HST » Topics » Property and Equipment

This excerpt taken from the HST 8-K filed Nov 9, 2009.

Property and Equipment

Property and equipment is recorded at cost. For newly developed properties, cost includes interest and real estate taxes incurred during development and construction. Replacements and improvements and capital leases are capitalized, while repairs and maintenance are expensed as incurred. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets, generally 40 years for buildings and three to ten years for furniture and equipment. Leasehold improvements are amortized over the shorter of the lease term or the useful lives of the related assets.

We capitalize certain inventory (such as china, glass, silver, linen) at the time of a hotel opening, or when significant inventory is purchased (in conjunction with a major rooms renovation or when the number of rooms or meeting space at a hotel is expanded). These amounts are then fully amortized over the estimated useful life of three years. Subsequent replacement purchases are expensed when placed in service.

We maintain a furniture, fixtures and equipment replacement fund for renewal and replacement capital expenditures at certain hotels, which is generally funded with approximately 5% of property revenues.

We analyze our assets for impairment when events or circumstances occur that indicate the carrying value may not be recoverable. We consider a property to be impaired when the sum of future undiscounted cash flows over our remaining estimated holding period is less than the carrying value of the asset. For impaired assets, we record an impairment charge equal to the excess of the property’s carrying value over its fair value.

We will classify a hotel as held for sale when the sale of the asset is probable, will be completed within one year and actions to complete the sale are unlikely to change or that the sale will be withdrawn. Accordingly, we typically classify assets as held for sale when our Board of Directors has approved the sale, a binding agreement to purchase the property has been signed under which the buyer has committed a significant amount of nonrefundable cash and no significant financing contingencies exist which could prevent the transaction from being completed in a timely manner. If these criteria are met, we will record an impairment loss if the fair value less costs to sell is lower than the carrying amount of the hotel and will cease incurring depreciation. We will classify the loss, together with the related operating results, including interest expense on debt assumed by the buyer or that is required to be repaid as a result of the sale, as discontinued operations on our consolidated statements of operations and classify the assets and related liabilities as held for sale on the balance sheet. Gains on sales of properties are recognized at the time of sale or deferred and recognized as income in subsequent periods as conditions requiring deferral are satisfied or expire without further cost to us.

We recognize the fair value of any liability for conditional asset retirement obligations including environmental remediation liabilities when incurred, which is generally upon acquisition, construction, or development and/or through the normal operation of the asset, if sufficient information exists to reasonably estimate the fair value of the obligation.

 

59


HOST HOTELS & RESORTS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS - (Continued)

 

This excerpt taken from the HST 8-K filed Aug 5, 2009.

Property and Equipment

Property and equipment is recorded at cost. For newly developed properties, cost includes interest and real estate taxes incurred during development and construction. Replacements and improvements and capital leases are capitalized, while repairs and maintenance are expensed as incurred. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets, generally 40 years for buildings and three to ten years for furniture and equipment. Leasehold improvements are amortized over the shorter of the lease term or the useful lives of the related assets.

We capitalize certain inventory (such as china, glass, silver, linen) at the time of a hotel opening, or when significant inventory is purchased (in conjunction with a major rooms renovation or when the number of rooms or meeting space at a hotel is expanded). These amounts are then fully amortized over the estimated useful life of three years. Subsequent replacement purchases are expensed when placed in service.

We maintain a furniture, fixtures and equipment replacement fund for renewal and replacement capital expenditures at certain hotels, which is generally funded with approximately 5% of property revenues.

We analyze our assets for impairment when events or circumstances occur that indicate the carrying value may not be recoverable. We consider a property to be impaired when the sum of future undiscounted cash flows over our remaining estimated holding period is less than the carrying value of the asset. For impaired assets, we record an impairment charge equal to the excess of the property’s carrying value over its fair value.

We will classify a hotel as held for sale when the sale of the asset is probable, will be completed within one year and actions to complete the sale are unlikely to change or that the sale will be withdrawn. Accordingly, we typically classify assets as held for sale when our Board of Directors has approved the sale, a binding agreement to purchase the property has been signed under which the buyer has committed a significant amount of nonrefundable cash and no significant financing contingencies exist which could prevent the transaction from being completed in a timely manner. If these criteria are met, we will record an impairment loss if the fair value less costs to sell is lower than the carrying amount of the hotel and will cease incurring depreciation. We will classify the loss, together with the related operating results, including interest expense on debt assumed by the buyer or that is required to be repaid as a result of the sale, as discontinued operations on our consolidated statements of operations and classify the assets and related liabilities as held for sale on the balance sheet. Gains on sales of properties are recognized at the time of sale or deferred and recognized as income in subsequent periods as conditions requiring deferral are satisfied or expire without further cost to us.

We recognize the fair value of any liability for conditional asset retirement obligations including environmental remediation liabilities when incurred, which is generally upon acquisition, construction, or development and/or through the normal operation of the asset, if sufficient information exists to reasonably estimate the fair value of the obligation.

 

59


HOST HOTELS & RESORTS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS - (Continued)

 

This excerpt taken from the HST 10-K filed Feb 27, 2009.

Property and Equipment

Property and equipment is recorded at cost. For newly developed properties, cost includes interest and real estate taxes incurred during development and construction. Replacements and improvements and capital leases are capitalized, while repairs and maintenance are expensed as incurred. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets, generally 40 years for buildings and three to ten years for furniture and equipment. Leasehold improvements are amortized over the shorter of the lease term or the useful lives of the related assets.

We capitalize certain inventory (such as china, glass, silver, linen) at the time of a hotel opening, or when significant inventory is purchased (in conjunction with a major rooms renovation or when the number of rooms or meeting space at a hotel is expanded). These amounts are then fully amortized over the estimated useful life of three years. Subsequent replacement purchases are expensed when placed in service.

We maintain a furniture, fixtures and equipment replacement fund for renewal and replacement capital expenditures at certain hotels, which is generally funded with approximately 5% of property revenues.

We assess impairment of our real estate properties based on whether estimated undiscounted future cash flows from each individual property are less than its net book value. If a property is impaired, a loss is recorded for the difference between the fair value and net book value of the hotel. Based on this analysis, we recorded an impairment charge of $3 million in 2008 that is included in depreciation expense on the accompanying statement of operations.

We will classify a hotel as held for sale when the sale of the asset is probable, will be completed within one year and actions to complete the sale are unlikely to change or that the sale will be withdrawn. Accordingly, we typically classify assets as held for sale when our Board of Directors has approved the sale, a binding agreement to purchase the property has been signed under which the buyer has committed a significant amount of nonrefundable cash and no significant financing contingencies exist which could prevent the transaction from being completed in a timely manner. If these criteria are met, we will record an impairment loss if the fair value less costs to sell is lower than the carrying amount of the hotel and will cease incurring depreciation. We will classify the loss, together with the related operating results, including interest expense on debt assumed by the buyer or that is required to be repaid as a result of the sale, as discontinued operations on our consolidated statements of operations and classify the assets and related liabilities as held for sale on the balance sheet. Gains on sales of properties are recognized at the time of sale or deferred and recognized as income in subsequent periods as conditions requiring deferral are satisfied or expire without further cost to us.

 

90


HOST HOTELS & RESORTS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS—(Continued)

 

We recognize the fair value of any liability for conditional asset retirement obligations including environmental remediation liabilities when incurred, which is generally upon acquisition, construction, or development and/or through the normal operation of the asset, if sufficient information exists to reasonably estimate the fair value of the obligation.

This excerpt taken from the HST 8-K filed Nov 21, 2008.

Property and Equipment

Property and equipment is recorded at cost. For newly developed properties, cost includes interest and real estate taxes incurred during development and construction. Replacements and improvements and capital leases are capitalized, while repairs and maintenance are expensed as incurred. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets, generally 40 years for buildings and three to ten years for furniture and equipment. Leasehold improvements are amortized over the shorter of the lease term or the useful lives of the related assets.

We capitalize certain inventory (such as china, glass, silver, linen) at the time of a hotel opening, or when significant inventory is purchased (in conjunction with a major rooms renovation or when the number of rooms or meeting space at a hotel is expanded). These amounts are then fully amortized over the estimated useful life of three years. Subsequent replacement purchases are expensed when placed in service.

We maintain a furniture, fixtures and equipment replacement fund for renewal and replacement capital expenditures at certain hotels, which is generally funded with approximately 5% of property revenues.

We assess impairment of our real estate properties based on whether it is probable that estimated undiscounted future cash flows from each individual property are less than its net book value. If a property is impaired, a loss is recorded for the difference between the fair value and net book value of the hotel.

We will classify a hotel as held for sale when the sale of the asset is probable, will be completed within one year and actions to complete the sale are unlikely to change or that the sale will be withdrawn. Accordingly, we typically classify assets as held for sale when our Board of Directors has approved the sale, a binding agreement to purchase the property has been signed under which the buyer has committed a significant amount of nonrefundable cash and no significant financing contingencies exist which could prevent the transaction from being completed in a timely manner. If these criteria are met, we will record an impairment loss if the fair value less costs to sell is lower than the carrying amount of the hotel and will cease incurring depreciation. We will classify the loss, together with the related operating results, including interest expense on debt assumed by the buyer or that is required to be repaid as a result of the sale, as discontinued operations on our consolidated statement of operations and classify the assets and related liabilities as held for sale on the balance sheet. Gains on sales of properties are recognized at the time of sale or deferred and recognized as income in subsequent periods as conditions requiring deferral are satisfied or expire without further cost to us.

We recognize the fair value of any liability for conditional asset retirement obligations including environmental remediation liabilities when incurred, which is generally upon acquisition, construction, or development and/or through the normal operation of the asset, if sufficient information exists to reasonably estimate the fair value of the obligation.

 

8


NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

This excerpt taken from the HST 10-K filed Feb 26, 2008.

Property and Equipment

Property and equipment is recorded at cost. For newly developed properties, cost includes interest and real estate taxes incurred during development and construction. Replacements and improvements and capital leases are capitalized, while repairs and maintenance are expensed as incurred. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets, generally 40 years for buildings and three to ten years for furniture and equipment. Leasehold improvements are amortized over the shorter of the lease term or the useful lives of the related assets.

We capitalize certain inventory (such as china, glass, silver, linen) at the time of a hotel opening, or when significant inventory is purchased (in conjunction with a major rooms renovation or when the number of rooms or meeting space at a hotel is expanded). These amounts are then fully amortized over the estimated useful life of three years. Subsequent replacement purchases are expensed when placed in service.

We maintain a furniture, fixtures and equipment replacement fund for renewal and replacement capital expenditures at certain hotels, which is generally funded with approximately 5% of property revenues.

We assess impairment of our real estate properties based on whether it is probable that estimated undiscounted future cash flows from each individual property are less than its net book value. If a property is impaired, a loss is recorded for the difference between the fair value and net book value of the hotel.

We will classify a hotel as held for sale when the sale of the asset is probable, will be completed within one year and actions to complete the sale are unlikely to change or that the sale will be withdrawn. Accordingly, we typically classify assets as held for sale when our Board of Directors has approved the sale, a binding agreement to purchase the property has been signed under which the buyer has committed a significant amount of nonrefundable cash and no significant financing contingencies exist which could prevent the transaction from being completed in a timely manner. If these criteria are met, we will record an impairment loss if the fair value less costs to sell is lower than the carrying amount of the hotel and will cease incurring depreciation. We will classify the loss, together with the related operating results, including interest expense on debt assumed by the buyer or that is required to be repaid as a result of the sale, as discontinued operations on our consolidated statement of operations and classify the assets and related liabilities as held for sale on the balance sheet. Gains on sales of properties are recognized at the time of sale or deferred and recognized as income in subsequent periods as conditions requiring deferral are satisfied or expire without further cost to us.

 

86


HOST HOTELS & RESORTS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS—(Continued)

 

We recognize the fair value of any liability for conditional asset retirement obligations including environmental remediation liabilities when incurred, which is generally upon acquisition, construction, or development and/or through the normal operation of the asset, if sufficient information exists to reasonably estimate the fair value of the obligation.

This excerpt taken from the HST 8-K filed May 22, 2007.

Property and Equipment

Property and equipment is recorded at cost. For newly developed properties, cost includes interest and real estate taxes incurred during development and construction. Replacements and improvements and capital leases are capitalized, while repairs and maintenance are expensed as incurred. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets, generally 40 years for buildings and three to ten years for furniture and equipment. Leasehold improvements are amortized over the shorter of the lease term or the useful lives of the related assets.

We capitalize certain inventory (such as china, glass, silver, linen) at the time of a hotel opening, or when significant inventory is purchased (in conjunction with a major rooms renovation or when the number of rooms or meeting space at a hotel is expanded). These amounts are then fully amortized over the estimated useful life of three years. Subsequent replacement purchases are expensed when opened and placed in service. Food and beverage inventory items are recorded at the lower of FIFO cost or market and expensed as utilized.

We maintain a furniture, fixtures and equipment replacement fund for renewal and replacement capital expenditures at certain hotels, which is generally funded with approximately 5% of property revenues.

We assess impairment of our real estate properties based on whether it is probable that estimated undiscounted future cash flows from each individual property are less than its net book value. If a property is impaired, a loss is recorded for the difference between the fair value and net book value of the hotel.

We will classify a hotel as held for sale when the sale of the asset is probable, will be completed within one year and that actions to complete the sale are unlikely to change or that the sale will be withdrawn. Accordingly, we typically classify assets as held for sale when our Board of Directors has approved the sale, a binding agreement to purchase the property has been signed under which the buyer has committed a significant amount of nonrefundable cash and no significant financing contingencies exist which could prevent the transaction from being completed in a timely manner. If these criteria are met, we will record an impairment loss if the fair value less costs to sell is lower than the carrying amount of the hotel and will cease incurring depreciation. We will classify the loss, together with the related operating results, including interest expense on debt assumed by the buyer or that is required to be repaid as a result of the sale, as discontinued operations on our consolidated statement of operations and classify the assets and related liabilities as held for sale on the balance sheet. Gains on sales of properties are recognized at the time of sale or deferred and recognized as income in subsequent periods as conditions requiring deferral are satisfied or expire without further cost to us.


As a result of the adoption of FIN 47, we recognize the fair value of any liability for conditional asset retirement obligations when incurred, which is generally upon acquisition, construction, or development and/or through the normal operation of the asset, if sufficient information exists to reasonably estimate the fair value of the obligation.

This excerpt taken from the HST 10-K filed Feb 27, 2007.

Property and Equipment

Property and equipment is recorded at cost. For newly developed properties, cost includes interest and real estate taxes incurred during development and construction. Replacements and improvements and capital leases are capitalized, while repairs and maintenance are expensed as incurred. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets, generally 40 years for buildings and three to ten years for furniture and equipment. Leasehold improvements are amortized over the shorter of the lease term or the useful lives of the related assets.

We capitalize certain inventory (such as china, glass, silver, linen) at the time of a hotel opening, or when significant inventory is purchased (in conjunction with a major rooms renovation or when the number of rooms or meeting space at a hotel is expanded). These amounts are then fully amortized over the estimated useful life of three years. Subsequent replacement purchases are expensed when opened and placed in service. Food and beverage inventory items are recorded at the lower of FIFO cost or market and expensed as utilized.

We maintain a furniture, fixtures and equipment replacement fund for renewal and replacement capital expenditures at certain hotels, which is generally funded with approximately 5% of property revenues.

We assess impairment of our real estate properties based on whether it is probable that estimated undiscounted future cash flows from each individual property are less than its net book value. If a property is impaired, a loss is recorded for the difference between the fair value and net book value of the hotel.

We will classify a hotel as held for sale when the sale of the asset is probable, will be completed within one year and that actions to complete the sale are unlikely to change or that the sale will be withdrawn. Accordingly, we typically classify assets as held for sale when our Board of Directors has approved the sale, a binding agreement to purchase the property has been signed under which the buyer has committed a significant amount of nonrefundable cash and no significant financing contingencies exist which could prevent the transaction from being completed in a timely manner. If these criteria are met, we will record an impairment loss if the fair value less costs to sell is lower than the carrying amount of the hotel and will cease incurring depreciation. We will classify the loss, together with the related operating results, including interest expense on debt assumed by the buyer or that is required to be repaid as a result of the sale, as discontinued operations on our consolidated statement of operations and classify the assets and related liabilities as held for sale on the balance sheet. Gains on sales of properties are recognized at the time of sale or deferred and recognized as income in subsequent periods as conditions requiring deferral are satisfied or expire without further cost to us.

 

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HOST HOTELS & RESORTS, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS—(Continued)

 

As a result of the adoption of FIN 47, we recognize the fair value of any liability for conditional asset retirement obligations when incurred, which is generally upon acquisition, construction, or development and/or through the normal operation of the asset, if sufficient information exists to reasonably estimate the fair value of the obligation.

This excerpt taken from the HST 8-K filed Oct 16, 2006.

2. Property and Equipment

Property and equipment consists of the following as of December 31:

 

     2005     2004  
     (in millions)  

Land and land improvements

   $ 864     $ 826  

Buildings and leasehold improvements

     8,163       7,922  

Furniture and equipment

     1,176       1,115  

Construction in progress

     179       85  
                
     10,382       9,948  

Less accumulated depreciation and amortization

     (2,948 )     (2,650 )
                
   $ 7,434     $ 7,298  
                
This excerpt taken from the HST 8-K filed Jun 16, 2006.

2. Property and Equipment

Property and equipment consists of the following as of December 31:

 

     2005     2004  
     (in millions)  

Land and land improvements

   $ 864     $ 826  

Buildings and leasehold improvements

     8,163       7,922  

Furniture and equipment

     1,176       1,115  

Construction in progress

     179       85  
                
     10,382       9,948  

Less accumulated depreciation and amortization

     (2,948 )     (2,650 )
                
   $ 7,434     $ 7,298  
                
This excerpt taken from the HST 10-K filed Mar 10, 2006.

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment is recorded at cost. For newly developed properties, cost includes interest and real estate taxes incurred during development and construction. Replacements and improvements and capital leases are capitalized, while repairs and maintenance are expensed as incurred. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets, generally 40 years for buildings and three to ten years for furniture and equipment. Leasehold improvements are amortized over the shorter of the lease term or the useful lives of the related assets.

 

We capitalize certain inventory (such as china, glass, silver, linen) at the time of a hotel opening, or when significant inventory is purchased (in conjunction with a major rooms renovation or when the number of rooms or meeting space at a hotel is expanded). These amounts are then fully amortized over the estimated useful life of three years. Subsequent replacement purchases are expensed when opened and placed in service. Food and beverage inventory items are recorded at the lower of FIFO cost or market and expensed as utilized.

 

We maintain a furniture, fixtures and equipment replacement fund for renewal and replacement capital expenditures at certain hotels, which is generally funded with approximately 5% of property revenues.

 

93


HOST MARRIOTT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

 

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS—(Continued)

 

We assess impairment of our real estate properties based on whether it is probable that estimated undiscounted future cash flows from each individual property are less than its net book value. If a property is impaired, a loss is recorded for the difference between the fair value and net book value of the hotel.

 

We will classify a hotel as held for sale when the sale of the asset is probable, will be completed within one year and that actions to complete the sale are unlikely to change or that the sale will be withdrawn. Accordingly, we classify assets as held-for-sale when our Board of Directors has approved the sale, a binding agreement to purchase the property has been signed under which the buyer has committed a significant amount of nonrefundable cash and no significant financing contingencies exist which could prevent the transaction from being completed in a timely manner. If these criteria are met, we will record an impairment loss if the fair value less costs to sell is lower than the carrying amount of the hotel and will cease incurring depreciation. We will classify the loss, together with the related operating results, including interest expense on debt assumed by the buyer or that is required to be repaid as a result of the sale, as discontinued operations on our consolidated statement of operations and classify the assets and related liabilities as held for sale on the balance sheet. Gains on sales of properties are recognized at the time of sale or deferred and recognized as income in subsequent periods as conditions requiring deferral are satisfied or expire without further cost to us.

 

This excerpt taken from the HST 8-K filed Dec 9, 2005.

2. Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment consists of the following as of December 31:

 

     2004

    2003

 
     (in millions)  

Land and land improvements

   $ 826     $ 786  

Buildings and leasehold improvements

     7,922       7,608  

Furniture and equipment

     1,091       1,062  

Construction in progress

     85       55  
    


 


       9,924       9,511  

Less accumulated depreciation and amortization

     (2,650 )     (2,426 )
    


 


     $ 7,274     $ 7,085  
    


 


 

11


This excerpt taken from the HST 10-K filed Mar 1, 2005.

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment is recorded at cost. For newly developed properties, cost includes interest, ground rent and real estate taxes incurred during development and construction. Replacements and improvements and capital leases are capitalized, while repairs and maintenance are expensed as incurred. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets, generally 40 years for buildings and three to ten years for furniture and equipment. Leasehold improvements are amortized over the shorter of the lease term or the useful lives of the related assets.

 

Gains on sales of properties are recognized at the time of sale or deferred to the extent required by GAAP. Deferred gains are recognized as income in subsequent periods as conditions requiring deferral are satisfied or expire without further cost to us.

 

We assess impairment of our real estate properties based on whether it is probable that estimated undiscounted future cash flows from each individual property are less than its net book value. If a property is impaired, a loss is recorded for the difference between the fair value and net book value of the hotel.

 

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HOST MARRIOTT CORPORATION AND SUBSIDIARIES

 

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS—(Continued)

 

We will classify a hotel as held for sale in the period in which we have made the decision to dispose of the hotel, a binding agreement to purchase the property has been signed under which the buyer has committed a significant amount of nonrefundable cash and no significant financing contingencies exist which could prevent the transaction from being completed in a timely manner. If these criteria are met, we will record an impairment loss if the fair value less costs to sell is lower than the carrying amount of the hotel and will cease incurring depreciation. We will classify the loss, together with the related operating results, as discontinued operations on our consolidated statement of operations and classify the assets and related liabilities as held for sale on the balance sheet.

 

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