HGSI » Topics » Competition

These excerpts taken from the HGSI 10-K filed Feb 26, 2009.
Competition
 
General.  We face intense competition from a wide range of pharmaceutical, biotechnology and diagnostic companies, as well as academic and research institutions and government agencies. Some of these competitors have substantially greater financial, marketing, research and development and human resources. Most large pharmaceutical companies have considerably more experience in undertaking clinical trials and in obtaining regulatory approval to market pharmaceutical products.
 
Basis of Competition.  Principal competitive factors in our industry include:
 
  •  the quality and breadth of an organization’s technology;
 
  •  the skill of an organization’s employees and ability to recruit and retain skilled employees;
 
  •  an organization’s intellectual property estate;


11


 

 
  •  the range of capabilities, from target identification and validation to drug discovery and development to manufacturing and marketing; and
 
  •  the availability of substantial capital resources to fund discovery, development, manufacturing and commercialization activities.
 
We believe that the quality and breadth of our technology platform, the skill of our employees and our ability to recruit and retain skilled employees, our patent portfolio, our capabilities for research and drug development, and our capital resources are competitive strengths. However, many large pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies have significantly larger intellectual property estates than we do, more substantial capital resources than we have, and greater capabilities and experience than we do in preclinical and clinical development, sales, marketing, manufacturing and regulatory affairs.
 
Products.  We are aware of products in research or development by our competitors that address all of the diseases we are targeting. Any of these products may compete with our product candidates. Our competitors may succeed in developing their products before we do, obtaining approvals from the FDA or other regulatory agencies for their products more rapidly than we do, or developing products that are more effective than our products. These products or technologies might render our technology obsolete or noncompetitive. In addition, our albumin fusion protein products are designed to be long-acting versions of existing products. While we believe our albumin fusion protein products will be a more attractive alternative to the existing products, the existing product in many cases has an established market that may make the introduction of our product more difficult. Competition is based primarily on product efficacy, safety, timing and scope of regulatory approvals, availability of supply, marketing and sales capability, reimbursement coverage, price and patent position.
 
Competition
 
General.  We face intense competition from a wide range of pharmaceutical, biotechnology and diagnostic companies, as well as academic and research institutions and government agencies. Some of these competitors have substantially greater financial, marketing, research and development and human resources. Most large pharmaceutical companies have considerably more experience in undertaking clinical trials and in obtaining regulatory approval to market pharmaceutical products.
 
Basis of Competition.  Principal competitive factors in our industry include:
 
  •  the quality and breadth of an organization’s technology;
 
  •  the skill of an organization’s employees and ability to recruit and retain skilled employees;
 
  •  an organization’s intellectual property estate;


11


 

 
  •  the range of capabilities, from target identification and validation to drug discovery and development to manufacturing and marketing; and
 
  •  the availability of substantial capital resources to fund discovery, development, manufacturing and commercialization activities.
 
We believe that the quality and breadth of our technology platform, the skill of our employees and our ability to recruit and retain skilled employees, our patent portfolio, our capabilities for research and drug development, and our capital resources are competitive strengths. However, many large pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies have significantly larger intellectual property estates than we do, more substantial capital resources than we have, and greater capabilities and experience than we do in preclinical and clinical development, sales, marketing, manufacturing and regulatory affairs.
 
Products.  We are aware of products in research or development by our competitors that address all of the diseases we are targeting. Any of these products may compete with our product candidates. Our competitors may succeed in developing their products before we do, obtaining approvals from the FDA or other regulatory agencies for their products more rapidly than we do, or developing products that are more effective than our products. These products or technologies might render our technology obsolete or noncompetitive. In addition, our albumin fusion protein products are designed to be long-acting versions of existing products. While we believe our albumin fusion protein products will be a more attractive alternative to the existing products, the existing product in many cases has an established market that may make the introduction of our product more difficult. Competition is based primarily on product efficacy, safety, timing and scope of regulatory approvals, availability of supply, marketing and sales capability, reimbursement coverage, price and patent position.
 
Competition
 
General.  We face intense competition from a wide range of pharmaceutical, biotechnology and diagnostic companies, as well as academic and research institutions and government agencies. Some of these competitors have substantially greater financial, marketing, research and development and human resources. Most large pharmaceutical companies have considerably more experience in undertaking clinical trials and in obtaining regulatory approval to market pharmaceutical products.
 
Basis of Competition.  Principal competitive factors in our industry include:
 
  •  the quality and breadth of an organization’s technology;
 
  •  the skill of an organization’s employees and ability to recruit and retain skilled employees;
 
  •  an organization’s intellectual property estate;


11


 

 
  •  the range of capabilities, from target identification and validation to drug discovery and development to manufacturing and marketing; and
 
  •  the availability of substantial capital resources to fund discovery, development, manufacturing and commercialization activities.
 
We believe that the quality and breadth of our technology platform, the skill of our employees and our ability to recruit and retain skilled employees, our patent portfolio, our capabilities for research and drug development, and our capital resources are competitive strengths. However, many large pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies have significantly larger intellectual property estates than we do, more substantial capital resources than we have, and greater capabilities and experience than we do in preclinical and clinical development, sales, marketing, manufacturing and regulatory affairs.
 
Products.  We are aware of products in research or development by our competitors that address all of the diseases we are targeting. Any of these products may compete with our product candidates. Our competitors may succeed in developing their products before we do, obtaining approvals from the FDA or other regulatory agencies for their products more rapidly than we do, or developing products that are more effective than our products. These products or technologies might render our technology obsolete or noncompetitive. In addition, our albumin fusion protein products are designed to be long-acting versions of existing products. While we believe our albumin fusion protein products will be a more attractive alternative to the existing products, the existing product in many cases has an established market that may make the introduction of our product more difficult. Competition is based primarily on product efficacy, safety, timing and scope of regulatory approvals, availability of supply, marketing and sales capability, reimbursement coverage, price and patent position.
 
Competition


 



General.  We face intense competition from a
wide range of pharmaceutical, biotechnology and diagnostic
companies, as well as academic and research institutions and
government agencies. Some of these competitors have
substantially greater financial, marketing, research and
development and human resources. Most large pharmaceutical
companies have considerably more experience in undertaking
clinical trials and in obtaining regulatory approval to market
pharmaceutical products.


 



Basis of Competition.  Principal competitive
factors in our industry include:


 




































  • 

the quality and breadth of an organization’s technology;
 
  • 

the skill of an organization’s employees and ability to
recruit and retain skilled employees;
 
  • 

an organization’s intellectual property estate;





11





 





 


























  • 

the range of capabilities, from target identification and
validation to drug discovery and development to manufacturing
and marketing; and
 
  • 

the availability of substantial capital resources to fund
discovery, development, manufacturing and commercialization
activities.


 



We believe that the quality and breadth of our technology
platform, the skill of our employees and our ability to recruit
and retain skilled employees, our patent portfolio, our
capabilities for research and drug development, and our capital
resources are competitive strengths. However, many large
pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies have significantly
larger intellectual property estates than we do, more
substantial capital resources than we have, and greater
capabilities and experience than we do in preclinical and
clinical development, sales, marketing, manufacturing and
regulatory affairs.


 



Products.  We are aware of products in research
or development by our competitors that address all of the
diseases we are targeting. Any of these products may compete
with our product candidates. Our competitors may succeed in
developing their products before we do, obtaining approvals from
the FDA or other regulatory agencies for their products more
rapidly than we do, or developing products that are more
effective than our products. These products or technologies
might render our technology obsolete or noncompetitive. In
addition, our albumin fusion protein products are designed to be
long-acting versions of existing products. While we believe our
albumin fusion protein products will be a more attractive
alternative to the existing products, the existing product in
many cases has an established market that may make the
introduction of our product more difficult. Competition is based
primarily on product efficacy, safety, timing and scope of
regulatory approvals, availability of supply, marketing and
sales capability, reimbursement coverage, price and patent
position.


 




Competition


 



General.  We face intense competition from a
wide range of pharmaceutical, biotechnology and diagnostic
companies, as well as academic and research institutions and
government agencies. Some of these competitors have
substantially greater financial, marketing, research and
development and human resources. Most large pharmaceutical
companies have considerably more experience in undertaking
clinical trials and in obtaining regulatory approval to market
pharmaceutical products.


 



Basis of Competition.  Principal competitive
factors in our industry include:


 




































  • 

the quality and breadth of an organization’s technology;
 
  • 

the skill of an organization’s employees and ability to
recruit and retain skilled employees;
 
  • 

an organization’s intellectual property estate;





11





 





 


























  • 

the range of capabilities, from target identification and
validation to drug discovery and development to manufacturing
and marketing; and
 
  • 

the availability of substantial capital resources to fund
discovery, development, manufacturing and commercialization
activities.


 



We believe that the quality and breadth of our technology
platform, the skill of our employees and our ability to recruit
and retain skilled employees, our patent portfolio, our
capabilities for research and drug development, and our capital
resources are competitive strengths. However, many large
pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies have significantly
larger intellectual property estates than we do, more
substantial capital resources than we have, and greater
capabilities and experience than we do in preclinical and
clinical development, sales, marketing, manufacturing and
regulatory affairs.


 



Products.  We are aware of products in research
or development by our competitors that address all of the
diseases we are targeting. Any of these products may compete
with our product candidates. Our competitors may succeed in
developing their products before we do, obtaining approvals from
the FDA or other regulatory agencies for their products more
rapidly than we do, or developing products that are more
effective than our products. These products or technologies
might render our technology obsolete or noncompetitive. In
addition, our albumin fusion protein products are designed to be
long-acting versions of existing products. While we believe our
albumin fusion protein products will be a more attractive
alternative to the existing products, the existing product in
many cases has an established market that may make the
introduction of our product more difficult. Competition is based
primarily on product efficacy, safety, timing and scope of
regulatory approvals, availability of supply, marketing and
sales capability, reimbursement coverage, price and patent
position.


 




Competition


 



General.  We face intense competition from a
wide range of pharmaceutical, biotechnology and diagnostic
companies, as well as academic and research institutions and
government agencies. Some of these competitors have
substantially greater financial, marketing, research and
development and human resources. Most large pharmaceutical
companies have considerably more experience in undertaking
clinical trials and in obtaining regulatory approval to market
pharmaceutical products.


 



Basis of Competition.  Principal competitive
factors in our industry include:


 




































  • 

the quality and breadth of an organization’s technology;
 
  • 

the skill of an organization’s employees and ability to
recruit and retain skilled employees;
 
  • 

an organization’s intellectual property estate;





11





 





 


























  • 

the range of capabilities, from target identification and
validation to drug discovery and development to manufacturing
and marketing; and
 
  • 

the availability of substantial capital resources to fund
discovery, development, manufacturing and commercialization
activities.


 



We believe that the quality and breadth of our technology
platform, the skill of our employees and our ability to recruit
and retain skilled employees, our patent portfolio, our
capabilities for research and drug development, and our capital
resources are competitive strengths. However, many large
pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies have significantly
larger intellectual property estates than we do, more
substantial capital resources than we have, and greater
capabilities and experience than we do in preclinical and
clinical development, sales, marketing, manufacturing and
regulatory affairs.


 



Products.  We are aware of products in research
or development by our competitors that address all of the
diseases we are targeting. Any of these products may compete
with our product candidates. Our competitors may succeed in
developing their products before we do, obtaining approvals from
the FDA or other regulatory agencies for their products more
rapidly than we do, or developing products that are more
effective than our products. These products or technologies
might render our technology obsolete or noncompetitive. In
addition, our albumin fusion protein products are designed to be
long-acting versions of existing products. While we believe our
albumin fusion protein products will be a more attractive
alternative to the existing products, the existing product in
many cases has an established market that may make the
introduction of our product more difficult. Competition is based
primarily on product efficacy, safety, timing and scope of
regulatory approvals, availability of supply, marketing and
sales capability, reimbursement coverage, price and patent
position.


 




These excerpts taken from the HGSI 10-K filed Feb 28, 2008.
Competition
 
General.  We face intense competition from a wide range of pharmaceutical, biotechnology and diagnostic companies, as well as academic and research institutions and government agencies. Some of these competitors have substantially greater financial, marketing, research and development and human resources. Most large pharmaceutical companies have considerably more experience in undertaking clinical trials and in obtaining regulatory approval to market pharmaceutical products.
 
Basis of Competition.  Principal competitive factors in our industry include:
 
  •  the quality and breadth of an organization’s technology;
 
  •  the skill of an organization’s employees and its ability to recruit and retain skilled employees;
 
  •  an organization’s intellectual property estate;
 
  •  the range of capabilities, from target identification and validation to drug discovery and development to manufacturing and marketing; and
 
  •  the availability of substantial capital resources to fund discovery, development and commercialization activities.
 
We believe that the quality and breadth of our technology platform, the skill of our employees and our ability to recruit and retain skilled employees, our patent portfolio, our capabilities for research and drug development, and our capital resources are competitive strengths. However, many large pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies have significantly larger intellectual property estates than we do, more substantial capital resources than we have, and greater capabilities and experience than we do in preclinical and clinical development, sales, marketing, manufacturing and regulatory affairs.
 
Products.  We are aware of products in research or development by our competitors that address all of the diseases we are targeting. Any of these products may compete with our product candidates. Our competitors may succeed in developing their products before we do, obtaining approvals from the FDA or other regulatory agencies for their products more rapidly than we do, or developing products that are more effective than our products. These products or technologies might render our technology obsolete or noncompetitive. In addition, our albumin fusion protein products are designed to be long-acting versions of existing products. While we believe our albumin fusion protein products will be a more attractive alternative to the existing products, the existing product in many cases has an established market that may make the introduction of our product more difficult. Competition is based primarily on product efficacy, safety, timing and scope of regulatory approvals, availability of supply, marketing and sales capability, reimbursement coverage, price and patent position.
 
Competition


 



General.  We face intense competition from a
wide range of pharmaceutical, biotechnology and diagnostic
companies, as well as academic and research institutions and
government agencies. Some of these competitors have
substantially greater financial, marketing, research and
development and human resources. Most large pharmaceutical
companies have considerably more experience in undertaking
clinical trials and in obtaining regulatory approval to market
pharmaceutical products.


 



Basis of Competition.  Principal competitive
factors in our industry include:


 














































  • 

the quality and breadth of an organization’s technology;
 
  • 

the skill of an organization’s employees and its ability to
recruit and retain skilled employees;
 
  • 

an organization’s intellectual property estate;
 
  • 

the range of capabilities, from target identification and
validation to drug discovery and development to manufacturing
and marketing; and


 
















  • 

the availability of substantial capital resources to fund
discovery, development and commercialization activities.


 



We believe that the quality and breadth of our technology
platform, the skill of our employees and our ability to recruit
and retain skilled employees, our patent portfolio, our
capabilities for research and drug development, and our capital
resources are competitive strengths. However, many large
pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies have significantly
larger intellectual property estates than we do, more
substantial capital resources than we have, and greater
capabilities and experience than we do in preclinical and
clinical development, sales, marketing, manufacturing and
regulatory affairs.


 



Products.  We are aware of products in research
or development by our competitors that address all of the
diseases we are targeting. Any of these products may compete
with our product candidates. Our competitors may succeed in
developing their products before we do, obtaining approvals from
the FDA or other regulatory agencies for their products more
rapidly than we do, or developing products that are more
effective than our products. These products or technologies
might render our technology obsolete or noncompetitive. In
addition, our albumin fusion protein products are designed to be
long-acting versions of existing products. While we believe our
albumin fusion protein products will be a more attractive
alternative to the existing products, the existing product in
many cases has an established market that may make the
introduction of our product more difficult. Competition is based
primarily on product efficacy, safety, timing and scope of
regulatory approvals, availability of supply, marketing and
sales capability, reimbursement coverage, price and patent
position.


 




These excerpts taken from the HGSI 10-K filed Feb 26, 2008.
Competition
 
General.  We face intense competition from a wide range of pharmaceutical, biotechnology and diagnostic companies, as well as academic and research institutions and government agencies. Some of these competitors have substantially greater financial, marketing, research and development and human resources. Most large pharmaceutical companies have considerably more experience in undertaking clinical trials and in obtaining regulatory approval to market pharmaceutical products.
 
Basis of Competition.  Principal competitive factors in our industry include:
 
  •  the quality and breadth of an organization’s technology;
 
  •  the skill of an organization’s employees and its ability to recruit and retain skilled employees;
 
  •  an organization’s intellectual property estate;
 
  •  the range of capabilities, from target identification and validation to drug discovery and development to manufacturing and marketing; and
 
  •  the availability of substantial capital resources to fund discovery, development and commercialization activities.
 
We believe that the quality and breadth of our technology platform, the skill of our employees and our ability to recruit and retain skilled employees, our patent portfolio, our capabilities for research and drug development, and our capital resources are competitive strengths. However, many large pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies have significantly larger intellectual property estates than we do, more substantial capital resources than we have, and greater capabilities and experience than we do in preclinical and clinical development, sales, marketing, manufacturing and regulatory affairs.
 
Products.  We are aware of products in research or development by our competitors that address all of the diseases we are targeting. Any of these products may compete with our product candidates. Our competitors may succeed in developing their products before we do, obtaining approvals from the FDA or other regulatory agencies for their products more rapidly than we do, or developing products that are more effective than our products. These products or technologies might render our technology obsolete or noncompetitive. In addition, our albumin fusion protein products are designed to be long-acting versions of existing products. While we believe our albumin fusion protein products will be a more attractive alternative to the existing products, the existing product in many cases has an established market that may make the introduction of our product more difficult. Competition is based primarily on product efficacy, safety, timing and scope of regulatory approvals, availability of supply, marketing and sales capability, reimbursement coverage, price and patent position.
 
Competition


 



General.  We face intense competition from a
wide range of pharmaceutical, biotechnology and diagnostic
companies, as well as academic and research institutions and
government agencies. Some of these competitors have
substantially greater financial, marketing, research and
development and human resources. Most large pharmaceutical
companies have considerably more experience in undertaking
clinical trials and in obtaining regulatory approval to market
pharmaceutical products.


 



Basis of Competition.  Principal competitive
factors in our industry include:


 














































  • 

the quality and breadth of an organization’s technology;
 
  • 

the skill of an organization’s employees and its ability to
recruit and retain skilled employees;
 
  • 

an organization’s intellectual property estate;
 
  • 

the range of capabilities, from target identification and
validation to drug discovery and development to manufacturing
and marketing; and


 
















  • 

the availability of substantial capital resources to fund
discovery, development and commercialization activities.


 



We believe that the quality and breadth of our technology
platform, the skill of our employees and our ability to recruit
and retain skilled employees, our patent portfolio, our
capabilities for research and drug development, and our capital
resources are competitive strengths. However, many large
pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies have significantly
larger intellectual property estates than we do, more
substantial capital resources than we have, and greater
capabilities and experience than we do in preclinical and
clinical development, sales, marketing, manufacturing and
regulatory affairs.


 



Products.  We are aware of products in research
or development by our competitors that address all of the
diseases we are targeting. Any of these products may compete
with our product candidates. Our competitors may succeed in
developing their products before we do, obtaining approvals from
the FDA or other regulatory agencies for their products more
rapidly than we do, or developing products that are more
effective than our products. These products or technologies
might render our technology obsolete or noncompetitive. In
addition, our albumin fusion protein products are designed to be
long-acting versions of existing products. While we believe our
albumin fusion protein products will be a more attractive
alternative to the existing products, the existing product in
many cases has an established market that may make the
introduction of our product more difficult. Competition is based
primarily on product efficacy, safety, timing and scope of
regulatory approvals, availability of supply, marketing and
sales capability, reimbursement coverage, price and patent
position.


 




This excerpt taken from the HGSI 10-K filed Feb 28, 2007.
Competition
 
General.  We face intense competition from a wide range of pharmaceutical, biotechnology and diagnostic companies, as well as academic and research institutions and government agencies. Some of these competitors have substantially greater financial, marketing, research and development and human resources. Most large pharmaceutical companies have considerably more experience in undertaking clinical trials and in obtaining regulatory approval to market pharmaceutical products.
 
Basis of Competition.  Principal competitive factors in our industry include:
 
  •  the quality and breadth of an organization’s technology;
 
  •  the skill of an organization’s employees and its ability to recruit and retain skilled employees;
 
  •  an organization’s intellectual property estate;
 
  •  the range of capabilities, from target identification and validation to drug discovery and development to manufacturing and marketing; and
 
  •  the availability of substantial capital resources to fund discovery, development and commercialization activities.
 
We believe that the quality and breadth of our technology platform, the skill of our employees and our ability to recruit and retain skilled employees, our patent portfolio, our capabilities for research and drug development, and our capital resources are competitive strengths. However, many large pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies have significantly larger intellectual property estates than we do, more substantial capital resources than we have, and greater capabilities and experience than we do in preclinical and clinical development, sales, marketing, manufacturing and regulatory affairs.
 
Products.  We are aware of products in research or development by our competitors that address all of the diseases we are targeting. Any of these products may compete with our product candidates. Our competitors may succeed in developing their products before we do, obtaining approvals from the FDA or other regulatory agencies for their products more rapidly than we do, or developing products that are more effective than our products. These products or technologies might render our technology obsolete or noncompetitive. In addition, our albumin fusion protein products are designed to be long-acting versions of existing products. While we believe our albumin fusion protein products will be a more attractive alternative to the existing products, the existing product in many cases has an established market that may make the introduction of our product more difficult. Competition is based primarily on product efficacy, safety, timing and scope of regulatory approvals, availability of supply, marketing and sales capability, reimbursement coverage, price and patent position.
 
This excerpt taken from the HGSI 10-K filed Mar 15, 2005.
Competition

      General. We face intense competition from a wide range of pharmaceutical, biotechnology and diagnostic companies, as well as academic and research institutions and government agencies. Some of these competitors have substantially greater financial, marketing, research and development and human resources. Most large pharmaceutical companies have considerably more experience in undertaking clinical trials and in obtaining regulatory approval to market pharmaceutical products.

      Basis of Competition. Principal competitive factors in our industry include:

  •  the quality and breadth of an organization’s technology;
 
  •  the skill of an organization’s employees and its ability to recruit and retain skilled employees;
 
  •  an organization’s intellectual property estate;
 
  •  the range of capabilities, from target identification and validation to drug discovery and development to manufacturing and marketing; and
 
  •  the availability of substantial capital resources to fund discovery, development and commercialization activities.

      We believe that the quality and breadth of our technology platform, the skill of our employees and our ability to recruit and retain skilled employees, our patent portfolio, our capabilities for early stage research and drug discovery and our capital resources are competitive strengths. However, many large pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies have significantly larger intellectual property estates than we do, more substantial capital resources than we have, and greater capabilities and experience than we do in preclinical and clinical development, sales, marketing, manufacturing and regulatory affairs.

      Products. We are aware of products in research or development by our competitors that address all of the diseases we are targeting. Any of these products may compete with our product candidates. Our competitors may succeed in developing their products before we do, obtaining approvals from the FDA or other regulatory agencies for their products more rapidly than we do, or developing products that are more effective than our products. These products or technologies might render our technology obsolete or noncompetitive. In addition, our albumin fusion protein products are designed to be long-acting versions of existing products. While we believe our albumin fusion protein products will be a more attractive alternative to the existing products, the existing product in many cases has an established market that may make the introduction of our product more difficult. Competition is based primarily on product efficacy, safety, timing and scope of regulatory approvals, availability of supply, marketing and sales capability, reimbursement coverage, price and patent position.

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