management of licensing, permitting and quality of our third-party installers. We have established processes and procedures that provide protections beyond those required by law to manage these requirements and ensure customer satisfaction with the services provided by our third-party installers. If we fail to manage these processes effectively or provide proper oversight of these services, we could suffer lost sales, fines and lawsuits, as well as damage to our reputation, which could adversely affect our business.

Changes in accounting standards and subjective assumptions, estimates and judgments by management related to complex accounting matters could significantly affect our financial results or financial condition.

Generally accepted accounting principles and related accounting pronouncements, implementation guidelines and interpretations with regard to a wide range of matters that are relevant to our business, such as revenue recognition, asset impairment, impairment of goodwill and other intangible assets, inventories, lease obligations, self-insurance, tax matters and litigation, are highly complex and involve many subjective assumptions, estimates and judgments. Changes in these rules or their interpretation or changes in underlying assumptions, estimates or judgments could significantly change our reported or expected financial performance or financial condition.

We are involved in a number of legal proceedings, and while we cannot predict the outcomes of those proceedings and other contingencies with certainty, some of these outcomes may adversely affect our operations or increase our costs.

We are involved in a number of legal proceedings, including government inquiries and investigations, and consumer, employment, tort and other litigation that arise from time to time in the ordinary course of business. Litigation is inherently unpredictable, and the outcome of some of these proceedings and other contingencies could require us to take or refrain from taking actions which could adversely affect our operations or could result in excessive verdicts. Additionally, defending against these lawsuits and proceedings may involve significant expense and diversion of management’s attention and resources from other matters.

 

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.

Not applicable.

 

9


Table of Contents
Item 2. Properties.

The following tables show locations of the 1,976 The Home Depot stores located in the U.S. and its territories and the 272 The Home Depot stores outside of the U.S. at the end of fiscal 2010:

 

U.S. Locations

   Number of Stores  

Alabama

     28   

Alaska

     7   

Arizona

     56   

Arkansas

     14   

California

     231   

Colorado

     46   

Connecticut

     28   

Delaware

     9   

District of Columbia

     1   

Florida

     153   

Georgia

     90   

Guam

     1   

Hawaii

     7   

Idaho

     11   

Illinois

     76   

Indiana

     24   

Iowa

     10   

Kansas

     16   

Kentucky

     14   

Louisiana

     28   

Maine

     11   

Maryland

     41   

Massachusetts

     45   

Michigan

     71   

Minnesota

     33   

Mississippi

     14   

Missouri

     34   

Montana

     6   

U.S. Locations

   Number of Stores  

Nebraska

     8   

Nevada

     21   

New Hampshire

     20   

New Jersey

     67   

New Mexico

     13   

New York

     100   

North Carolina

     42   

North Dakota

     1   

Ohio

     70   

Oklahoma

     16   

Oregon

     26   

Pennsylvania

     70   

Puerto Rico

     8   

Rhode Island

     8   

South Carolina

     25   

South Dakota

     1   

Tennessee

     39   

Texas

     178   

Utah

     22   

Vermont

     3   

Virgin Islands

     1   

Virginia

     49   

Washington

     45   

West Virginia

     6   

Wisconsin

     27   

Wyoming

     5   
          

Total U.S.

     1,976   
 

 

10


Table of Contents

International Locations

   Number of Stores  

Canada:

  

Alberta

     27   

British Columbia

     25   

Manitoba

     6   

New Brunswick

     3   

Newfoundland

     1   

Nova Scotia

     4   

Ontario

     86   

Prince Edward Island

     1   

Quebec

     22   

Saskatchewan

     4   
          

Total Canada

     179   

China:

  

Beijing

     1   

Henan

     1   

Shaanxi

     2   

Tianjin

     4   
          

Total China

  

 

 

 

8

 

  

International Locations

   Number of Stores  

Mexico:

  

Aguascalientes

     1   

Baja California Norte

     5   

Baja California Sur

     2   

Chiapas

     2   

Chihuahua

     5   

Coahuila

     4   

Colima

     1   

Distrito Federal

     7   

Durango

     1   

Guanajuato

     4   
  

Guerrero

     2   

Hidalgo

     1   

Jalisco

     5   

Michoacán

     1   

Morelos

     1   

Nuevo León

     9   
  

Puebla

     4   

Queretaro

     2   

Quintana Roo

     1   

San Luis Potosi

     1   

Sinaloa

     3   

Sonora

     2   

State of Mexico

     11   

Tabasco

     1   

Tamaulipas

     4   

Veracruz

     4   

Yucatan

     1   
          

Total Mexico

     85   
 

 

Of our 2,248 stores operating at the end of fiscal 2010, approximately 89% were owned (including those owned subject to a ground lease) consisting of approximately 209.7 million square feet, and approximately 11% of such stores were leased consisting of approximately 25.8 million square feet.

Additionally, at the end of fiscal 2010, we had six Home Decorators Collection locations in Illinois, Kansas, Missouri and New Jersey.

At the end of fiscal 2010, we utilized 185 warehouses and distribution centers located in 34 states or provinces, consisting of approximately 35.6 million square feet, of which approximately 0.2 million is owned and approximately 35.4 million is leased.

Our executive, corporate staff, divisional staff and financial offices occupy approximately 2.1 million square feet of leased and owned space in Atlanta, Georgia. At the end of fiscal 2010, we occupied an aggregate of approximately 4.1 million square feet, of which approximately 2.4 million square feet is owned and approximately 1.7 million square feet is leased, for store support centers and customer support centers in Atlanta and other locations.

 

11


Table of Contents
Item 3. Legal Proceedings.

In July 2005, the Company received a grand jury subpoena from the United States Attorney’s Office in Los Angeles, California, seeking documents and information relating to the Company’s handling, storage and disposal of hazardous waste. The Company is cooperating fully with the United States Attorney’s Office. Although the Company cannot predict the outcome of this proceeding, it does not expect the outcome to have a material adverse effect on its consolidated financial condition or results of operations.

As previously reported, in the second and third quarters of fiscal 2006, three purported, but uncertified, class actions were filed against the Company, The Home Depot FutureBuilder Administrative Committee and certain of the Company’s current and former directors and employees alleging breach of fiduciary duty in violation of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (“ERISA”) in connection with the Company’s return-to-vendor and stock option practices. These actions were joined into one case in 2007, and the joint amended complaint seeks certification as a class action, unspecified damages, costs, attorney’s fees and equitable and injunctive relief. On June 7, 2010, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia in Atlanta granted with prejudice Home Depot’s motion to dismiss plaintiffs’ third amended complaint. On June 28, 2010, plaintiffs filed a notice of appeal with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit. Although the Company cannot predict the outcome of this matter, it does not expect the outcome to have a material adverse effect on its consolidated financial condition or results of operations.

In September 2010, the Company was contacted by prosecutors in the four counties in California within the South Coast Air Quality Management District (“SCAQMD”) and the City of Los Angeles regarding allegations that the Company sold products in those counties with VOC (volatile organic compound) levels in excess of amounts permitted by SCAQMD rules. The Company has received an administrative subpoena seeking documents and information related to the alleged violations. The Company is in the process of responding to the subpoena. Although the Company cannot predict the outcome of this matter, it does not expect the outcome to have a material adverse effect on its consolidated financial condition or results of operations.

 

Item 4. (Removed and Reserved).

 

12


Table of Contents

PART II

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

Since April 19, 1984, our common stock has been listed on the New York Stock Exchange, trading under the symbol “HD.” The Company paid its first cash dividend on June 22, 1987, and has paid cash dividends during each subsequent quarter. Future dividend payments will depend on the Company’s earnings, capital requirements, financial condition and other factors considered relevant by the Board of Directors.

The table below sets forth the high and low sales prices of our common stock on the New York Stock Exchange and the quarterly cash dividends declared per share of common stock for the periods indicated.

 

     Price Range        Cash Dividends
Declared
 
     High        Low       

Fiscal Year 2010

            

First Quarter Ended May 2, 2010

   $ 36.49         $ 27.93           $0.23625   

Second Quarter Ended August 1, 2010

   $ 35.89         $ 27.07           $0.23625   

Third Quarter Ended October 31, 2010

   $ 31.89         $ 27.31           $0.23625   

Fourth Quarter Ended January 30, 2011

   $ 37.98         $ 30.21           $0.25   

Fiscal Year 2009

            

First Quarter Ended May 3, 2009

   $ 26.34         $ 18.00           $0.225   

Second Quarter Ended August 2, 2009

   $ 26.21         $ 22.40           $0.225   

Third Quarter Ended November 1, 2009

   $ 28.23         $ 25.09           $0.225   

Fourth Quarter Ended January 31, 2010

   $ 29.29         $ 24.96           $0.23625   

As of March 14, 2011, there were approximately 164,000 shareholders of record and approximately 1,030,000 additional shareholders holding stock under nominee security position listings.

 

13


Table of Contents

Stock Performance Graph

The graph and table below present the Company’s cumulative total shareholder returns relative to the performance of the Standard & Poor’s 500 Composite Stock Index and the Standard & Poor’s Retail Composite Index for the five-year period commencing January 27, 2006, the last trading day of fiscal 2005, and ending January 28, 2011, the last trading day of fiscal 2010. The graph assumes $100 invested at the closing price of the Company’s common stock on the New York Stock Exchange and each index on January 27, 2006 and assumes that all dividends were reinvested on the date paid. The points on the graph represent fiscal year-end amounts based on the last trading day in each fiscal year.

LOGO

 

     January 27,
2006
       January 26,
2007
       February 1,
2008
       January 30,
2009
       January 29,
2010
       January 28,
2011
 

The Home Depot

   $ 100.00         $ 101.67         $ 79.57         $ 58.27         $ 78.67         $ 106.29   

S&P 500 Index

   $ 100.00         $ 112.89         $ 112.92         $ 68.46         $ 91.15         $ 110.53   

S&P Retail Composite Index

   $ 100.00         $ 111.66         $ 93.95         $ 58.51         $ 91.01         $ 115.96   

 

14


Table of Contents

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Since fiscal 2002, the Company has repurchased shares of its common stock having a value of approximately $30.1 billion pursuant to its share repurchase program. The number and average price of shares purchased in each fiscal month of the fourth quarter of fiscal 2010 are set forth in the table below:

 

Period

   Total Number of
Shares Purchased(1)
       Average
Price Paid
per Share
       Total Number of
Shares Purchased as
Part of Publicly
Announced Program(2)
       Dollar Value of Shares
that May Yet Be
Purchased Under
the Program
 

Nov. 1, 2010 – Nov. 28, 2010

     2,600,556         $ 31.07           2,556,600         $ 10,430,554,499   

Nov. 29, 2010 – Dec. 26, 2010

     5,811,860         $ 33.74           5,803,346         $ 10,234,773,814   

Dec. 27, 2010 – Jan. 30, 2011

     9,207,339         $ 35.29           9,203,497         $ 9,909,997,344   

 

(1) These amounts include repurchases pursuant to the Company’s 1997 and 2005 Omnibus Stock Incentive Plans (the “Plans”). Under the Plans, participants may exercise stock options by surrendering shares of common stock that the participants already own as payment of the exercise price. Participants in the Plans may also surrender shares as payment of applicable tax withholding on the vesting of restricted stock and deferred share awards. Shares so surrendered by participants in the Plans are repurchased pursuant to the terms of the Plans and applicable award agreement and not pursuant to publicly announced share repurchase programs.

 

(2) The Company’s common stock repurchase program was initially announced on July 15, 2002. As of the end of fiscal 2010, the Board had approved purchases up to $40.0 billion. The program does not have a prescribed expiration date.

Sales of Unregistered Securities

During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2010, the Company issued 448 deferred stock units under The Home Depot, Inc. NonEmployee Directors’ Deferred Stock Compensation Plan pursuant to the exemption from registration provided by Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended. The deferred stock units were credited to the accounts of those nonemployee directors who elected to receive board retainers in the form of deferred stock units instead of cash during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2010. The deferred stock units convert to shares of common stock on a one-for-one basis following a termination of service as described in this plan.

During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2010, the Company credited 1,037 deferred stock units to participant accounts under The Home Depot FutureBuilder Restoration Plan pursuant to an exemption from the registration requirements of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, for involuntary, non-contributory plans. The deferred stock units convert to shares of common stock on a one-for-one basis following the termination of services as described in this plan.

 

Item 6. Selected Financial Data.

The information required by this item is incorporated by reference to page F-1 of this report.

 

15


Table of Contents
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

Executive Summary and Selected Consolidated Statements of Earnings Data

For fiscal year ended January 30, 2011 (“fiscal 2010”), we reported Net Earnings of $3.3 billion and Diluted Earnings per Share of $2.01 compared to Net Earnings of $2.7 billion and Diluted Earnings per Share of $1.57 for fiscal year ended January 31, 2010 (“fiscal 2009”).

The results for fiscal 2010 included a $51 million pretax charge related to the extension of our guarantee of a senior secured loan of HD Supply, Inc. (the “HD Supply Guarantee Extension”). The results for fiscal 2009 reflected the impact of several strategic actions initiated in fiscal 2008. These strategic actions resulted in store rationalization charges related to the closing of 15 underperforming U.S. stores and the removal of approximately 50 stores from our new store pipeline, business rationalization charges related to the exit of our EXPO, THD Design Center, Yardbirds and HD Bath businesses (the “Exited Businesses”) and charges related to the restructuring of support functions (collectively, the “Rationalization Charges”). These actions resulted in pretax Rationalization Charges of $146 million for fiscal 2009. The results for fiscal 2009 also included a pretax charge of $163 million to write-down our investment in HD Supply, Inc. Additionally, fiscal 2009 included earnings of $41 million from discontinued operations, net of tax, for the settlement of working capital matters arising from the sale of HD Supply.

We reported Earnings from Continuing Operations of $3.3 billion and Diluted Earnings per Share from Continuing Operations of $2.01 for fiscal 2010 compared to Earnings from Continuing Operations of $2.6 billion and Diluted Earnings per Share from Continuing Operations of $1.55 for fiscal 2009. Excluding the HD Supply Guarantee Extension charge from our fiscal 2010 results, and the Rationalization Charges and the write-down of our investment in HD Supply from our fiscal 2009 results, Earnings from Continuing Operations were $3.4 billion and Diluted Earnings per Share from Continuing Operations were $2.03 for fiscal 2010 compared to Earnings from Continuing Operations of $2.8 billion and Diluted Earnings per Share from Continuing Operations of $1.66 for fiscal 2009.

Net Sales increased 2.8% to $68.0 billion for fiscal 2010 from $66.2 billion for fiscal 2009. Our comparable store sales increased 2.9% in fiscal 2010, driven by a 2.4% increase in our comparable store customer transactions and a 0.5% increase in our comparable store average ticket to $51.93. Comparable store sales for our U.S. stores increased 2.5% in fiscal 2010.

In fiscal 2010, we focused on the following four key initiatives:

Customer Service – Our focus on customer service is anchored on the principles of taking care of our associates, putting customers first and simplifying the business. The roll out of our Customers FIRST training to all store associates and support staff in fiscal 2009 has brought simplification and focus across the business, and we repeated and refreshed the Customers FIRST training during fiscal 2010. The Customers FIRST program is part of our ongoing commitment to improve customer service levels in our stores, and we continued to see the benefit of this training in improved customer service ratings for fiscal 2010 compared to fiscal 2009. Also in fiscal 2010, we completed the deployment of our FIRST Phone, a new hand held device that provides multiple functions such as inventory management, product location and mobile checkout. The core purpose of this new device is to reduce tasking time for our store associates to allow them more time to focus on customer service. We ended fiscal 2010 with more than half of our store payroll allocated to customer facing activities rather than tasking activities. We have a customer facing store payroll target of 60%, and we believe we will achieve that by 2013.

Product Authority – Our focus on product authority is facilitated by our merchandising transformation and portfolio strategy, including innovation, assortment and value. In fiscal 2010, we made significant progress on our merchandising tools in the U.S. that helped us manage markdown and clearance activity and better control inventory. Our inventory turnover ratio was 4.13 times at the end of fiscal 2010 compared to 4.06 times at the end of fiscal 2009. Additionally, we continued to form strategic alliances and relationships with selected suppliers to bring a number of proprietary and exclusive brands across a wide range of departments.

 

16


Table of Contents

Productivity and Efficiency – Our approach to driving productivity and efficiency starts with disciplined capital allocation focused on building best-in-class competitive advantages in information technology and supply chain, as well as building shareholder value through higher returns on invested capital and total value returned to shareholders in the form of dividends and share repurchases. At the end of fiscal 2010, we completed the roll out of our Rapid Deployment Centers (“RDCs”) and now have 19 RDCs that serve 100% of our U.S. stores. Also during fiscal 2010, we repurchased 80.9 million shares for $2.6 billion, and on February 22, 2011 we announced a six percent increase in our quarterly cash dividend to 25 cents per share.

Interconnected Retail – Our focus on interconnected retail is based on the view that providing a seamless shopping experience across multiple channels will be a critical enabler for future success. Our multiple channel focus is allowing us to greatly expand our assortment of merchandise, and we are making the investment to build these capabilities, including the roll out of “buy on-line, pick-up in store” next year. We are committed to having a best-in-class website, and during fiscal 2010 our site was named as a Most Improved Website for customer satisfaction by Foresee, a leading customer satisfaction analytics firm.

We opened eight new stores in fiscal 2010, including one relocation, and closed three stores, bringing our total store count at the end of fiscal 2010 to 2,248. As of the end of fiscal 2010, a total of 272 of these stores, or 12.1%, were located in Canada, Mexico and China compared to 268 stores, or 11.9%, at the end of fiscal 2009.

We generated approximately $4.6 billion of cash flow from operations in fiscal 2010. We used this cash flow along with cash on hand to fund $2.6 billion of share repurchases, pay $1.6 billion of dividends and fund $1.1 billion in capital expenditures.

At the end of fiscal 2010, our long-term debt-to-equity ratio was 46.1% compared to 44.7% at the end of fiscal 2009. Our return on invested capital for continuing operations (computed on net operating profit after tax for the trailing twelve months and the average of beginning and ending long-term debt and equity) was 12.8% for fiscal 2010 compared to 10.7% for fiscal 2009. This increase reflects the impact of the Rationalization Charges which were included in our operating profit for fiscal 2009. Excluding the Rationalization Charges, our return on invested capital for continuing operations was 12.7% for fiscal 2010 compared to 11.1% for fiscal 2009.

 

17


Table of Contents

We believe the selected sales data, the percentage relationship between Net Sales and major categories in the Consolidated Statements of Earnings and the percentage change in the dollar amounts of each of the items presented below are important in evaluating the performance of our business operations.

 

    % of Net Sales     % Increase (Decrease)
In Dollar Amounts
 
    Fiscal Year(1)  
    2010     2009     2008     2010
vs. 2009
    2009
vs. 2008
 

NET SALES

    100.0     100.0     100.0     2.8     (7.2 )% 

Gross Profit

    34.3        33.9        33.7        4.0        (6.6

Operating Expenses:

         

Selling, General and Administrative

    23.3        24.0        25.0        (0.3     (10.9

Depreciation and Amortization

    2.4        2.6        2.5        (5.3     (4.4
                                       

Total Operating Expenses

    25.7        26.6        27.5        (0.8     (10.3
                                       

OPERATING INCOME

    8.6        7.3        6.1        21.6        10.2   

Interest and Other (Income) Expense:

         

Interest and Investment Income

                         (16.7     0.0   

Interest Expense

    0.8        1.0        0.9        (21.6     8.3   

Other

    0.1        0.2        0.2        (68.7     0.0   
                                       

Interest and Other, net

    0.8        1.2        1.1        (31.1     6.8   
                                       

EARNINGS FROM CONTINUING
OPERATIONS BEFORE PROVISION
FOR INCOME TAXES

    7.8        6.0        5.0        32.4        10.9   

Provision for Income Taxes

    2.8        2.1        1.8        42.1        6.6   
                                       

EARNINGS FROM CONTINUING
OPERATIONS

    4.9     4.0     3.2     27.4     13.3
                                       

SELECTED SALES DATA

         

Number of Customer Transactions (in millions)

    1,306        1,274        1,272        2.5     0.2

Average Ticket

  $ 51.93      $ 51.76      $ 55.61        0.3        (6.9

Weighted Average Weekly Sales per Operating Store (in thousands)

  $ 581      $ 563      $ 601        3.2        (6.3

Weighted Average Sales per Square Foot

  $ 288.64      $ 278.97      $ 298.19        3.5        (6.4

Comparable Store Sales Increase (Decrease) (%)(2)

    2.9     (6.6 )%      (8.7 )%      N/A        N/A   

Note: Certain percentages may not sum to totals due to rounding.

 

 

(1) Fiscal years 2010, 2009 and 2008 refer to the fiscal years ended January 30, 2011, January 31, 2010 and February 1, 2009, respectively. Fiscal years 2010, 2009 and 2008 include 52 weeks.

 

(2)

Includes Net Sales at locations open greater than 12 months, including relocated and remodeled stores. Retail stores become comparable on the Monday following their 365th day of operation. Comparable store sales is intended only as supplemental information and is not a substitute for Net Sales or Net Earnings presented in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.

N/A – Not Applicable

 

18


Table of Contents

Results of Operations

For an understanding of the significant factors that influenced our performance during the past three fiscal years, the following discussion should be read in conjunction with the Consolidated Financial Statements and the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements presented in this report.

Fiscal 2010 Compared to Fiscal 2009

Net Sales

Net Sales for fiscal 2010 increased 2.8% to $68.0 billion from $66.2 billion for fiscal 2009. The increase in Net Sales for fiscal 2010 reflects the impact of positive comparable store sales. Total comparable store sales increased 2.9% for fiscal 2010 compared to a decrease of 6.6% for fiscal 2009.

The increase in comparable store sales for fiscal 2010 reflects a number of factors. We experienced positive comparable store sales in 11 of our 13 departments for fiscal 2010. Comparable store sales for our Lumber, Tools, Electrical, Indoor Garden, Outdoor Garden and Kitchen/Bath product categories were above the Company average for fiscal 2010. The increase in comparable store sales also reflects a 2.4% increase in our comparable store customer transactions and a 0.5% increase in our comparable store average ticket to $51.93.

We believe that our sales performance has been, and could continue to be, negatively impacted by the level of competition that we encounter in various markets. We estimate our share of the U.S. home improvement market is approximately 26% using the U.S. Census Bureau’s North American Industry Classification System, or NAICS, 4441 classification for building material and supplies dealers.

Gross Profit

Gross Profit increased 4.0% to $23.3 billion for fiscal 2010 from $22.4 billion for fiscal 2009. Gross Profit as a percent of Net Sales was 34.3% for fiscal 2010 compared to 33.9% for fiscal 2009, an increase of 40 basis points. Our U.S. stores experienced gross profit margin expansion in fiscal 2010 as we realized benefits from better product assortment management through our portfolio approach and leveraging of our newly developed merchandising tools. Lower levels of clearance inventory in our stores for fiscal 2010 compared to last year also contributed to this expansion. Additionally, we realized gross profit margin expansion from our non-U.S. businesses, primarily Canada, due primarily to a change in the mix of products sold.

Operating Expenses

Selling, General and Administrative expenses (“SG&A”) decreased 0.3% to $15.8 billion for fiscal 2010 from $15.9 billion for fiscal 2009. As a percent of Net Sales, SG&A was 23.3% for fiscal 2010 compared to 24.0% for fiscal 2009. Excluding the Rationalization Charges, SG&A as a percent of Net Sales was 23.9% for fiscal 2009. The decrease in SG&A as a percent of Net Sales for fiscal 2010 reflects expense leverage in the positive comparable store sales environment and lower payroll and other expenses.

Depreciation and Amortization decreased 5.3% to $1.6 billion for fiscal 2010 from $1.7 billion for fiscal 2009. Depreciation and Amortization as a percent of Net Sales was 2.4% for fiscal 2010 compared to 2.6% for fiscal 2009. The decrease in Depreciation and Amortization as a percent of Net Sales was primarily due to a smaller depreciable fixed asset base compared to last year, arising from fully depreciated assets.

Operating Income

Operating Income increased 21.6% to $5.8 billion for fiscal 2010 from $4.8 billion for fiscal 2009. Operating Income as a percent of Net Sales was 8.6% for fiscal 2010 compared to 7.3% for fiscal 2009. Excluding the Rationalization Charges from the results of fiscal 2009, Operating Income increased 18.0% for fiscal 2010.

 

19


Table of Contents

Interest and Other, net

In fiscal 2010, we recognized $566 million of Interest and Other, net, compared to $821 million for fiscal 2009. Interest and Other, net, as a percent of Net Sales was 0.8% for fiscal 2010 compared to 1.2% for fiscal 2009. Interest and Other, net, reflects a $51 million charge in fiscal 2010 related to the HD Supply Guarantee Extension and a $163 million charge in fiscal 2009 to write-down our investment in HD Supply. Excluding these charges, Interest and Other, net, as a percent of Net Sales was 0.8% for fiscal 2010 compared to 1.0% for fiscal 2009. This decrease was primarily due to a $44 million benefit arising from favorable IRS guidance resulting in the reversal of an interest accrual during fiscal 2010, a lower cost of outstanding indebtedness than last year and an interest benefit arising from certain state income tax settlements.

Provision for Income Taxes

Our combined effective income tax rate for continuing operations increased to 36.7% for fiscal 2010 from 34.2% for fiscal 2009. Fiscal 2009 included benefits arising from a favorable foreign tax settlement and a realignment of our foreign corporate structure.

Diluted Earnings per Share from Continuing Operations

Diluted Earnings per Share from Continuing Operations were $2.01 for fiscal 2010 and $1.55 for fiscal 2009. Excluding the HD Supply Guarantee Extension charge from our fiscal 2010 results, and the Rationalization Charges and the write-down of our investment in HD Supply from our fiscal 2009 results, Diluted Earnings per Share from Continuing Operations for fiscal 2010 were $2.03 compared to $1.66 for fiscal 2009, an increase of 22.3%. Diluted Earnings per Share from Continuing Operations for fiscal 2010 reflect $0.04 of benefit from repurchases of our common stock.

Discontinued Operations

On August 30, 2007, the Company closed the sale of HD Supply. Discontinued operations for fiscal 2009 consist of earnings of $41 million, net of tax, or $0.02 per diluted share, for the settlement of working capital matters arising from the sale of HD Supply.

Non-GAAP Measures

To provide clarity, internally and externally, about our operating performance for fiscal 2010, 2009 and 2008, we supplement our reporting with non-GAAP financial measures to reflect adjustments for the $51 million pretax charge related to the HD Supply Guarantee Extension as described more fully in Note 4 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, the Rationalization Charges as described more fully in Note 2 to the Consolidated Financial Statements, as well as the Net Sales from Exited Businesses during the period from closing announcement to actual closing, and the charges to write-down our investment in HD Supply of $163 million in each of fiscal 2009 and 2008 as described more fully in Note 4 to the Consolidated Financial Statements. We believe these non-GAAP financial measures better enable management and investors to understand and analyze our performance by providing them with meaningful information relevant to events of unusual nature or frequency that impact the comparability of underlying business results from period to period. However, this supplemental information should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for the related GAAP measures.

 

20


Table of Contents

The following reconciles the non-GAAP financial measures to the corresponding GAAP measures for fiscal 2010, 2009 and 2008 (amounts in millions, except per share data):

 

     Fiscal Year Ended January 30, 2011  
     As
Reported
     Adjustment      Non-GAAP
Measures
       % of
Net Sales
 

Net Sales

    $ 67,997       $       $ 67,997           100.0

Cost of Sales

     44,693                 44,693           65.7   
                                     

Gross Profit

     23,304                 23,304           34.3   

Operating Expenses:

             

Selling, General and Administrative

     15,849                 15,849           23.3   

Depreciation and Amortization

     1,616                 1,616           2.4   
                                     

Total Operating Expenses

     17,465                 17,465           25.7   
                                     

Operating Income

     5,839                 5,839           8.6   

Interest and Other, net

     566         51         515           0.8   
                                     

Earnings From Continuing Operations Before Provision
for Income Taxes

     5,273         (51      5,324           7.8   

Provision for Income Taxes

     1,935         (18      1,953           2.9   
                                     

Earnings from Continuing Operations

   $ 3,338       $ (33    $ 3,371           5.0
                                     

Diluted Earnings per Share from Continuing Operations

   $ 2.01       $   (0.02    $ 2.03           N/A   
                                     
     Fiscal Year Ended January 31, 2010  
     As
Reported
     Adjustments      Non-GAAP
Measures
       % of
Net Sales
 

Net Sales

    $ 66,176       $ 221       $ 65,955           100.0

Cost of Sales

     43,764         193         43,571           66.1   
                                     

Gross Profit

     22,412         28         22,384           33.9   

Operating Expenses:

             

Selling, General and Administrative

     15,902         170         15,732           23.9   

Depreciation and Amortization

     1,707         4         1,703           2.6   
                                     

Total Operating Expenses

     17,609         174         17,435           26.4   
                                     

Operating Income

     4,803         (146      4,949           7.5   

Interest and Other, net

     821         163         658           1.0   
                                     

Earnings From Continuing Operations Before Provision
for Income Taxes

     3,982         (309      4,291           6.5   

Provision for Income Taxes

     1,362         (118      1,480           2.2   
                                     

Earnings from Continuing Operations

   $ 2,620       $ (191    $ 2,811           4.3
                                     

Diluted Earnings per Share from Continuing Operations

   $ 1.55       $ (0.11    $ 1.66           N/A   
                                     

 

21


Table of Contents

Non-GAAP Measures (continued):

 

     Fiscal Year Ended February 1, 2009  
     As
Reported
     Adjustments      Non-GAAP
Measures
       % of
Net Sales
 

Net Sales

   $ 71,288       $       $ 71,288           100.0

Cost of Sales

     47,298         30         47,268           66.3   
                                     

Gross Profit

     23,990         (30      24,020           33.7   

Operating Expenses:

             

Selling, General and Administrative

     17,846         918         16,928           23.7   

Depreciation and Amortization

     1,785         3         1,782           2.5   
                                     

Total Operating Expenses

     19,631         921         18,710           26.2   
                                     

Operating Income

     4,359         (951      5,310           7.4   

Interest and Other, net

     769         163         606           0.9   
                                     

Earnings From Continuing Operations Before Provision
for Income Taxes

     3,590         (1,114      4,704           6.6   

Provision for Income Taxes

     1,278         (430      1,708           2.4   
                                     

Earnings from Continuing Operations

   $ 2,312       $ (684    $ 2,996           4.2
                                     

Diluted Earnings per Share from Continuing Operations

   $ 1.37       $ (0.41    $ 1.78           N/A   
                                     

Fiscal 2009 Compared to Fiscal Year Ended February 1, 2009 (“fiscal 2008”)

Net Sales

Net Sales for fiscal 2009 decreased 7.2% to $66.2 billion from $71.3 billion for fiscal 2008. The decrease in Net Sales for fiscal 2009 reflects the impact of negative comparable store sales as well as the net impact of fewer open stores in fiscal 2009 versus fiscal 2008. Total comparable store sales decreased 6.6% for fiscal 2009 compared to a decrease of 8.7% for fiscal 2008.

There were a number of factors that contributed to our comparable store sales decline. The U.S. residential construction, housing and home improvement markets continued to be soft, and consumers were challenged due to a number of factors including higher unemployment. We saw relative strength in our Building Materials, Flooring, Paint, Plumbing and Garden/Seasonal product categories as comparable store sales in these areas were above the Company average for fiscal 2009. Comparable store sales for our Lumber, Hardware, Electrical, Kitchen/Bath and Millwork product categories were below the Company average for fiscal 2009. In fiscal 2009, we also saw significant strengthening of the U.S. dollar against all currencies. Fluctuating exchange rates negatively impacted our total Company sales by approximately $565 million for fiscal 2009 compared to fiscal 2008.

Gross Profit

Gross Profit decreased 6.6% to $22.4 billion for fiscal 2009 from $24.0 billion for fiscal 2008. Gross Profit as a percent of Net Sales was 33.9% for fiscal 2009 compared to 33.7% for fiscal 2008, an increase of 22 basis points. Through our focused bay portfolio approach, our U.S. merchants continued to introduce new lower prices while growing overall gross margin. Additionally, gross margin expansion for fiscal 2009 was driven by lower markdowns as compared to fiscal 2008.

Operating Expenses

SG&A decreased 10.9% to $15.9 billion for fiscal 2009 from $17.8 billion for fiscal 2008. As a percent of Net Sales, SG&A was 24.0% for fiscal 2009 compared to 25.0% for fiscal 2008. Excluding the Rationalization

 

22


Table of Contents

Charges, SG&A as a percent of Net Sales was 23.9% for fiscal 2009 compared to 23.7% for fiscal 2008. Our SG&A results for fiscal 2009 reflect the impact of a negative comparable store sales environment, offset by a lower cost of credit associated with the private label credit card program and solid expense control. For fiscal 2009, the penetration of the private label credit card sales was 25.1% compared to 28.1% for fiscal 2008.

Depreciation and Amortization decreased 4.4% to $1.7 billion for fiscal 2009 from $1.8 billion for fiscal 2008. Depreciation and Amortization as a percent of Net Sales was 2.6% for fiscal 2009 and 2.5% for fiscal 2008. The increase in Depreciation and Amortization as a percent of Net Sales was primarily due to lower sales.

Operating Income

Operating Income increased 10.2% to $4.8 billion for fiscal 2009 from $4.4 billion for fiscal 2008. Operating Income as a percent of Net Sales was 7.3% for fiscal 2009 compared to 6.1% for fiscal 2008. Excluding the Rationalization Charges, Operating Income as a percent of Net Sales was 7.5% for fiscal 2009 compared to 7.4% for fiscal 2008.

Interest and Other, net

In fiscal 2009, we recognized $821 million of Interest and Other, net, compared to $769 million in fiscal 2008. Interest and Other, net, as a percent of Net Sales was 1.2% for fiscal 2009 compared to 1.1% for fiscal 2008. Interest and Other, net, reflects a $163 million charge in each of fiscal 2009 and 2008 to write-down our investment in HD Supply. Excluding these charges, Interest and Other, net, as a percent of Net Sales was 1.0% for fiscal 2009 compared to 0.9% for fiscal 2008. The increase in Interest and Other, net, as a percent of Net Sales was primarily due to lower sales.

Provision for Income Taxes

Our combined effective income tax rate for continuing operations decreased to 34.2% for fiscal 2009 from 35.6% for fiscal 2008. The decrease in our effective income tax rate for fiscal 2009 reflects benefits arising from a favorable foreign tax settlement and a realignment of our foreign corporate structure.

Diluted Earnings per Share from Continuing Operations

Diluted Earnings per Share from Continuing Operations were $1.55 for fiscal 2009 and $1.37 for fiscal 2008. Excluding the Rationalization Charges and the write-downs of our investment in HD Supply, Diluted Earnings per Share from Continuing Operations for fiscal 2009 were $1.66 compared to $1.78 for fiscal 2008, a decrease of 6.7%.

Discontinued Operations

On August 30, 2007, the Company closed the sale of HD Supply. Discontinued operations for fiscal 2009 consist of earnings of $41 million, net of tax, or $0.02 per diluted share, compared to a loss of $52 million, net of tax, or $0.03 per diluted share in fiscal 2008, in each case for the settlement of working capital matters arising from the sale of HD Supply.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Cash flow generated from operations provides us with a significant source of liquidity. For fiscal 2010, Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities was approximately $4.6 billion compared to approximately $5.1 billion for fiscal 2009. This decrease was primarily a result of changes in inventory levels and other net working capital items partially offset by increased earnings.

Net Cash Used in Investing Activities for fiscal 2010 was $1.0 billion compared to $755 million for fiscal 2009. This change was primarily due to increased Capital Expenditures and lower Proceeds from Sales of Property and Equipment.

 

23


Table of Contents

In fiscal 2010, we spent $1.1 billion on Capital Expenditures, allocated as follows: 34% for core technology, 18% for merchandising and operations, 17% for maintenance, 9% for new stores and 22% for other initiatives. In fiscal 2010, we added eight new stores, including one relocation.

Net Cash Used in Financing Activities for fiscal 2010 was $4.5 billion compared to $3.5 billion for fiscal 2009. This increase was primarily due to $2.4 billion more in Repurchases of Common Stock than in fiscal 2009, partially offset by a $998 million increase in Proceeds from Long-Term Borrowings and a $745 million decrease in Repayments of Long-Term Debt in fiscal 2010.

We repurchased 80.9 million shares of our common stock for $2.6 billion in fiscal 2010 and 7.7 million shares for $213 million in fiscal 2009. Since the inception of our share repurchase program in 2002, we have repurchased 834.4 million shares of our common stock for a total of $30.1 billion. As of January 30, 2011, $9.9 billion remained under our share repurchase authorization.

We have commercial paper programs that allow for borrowings up to $2.0 billion. In connection with the programs, we have a back-up credit facility with a consortium of banks for borrowings up to $2.0 billion. As of January 30, 2011, there were no borrowings outstanding under the commercial paper programs or the related credit facility. The credit facility expires in July 2013 and contains various restrictive covenants. As of January 30, 2011, we were in compliance with all of the covenants, and they are not expected to impact our liquidity or capital resources.

We use capital and operating leases to finance a portion of our real estate, including our stores, distribution centers and store support centers. The net present value of capital lease obligations is reflected in our Consolidated Balance Sheets in Long-Term Debt and Current Installments of Long-Term Debt. In accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, the operating leases are not reflected in our Consolidated Balance Sheets. As of the end of fiscal 2010, our long-term debt-to-equity ratio was 46.1% compared to 44.7% at the end of fiscal 2009.

As of January 30, 2011, we guaranteed a $1.0 billion senior secured amortizing term loan in connection with the sale of HD Supply. We are responsible for up to $1.0 billion and any unpaid interest in the event of nonpayment by HD Supply. As reported in the quarterly report on Form 10-Q of HD Supply for the period ended October 31, 2010, the outstanding balance of this term loan as of October 31, 2010 was $940 million. The guaranteed loan is collateralized by certain assets of HD Supply. The original expiration date of the guarantee was August 30, 2012. On March 19, 2010, we amended the guarantee to extend the expiration date to April 1, 2014. The fair value of the guarantee at August 30, 2007 was $16 million and was recorded as a liability in Other Long-Term Liabilities. The extension of the guarantee increased the fair value of the guarantee to $67 million, resulting in a $51 million charge to Interest and Other, net, for fiscal 2010.

As of January 30, 2011, we had $545 million in Cash and Cash Equivalents. We believe that our current cash position, access to the debt capital markets and cash flow generated from operations should be sufficient to enable us to complete our capital expenditure programs and fund dividend payments, share repurchases and any required long-term debt payments through the next several fiscal years. In addition, we have funds available from our commercial paper programs and the ability to obtain alternative sources of financing. Subsequent to the end of fiscal 2010, we repaid $1.0 billion of 5.20% Senior Notes that were due March 1, 2011. We issued commercial paper to repay the 5.20% Senior Notes and plan to refinance this debt in the first quarter of fiscal 2011.

At January 30, 2011, we had outstanding interest rate swaps, accounted for as fair value hedges, that expire on December 16, 2013 with a notional amount of $1.25 billion that swap fixed rate interest on our $1.25 billion 5.25% Senior Notes for variable interest equal to LIBOR plus 259 basis points. At January 30, 2011, the approximate fair value of these agreements was an asset of $47 million, which is the estimated amount we would have received to settle the agreements.

In May 2010, we entered into a forward starting interest rate swap agreement with a notional amount of $500 million, accounted for as cash flow hedge, to hedge interest rate fluctuations in anticipation of issuing long-term debt to refinance debt maturing in fiscal 2011. At January 30, 2011, the approximate fair market value of this

 

24


Table of Contents

agreement was a liability of $2 million, which is the estimated amount we would have paid to settle the agreement.

In September 2010, we issued $500 million of 3.95% Senior Notes due September 15, 2020 at a discount of $1 million and $500 million of 5.40% Senior Notes due September 15, 2040 at a discount of $1 million (together, the “September 2010 issuance”). The net proceeds of the September 2010 issuance were used to refinance our 4.625% Senior Notes that matured August 15, 2010 in the aggregate principal amount of $1.0 billion.

In fiscal 2009 and 2010, we entered into forward starting interest rate swap agreements with a combined notional amount of $1.0 billion to hedge interest rate fluctuations in anticipation of the September 2010 issuance, which were accounted for as cash flow hedges. Upon the September 2010 issuance, we paid $193 million to settle these forward starting interest rate swap agreements. This amount, net of income taxes, is included in Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income and is being amortized to Interest Expense over the lives of the Senior Notes issued in September 2010.

In March 2011, we entered into an interest rate swap, accounted for as a fair value hedge, that expires on March 1, 2016 with a notional amount of $500 million that swaps fixed rate interest on our $500 million 5.40% Senior Notes due March 1, 2016 for variable interest equal to LIBOR plus 300 basis points.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

In accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, operating leases for a portion of our real estate and other assets are not reflected in our Consolidated Balance Sheets.

Contractual Obligations

The following table summarizes our significant contractual obligations as of January 30, 2011 (amounts in millions):

 

       Payments Due by Fiscal Year  

Contractual Obligations

     Total        2011        2012-2013        2014-2015        Thereafter  

Total Debt(1)

     $ 15,953         $ 1,452         $ 2,135         $ 780         $ 11,586   

Capital Lease Obligations(2)

       1,259           114           192           179           774   

Operating Leases

       8,181           783           1,338           1,125           4,935   

Purchase Obligations(3)

       4,352           1,711           1,741           900             

Unrecognized Tax Benefits(4)

       63           63                                 
                                                      

Total

     $ 29,808         $ 4,123         $ 5,406         $ 2,984         $ 17,295   
                                                      

 

(1) Excludes present value of capital lease obligations of $452 million. Includes $6.7 billion of interest payments.

 

(2) Includes $807 million of imputed interest.

 

(3) Purchase obligations include all legally binding contracts such as firm commitments for inventory purchases, utility purchases, capital expenditures, software acquisitions and license commitments and legally binding service contracts. Purchase orders that are not binding agreements are excluded from the table above.

 

(4) Excludes $599 million of noncurrent unrecognized tax benefits due to uncertainty regarding the timing of future cash payments.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

Our exposure to market risk results primarily from fluctuations in interest rates. Interest rate swap agreements are used, at times, to manage our fixed/floating rate debt portfolio. At January 30, 2011, after giving consideration to our interest rate swap agreements, approximately 87% of our debt portfolio was comprised of fixed-rate debt and 13% was floating-rate debt. A 1.0 percentage point change in the interest costs of floating-rate debt would not have a material impact on our results of operations.

 

25


Table of Contents

As of January 30, 2011 we had, net of discounts, $9.3 billion of Senior Notes outstanding. The aggregate market value of the publicly traded Senior Notes as of January 30, 2011 was approximately $9.8 billion.

Although we have international operating entities, our exposure to foreign currency rate fluctuations is not significant to our financial condition or results of operations.

Impact of Inflation, Deflation and Changing Prices

We have experienced inflation and deflation related to our purchase of certain commodity products. We do not believe that changing prices for commodities have had a material effect on our Net Sales or results of operations. Although we cannot precisely determine the overall effect of inflation and deflation on operations, we do not believe inflation and deflation have had a material effect on our results of operations.

Critical Accounting Policies

Our significant accounting policies are disclosed in Note 1 to the Consolidated Financial Statements. The following discussion addresses our most critical accounting policies, which are those that are both important to the portrayal of our financial condition and results of operations and that require significant judgment or use of significant assumptions or complex estimates.

Revenues

We recognize revenue, net of estimated returns and sales tax, at the time the customer takes possession of the merchandise or receives services. We estimate the liability for sales returns based on our historical return levels. We believe that our estimate for sales returns is an accurate reflection of future returns. We have never recorded a significant adjustment to our estimated liability for sales returns. However, if these estimates are significantly below the actual amounts, our sales could be adversely impacted. When we receive payment from customers before the customer has taken possession of the merchandise or the service has been performed, the amount received is recorded as Deferred Revenue in the accompanying Consolidated Balance Sheets until the sale or service is complete. We also record Deferred Revenue for the sale of gift cards and recognize this revenue upon the redemption of gift cards in Net Sales.

Merchandise Inventories

Our Merchandise Inventories are stated at the lower of cost (first-in, first-out) or market, with approximately 80% valued under the retail inventory method and the remainder under a cost method. Retailers like us, with many different types of merchandise at low unit cost and a large number of transactions, frequently use the retail inventory method. Under the retail inventory method, Merchandise Inventories are stated at cost, which is determined by applying a cost-to-retail ratio to the ending retail value of inventories. As our inventory retail value is adjusted regularly to reflect market conditions, our inventory valued under the retail method approximates the lower of cost or market. We evaluate our inventory valued under a cost method at the end of each quarter to ensure that it is carried at the lower of cost or market. The valuation allowance for Merchandise Inventories valued under a cost method was not material to our Consolidated Financial Statements as of the end of fiscal 2010 or 2009.

Independent physical inventory counts or cycle counts are taken on a regular basis in each store and distribution center to ensure that amounts reflected in the accompanying Consolidated Financial Statements for Merchandise Inventories are properly stated. During the period between physical inventory counts in our stores, we accrue for estimated losses related to shrink on a store-by-store basis. Shrink (or in the case of excess inventory, “swell”) is the difference between the recorded amount of inventory and the physical inventory. Shrink may occur due to theft, loss, inaccurate records for the receipt of inventory or deterioration of goods, among other things. We estimate shrink as a percent of Net Sales using the average shrink results from the previous two physical inventories. The estimates are evaluated quarterly and adjusted based on recent shrink results and current trends in the business. Actual shrink results did not vary materially from estimated amounts for fiscal 2010, 2009 or 2008.

 

26


Table of Contents

Self-Insurance

We are self-insured for certain losses related to general liability, workers’ compensation, medical, product liability and automobile claims. Our liability represents an estimate of the ultimate cost of claims incurred as of the balance sheet date. The estimated liability is not discounted and is established based upon analysis of historical data and actuarial estimates, and is reviewed by management and third-party actuaries on a regular basis to ensure that the liability is appropriate. While we believe these estimates are reasonable based on the information currently available, if actual trends, including the severity or frequency of claims, medical cost inflation, or fluctuations in premiums, differ from our estimates, our results of operations could be impacted. Actual results related to these types of claims did not vary materially from estimated amounts for fiscal 2010, 2009 or 2008.

Vendor Allowances

Vendor allowances primarily consist of volume rebates that are earned as a result of attaining certain purchase levels and advertising co-op allowances for the promotion of vendors’ products that are typically based on guaranteed minimum amounts with additional amounts being earned for attaining certain purchase levels. These vendor allowances are accrued as earned, with those allowances received as a result of attaining certain purchase levels accrued over the incentive period based on estimates of purchases. We believe that our estimate of vendor allowances earned based on expected volume of purchases over the incentive period is an accurate reflection of the ultimate allowance to be received from our vendors.

Volume rebates and advertising co-op allowances earned are initially recorded as a reduction in Merchandise Inventories and a subsequent reduction in Cost of Sales when the related product is sold. Certain advertising co-op allowances that are reimbursements of specific, incremental and identifiable costs incurred to promote vendors’ products are recorded as an offset against advertising expense in SG&A.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

We evaluate our long-lived assets each quarter for indicators of potential impairment. Indicators of impairment include current period losses combined with a history of losses, management’s decision to relocate or close a store or other location before the end of its previously estimated useful life, or when changes in other circumstances indicate the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. The evaluation for long-lived assets is performed at the lowest level of identifiable cash flows, which is generally the individual store level.

The assets of a store with indicators of impairment are evaluated by comparing its undiscounted cash flows with its carrying value. The estimate of cash flows includes management’s assumptions of cash inflows and outflows directly resulting from the use of those assets in operations, including gross margin on Net Sales, payroll and related items, occupancy costs, insurance allocations and other costs to operate a store. If the carrying value is greater than the undiscounted cash flows, an impairment loss is recognized for the difference between the carrying value and the estimated fair market value. Impairment losses are recorded as a component of SG&A in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Earnings. When a leased location closes, we also recognize in SG&A the net present value of future lease obligations less estimated sublease income.

We make critical assumptions and estimates in completing impairment assessments of long-lived assets. Our cash flow projections look several years into the future and include assumptions on variables such as future sales and operating margin growth rates, economic conditions, market competition and inflation. A 10% decrease in the estimated undiscounted cash flows for the stores with indicators of impairment would not have a material impact on our results of operations. Our estimates of fair market value are generally based on market appraisals of owned locations and estimates on the amount of potential sublease income and the time required to sublease for leased locations.

As part of our Rationalization Charges, we recorded no asset impairments in fiscal 2010 and 2009 and recorded $580 million of asset impairments in fiscal 2008. Also as part of our Rationalization Charges, we recorded no lease obligation costs in fiscal 2010 and recorded $84 million and $252 million of lease obligation costs in fiscal 2009 and 2008, respectively. See Note 2 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for more details on the

 

27


Table of Contents

Rationalization Charges. A 10% decrease in estimated sublease income and a 10% increase in the time required to sublease would not have a material impact on our results of operations. We also recorded impairments and other lease obligation costs on other closings and relocations in the ordinary course of business, which were not material to the Consolidated Financial Statements in fiscal 2010, 2009 and 2008.

Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

Goodwill represents the excess of purchase price over the fair value of net assets acquired. We do not amortize goodwill, but do assess the recoverability of goodwill in the third quarter of each fiscal year, or more often if indicators warrant, by determining whether the fair value of each reporting unit supports its carrying value. The fair values of our identified reporting units were estimated using the present value of expected future discounted cash flows.

We make critical assumptions and estimates in completing impairment assessments of goodwill and other intangible assets. Our cash flow projections look several years into the future and include assumptions on variables such as future sales and operating margin growth rates, economic conditions, market competition, inflation and discount rates. A 10% decrease in the estimated discounted cash flows for the reporting units tested would result in an impairment that is not material to our results of operations. A 1.0 percentage point increase in the discount rate used would also result in an impairment that is not material to our results of operations.

We amortize the cost of other intangible assets over their estimated useful lives, which range up to 20 years, unless such lives are deemed indefinite. Intangible assets with indefinite lives are tested in the third quarter of each fiscal year for impairment, or more often if indicators warrant. Impairment charges related to goodwill and other intangible assets were not material for fiscal 2010, 2009 or 2008.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In June 2009, the FASB issued “Amendments to FASB Interpretation No. 46(R)” (“FASB ASC 810-10”), which clarifies that the determination of whether a company is required to consolidate an entity is based on, among other things, an entity’s purpose and design and a company’s ability to direct the activities of the entity that most significantly impact the entity’s economic performance. FASB ASC 810-10 requires ongoing reassessments of whether a company is the primary beneficiary of a variable interest entity and eliminates the qualifying special purpose entity concept. FASB ASC 810-10 also requires additional disclosures about a company’s involvement in variable interest entities and any significant changes in risk exposure due to that involvement. This guidance was effective for annual reporting periods beginning after November 15, 2009, for interim periods within that first annual reporting period, and for interim and annual reporting periods thereafter. This guidance did not have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

In June 2008, the FASB issued guidance to clarify that unvested share-based payment awards that contain nonforfeitable rights to dividends or dividend equivalents (whether paid or unpaid) are participating securities and are to be included in the computation of earnings per share under the two-class method. This guidance was effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2008, and interim periods within those years. This guidance did not have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.

The information required by this item is incorporated by reference to Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” of this report.

 

28


Table of Contents
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.

Management’s Responsibility for Financial Statements

The financial statements presented in this Annual Report have been prepared with integrity and objectivity and are the responsibility of the management of The Home Depot, Inc. These financial statements have been prepared in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles and properly reflect certain estimates and judgments based upon the best available information.

The financial statements of the Company have been audited by KPMG LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm. Their accompanying report is based upon an audit conducted in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States).

The Audit Committee of the Board of Directors, consisting solely of independent directors, meets five times a year with the independent registered public accounting firm, the internal auditors and representatives of management to discuss auditing and financial reporting matters. In addition, a telephonic meeting is held prior to each quarterly earnings release. The Audit Committee retains the independent registered public accounting firm and regularly reviews the internal accounting controls, the activities of the independent registered public accounting firm and internal auditors and the financial condition of the Company. Both the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm and the internal auditors have free access to the Audit Committee.

Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in Rule 13a-15(f) promulgated under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). Under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, we conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of January 30, 2011 based on the framework in Internal Control –Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). Based on our evaluation, our management concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of January 30, 2011 in providing reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. The effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of January 30, 2011 has been audited by KPMG LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, as stated in their report which is included on page 30 in this Form 10-K.

 

/s/    FRANCIS S. BLAKE

   

/s/    CAROL B. TOMÉ

Francis S. Blake

Chairman &

Chief Executive Officer

   

Carol B. Tomé

Chief Financial Officer &

Executive Vice President – Corporate Services

 

29


Table of Contents

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

The Board of Directors and Stockholders

The Home Depot, Inc.:

We have audited The Home Depot Inc.’s internal control over financial reporting as of January 30, 2011, based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). The Home Depot Inc.’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audit also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

In our opinion, The Home Depot, Inc. maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of January 30, 2011, based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the Consolidated Balance Sheets of The Home Depot, Inc. and subsidiaries as of January 30, 2011 and January 31, 2010, and the related Consolidated Statements of Earnings, Stockholders’ Equity and Comprehensive Income, and Cash Flows for each of the fiscal years in the three-year period ended January 30, 2011, and our report dated March 24, 2011 expressed an unqualified opinion on those consolidated financial statements.

/s/ KPMG LLP

Atlanta, Georgia

March 24, 2011

 

30


Table of Contents

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

The Board of Directors and Stockholders

The Home Depot, Inc.:

We have audited the accompanying Consolidated Balance Sheets of The Home Depot, Inc. and subsidiaries as of January 30, 2011 and January 31, 2010, and the related Consolidated Statements of Earnings, Stockholders’ Equity and Comprehensive Income, and Cash Flows for each of the fiscal years in the three-year period ended January 30, 2011. These Consolidated Financial Statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these Consolidated Financial Statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the Consolidated Financial Statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of The Home Depot, Inc. and subsidiaries as of January 30, 2011 and January 31, 2010, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the fiscal years in the three-year period ended January 30, 2011, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), The Home Depot, Inc.’s internal control over financial reporting as of January 30, 2011, based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO), and our report dated March 24, 2011 expressed an unqualified opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

/s/ KPMG LLP

Atlanta, Georgia

March 24, 2011

 

31


Table of Contents

THE HOME DEPOT, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF EARNINGS

 

    Fiscal Year Ended(1)  
amounts in millions, except per share data   January 30,
2011
    January 31,
2010
    February 1,
2009
 

NET SALES

   $ 67,997       $ 66,176       $ 71,288   

Cost of Sales

    44,693        43,764        47,298   
                       

GROSS PROFIT

    23,304        22,412        23,990   

Operating Expenses:

     

Selling, General and Administrative

    15,849        15,902        17,846   

Depreciation and Amortization

    1,616        1,707        1,785   
                       

Total Operating Expenses

    17,465        17,609        19,631   
                       

OPERATING INCOME

    5,839        4,803        4,359   

Interest and Other (Income) Expense:

     

Interest and Investment Income

    (15     (18     (18

Interest Expense

    530        676        624   

Other

    51        163        163   
                       

Interest and Other, net

    566        821        769   
                       

EARNINGS FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS BEFORE PROVISION FOR INCOME TAXES

    5,273        3,982        3,590   

Provision for Income Taxes

    1,935        1,362        1,278   
                       

EARNINGS FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS

    3,338        2,620        2,312   

EARNINGS (LOSS) FROM DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS, NET OF TAX

    -        41        (52
                       

NET EARNINGS

   $ 3,338       $ 2,661       $ 2,260   
                       

Weighted Average Common Shares

    1,648        1,683        1,682   

BASIC EARNINGS PER SHARE FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS

   $ 2.03       $ 1.56       $ 1.37   

BASIC EARNINGS (LOSS) PER SHARE FROM DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS

   $ -       $ 0.02       $ (0.03

BASIC EARNINGS PER SHARE

   $ 2.03       $ 1.58       $ 1.34   

Diluted Weighted Average Common Shares

    1,658        1,692        1,686   

DILUTED EARNINGS PER SHARE FROM CONTINUING OPERATIONS

   $ 2.01       $ 1.55       $ 1.37   

DILUTED EARNINGS (LOSS) PER SHARE FROM DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS

   $ -       $ 0.02       $ (0.03

DILUTED EARNINGS PER SHARE

   $ 2.01       $ 1.57       $ 1.34   

 

(1) Fiscal years ended January 30, 2011, January 31, 2010 and February 1, 2009 include 52 weeks.

See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

32


Table of Contents

THE HOME DEPOT, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

amounts in millions, except share and per share data    January 30,
2011
     January 31,
2010
 

ASSETS

     

Current Assets:

     

Cash and Cash Equivalents

    $ 545        $ 1,421   

Receivables, net

     1,085         964   

Merchandise Inventories

     10,625         10,188   

Other Current Assets

     1,224         1,327   
                 

Total Current Assets

     13,479         13,900   
                 

Property and Equipment, at cost:

     

Land

     8,497         8,451   

Buildings

     17,606         17,391   

Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment

     9,687         9,091   

Leasehold Improvements

     1,373         1,383   

Construction in Progress

     654         525   

Capital Leases

     568         504   
                 
     38,385         37,345   

Less Accumulated Depreciation and Amortization

     13,325         11,795   
                 

Net Property and Equipment

     25,060         25,550   
                 

Notes Receivable

     139         33   

Goodwill

     1,187         1,171   

Other Assets

     260         223   
                 

Total Assets

    $ 40,125        $ 40,877   
                 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

     

Current Liabilities:

     

Accounts Payable

    $ 4,717        $ 4,863   

Accrued Salaries and Related Expenses

     1,290         1,263   

Sales Taxes Payable

     368         362   

Deferred Revenue

     1,177         1,158   

Income Taxes Payable

     13         108   

Current Installments of Long-Term Debt

     1,042         1,020   

Other Accrued Expenses

     1,515         1,589   
                 

Total Current Liabilities

     10,122         10,363   
                 

Long-Term Debt, excluding current installments

     8,707         8,662   

Other Long-Term Liabilities

     2,135         2,140   

Deferred Income Taxes

     272         319   
                 

Total Liabilities

     21,236         21,484   
                 

STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

     

Common Stock, par value $0.05; authorized: 10 billion shares; issued: 1.722 billion shares at January 30, 2011 and 1.716 billion shares at January 31, 2010; outstanding: 1.623 billion shares at January 30, 2011 and 1.698 billion shares at January 31, 2010

     86         86   

Paid-In Capital

     6,556         6,304   

Retained Earnings

     14,995         13,226   

Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income

     445         362   

Treasury Stock, at cost, 99 million shares at January 30, 2011 and 18 million shares at January 31, 2010

     (3,193      (585
                 

Total Stockholders’ Equity

     18,889         19,393   
                 

Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity

    $ 40,125        $ 40,877   
                 

See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

33


Table of Contents

THE HOME DEPOT, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

 

    Common Stock     Paid-In
Capital
    Retained
Earnings
    Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
    Treasury Stock     Stockholders’
Equity
    Total
Comprehensive
Income
 
amounts in millions, except per share data   Shares     Amount           Shares     Amount      

BALANCE, FEBRUARY 3, 2008

    1,698      $ 85      $ 5,800      $ 11,388      $ 755        (8   $ (314   $ 17,714     
     

Net Earnings

                         2,260                             2,260      $ 2,260   

Shares Issued Under Employee Stock Plans

    9               68                                    68     

Tax Effect of Sale of Option Shares by Employees

                  7                                    7     

Translation Adjustments

                                (831                   (831     (831

Cash Flow Hedges, net of tax

                                (1                   (1     (1

Stock Options, Awards and Amortization of
Restricted Stock

                  176                                    176     

Repurchases of Common Stock

                                       (3     (70     (70  

Cash Dividends ($0.90 per share)

                         (1,521                          (1,521  

Other

                  (3     (34                   12        (25  
                       

Comprehensive Income

                  $ 1,428   
           

BALANCE, FEBRUARY 1, 2009

    1,707      $  85      $ 6,048      $ 12,093      $ (77     (11   $ (372   $ 17,777     
     

Net Earnings

                         2,661                             2,661      $ 2,661   

Shares Issued Under Employee Stock Plans

    9        1        57                                    58     

Tax Effect of Sale of Option Shares by Employees

                  (2                                 (2  

Translation Adjustments

                                426                      426        426   

Cash Flow Hedges, net of tax

                                11                      11        11   

Stock Options, Awards and Amortization of
Restricted Stock

                  201                                    201     

Repurchases of Common Stock

                                       (7     (213     (213  

Cash Dividends ($0.90 per share)

                         (1,525                          (1,525  

Other

                         (3     2                      (1     2   
                       

Comprehensive Income

                  $ 3,100   
           

BALANCE, JANUARY 31, 2010

    1,716      $ 86      $ 6,304      $ 13,226      $ 362        (18   $ (585   $ 19,393     
     

Net Earnings

                         3,338                             3,338      $ 3,338   

Shares Issued Under Employee Stock Plans

    6               42                                    42     

Tax Effect of Sale of Option Shares by Employees

                  2                                    2     

Translation Adjustments

                                206                      206        206   

Cash Flow Hedges, net of tax

                                (116                   (116     (116

Stock Options, Awards and Amortization of
Restricted Stock

                  214                                    214     

Repurchases of Common Stock

                                       (81     (2,608     (2,608  

Cash Dividends ($0.945 per share)

                         (1,569                          (1,569  

Other

                  (6            (7                   (13     (7
                       

Comprehensive Income

                  $ 3,421   
           

BALANCE, JANUARY 30, 2011

    1,722      $ 86      $ 6,556      $ 14,995      $ 445        (99   $ (3,193   $ 18,889     
     

See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

34


Table of Contents

THE HOME DEPOT, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

    Fiscal Year Ended(1)  
amounts in millions   January 30,
2011
    January 31,
2010
    February 1,
2009
 

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:

     

Net Earnings

  $ 3,338      $ 2,661      $ 2,260   

Reconciliation of Net Earnings to Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities:

     

Depreciation and Amortization

    1,718        1,806        1,902   

Impairment Related to Rationalization Charges

                  580   

Impairment of Investment

           163        163   

Stock-Based Compensation Expense

    214        201        176   

Changes in Assets and Liabilities:

     

(Increase) Decrease in Receivables, net

    (102     (23     121   

(Increase) Decrease in Merchandise Inventories

    (355     625        743   

Decrease (Increase) in Other Current Assets

    12        4        (7

(Decrease) Increase in Accounts Payable and Accrued Expenses

    (133     59        (646

Increase (Decrease) in Deferred Revenue

    10        (21     (292

(Decrease) Increase in Income Taxes Payable

    (85     (174     262   

Increase (Decrease) in Deferred Income Taxes

    104        (227     (282

(Decrease) Increase in Other Long-Term Liabilities

    (61     (19     306   

Other

    (75     70        242   
                       

Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities

    4,585        5,125        5,528   
                       

CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:

     

Capital Expenditures, net of $62, $10 and $37 of non-cash capital
expenditures in fiscal 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively

    (1,096     (966     (1,847

Proceeds from Sales of Property and Equipment

    84        178        147   

Purchases of Investments

                  (168

Proceeds from Sales and Maturities of Investments

           33        139   
                       

Net Cash Used in Investing Activities

    (1,012     (755     (1,729
                       

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:

     

Repayments of Short-Term Borrowings, net

                  (1,732

Proceeds from Long-Term Borrowings, net of discount

    998                 

Repayments of Long-Term Debt

    (1,029     (1,774     (313

Repurchases of Common Stock

    (2,608     (213     (70

Proceeds from Sales of Common Stock

    104        73        84   

Cash Dividends Paid to Stockholders

    (1,569     (1,525     (1,521

Other Financing Activities

    (347     (64     (128
                       

Net Cash Used in Financing Activities

    (4,451     (3,503     (3,680
                       

(Decrease) Increase in Cash and Cash Equivalents

    (878     867        119   

Effect of Exchange Rate Changes on Cash and Cash Equivalents

    2        35        (45

Cash and Cash Equivalents at Beginning of Year

    1,421        519        445   
                       

Cash and Cash Equivalents at End of Year

  $ 545      $ 1,421      $ 519   
                       

SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF CASH PAYMENTS MADE FOR:

     

Interest, net of interest capitalized

  $ 579      $ 664      $ 622   

Income Taxes

  $ 2,067      $ 2,082      $ 1,265   

 

(1) Fiscal years ended January 30, 2011, January 31, 2010 and February 1, 2009 include 52 weeks.

See accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

35


Table of Contents

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

1. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Business, Consolidation and Presentation

The Home Depot, Inc. and its subsidiaries (the “Company”) operate The Home Depot stores, which are full-service, warehouse-style stores averaging approximately 105,000 square feet in size. The stores stock approximately 30,000 to 40,000 different kinds of building materials, home improvement supplies and lawn and garden products that are sold to do-it-yourself customers, do-it-for-me customers and professional customers. At the end of fiscal 2010, the Company was operating 2,248 stores, which included 1,976 The Home Depot stores in the United States, including the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the territories of the U.S. Virgin Islands and Guam (“U.S.”), 179 The Home Depot stores in Canada, 85 The Home Depot stores in Mexico and 8 The Home Depot stores in China. The Consolidated Financial Statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries. All significant intercompany transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

Fiscal Year

The Company’s fiscal year is a 52- or 53-week period ending on the Sunday nearest to January 31. Fiscal years ended January 30, 2011 (“fiscal 2010”), January 31, 2010 (“fiscal 2009”) and February 1, 2009 (“fiscal 2008”) include 52 weeks.

Use of Estimates

Management of the Company has made a number of estimates and assumptions relating to the reporting of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities, and reported amounts of revenues and expenses in preparing these financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Actual results could differ from these estimates.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

The carrying amounts of Cash and Cash Equivalents, Receivables and Accounts Payable approximate fair value due to the short-term maturities of these financial instruments. The fair value of the Company’s investments is discussed under the caption “Short-Term Investments” in this Note 1. The fair value of the Company’s Long-Term Debt is discussed in Note 11.

Cash Equivalents

The Company considers all highly liquid investments purchased with original maturities of three months or less to be cash equivalents. The Company’s cash equivalents are carried at fair market value and consist primarily of high-grade commercial paper, money market funds and U.S. government agency securities.

Short-Term Investments

Short-term investments are recorded at fair value based on current market rates and are classified as available-for-sale. The Company’s short-term investments are included in Other Current Assets in the accompanying Consolidated Balance Sheets.

Accounts Receivable

The Company has an agreement with a third-party service provider who directly extends credit to customers, manages the Company’s private label credit card program and owns the related receivables. The Company evaluated the third-party entities holding the receivables under the program and concluded that they should not be consolidated by the Company. The agreement with the third-party service provider expires in 2018, with the Company having the option, but no obligation, to purchase the receivables at the end of the agreement. The deferred interest charges incurred by the Company for its deferred financing programs offered to its customers

 

36


Table of Contents

are included in Cost of Sales. The interchange fees charged to the Company for the customers’ use of the cards and the profit sharing with the third-party administrator are included in Selling, General and Administrative expenses (“SG&A”). The sum of the three is referred to by the Company as “the cost of credit” of the private label credit card program.

In addition, certain subsidiaries of the Company extend credit directly to customers in the ordinary course of business. The receivables due from customers were $42 million and $38 million as of January 30, 2011 and January 31, 2010, respectively. The Company’s valuation reserve related to accounts receivable was not material to the Consolidated Financial Statements of the Company as of the end of fiscal 2010 or 2009.

Merchandise Inventories

The majority of the Company’s Merchandise Inventories are stated at the lower of cost (first-in, first-out) or market, as determined by the retail inventory method. As the inventory retail value is adjusted regularly to reflect market conditions, the inventory valued using the retail method approximates the lower of cost or market. Certain subsidiaries, including retail operations in Canada, Mexico and China, and distribution centers, record Merchandise Inventories at the lower of cost or market, as determined by a cost method. These Merchandise Inventories represent approximately 20% of the total Merchandise Inventories balance. The Company evaluates the inventory valued using a cost method at the end of each quarter to ensure that it is carried at the lower of cost or market. The valuation allowance for Merchandise Inventories valued under a cost method was not material to the Consolidated Financial Statements of the Company as of the end of fiscal 2010 or 2009.

Independent physical inventory counts or cycle counts are taken on a regular basis in each store and distribution center to ensure that amounts reflected in the accompanying Consolidated Financial Statements for Merchandise Inventories are properly stated. During the period between physical inventory counts in stores, the Company accrues for estimated losses related to shrink on a store-by-store basis based on historical shrink results and current trends in the business. Shrink (or in the case of excess inventory, “swell”) is the difference between the recorded amount of inventory and the physical inventory. Shrink may occur due to theft, loss, inaccurate records for the receipt of inventory or deterioration of goods, among other things.

Income Taxes

Income taxes are accounted for under the asset and liability method. The Company provides for federal, state and foreign income taxes currently payable, as well as for those deferred due to timing differences between reporting income and expenses for financial statement purposes versus tax purposes. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to temporary differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted income tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect of a change in income tax rates is recognized as income or expense in the period that includes the enactment date.

The Company recognizes the effect of income tax positions only if those positions are more likely than not of being sustained. Recognized income tax positions are measured at the largest amount that is greater than 50% likely of being realized. Changes in recognition or measurement are reflected in the period in which the change in judgment occurs.

The Company and its eligible subsidiaries file a consolidated U.S. federal income tax return. Non-U.S. subsidiaries and certain U.S. subsidiaries, which are consolidated for financial reporting purposes, are not eligible to be included in the Company’s consolidated U.S. federal income tax return. Separate provisions for income taxes have been determined for these entities. The Company intends to reinvest substantially all of the unremitted earnings of its non-U.S. subsidiaries and postpone their remittance indefinitely. Accordingly, no provision for U.S. income taxes for these non-U.S. subsidiaries was recorded in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Earnings.

 

37


Table of Contents

Depreciation and Amortization

The Company’s Buildings, Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment are recorded at cost and depreciated using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets. Leasehold Improvements are amortized using the straight-line method over the original term of the lease or the useful life of the improvement, whichever is shorter. The Company’s Property and Equipment is depreciated using the following estimated useful lives:

 

     Life  

Buildings

     5 – 45 years   

Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment

     2 – 20 years   

Leasehold Improvements

     5 – 45 years   

Capitalized Software Costs

The Company capitalizes certain costs related to the acquisition and development of software and amortizes these costs using the straight-line method over the estimated useful life of the software, which is three to six years. These costs are included in Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment in the accompanying Consolidated Balance Sheets. Certain development costs not meeting the criteria for capitalization are expensed as incurred.

Revenues

The Company recognizes revenue, net of estimated returns and sales tax, at the time the customer takes possession of merchandise or receives services. The liability for sales returns is estimated based on historical return levels. When the Company receives payment from customers before the customer has taken possession of the merchandise or the service has been performed, the amount received is recorded as Deferred Revenue in the accompanying Consolidated Balance Sheets until the sale or service is complete. The Company also records Deferred Revenue for the sale of gift cards and recognizes this revenue upon the redemption of gift cards in Net Sales. Gift card breakage income is recognized based upon historical redemption patterns and represents the balance of gift cards for which the Company believes the likelihood of redemption by the customer is remote. During fiscal 2010, 2009 and 2008, the Company recognized $46 million, $40 million and $37 million, respectively, of gift card breakage income. This income is included in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Earnings as a reduction in SG&A.

Services Revenue

Net Sales include services revenue generated through a variety of installation, home maintenance and professional service programs. In these programs, the customer selects and purchases material for a project and the Company provides or arranges professional installation. These programs are offered through the Company’s stores. Under certain programs, when the Company provides or arranges the installation of a project and the subcontractor provides material as part of the installation, both the material and labor are included in services revenue. The Company recognizes this revenue when the service for the customer is complete.

All payments received prior to the completion of services are recorded in Deferred Revenue in the accompanying Consolidated Balance Sheets. Services revenue was $2.7 billion, $2.6 billion and $3.1 billion for fiscal 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively.

Self-Insurance

The Company is self-insured for certain losses related to general liability, workers’ compensation, medical, product liability and automobile claims. The expected ultimate cost for claims incurred as of the balance sheet date is not discounted and is recognized as a liability. The expected ultimate cost of claims is estimated based upon analysis of historical data and actuarial estimates.

 

38


Table of Contents

Prepaid Advertising

Television and radio advertising production costs, along with media placement costs, are expensed when the advertisement first appears. Amounts included in Other Current Assets in the accompanying Consolidated Balance Sheets relating to prepayments of production costs for print and broadcast advertising as well as sponsorship promotions were not material at the end of fiscal 2010 and 2009.

Vendor Allowances

Vendor allowances primarily consist of volume rebates that are earned as a result of attaining certain purchase levels and advertising co-op allowances for the promotion of vendors’ products that are typically based on guaranteed minimum amounts with additional amounts being earned for attaining certain purchase levels. These vendor allowances are accrued as earned, with those allowances received as a result of attaining certain purchase levels accrued over the incentive period based on estimates of purchases.

Volume rebates and certain advertising co-op allowances earned are initially recorded as a reduction in Merchandise Inventories and a subsequent reduction in Cost of Sales when the related product is sold. Certain advertising co-op allowances that are reimbursements of specific, incremental and identifiable costs incurred to promote vendors’ products are recorded as an offset against advertising expense. In fiscal 2010, 2009 and 2008, gross advertising expense was $864 million, $897 million and $1.0 billion, respectively, and is included in SG&A. Specific, incremental and identifiable advertising co-op allowances were $90 million, $105 million and $107 million for fiscal 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively, and are recorded as an offset to advertising expense in SG&A.

Cost of Sales

Cost of Sales includes the actual cost of merchandise sold and services performed, the cost of transportation of merchandise from vendors to the Company’s stores, locations or customers, the operating cost of the Company’s sourcing and distribution network and the cost of deferred interest programs offered through the Company’s private label credit card program.

The cost of handling and shipping merchandise from the Company’s stores, locations or distribution centers to the customer is classified as SG&A. The cost of shipping and handling, including internal costs and payments to third parties, classified as SG&A was $438 million, $426 million and $501 million in fiscal 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

The Company evaluates its long-lived assets each quarter for indicators of potential impairment. Indicators of impairment include current period losses combined with a history of losses, management’s decision to relocate or close a store or other location before the end of its previously estimated useful life, or when changes in other circumstances indicate the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. The evaluation for long-lived assets is performed at the lowest level of identifiable cash flows, which is generally the individual store level.

The assets of a store with indicators of impairment are evaluated by comparing its undiscounted cash flows with its carrying value. The estimate of cash flows includes management’s assumptions of cash inflows and outflows directly resulting from the use of those assets in operations, including gross margin on Net Sales, payroll and related items, occupancy costs, insurance allocations and other costs to operate a store. If the carrying value is greater than the undiscounted cash flows, an impairment loss is recognized for the difference between the carrying value and the estimated fair market value. Impairment losses are recorded as a component of SG&A in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Earnings. When a leased location closes, the Company also recognizes in SG&A the net present value of future lease obligations less estimated sublease income.

As part of its Rationalization Charges, the Company recorded no asset impairments in fiscal 2010 and 2009 and recorded $580 million of asset impairments in fiscal 2008. Also as part of its Rationalization Charges, the Company recorded no lease obligation costs in fiscal 2010 and recorded $84 million and $252 million of lease

 

39


Table of Contents

obligation costs in fiscal 2009 and 2008, respectively. See Note 2 for more details on the Rationalization Charges. The Company also recorded impairments and other lease obligation costs on other closings and relocations in the ordinary course of business, which were not material to the Consolidated Financial Statements in fiscal 2010, 2009 and 2008.

Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

Goodwill represents the excess of purchase price over the fair value of net assets acquired. The Company does not amortize goodwill, but does assess the recoverability of goodwill in the third quarter of each fiscal year, or more often if indicators warrant, by determining whether the fair value of each reporting unit supports its carrying value. The fair values of the Company’s identified reporting units were estimated using the present value of expected future discounted cash flows.

The Company amortizes the cost of other intangible assets over their estimated useful lives, which range up to 20 years, unless such lives are deemed indefinite. Intangible assets with indefinite lives are tested in the third quarter of each fiscal year for impairment, or more often if indicators warrant. Impairment charges related to goodwill and other intangible assets were not material for fiscal 2010, 2009 or 2008.

Stock-Based Compensation

The per share weighted average fair value of stock options granted during fiscal 2010, 2009 and 2008 was $6.70, $6.61 and $6.46, respectively. The fair value of these options was determined at the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model with the following assumptions:

 

       Fiscal Year Ended  
       January 30,
2011
       January 31,
2010
       February 1,
2009
 

Risk-free interest rate

       3.1%           2.3%           2.9%   

Assumed volatility

       26.4%           41.5%           33.8%   

Assumed dividend yield

       2.9%           3.9%           3.5%   

Assumed lives of option

       5 years           6 years           6 years   

Derivatives

The Company uses derivative financial instruments from time to time in the management of its interest rate exposure on long-term debt and its exposure on foreign currency fluctuations. The Company accounts for its derivative financial instruments in accordance with the Financial Accounting Standards Board Accounting Standards Codification (“FASB ASC”) 815-10. The fair value of the Company’s derivative financial instruments is discussed in Note 11.

Comprehensive Income

Comprehensive Income includes Net Earnings adjusted for certain revenues, expenses, gains and losses that are excluded from Net Earnings under U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Adjustments to Net Earnings and Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income consist primarily of foreign currency translation adjustments.

Foreign Currency Translation

Assets and liabilities denominated in a foreign currency are translated into U.S. dollars at the current rate of exchange on the last day of the reporting period. Revenues and expenses are generally translated using average exchange rates for the period and equity transactions are translated using the actual rate on the day of the transaction.

 

40


Table of Contents

Segment Information

The Company operates within a single reportable segment primarily within North America. Net Sales for the Company outside of the U.S. were $7.5 billion, $7.0 billion and $7.4 billion for fiscal 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively. Long-lived assets outside of the U.S. totaled $3.2 billion and $3.0 billion as of January 30, 2011 and January 31, 2010, respectively.

Reclassifications

Certain amounts in prior fiscal years have been reclassified to conform with the presentation adopted in the current fiscal year.

 

2. RATIONALIZATION CHARGES

In fiscal 2008, the Company reduced its square footage growth plans to improve free cash flow, provide stronger returns for the Company and invest in its existing stores to continue improving the customer experience. As a result of this store rationalization plan, the Company determined that it would no longer pursue the opening of approximately 50 U.S. stores that had been in its new store pipeline. The Company expects to dispose of or sublet any remaining pipeline locations over varying periods. The Company also closed 15 underperforming U.S. stores in the second quarter of fiscal 2008, and the Company expects to dispose of or sublet any remaining locations over varying periods.

Also in fiscal 2008, the Company announced that it would exit its EXPO, THD Design Center, Yardbirds and HD Bath businesses (the “Exited Businesses”) in order to focus on its core The Home Depot stores. The Company closed the Exited Businesses in the first quarter of fiscal 2009 and expects to dispose of or sublet any remaining locations over varying periods. These steps impacted approximately 5,000 associates in those locations, their support functions and their distribution centers.

Finally, in January 2009 the Company also restructured its support functions to better align the Company’s cost structure. These actions impacted approximately 2,000 associates.

The Company did not incur any material charges related to these actions (collectively, the “Rationalization Charges”) in fiscal 2010 and recognized $146 million and $951 million in total pretax charges for fiscal 2009 and 2008, respectively. The Company does not expect any further material charges related to these actions.

Activity related to Rationalization Charges for fiscal 2010, 2009 and 2008 was as follows (amounts in millions):

 

     Asset
Impairments
     Lease Obligation
Costs, net
    Severance      Other      Total  

Fiscal 2008 Charges

   $ 580       $ 252      $ 78       $ 41       $ 951   

Cash Uses

             39        6         18         63   

Non-cash Activity

     542                        3         545   
                                           

Accrued Balance at February 1, 2009

     38         213        72         20         343   
                                           

Fiscal 2009 Charges

             84        8         54         146   

Cash Uses

             106        80         71         257   

Non-cash Activity

     15                        3         18   
                                           

Accrued Balance at January 31, 2010

     23         191                        214   
                                           

Cash Uses

             42                        42   

Non-cash Activity

     19         (9                     10   
                                           

Accrued Balance at January 30, 2011

   $ 4       $ 158      $  —       $  —       $ 162   
                                           

 

41


Table of Contents

Inventory markdown costs reflected in Other are included in Cost of Sales in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Earnings, and costs related to asset impairments, lease obligations, severance and other miscellaneous costs are included in SG&A expenses. Asset impairment charges, including contractual costs to complete certain assets, were determined based on fair market value using market data for each individual property. Lease obligation costs represent the present value of contractually obligated rental payments offset by estimated sublet income, including estimates of the time required to sublease the locations. The payments related to the leased locations therefore are not generally incremental uses of cash.

 

3. CHANGE IN ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLE

During fiscal 2008, the Company implemented a new enterprise resource planning (“ERP”) system, including a new inventory system, for its retail operations in Canada. Along with this implementation, the Company changed its method of accounting for Merchandise Inventories for its retail operations in Canada from the lower of cost (first-in, first-out) or market, as determined by the retail inventory method, to the lower of cost or market using a weighted-average cost method. As of the end of fiscal 2008, the implementation of the new inventory system and related conversion to the weighted-average cost method for Canadian retail operations was complete.

The new ERP system allows the Company to utilize the weighted-average cost method, which the Company believes will result in greater precision in the costing of inventories and a better matching of cost of sales with revenue generated. The effect of the change on the Merchandise Inventories and Retained Earnings balances was not material. Prior to the inventory system conversion, the Company could not determine the impact of the change to the weighted-average cost method, and therefore, could not retroactively apply the change to periods prior to fiscal 2008.

 

4. HD SUPPLY DISPOSITION

On August 30, 2007, the Company closed the sale of HD Supply, Inc. In accordance with FASB ASC 360-10, the Company reclassified the results of HD Supply as discontinued operations in its Consolidated Statements of Earnings for all periods presented. Settlement of working capital matters arising from the sale of HD Supply resulted in earnings from discontinued operations of $41 million, net of tax, in fiscal 2009 and a loss from discontinued operations of $52 million, net of tax, in fiscal 2008.

In connection with the sale, the Company purchased a 12.5% equity interest in the newly formed HD Supply for $325 million. In fiscal 2008, the Company determined its 12.5% equity interest in HD Supply was impaired and recorded a $163 million charge to write-down the investment. In fiscal 2009, the Company determined its equity interest in HD Supply was further impaired and recorded an additional charge of $163 million to write-down the remaining investment. These charges are included in Interest and Other, net, in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Earnings.

Also in connection with the sale, the Company guaranteed a $1.0 billion senior secured amortizing term loan of HD Supply. The Company is responsible for up to $1.0 billion and any unpaid interest in the event of nonpayment by HD Supply. As reported in the quarterly report on Form 10-Q of HD Supply for the period ended October 31, 2010, the outstanding balance of this term loan as of October 31, 2010 was $940 million. The guaranteed loan is collateralized by certain assets of HD Supply. The original expiration date of the guarantee was August 30, 2012. On March 19, 2010, the Company amended the guarantee to extend the expiration date to April 1, 2014. The fair value of the guarantee at August 30, 2007 was $16 million and was recorded as a liability of the Company in Other Long-Term Liabilities. The extension of the guarantee increased the fair value of the guarantee to $67 million, resulting in a $51 million charge to Interest and Other, net, for fiscal 2010.

 

42


Table of Contents
5. DEBT

The Company has commercial paper programs that allow for borrowings up to $2.0 billion. All of the Company’s short-term borrowings in fiscal 2010 and 2009 were under these commercial paper programs. In connection with the commercial paper programs, the Company has a back-up credit facility with a consortium of banks for borrowings up to $2.0 billion. The credit facility expires in July 2013 and contains various restrictive covenants. At January 30, 2011, the Company was in compliance with all of the covenants, and they are not expected to impact the Company’s liquidity or capital resources.

Short-Term Debt under the commercial paper programs was as follows (amounts in millions):

 

     January 30,
2011
     January 31,
2010
 

Balance outstanding at fiscal year-end

   $       $   

Maximum amount outstanding at any month-end

   $       $ 190   

Average daily short-term borrowings

   $ 5       $ 55   

Weighted average interest rate

     0.4      1.1

The Company’s Long-Term Debt at the end of fiscal 2010 and 2009 consisted of the following (amounts in millions):

 

    January 30,
2011
       January 31,
2010
 

4.625% Senior Notes; due August 15, 2010; interest payable semi-annually on
February 15 and August 15

   $          $ 999   

5.20% Senior Notes; due March 1, 2011; interest payable semi-annually on
March 1 and September 1

    1,000           1,000   

5.25% Senior Notes; due December 16, 2013; interest payable semi-annually on
June 16 and December 16

    1,297           1,258   

5.40% Senior Notes; due March 1, 2016; interest payable semi-annually on
March 1 and September 1

    3,033           3,040   

3.95% Senior Notes; due September 15, 2020; interest payable semi-annually on
March 15 and September 15

    499             

5.875% Senior Notes; due December 16, 2036; interest payable semi-annually on
June 16 and December 16

    2,960           2,960   

5.40% Senior Notes; due September 15, 2040; interest payable semi-annually on
March 15 and September 15

    499             

Capital Lease Obligations; payable in varying installments through January 31,
2055

    452           408   

Other

    9           17   
                  

Total debt

    9,749           9,682   

Less current installments

    1,042           1,020   
                  

Long-Term Debt, excluding current installments

   $ 8,707          $ 8,662   
                  

At January 30, 2011, the Company had outstanding interest rate swaps, accounted for as fair value hedges, that expire on December 16, 2013 with a notional amount of $1.25 billion that swap fixed rate interest on the Company’s $1.25 billion 5.25% Senior Notes for variable interest equal to LIBOR plus 259 basis points. At January 30, 2011, the approximate fair value of these agreements was an asset of $47 million, which is the estimated amount the Company would have received to settle the agreements and is included in Other Assets in the accompanying Consolidated Balance Sheets.

In May 2010, the Company entered into a forward starting interest rate swap agreement with a notional amount of $500 million, accounted for as a cash flow hedge, to hedge interest rate fluctuations in anticipation of issuing long-

 

43


Table of Contents

term debt to refinance debt maturing in fiscal 2011. At January 30, 2011, the approximate fair market value of this agreement was a liability of $2 million, which is the estimated amount the Company would have paid to settle the agreement and is included in Other Long-Term Liabilities in the accompanying Consolidated Balance Sheets.

In September 2010, the Company issued $500 million of 3.95% Senior Notes due September 15, 2020 at a discount of $1 million and $500 million of 5.40% Senior Notes due September 15, 2040 at a discount of $1 million (together, the “September 2010 issuance”). Interest on these Senior Notes is due semi-annually on March 15 and September 15 of each year. The net proceeds of the September 2010 issuance were used to refinance the Company’s 4.625% Senior Notes that matured August 15, 2010 in the aggregate principal amount of $1.0 billion. The $2 million discount associated with the September 2010 issuance is being amortized over the term of the Senior Notes using the effective interest rate method. Issuance costs were $8 million and are being amortized over the term of the Senior Notes.

In fiscal 2009 and 2010, the Company entered into forward starting interest rate swap agreements with a combined notional amount of $1.0 billion to hedge interest rate fluctuations in anticipation of the September 2010 issuance, which were accounted for as cash flow hedges. Upon the September 2010 issuance, the Company paid $193 million to settle these forward starting interest rate swap agreements. This amount, net of income taxes, is included in Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income and is being amortized to Interest Expense over the lives of the Senior Notes issued in September 2010.

During fiscal 2007 and 2008, the Company entered into interest rate swaps, accounted for as fair value hedges, with notional amounts of $3.0 billion, that swapped fixed rate interest on the Company’s $3.0 billion 5.40% Senior Notes due March 1, 2016 for variable rate interest equal to LIBOR plus 60 to 149 basis points. In fiscal 2008, the Company received $56 million to settle these swaps, which is being amortized to reduce net Interest Expense over the remaining term of the debt.

The Senior Notes may be redeemed by the Company at any time, in whole or in part, at a redemption price plus accrued interest up to the redemption date. The redemption price is equal to the greater of (1) 100% of the principal amount of the Senior Notes to be redeemed, or (2) the sum of the present values of the remaining scheduled payments of principal and interest to maturity.

Additionally, if a Change in Control Triggering Event occurs, as defined by the terms of the September 2010 Issuance and the 5.25% Senior Notes and the 5.875% Senior Notes issuance (together, the “December 2006 Issuance”), holders of the September 2010 Issuance and the December 2006 Issuance have the right to require the Company to redeem those notes at 101% of the aggregate principal amount of the notes plus accrued interest up to the redemption date.

The Company is generally not limited under the indenture governing the Senior Notes in its ability to incur additional indebtedness or required to maintain financial ratios or specified levels of net worth or liquidity. Further, while the indenture governing the Senior Notes contains various restrictive covenants, none is expected to impact the Company’s liquidity or capital resources.

At January 30, 2011, the Company had outstanding cross currency swap agreements with a notional amount of $590 million, accounted for as cash flow hedges, to hedge foreign currency fluctuations on certain intercompany debt. At January 30, 2011, the approximate fair value of these agreements was a liability of $38 million, which is the estimated amount the Company would have paid to settle the agreements and is included in Other Long-Term Liabilities in the accompanying Consolidated Balance Sheets.

Interest Expense in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Earnings is net of interest capitalized of $3 million, $4 million and $20 million in fiscal 2010, 2009 and 2008, respectively. Maturities of Long-Term Debt are $1.0 billion for fiscal 2011, $29 million for fiscal 2012, $1.3 billion for fiscal 2013, $28 million for fiscal 2014, $26 million for fiscal 2015 and $7.3 billion thereafter.

 

44


Table of Contents
6. INCOME TAXES

The components of Earnings from Continuing Operations before Provision for Income Taxes for fiscal 2010, 2009 and 2008 were as follows (amounts in millions):

 

     Fiscal Year Ended  
     January 30,
2011
       January 31,
2010
       February 1,
2009
 

United States

    $ 4,854          $ 3,586          $ 3,136   

Foreign

     419           396           454   
                              

Total

    $ 5,273          $ 3,982          $ 3,590   
                              

The Provision for Income Taxes consisted of the following (amounts in millions):

 

     Fiscal Year Ended  
     January 30,
2011
       January 31,
2010
     February 1,
2009
 

Current:

          

Federal

    $ 1,478          $ 1,157        $ 1,283   

State

     181           184         198   

Foreign

     151           195         85   
                            
     1,810           1,536         1,566   
                            

Deferred:

          

Federal

     79           (121      (209

State

     21           (24      (56

Foreign

     25           (29      (23
                            
     125           (174      (288
                            

Total

    $ 1,935          $ 1,362        $ 1,278   
                            

The Company’s combined federal, state and foreign effective tax rates for fiscal 2010, 2009 and 2008, net of offsets generated by federal, state and foreign tax benefits, were approximately 36.7%, 34.2% and 35.6%, respectively.

The reconciliation of the Provision for Income Taxes at the federal statutory rate of 35% to the actual tax expense for the applicable fiscal years was as follows (amounts in millions):

 

     Fiscal Year Ended  
     January 30,
2011
     January 31,
2010
     February 1,
2009
 

Income taxes at federal statutory rate

    $ 1,846        $ 1,394        $ 1,257   

State income taxes, net of federal income tax benefit

     131         104         92   

Other, net

     (42      (136      (71
                          

Total

    $ 1,935        $ 1,362        $ 1,278   
                          

 

45


Table of Contents

The tax effects of temporary differences that give rise to significant portions of the deferred tax assets and deferred tax liabilities as of January 30, 2011 and January 31, 2010 were as follows (amounts in millions):

 

     January 30,
        2011         
       January 31,
        2010         
 

Current:

       

Deferred Tax Assets:

       

Property and equipment

    $ 64          $ 85   

Accrued self-insurance liabilities

     115           109   

Other accrued liabilities

     196           303   

Deferred compensation

     393           372   
                   

Current Deferred Tax Assets

     768           869   

Deferred Tax Liabilities:

       

Accelerated inventory deduction

     (106        (114

Other

     (114        (111
                   

Current Deferred Tax Liabilities

     (220        (225
                   

Current Deferred Tax Assets, net

     548           644   
                   

Noncurrent:

       

Deferred Tax Assets:

       

Accrued self-insurance liabilities

     345           338   

State income taxes

     69           123   

Capital loss carryover

     141           86   

Net operating losses

     66           74   

Foreign tax credit carry forward

     30           65   

Impairment of investment

     120           114   

Other

     212           174   

Valuation allowance

     (66        (15
                   

Noncurrent Deferred Tax Assets

     917           959   

Deferred Tax Liabilities:

       

Property and equipment

     (1,073        (1,178

Goodwill and other intangibles

     (95        (88
                   

Noncurrent Deferred Tax Liabilities

     (1,168        (1,266
                   

Noncurrent Deferred Tax Liabilities, net

     (251        (307
                   

Net Deferred Tax Assets

    $ 297          $ 337   
                   

Current deferred tax assets and current deferred tax liabilities are netted by tax jurisdiction and noncurrent deferred tax assets and noncurrent deferred tax liabilities are netted by tax jurisdiction, and are included in the accompanying Consolidated Balance Sheets as follows (amounts in millions):

 

     January 30,
        2011         
       January 31,
        2010         
 

Other Current Assets

    $ 553          $ 650  &nb