HFBC » Topics » Fair Values of Financial Instruments

These excerpts taken from the HFBC 10-K filed Mar 31, 2009.

Fair Values of Financial Instruments

SFAS 107, Disclosures about Fair Value of Financial Instruments, requires disclosure of fair value information about financial instruments, whether or not recognized in the consolidated balance sheets for which it is practicable to estimate that value. In cases where quoted market prices are not available, fair values are based on estimates using present value or other valuation techniques. Those techniques are significantly affected by the assumptions used, including the discount rate and estimates of future cash flows. In that regard, the derived fair value estimates cannot be substantiated by comparison to independent markets and, in many cases, could not be realized in immediate settlement of the instruments. Fair value estimates are made at a point in time, based on relevant market information and information about the financial instrument. Accordingly, such estimates involve uncertainties and matters of judgment and therefore cannot be determined with precision. SFAS 107 excludes certain financial instruments and all non-financial instruments from its disclosure requirements. Accordingly, the aggregate fair value amounts presented do not represent the underlying value of the Company.

The following are the more significant methods and assumptions used by the Company in estimating its fair value disclosures for financial instruments:

Fair Values of Financial Instruments

SFAS 107, Disclosures about Fair Value of Financial Instruments, requires disclosure of fair value information about financial instruments, whether or not recognized in the consolidated balance sheets for which it is practicable to estimate that value. In cases where quoted market prices are not available, fair values are based on estimates using present value or other valuation techniques. Those techniques are significantly affected by the assumptions used, including the discount rate and estimates of future cash flows. In that regard, the derived fair value estimates cannot be substantiated by comparison to independent markets and, in many cases, could not be realized in immediate settlement of the instruments. Fair value estimates are made at a point in time, based on relevant market information and information about the financial instrument. Accordingly, such estimates involve uncertainties and matters of judgment and therefore cannot be determined with precision. SFAS 107 excludes certain financial instruments and all non-financial instruments from its disclosure requirements. Accordingly, the aggregate fair value amounts presented do not represent the underlying value of the Company.

The following are the more significant methods and assumptions used by the Company in estimating its fair value disclosures for financial instruments:

Fair Values of Financial Instruments

STYLE="margin-top:6px;margin-bottom:0px; margin-left:4%">SFAS 107, Disclosures about Fair Value of Financial Instruments, requires disclosure of fair value information about financial instruments, whether
or not recognized in the consolidated balance sheets for which it is practicable to estimate that value. In cases where quoted market prices are not available, fair values are based on estimates using present value or other valuation techniques.
Those techniques are significantly affected by the assumptions used, including the discount rate and estimates of future cash flows. In that regard, the derived fair value estimates cannot be substantiated by comparison to independent markets and,
in many cases, could not be realized in immediate settlement of the instruments. Fair value estimates are made at a point in time, based on relevant market information and information about the financial instrument. Accordingly, such estimates
involve uncertainties and matters of judgment and therefore cannot be determined with precision. SFAS 107 excludes certain financial instruments and all non-financial instruments from its disclosure requirements. Accordingly, the aggregate fair
value amounts presented do not represent the underlying value of the Company.

The following are the more significant methods and
assumptions used by the Company in estimating its fair value disclosures for financial instruments:

Cash and cash equivalents

The carrying amounts reported in the consolidated balance sheets for cash and cash equivalents approximate those assets’ fair values,
because they mature within 90 days or less and do not present credit risk concerns.

Fair Values of Financial Instruments

STYLE="margin-top:6px;margin-bottom:0px; margin-left:4%">SFAS 107, Disclosures about Fair Value of Financial Instruments, requires disclosure of fair value information about financial instruments, whether
or not recognized in the consolidated balance sheets for which it is practicable to estimate that value. In cases where quoted market prices are not available, fair values are based on estimates using present value or other valuation techniques.
Those techniques are significantly affected by the assumptions used, including the discount rate and estimates of future cash flows. In that regard, the derived fair value estimates cannot be substantiated by comparison to independent markets and,
in many cases, could not be realized in immediate settlement of the instruments. Fair value estimates are made at a point in time, based on relevant market information and information about the financial instrument. Accordingly, such estimates
involve uncertainties and matters of judgment and therefore cannot be determined with precision. SFAS 107 excludes certain financial instruments and all non-financial instruments from its disclosure requirements. Accordingly, the aggregate fair
value amounts presented do not represent the underlying value of the Company.

The following are the more significant methods and
assumptions used by the Company in estimating its fair value disclosures for financial instruments:

Cash and cash equivalents

The carrying amounts reported in the consolidated balance sheets for cash and cash equivalents approximate those assets’ fair values,
because they mature within 90 days or less and do not present credit risk concerns.

Fair Values of Financial Instruments

STYLE="margin-top:6px;margin-bottom:0px; margin-left:4%">SFAS 107, Disclosures about Fair Value of Financial Instruments, requires disclosure of fair value information about financial instruments, whether
or not recognized in the consolidated balance sheets for which it is practicable to estimate that value. In cases where quoted market prices are not available, fair values are based on estimates using present value or other valuation techniques.
Those techniques are significantly affected by the assumptions used, including the discount rate and estimates of future cash flows. In that regard, the derived fair value estimates cannot be substantiated by comparison to independent markets and,
in many cases, could not be realized in immediate settlement of the instruments. Fair value estimates are made at a point in time, based on relevant market information and information about the financial instrument. Accordingly, such estimates
involve uncertainties and matters of judgment and therefore cannot be determined with precision. SFAS 107 excludes certain financial instruments and all non-financial instruments from its disclosure requirements. Accordingly, the aggregate fair
value amounts presented do not represent the underlying value of the Company.

The following are the more significant methods and
assumptions used by the Company in estimating its fair value disclosures for financial instruments:

Cash and cash equivalents

The carrying amounts reported in the consolidated balance sheets for cash and cash equivalents approximate those assets’ fair values,
because they mature within 90 days or less and do not present credit risk concerns.

These excerpts taken from the HFBC 10-K filed Mar 28, 2008.

Fair Values of Financial Instruments

SFAS 107, Disclosures about Fair Value of Financial Instruments, requires disclosure of fair value information about financial instruments, whether or not recognized in the consolidated balance sheets for which it is practicable to estimate that value. In cases where quoted market prices are not available, fair values are based on estimates using present value or other valuation techniques. Those techniques are significantly affected by the assumptions used, including the discount rate and estimates of future cash flows. In that regard, the derived fair value estimates cannot be substantiated by comparison to independent markets and, in many cases, could not be realized in immediate settlement of the instruments. Fair value estimates are made at a point in time, based on relevant market information and information about the financial instrument. Accordingly, such estimates involve uncertainties and matters of judgment and therefore cannot be determined with precision. SFAS 107 excludes certain financial instruments and all non-financial instruments from its disclosure requirements. Accordingly, the aggregate fair value amounts presented do not represent the underlying value of the Company.

The following are the more significant methods and assumptions used by the Company in estimating its fair value disclosures for financial instruments:

Fair Values of Financial Instruments

STYLE="margin-top:6px;margin-bottom:0px; margin-left:4%">SFAS 107, Disclosures about Fair Value of Financial Instruments, requires disclosure of fair value information about financial instruments, whether
or not recognized in the consolidated balance sheets for which it is practicable to estimate that value. In cases where quoted market prices are not available, fair values are based on estimates using present value or other valuation techniques.
Those techniques are significantly affected by the assumptions used, including the discount rate and estimates of future cash flows. In that regard, the derived fair value estimates cannot be substantiated by comparison to independent markets and,
in many cases, could not be realized in immediate settlement of the instruments. Fair value estimates are made at a point in time, based on relevant market information and information about the financial instrument. Accordingly, such estimates
involve uncertainties and matters of judgment and therefore cannot be determined with precision. SFAS 107 excludes certain financial instruments and all non-financial instruments from its disclosure requirements. Accordingly, the aggregate fair
value amounts presented do not represent the underlying value of the Company.

The following are the more significant methods and
assumptions used by the Company in estimating its fair value disclosures for financial instruments:

Cash and cash equivalents

The carrying amounts reported in the consolidated balance sheets for cash and cash equivalents approximate those assets’ fair values,
because they mature within 90 days or less and do not present credit risk concerns.

This excerpt taken from the HFBC 10-K filed Mar 30, 2007.

Fair Values of Financial Instruments

SFAS 107, Disclosures about Fair Value of Financial Instruments, requires disclosure of fair value information about financial instruments, whether or not recognized in the consolidated balance sheets for which it is practicable to estimate that value. In cases where quoted market prices are not available, fair values are based on estimates using present value or other valuation techniques. Those techniques are significantly affected by the assumptions used, including the discount rate and estimates of future cash flows. In that regard, the derived fair value estimates cannot be substantiated by comparison to independent markets and, in many cases, could not be realized in immediate settlement of the instruments. Fair value estimates are made at a point in time, based on relevant market information and information about the financial instrument. Accordingly, such estimates involve uncertainties and matters of judgment and therefore cannot be determined with precision. SFAS 107 excludes certain financial instruments and all non-financial instruments from its disclosure requirements. Accordingly, the aggregate fair value amounts presented do not represent the underlying value of the Company.

The following are the more significant methods and assumptions used by the Company in estimating its fair value disclosures for financial instruments:

This excerpt taken from the HFBC 10-K filed Apr 12, 2006.

Fair Values of Financial Instruments

SFAS 107, Disclosures about Fair Value of Financial Instruments, requires disclosure of fair value information about financial instruments, whether or not recognized in the consolidated balance sheets for which it is practicable to estimate that value. In cases where quoted market prices are not available, fair values are based on estimates using present value or other valuation techniques. Those techniques are significantly affected by the assumptions used, including the discount rate and estimates of future cash flows. In that regard, the derived fair value estimates cannot be substantiated by comparison to independent markets and, in many cases, could not be realized in immediate settlement of the instruments. Fair value estimates are made at a point in time, based on relevant market information and information about the financial instrument. Accordingly, such estimates involve uncertainties and matters of judgment and therefore cannot be determined with precision. SFAS 107 excludes certain financial instruments and all non-financial instruments from its disclosure requirements. Accordingly, the aggregate fair value amounts presented do not represent the underlying value of the Company.

The following are the more significant methods and assumptions used by the Company in estimating its fair value disclosures for financial instruments:

This excerpt taken from the HFBC 10-K filed Mar 31, 2005.

Fair Values of Financial Instruments

 

The following are the more significant methods and assumptions used by the Company in estimating its fair value disclosures for financial instruments:

 

F-15


HopFed Bancorp, Inc. and Subsidiaries

 

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, Continued

 

December 31, 2004, 2003 and 2002

 

(1) Summary of Significant Accounting Policies: (Continued)

 

Fair Values of Financial Instruments: (Continued)

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

The carrying amounts reported in the consolidated balance sheets for cash and cash equivalents approximate those assets’ fair values, because they mature within 90 days or less and do not present credit risk concerns.

 

"Fair Values of Financial Instruments" elsewhere:

Pamrapo Bancorp (PBCI)
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