Annual Reports

 
Quarterly Reports

 
8-K

 
Other

IHS 10-K 2012

Documents found in this filing:

  1. 10-K/A
  2. Ex-23
  3. Ex-31.1
  4. Ex-31.2
  5. Ex-32
  6. Ex-32
Q411 10K/A
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 ___________________________________________________
FORM 10-K/A
Amendment No. 1
  ___________________________________________________
x
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended November 30, 2011

OR
o
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from              to             
Commission file number 001-32511
 ___________________________________________________
IHS INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter) 
 ___________________________________________________
Delaware
 
13-3769440
(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
 
(IRS Employer
Identification No.)
15 Inverness Way East
Englewood, CO 80112
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)
(303) 790-0600
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
 ___________________________________________________ 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Class A Common Stock, $0.01 par value per share
 
New York Stock Exchange
Series A junior participating preferred stock purchase rights (attached to the Class A Common Stock)
 
 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
None.
___________________________________________________ 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. x  Yes    o  No
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act. o  Yes    x  No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    x  Yes    o  No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding



12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    x  Yes    o  No

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.     o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
 
Large accelerated filer
 
x
Accelerated filer
 
o
 
 
 
 
Non-accelerated filer
 
o  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Smaller Reporting Company
 
o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    o  Yes    x  No
The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates, based upon the closing price for the Common Stock as reported on the New York Stock Exchange composite tape on the last business day of the registrant's most recently completed second fiscal quarter, was approximately $3.4 billion. All executive officers, directors, and holders of 5% or more of the outstanding Common Stock of the registrant have been deemed, solely for purposes of the foregoing calculation, to be "affiliates" of the registrant.
As of December 31, 2011, there were 65,184,139 shares of our Class A Common Stock outstanding.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
The information required by Part III of the Form 10-K, to the extent not set forth herein, is incorporated herein by reference from the registrant's definitive proxy statement on Schedule 14A for the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held on April 12, 2012, to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission pursuant to Regulation 14A not later than 120 days after the close of the registrant's fiscal year.



EXPLANATORY NOTE

We are filing this Amendment No. 1 to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended November 30, 2011, to amend the classification of revenue amounts by country for 2009, 2010, and 2011, as disclosed in the second table of Note 19 - Segment Information in Item 8 of Part II of the Annual Report.   These amended figures reflect our application of an updated methodology to better reflect the allocation of revenue by country.   The updated methodology does not impact our reported revenue by geographic segment or any other financial disclosure in our Annual Report on Form 10-K.  We believe that these changes are immaterial, both individually and in the aggregate, to the financial statements taken as a whole.
As required by Rule 12b-15 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, certifications by our principal executive officer and principal financial officer for the 10-K are filed as exhibits to this Amendment.
This Amendment includes in its entirety Item 8 of Part II of the original Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on January 23, 2012, and no other information included in the original Annual Report on Form 10-K is amended.  This Amendment does not reflect events occurring after the filing of the original 10-K or modify or update those disclosures that may be affected by subsequent events.




PART II
Item 8.
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

Index to Consolidated Financial Statements


4




Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

The Board of Directors and Stockholders of IHS Inc.

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of IHS Inc. (the Company) as of November 30, 2011 and 2010, and the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in stockholders' equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended November 30, 2011. These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of IHS Inc. at November 30, 2011 and 2010, and the consolidated results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended November 30, 2011, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

As discussed in Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company has elected to change its method of accounting for actuarial gains and losses and the calculation of the market-related value of plan assets related to its pension and other postretirement benefit plans during the fourth quarter of the year ended November 30, 2011.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), IHS Inc.'s internal control over financial reporting as of November 30, 2011, based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission and our report dated January 23, 2012 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.

/s/ Ernst & Young

Denver, Colorado
January 23, 2012,
except for Note 19, as to which the date is
February 8, 2012


5




Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f). Under the supervision and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, we conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of November 30, 2011, based on the framework in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). Based on that evaluation, our management concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was effective as of November 30, 2011.

Our management's evaluation did not include assessing the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting at Seismic Micro-Technology (SMT), which was acquired on August 10, 2011. SMT was included in our consolidated financial statements and constituted $557.8 million and $523.2 million of total and net assets, respectively, as of November 30, 2011, and $27.2 million and $6.6 million of revenues and net income, respectively, for the year then ended. The net income generated by the SMT business includes amortization expense related to the acquired intangible assets and interest expense related to borrowings made to effect the acquisition.

Our independent registered public accounting firm has issued an audit report on our internal control over financial reporting. Their report appears on the following page.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Therefore, even those systems determined to be effective can provide only reasonable assurance with respect to financial statement preparation and presentation.

Date: January 23, 2012

    /s/ Jerre L. Stead
 
Jerre L. Stead
 
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
 
 
 
    /s/ Richard Walker
 
Richard Walker
 
Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
 


6




REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING

The Board of Directors and Stockholders of IHS Inc.

We have audited IHS Inc.'s internal control over financial reporting as of November 30, 2011, based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (the COSO criteria). IHS Inc.'s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting, and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting included in the accompanying Management's Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company's internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk, and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

A company's internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company's internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company's assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

As indicated in the accompanying Management's Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting, management's assessment of and conclusion on the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting did not include the internal controls of Seismic Micro-Technology which was acquired by IHS Inc. on August 10, 2011, which is included in the 2011 consolidated financial statements of IHS Inc. and constituted $557.8 million and $523.2 million of total and net assets, respectively, as of November 30, 2011 and $27.2 million and $6.6 million of revenues and net income, respectively, for the year then ended. Our audit of internal control over financial reporting of IHS Inc. also did not include an evaluation of the internal control over financial reporting of Seismic Micro-Technology.

In our opinion, IHS Inc. maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of November 30, 2011, based on the COSO criteria.

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated balance sheets of IHS Inc. as of November 30, 2011 and 2010, and the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in stockholders' equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended November 30, 2011 and our report dated January 23, 2012 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.

 
/s/ Ernst & Young

Denver, Colorado
January 23, 2012


7



IHS INC.
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(In thousands, except for share and per-share amounts)
 
As of
 
As of
 
November 30, 2011
 
November 30, 2010
Assets

 

Current assets:

 

Cash and cash equivalents
$
234,685

 
$
200,735

Accounts receivable, net
326,009

 
256,552

Income tax receivable
25,194

 

Deferred subscription costs
43,136

 
41,449

Deferred income taxes
45,253

 
33,532

Other
23,801

 
20,466

Total current assets
698,078

 
552,734

Non-current assets:

 

Property and equipment, net
128,418

 
93,193

Intangible assets, net
514,949

 
384,568

Goodwill, net
1,722,312

 
1,120,830

Other
9,280

 
4,377

Total non-current assets
2,374,959

 
1,602,968

Total assets
$
3,073,037

 
$
2,155,702

Liabilities and stockholders’ equity

 

Current liabilities:

 

Short-term debt
$
144,563

 
$
19,054

Accounts payable
32,428

 
35,854

Accrued compensation
57,516

 
51,233

Accrued royalties
26,178

 
24,338

Other accrued expenses
69,000

 
51,307

Income tax payable

 
4,350

Deferred revenue
487,172

 
392,132

Total current liabilities
816,857

 
578,268

Long-term debt
658,911

 
275,095

Accrued pension liability
59,460

 
25,104

Accrued postretirement benefits
9,200

 
10,056

Deferred income taxes
123,895

 
73,586

Other liabilities
19,985

 
17,512

Commitments and contingencies

 

Stockholders’ equity:

 

Class A common stock, $0.01 par value per share, 160,000,000 shares authorized, 67,527,344 and 66,250,283 shares issued, and 65,121,884 and 64,248,547 shares outstanding at November 30, 2011 and November 30, 2010, respectively
675

 
662

Additional paid-in capital
636,440

 
541,108

Treasury stock, at cost: 2,405,460 and 2,001,736 shares at November 30, 2011 and 2010, respectively
(133,803
)
 
(101,554
)
Retained earnings
930,619

 
795,204

Accumulated other comprehensive loss
(49,202
)
 
(59,339
)
Total stockholders’ equity
1,384,729

 
1,176,081

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
$
3,073,037

 
$
2,155,702

See accompanying notes.

8


IHS INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(In thousands, except for per-share amounts)
 
 
Year Ended November 30,
 
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
Revenue:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Products
 
$
1,151,091

 
$
935,082

 
$
836,402

Services
 
174,547

 
122,660

 
117,297

Total revenue
 
1,325,638

 
1,057,742

 
953,699

Operating expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cost of revenue:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Products
 
464,138

 
372,592

 
331,173

Services
 
94,354

 
74,379

 
69,996

Total cost of revenue (includes stock-based compensation expense of $3,680; $3,633; and $2,564 for the years ended November 30, 2011, 2010, and 2009, respectively)
 
558,492

 
446,971

 
401,169

Selling, general and administrative (includes stock-based compensation expense of $82,514; $62,841; and $54,548 for the years ended November 30, 2011, 2010, and 2009, respectively)
 
453,481

 
358,012

 
332,518

Depreciation and amortization
 
88,039

 
59,474

 
49,146

Restructuring charges (credits)
 
1,242

 
9,022

 
(735
)
Acquisition-related costs
 
8,000

 

 

Gain on sales of assets, net
 

 

 
(365
)
Net periodic pension and postretirement expense
 
44,995

 
10,587

 
11,896

Other income, net
 
(1,079
)
 
(453
)
 
(412
)
Total operating expenses
 
1,153,170

 
883,613

 
793,217

Operating income
 
172,468

 
174,129

 
160,482

Interest income
 
862

 
655

 
1,088

Interest expense
 
(11,346
)
 
(2,036
)
 
(2,217
)
Non-operating expense, net
 
(10,484
)
 
(1,381
)
 
(1,129
)
Income from continuing operations before income taxes
 
161,984

 
172,748

 
159,353

Provision for income taxes
 
(26,695
)
 
(39,231
)
 
(34,350
)
Income from continuing operations
 
135,289

 
133,517

 
125,003

Income from discontinued operations, net
 
126

 
4,223

 
3,012

Net income
 
135,415

 
137,740

 
128,015

Less: Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests
 

 

 
(2,144
)
Net income attributable to IHS Inc.
 
$
135,415

 
$
137,740

 
$
125,871


 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic earnings per share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income from continuing operations attributable to IHS Inc.
 
$
2.08

 
$
2.09

 
$
1.95

Income from discontinued operations, net
 

 
0.07

 
0.05

Net income attributable to IHS Inc.
 
$
2.09

 
$
2.15

 
$
2.00

Weighted average shares used in computing basic earnings per share
 
64,938

 
63,964

 
63,055


 
 
 
 
 
 
Diluted earnings per share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income from continuing operations attributable to IHS Inc.
 
$
2.06

 
$
2.06

 
$
1.92

Income from discontinued operations, net
 

 
0.07

 
0.05

Net income attributable to IHS Inc.
 
$
2.06

 
$
2.13

 
$
1.97

Weighted average shares used in computing diluted earnings per share
 
65,716

 
64,719

 
63,940

See accompanying notes.

9


IHS INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(In thousands)
 
 
Year Ended November 30,
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
Operating activities:

 

 
 
Net income
$
135,415

 
$
137,740

 
$
128,015

Reconciliation of net income to net cash provided by operating activities:
 
 
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
88,039

 
59,474

 
49,146

Stock-based compensation expense
86,194

 
66,474

 
57,112

Gain on sales of assets

 

 
(365
)
Excess tax benefit from stock-based compensation
(9,943
)
 
(5,024
)
 
(13,072
)
Non-cash net periodic pension and postretirement expense
44,648

 
9,598

 
10,172

Deferred income taxes
(1,683
)
 
(5,699
)
 
12,783

Change in assets and liabilities:

 

 
 
Accounts receivable, net
(35,137
)
 
(37,886
)
 
19,476

Other current assets
(1,508
)
 
(2,565
)
 
205

Accounts payable
(4,302
)
 
3,017

 
(13,280
)
Accrued expenses
5,267

 
(800
)
 
(13,334
)
Income tax payable
(9,082
)
 
6,547

 
(2,606
)
Deferred revenue
43,757

 
36,268

 
712

Other liabilities
385

 
(956
)
 
(270
)
Net cash provided by operating activities
342,050

 
266,188

 
234,694

Investing activities:

 

 
 
Capital expenditures on property and equipment
(54,340
)
 
(31,836
)
 
(27,739
)
Acquisitions of businesses, net of cash acquired
(730,058
)
 
(334,514
)
 
(125,379
)
Intangible assets acquired
(2,985
)
 

 
(5,300
)
Change in other assets
(5,687
)
 
(186
)
 
1,501

Settlements of forward contracts
(168
)
 
(424
)
 
830

Proceeds from sales of assets and investment in affiliate

 

 
2,049

Net cash used in investing activities
(793,238
)
 
(366,960
)
 
(154,038
)
Financing activities:

 

 
 
Proceeds from borrowings
954,031

 
245,000

 
179,000

Repayment of borrowings
(444,775
)
 
(43,300
)
 
(183,297
)
Payment of debt issuance costs
(6,326
)
 

 

Excess tax benefit from stock-based compensation
9,992

 
5,024

 
13,072

Proceeds from the exercise of employee stock options
2,144

 
1,320

 
2,112

Repurchases of common stock
(32,249
)
 
(26,442
)
 
(10,480
)
Net cash provided by financing activities
482,817

 
181,602

 
407

Foreign exchange impact on cash balance
2,321

 
(4,296
)
 
12,098

Net increase in cash and cash equivalents
33,950

 
76,534

 
93,161

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the period
200,735

 
124,201

 
31,040

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the period
$
234,685

 
$
200,735

 
$
124,201


See accompanying notes.


10


IHS INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
(In thousands)
 
 
Shares of
Class A
Common
Stock
 
Class A
Common
Stock
 
Additional
Paid-In
Capital
 
Treasury
Stock
 
Retained
Earnings
 
Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Loss
 
Total
Balance at November 30, 2008
62,802

 
$
641

 
$
408,007

 
$
(64,632
)
 
$
531,593

 
$
(74,554
)
 
$
801,055

Stock-based award activity
482

 
7

 
58,156

 
(10,480
)
 

 

 
47,683

Excess tax benefit on vested shares

 

 
6,628

 

 

 

 
6,628

Net income attributable to IHS Inc.

 

 

 

 
125,871

 

 
125,871

Other comprehensive income, net of tax:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency translation adjustments

 

 

 

 

 
41,681

 
41,681

Net pension liability adjustment

 

 

 

 

 
(9,240
)
 
(9,240
)
Comprehensive income, net of tax

 

 

 

 

 

 
158,312

Balance at November 30, 2009
63,284

 
$
648

 
$
472,791

 
$
(75,112
)
 
$
657,464

 
$
(42,113
)
 
$
1,013,678

Stock-based award activity
965

 
14

 
64,746

 
(26,442
)
 

 

 
38,318

Excess tax benefit on vested shares

 

 
3,571

 

 

 

 
3,571

Net income attributable to IHS Inc.

 

 

 

 
137,740

 

 
137,740

Other comprehensive income, net of tax:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Foreign currency translation adjustments

 

 

 

 

 
(18,079
)
 
(18,079
)
Net pension liability adjustment

 

 

 

 

 
853

 
853

Comprehensive income, net of tax

 

 

 

 

 

 
120,514

Balance at November 30, 2010
64,249

 
$
662

 
$
541,108

 
$
(101,554
)
 
$
795,204

 
$
(59,339
)
 
$
1,176,081

Stock-based award activity
873

 
13

 
85,389

 
(32,249
)
 

 

 
53,153

Excess tax benefit on vested shares

 

 
9,943

 

 

 

 
9,943

Net income

 

 

 

 
135,415

 

 
135,415

Other comprehensive income, net of tax:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unrealized losses on hedging activities

 

 

 

 

 
(1,918
)
 
(1,918
)
Foreign currency translation adjustments

 

 

 

 

 
6,667

 
6,667

Net pension liability adjustment, net of tax

 

 

 

 

 
5,388

 
5,388

Comprehensive income, net of tax

 

 

 

 

 

 
145,552

Balance at November 30, 2011
65,122

 
$
675

 
$
636,440

 
$
(133,803
)
 
$
930,619

 
$
(49,202
)
 
$
1,384,729

See accompanying notes.


11


IHS INC.
NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
1.
Nature of Business

We are a leading source of information and insight in critical areas that shape today's business landscape, including energy and power; design and supply chain; defense, risk and security; environmental, health and safety (EHS) and sustainability; country and industry forecasting; and commodities, pricing and cost. Businesses and governments in more than 165 countries around the globe rely on the comprehensive content, expert independent analysis and flexible delivery methods of IHS to make high-impact decisions and develop strategies with speed and confidence. IHS has been in business since 1959, incorporated in the State of Delaware in 1994, and became a publicly traded company on the New York Stock Exchange in 2005. Headquartered in Englewood, Colorado, USA, IHS employs more than 5,500 people in more than 30 countries around the world.

We have organized our business around our customers and the geographies in which they reside: Americas, EMEA, and APAC. Our integrated global organization makes it easier for our customers to do business with us by providing a cohesive, consistent, and effective sales-and-marketing approach in each local geography. We sell our offerings primarily through subscriptions, which tend to generate recurring revenue and cash flow for us. Our subscriptions are usually for one-year periods, and we have historically seen high renewal rates. Subscriptions are generally paid in full within one or two months after the subscription period commences; as a result, the timing of our cash flows generally precedes the recognition of revenue and income.

Our business has seasonal aspects. Our fourth quarter typically generates our highest quarterly levels of revenue and profit. Conversely, our first quarter generally has our lowest levels of revenue and profit. These trends have been further amplified by the product mix from recent acquisitions, which generate a larger proportion of their sales in the fourth quarter. We also have event-driven seasonality in our business; for instance, CERAWeek, an annual energy executive gathering, is held during our second quarter. Another example is the triennial release of the Boiler Pressure Vessel Code (BPVC) engineering standard, which generates revenue for us predominantly in the third quarter of every third year. The BPVC benefit most recently occurred in the third quarter of 2010.

2.
Significant Accounting Policies

Fiscal Year End
Our fiscal year ends on November 30 of each year. References herein to individual years mean the year ended November 30. For example, 2011 means the year ended November 30, 2011.

Consolidation Policy
The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of all wholly-owned and majority-owned and controlled subsidiaries. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

Use of Estimates
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires that we make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, as well as the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Significant estimates have been made in areas that include revenue recognition, valuation of long-lived and intangible assets and goodwill, income taxes, pension and postretirement benefits, and stock-based compensation. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Concentration of Credit Risk
We are exposed to credit risk associated with cash equivalents, foreign currency and interest rate derivatives, and trade receivables. We do not believe that our cash equivalents or investments present significant credit risks because the counterparties to the instruments consist of major financial institutions that are financially sound or have been capitalized by the U.S. government and we manage the notional amount of contracts entered into with any counterparty. Substantially all trade receivable balances are unsecured. The concentration of credit risk with respect to trade receivables is limited by the large number of customers in our customer base and their dispersion across various industries and geographic areas. We perform ongoing credit evaluations of our customers and maintain an allowance for probable credit losses. The allowance is based upon management’s assessment of known credit risks as well as general industry and economic conditions. Specific accounts receivable are written-off upon notification of bankruptcy or once it is determined the account is significantly past due and collection efforts are unsuccessful.

12



Fair Value of Financial Instruments
The carrying values of our financial instruments, including cash, accounts receivable, accounts payable, and short-term and long-term debt, approximate their fair value.

Financial instruments included in pension plan assets are stated at fair value, and are categorized into the following fair value hierarchy:

Level 1 – Quoted prices (unadjusted) for identical assets or liabilities in active markets that are accessible as of the measurement date.

Level 2 – Inputs other than quoted prices within Level 1 that are observable either directly or indirectly, including but not limited to quoted prices in markets that are not active, quoted prices in active markets for similar assets or liabilities, and observable inputs other than quoted prices such as interest rates or yield curves.

Level 3 – Unobservable inputs reflecting our own assumptions about the assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability, including assumptions about risk.

Revenue Recognition
Revenue is recognized when all of the following criteria have been met: (a) persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, (b) delivery has occurred or services have been rendered, (c) the price to the customer is fixed or determinable, and (d) collectibility is reasonably assured.

The majority of our revenue is derived from the sale of subscriptions to our Critical Information, which is initially deferred and then recognized ratably as delivered over the subscription period, which is generally 12 months.

Revenue is recognized upon delivery for non-subscription-based sales.

In certain locations, we use dealers to distribute our Critical Information and Insight. Revenue for products sold through dealers is recognized as follows:

For subscription-based services, revenue is recognized ratably as delivered to the end user over the subscription period.
For non-subscription-based products, revenue is recognized upon delivery to the dealer.

We do not defer the revenue for the limited number of sales of subscriptions in which we act as a sales agent for third parties and we have no continuing responsibility to maintain and update the underlying database. We recognize this revenue on a net basis upon the sale of these subscriptions and delivery of the information and tools.

Services
We provide our customers with service offerings that are primarily sold on a stand-alone basis and on a significantly more limited basis as part of a multiple-element arrangement. Our service offerings are generally separately priced in a standard price book. For services that are not in a standard-price book, as the price varies based on the nature and complexity of the service offering, pricing is based on the estimated amount of time to be incurred at standard billing rates for the estimated underlying effort for executing the associated deliverable in the contract. Revenue related to services performed under time-and-material-based contracts is recognized in the period performed at standard billing rates. Revenue associated with fixed-price contracts is recognized upon completion of each specified performance obligation or proportionally based upon performance progress under the terms of the contract. See discussion of “multiple-element arrangements” below. If the contract includes acceptance contingencies, revenue is recognized in the period in which we receive documentation of acceptance from the customer.

Software
We are beginning to sell more software products and maintenance contracts as a result of recent acquisitions. In addition to meeting the standard revenue recognition criteria described above, software license revenue must also meet the requirement that vendor-specific objective evidence (“VSOE”) of the fair value of undelivered elements exists. As a significant portion of our software licenses are sold in multiple-element arrangements that include either maintenance or, in more limited circumstances, both maintenance and professional services, we use the residual method to determine the amount of license revenue to be recognized. Under the residual method, consideration is allocated to undelivered elements based upon VSOE of the fair value of those elements, with the residual of the arrangement fee allocated to and recognized as license revenue. We recognize license revenue upon delivery, with maintenance revenue recognized ratably over the maintenance period, usually

13


one to three years. We have established VSOE of the fair value of maintenance through independent maintenance renewals, which demonstrate a consistent relationship of pricing maintenance as a percentage of the discounted or undiscounted license list price. VSOE of the fair value of professional services is established based on daily rates when sold on a stand-alone basis.

Multiple-element arrangements
Occasionally, we may execute contracts with customers which contain multiple offerings. In our business, multiple-element arrangements refer to contracts with separate fees for subscription offerings, decision-support tools, maintenance, and/or related services. We have established separate units of accounting as each offering is primarily sold on a stand-alone basis. Using the relative selling price method, we allocate the fair value of each element of the arrangement based generally on stand-alone sales of these products and services, and then recognize the elements of the contract as follows:

Subscription offerings and license fees are recognized ratably over the license period as long as there is an associated licensing period or a future obligation. Otherwise, revenue is recognized upon delivery.
For non-subscription offerings of a multiple-element arrangement, the revenue is generally recognized for each element in the period in which delivery of the product to the customer occurs, completion of services occurs or, for post-contract support, ratably over the term of the maintenance period.
In some instances, customer acceptance is required for consulting services rendered. For those transactions, the service revenue component of the arrangement is recognized in the period that customer acceptance is obtained.

Cash and Cash Equivalents
We consider all highly liquid investments purchased with an original maturity of three months or less to be cash equivalents. Cash equivalents are carried at cost, which approximates fair value.

Deferred Subscription Costs
Deferred subscription costs represent royalties and commissions associated with customer subscriptions. These costs are deferred and amortized to expense over the period of the subscriptions. Generally, subscription periods are 12 months in duration.

Property and Equipment
Land, buildings and improvements, machinery and equipment are stated at cost. Depreciation is recorded using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets as follows:
 
Buildings and improvements
 
7

to
30
years
Machinery and equipment
 
3

to
10
years

Leasehold improvements are depreciated over their estimated useful life, or the life of the lease, whichever is shorter. Maintenance, repairs and renewals of a minor nature are expensed as incurred. Betterments and major renewals which extend the useful lives of buildings, improvements, and equipment are capitalized.

Leases
In certain circumstances, we enter into leases with free rent periods or rent escalations over the term of the lease. In such cases, we calculate the total payments over the term of the lease and record them ratably as rent expense over that term.

Identifiable Intangible Assets and Goodwill
We account for our business acquisitions using the purchase method of accounting. We allocate the total cost of an acquisition to the underlying net assets based on their respective estimated fair values. As part of this allocation process, we must identify and attribute values and estimated lives to the intangible assets acquired. We evaluate our intangible assets and goodwill for impairment at least annually, as well as whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that carrying amounts may not be recoverable. Impairments are expensed as incurred.

Finite-lived intangible assets
Identifiable intangible assets with finite lives are generally amortized on a straight-line basis over their respective lives, as follows:

14


Information databases
 
5
to
15
years
Customer relationships
 
2
to
15
years
Non-compete agreements
 
1
to
5
years
Developed computer software
 
3
to
10
years
Other
 
3
to
15
years

Indefinite-lived intangible assets
We perform the impairment test for indefinite-lived intangible assets, which consist of trade names and perpetual licenses, by comparing the asset’s fair value to its carrying value. An impairment charge is recognized if the asset’s estimated fair value is less than its carrying value.

We estimate the fair value based on the relief from royalty method using projected discounted future cash flows, which, in turn, are based on our views of uncertain variables such as growth rates, anticipated future economic conditions and the appropriate discount rates relative to risk and estimates of residual values. The use of different estimates or assumptions within our discounted cash flow model when determining the fair value of our indefinite-lived intangible assets or using a methodology other than a discounted cash flow model could result in different values for our indefinite-lived intangible assets and could result in an impairment charge.

Goodwill
We test goodwill for impairment on a reporting unit level. A reporting unit is a group of businesses (i) for which discrete financial information is available and (ii) that have similar economic characteristics. We test goodwill for impairment using the following two-step approach:

We first determine the fair value of each reporting unit. If the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying value, this is an indicator that the goodwill assigned to that reporting unit might be impaired, which requires performance of the second step. We determine the fair value of our reporting units based on projected future discounted cash flows, which, in turn, are based on our views of uncertain variables such as growth rates, anticipated future economic conditions and the appropriate discount rates relative to risk and estimates of residual values. There were no deficiencies in reporting unit fair values versus carrying values in the fiscal years ended November 30, 2011, 2010, and 2009.

If necessary, in the second step, we allocate the fair value of the reporting unit to the assets and liabilities of the reporting unit as if it had just been acquired in a business combination and as if the purchase price was equivalent to the fair value of the reporting unit. The excess of the fair value of the reporting unit over the amounts assigned to its assets and liabilities is referred to as the implied fair value of goodwill. We then compare that implied fair value of the reporting unit’s goodwill to the carrying value of that goodwill. If the implied fair value is less than the carrying value, we recognize an impairment loss for the deficiency.

Income Taxes
Deferred income taxes are provided using tax rates enacted for periods of expected reversal on all temporary differences. Temporary differences relate to differences between the book and tax basis of assets and liabilities, principally intangible assets, property and equipment, deferred revenue, pension and other postretirement benefits, accruals, and stock-based compensation. Valuation allowances are established to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount that will more likely than not be realized. To the extent that a determination is made to establish or adjust a valuation allowance, the expense or benefit is recorded in the period in which the determination is made.

Judgment is required in determining the worldwide provision for income taxes. Additionally, the income tax provision is based on calculations and assumptions that are subject to examination by many different tax authorities and to changes in tax law and rates in many jurisdictions. We adjust our income tax provision in the period in which it becomes probable that actual results will differ from our estimates.

Pension and Other Postretirement Benefits
During the fourth quarter of 2011, we changed our method of accounting for actuarial gains and losses related to our pension and other postretirement benefit plans. Historically, we have recognized actuarial gains and losses as a component of stockholders' equity in the consolidated balance sheet. These gains and losses were amortized into operating results over the average remaining service period of active plan participants (or the average remaining life expectancy when all or almost all plan participants are inactive), to the extent such gains and losses were outside a corridor. The corridor amount is equivalent to

15


10% of the greater of the market-related value of plan assets or the plan's benefit obligation at the beginning of the year. Under the new method, the net actuarial gains or losses in excess of the corridor will be recognized immediately in our operating results during the fourth quarter of each fiscal year (or upon any remeasurement date), as we believe it is preferable to accelerate the recognition of deferred gains and losses into income rather than to delay such recognition. This change is designed to reduce complexity in our operating results by more quickly recognizing the effects of economic and interest rate conditions on plan obligations, investments, and assumptions. Additionally, for the U.S. Retirement Income Plan, we will no longer use a calculated value for the market-related value of plan assets that reflects changes in the fair value of plan assets over five years, but instead will use the actual fair value of plan assets at the measurement date. This change aligns the method of computing the market-related value of plan assets for the U.S. Retirement Income Plan with the method used for our other funded plan. We have applied these changes retrospectively, adjusting all prior periods presented.
 
The cumulative effect of the change on retained earnings as of December 1, 2008, was a reduction of $52.6 million, with an offset to accumulated other comprehensive income (OCI). The table below shows the impacts of all adjustments made to the financial statements as a result of the change in accounting (in thousands, except for per share amounts):

 
 
Historical
Accounting Method *
 
As Adjusted
 
Effect of Change
At November 30, 2010 or for the year ended
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net periodic pension and postretirement expense
 
$
4,784

 
$
10,587

 
$
5,803

Income from continuing operations before income tax
 
178,551

 
172,748

 
(5,803
)
Provision for income taxes
 
(41,460
)
 
(39,231
)
 
2,229

Net income
 
141,315

 
137,740

 
(3,575
)
Basic earnings per share
 
2.21

 
2.15

 
(0.06
)
Diluted earnings per share
 
2.18

 
2.13

 
(0.05
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Retained earnings
 
860,497

 
795,204

 
(65,293
)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss
 
(124,632
)
 
(59,339
)
 
65,293

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
At November 30, 2009 or for the year ended
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net periodic pension and postretirement expense (income)
 
$
(2,684
)
 
$
11,896

 
$
14,580

Income from continuing operations before income tax
 
173,933

 
159,353

 
(14,580
)
Provision for income taxes
 
(39,839
)
 
(34,350
)
 
5,489

Net income attributable to IHS Inc.
 
134,963

 
125,871

 
(9,092
)
Basic earnings per share
 
2.14

 
2.00

 
(0.14
)
Diluted earnings per share
 
2.11

 
1.97

 
(0.14
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Retained earnings
 
719,182

 
657,464

 
(61,718
)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss
 
(103,831
)
 
(42,113
)
 
61,718

* Represents previously reported amounts, as adjusted for discontinued operations presentation (see Note 11).

Treasury Stock
For all IHS stock retention and buyback programs and transactions, we utilize the cost method of accounting. Regarding the inventory costing method for treasury stock transactions, we employ the weighted-average cost method.

Earnings per Share
Basic EPS is computed by dividing net income by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted EPS is computed using the weighted average number of common shares and dilutive potential common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted EPS reflects the potential dilution that could occur if securities were exercised or converted into common shares.

Foreign Currency
Absent circumstances to the contrary, the functional currency of each of our foreign subsidiaries is such subsidiary’s local currency. Assets and liabilities are translated at period-end exchange rates. Income and expense items are translated at weighted average rates of exchange prevailing during the year. Any translation adjustments are included in other comprehensive income.

16


Transactions executed in different currencies resulting in exchange adjustments are translated at spot rates and resulting foreign-exchange-transaction gains and losses are included in the results of operations.

From time to time, we utilize forward-contract instruments to manage market risks associated with fluctuations in certain foreign-currency exchange rates as they relate to specific balances of accounts and notes receivable and payable denominated in foreign currencies. At the end of the reporting period, non-functional foreign-currency-denominated receivable and cash balances are re-measured into the functional currency of the reporting entities at current market rates. The change in value from this re-measurement is reported as a foreign exchange gain or loss for that period in other income (expense) in the accompanying consolidated statements of operations. The resulting gains or losses from the forward foreign currency contracts described above, which are also included in other income (expense), mitigate the exchange rate risk of the associated assets.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets
We review the carrying amounts of long-lived assets to determine whether current events or circumstances warrant adjustment to such carrying amounts annually. A long-lived asset with a finite life is considered to be impaired if its carrying value exceeds the estimated future undiscounted cash flows to be derived from it. Any impairment is measured by the amount that the carrying value of such assets exceeds their fair value, primarily based on estimated discounted cash flows. Considerable management judgment is necessary to estimate the fair value of assets. Assets to be disposed of are carried at the lower of their financial statement carrying amount or fair value, less cost to sell.

Stock-Based Compensation
All share-based payments to employees, including restricted stock unit and stock option grants, are recognized in the income statement based on their fair values. In addition, we estimate forfeitures at the grant date. Compensation cost is recognized based on the number of awards expected to vest. There will be adjustments in future periods if actual forfeitures differ from our estimates. Our forfeiture rate is based upon historical experience as well as anticipated employee turnover considering certain qualitative factors. We amortize the value of nonvested share awards to expense over the vesting period on a straight-line basis. For awards with performance conditions, an evaluation is made each quarter as to the likelihood of the performance criteria being met. Compensation expense is then adjusted to reflect the number of shares expected to vest and the cumulative vesting period met to date. For stock options, we estimate the fair value of awards on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes pricing model. We amortize the value of stock options to expense over the vesting period on a straight-line basis.

Recent Accounting Pronouncements
In June 2011, the FASB issued guidance on the presentation of comprehensive income that will become effective for us in the first quarter of 2013. Under the new guidance, an entity has the option to present the total of comprehensive income, the components of net income, and the components of other comprehensive income either in a single continuous statement of comprehensive income or in two separate but consecutive statements. This guidance does not change the components that must be reported in other comprehensive income or when an item of other comprehensive income must be reclassified to net income. We are evaluating our presentation options under this ASU; however, we do not expect these changes to impact the consolidated financial statements other than the change in presentation.

In September 2011, the FASB issued guidance on testing goodwill for impairment that will become effective for us in the first quarter of 2013; however, early adoption is permitted. Under the new guidance, an entity has the option to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether the existence of events or circumstances leads to a determination that it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount. If the entity determines that this threshold is not met, then performing the two-step impairment test is unnecessary. We are currently evaluating whether we will elect to use this new qualitative approach to impairment testing.

3.
Business Combinations

During the year ended November 30, 2011, we completed the following acquisitions, among others:

ODS-Petrodata (Holdings) Ltd. (ODS-Petrodata). On April 16, 2011, we acquired ODS-Petrodata for approximately $75 million in cash, net of cash acquired. ODS-Petrodata is a premier provider of data, information, and market intelligence to the offshore energy industry. We expect that the ODS-Petrodata products and services will extend our offerings to the upstream energy sector through provision of high quality data and research across the range of critical, high-value offshore markets such as drilling rigs, marine and seismic vessels and field development operations.

Dyadem International, Ltd. (Dyadem). On April 26, 2011, we acquired Dyadem for approximately $49 million in cash, net of cash acquired. Dyadem is a market leader in Operational Risk Management and Quality Risk Management solutions. We expect that the acquisition of Dyadem will provide our customers with software solutions that will help them achieve

17


regulatory compliance and business continuity.

Chemical Market Associates, Inc. (CMAI). On May 2, 2011, we acquired CMAI for approximately $73 million in cash, net of cash acquired. CMAI is a leading provider of market and business advisory services for the worldwide petrochemical, specialty chemicals, fertilizer, plastics, fibers, and chlor-alkali industries. We expect that CMAI’s comprehensive information and analysis will add to our event-driven supply-chain information strategy and that CMAI's price discovery and analysis business will broaden our commodities and cost information capabilities.

Seismic Micro-Technology (SMT). On August 10, 2011, we acquired SMT for approximately $502 million in cash, net of cash acquired. SMT is a global leader in Windows-based exploration and production software, and its solutions are used by geoscientists worldwide to evaluate potential reservoirs and plan field development. As a result of the acquisition, we expect to provide a more robust, valuable, and integrated solution set of information, software, and insight to support our energy customers worldwide.

Purvin & Gertz. On November 10, 2011, we acquired Purvin & Gertz for approximately $29 million in cash, net of cash acquired. Purvin & Gertz is a well-established global advisory and market research firm that provides technical, commercial and strategic advice to international clients in the petroleum refining, natural gas, natural gas liquids, crude oil and petrochemical industries. We expect that this acquisition will enhance the focused, actionable analysis and deep industry knowledge of our product and service portfolio that is critical to senior executives and other key decision makers.

The following table summarizes the initial purchase price allocation, net of acquired cash, for all acquisitions completed in 2011 (in thousands):

 
SMT
 
ODS-Petrodata
 
CMAI
 
All others
 
Total
Assets:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Current assets
$
19,752

 
$
5,468

 
$
6,222

 
$
15,233

 
$
46,675

Property and equipment
2,302

 
851

 
1,799

 
2,363

 
7,315

Intangible assets
105,310

 
21,960

 
34,170

 
33,233

 
194,673

Goodwill
437,768

 
61,375

 
62,577

 
50,093

 
611,813

Other long-term assets

 
1,440

 

 
135

 
1,575

Total assets
565,132

 
91,094

 
104,768

 
101,057

 
862,051

Liabilities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Current liabilities
5,105

 
2,208

 
5,762

 
12,044

 
25,119

Deferred revenue
17,403

 
9,709

 
15,646

 
6,404

 
49,162

Deferred taxes
40,547

 
3,681

 
10,041

 
2,758

 
57,027

Other long-term liabilities

 
335

 
178

 
172

 
685

Total liabilities
63,055

 
15,933

 
31,627

 
21,378

 
131,993

Purchase price
$
502,077

 
$
75,161

 
$
73,141

 
$
79,679

 
$
730,058


We have included revenue and expenses from acquisition operations in the appropriate geographic segment from the date of each respective acquisition. The acquisitions have contributed $80.3 million of revenue for the year ended November 30, 2011, and $7.8 million of income from continuing operations for the same period.

The following unaudited pro forma information has been prepared as if all acquisitions completed in 2011 had been consummated at December 1, 2009. This information is presented for informational purposes only, and is not necessarily indicative of the operating results that would have occurred if the acquisitions had been consummated as of that date. This information should not be used as a predictive measure of our future financial position, results of operations, or liquidity.

18


 
 
Year Ended November 30,
Supplemental pro forma financial information (Unaudited)
 
2011
 
2010
 
 
(in thousands, except for per share amounts)
Total revenue
 
$
1,428,411

 
$
1,209,437

Income from continuing operations
 
$
139,146

 
$
122,891

Diluted earnings per share
 
$
2.12

 
$
1.90


During 2010, we made the following acquisitions:

Emerging Energy Research, LLC (EER). On February 10, 2010, we acquired EER for approximately $18 million, net of cash acquired. EER is a leading advisory firm whose mission is to help clients understand, leverage, and exploit the technological, regulatory and competitive trends in the global emerging energy sector.

CSM Worldwide, Inc. (CSM). On March 17, 2010, we acquired CSM for approximately $25 million, net of cash acquired. CSM is a leading automotive market forecasting firm dedicated to providing automotive suppliers with market information and production, power train, and sales forecasting through trusted automotive market forecasting services, and strategic advisory solutions to the world’s top automotive manufacturers, suppliers, and financial organizations.

Quantitative Micro Software, LLC (QMS). On May 5, 2010, we acquired QMS for approximately $40 million, net of cash acquired. QMS is a worldwide leader in Windows-based econometric and forecasting software applications.

Access Intelligence. On September 7, 2010, we acquired certain chemical and energy portfolio business assets of Access Intelligence for approximately $79 million, net of cash acquired. We purchased these businesses in order to extend the breadth of information available for current IHS energy customers and support the development of additional products and services for a broad range of industries along the supply chain.

Atrion International Inc. (Atrion). On September 22, 2010, we acquired Atrion for approximately $56 million, net of cash acquired. Atrion is a company that combines regulatory expertise and industry-leading technology to streamline the generation, management, and distribution of hazardous materials communication documents and reports.

Syntex Management Systems, Inc. (Syntex). On September 22, 2010, we acquired Syntex for approximately $23 million, net of cash acquired. Syntex is a leading provider of operational risk management software and services that help companies ensure the health and safety of their workers while protecting the environment and managing costs.

iSuppli, Inc. (iSuppli). On November 19, 2010, we acquired iSuppli for approximately $94 million, net of cash acquired. iSuppli is a global leader in technology value chain research and advisory services. The transaction also included Screen Digest Limited, a leading digital media and technology research company, which had been recently acquired by iSuppli.

The purchase prices for these 2010 acquisitions, excluding acquired cash, were initially allocated as follows (in thousands):


19


 
 
iSuppli
 
Access Intelligence
 
Atrion
 
All others
 
Total
Assets:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Current assets
 
$
7,496

 
$
3,841

 
$
2,868

 
$
6,527

 
$
20,732

Property and equipment
 
1,435

 
213

 
403

 
1,752

 
3,803

Intangible assets
 
27,576

 
30,635

 
26,259

 
36,095

 
120,565

Goodwill
 
70,289

 
57,858

 
39,890

 
87,438

 
255,475

Other long-term assets
 
5,590

 

 
2,072

 
98

 
7,760

Total assets
 
112,386

 
92,547

 
71,492

 
131,910

 
408,335

Liabilities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Current liabilities
 
5,424

 
955

 
1,066

 
7,934

 
15,379

Deferred revenue
 
10,775

 
11,698

 
6,381

 
12,658

 
41,512

Deferred taxes
 
1,807

 
647

 
7,878

 
6,145

 
16,477

Other long-term liabilities
 

 
222

 
141

 
90

 
453

Total liabilities
 
18,006

 
13,522

 
15,466

 
26,827

 
73,821

Purchase price
 
$
94,380

 
$
79,025

 
$
56,026

 
$
105,083

 
$
334,514


During 2009, we made the following acquisitions:

Prime Publications Limited (Prime) and Lloyd’s Register-Fairplay Limited (Fairplay). On March 3, 2008, we acquired Prime Publications Limited (Prime), which owned a 50% interest in the Lloyd’s Register-Fairplay Limited (Fairplay) joint venture, a leading source of global maritime information. Fairplay is the pre-eminent brand name in the maritime information industry and the only organization that provides comprehensive details of the current world merchant fleet (tankers, cargo, carrier and passenger ships) and a complete range of products and services to assist the world’s maritime community. The investment in Fairplay was the primary asset of Prime. IHS accounted for the joint venture under the equity method of accounting from March 2008 through November 30, 2008. As of December 1, 2008, we obtained an additional 0.1% ownership interest and a majority position on the venture’s governing board giving us a 50.1% controlling interest in the joint venture and accordingly began consolidating Fairplay within our results. On June 17, 2009, we acquired the remaining 49.9% of Fairplay from Lloyd’s Register giving us 100% ownership of Fairplay. The remaining 49.9% interest was acquired for approximately $64 million.

LogTech Canada Ltd. (LogTech). On September 2, 2009, we acquired LogTech, a leader in the development of pragmatic and cost-effective software solutions, services and digital log data for the petroleum industry. We acquired LogTech for $3 million, net of cash acquired.

Environmental Support Solutions, Inc. (ESS). On September 17, 2009, we acquired ESS, a leading provider of environmental, health and safety and crisis management software for enterprise sustainability, for approximately $59 million, net of cash acquired.

The purchase prices for these 2009 acquisitions, excluding acquired cash and including acquisition-related costs, were initially allocated as follows (in thousands):


20


 
 
Prime *
 
ESS
 
LogTech
 
Total
Assets:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Current assets
 
$
5,597

 
$
3,988

 
$
145

 
$
9,730

Property and equipment
 
553

 
669

 
36

 
1,258

Intangible assets
 
29,625

 
16,850

 
1,508

 
47,983

Goodwill
 
104,175

 
49,450

 
2,393

 
156,018

Other long-term assets
 

 
32

 

 
32

Total assets
 
139,950

 
70,989

 
4,082

 
215,021

Liabilities:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Current liabilities
 
10,487

 
11,358

 
839

 
22,684

Deferred taxes
 
6,973

 
378

 
185

 
7,536

Other long-term liabilities
 
2,253

 
127

 

 
2,380

Total liabilities
 
19,713

 
11,863

 
1,024

 
32,600

Purchase price
 
$
120,237

 
$
59,126

 
$
3,058

 
$
182,421

* Includes cumulative purchase price for the 50% interest acquired in 2008 and the remaining 50% interest acquired in 2009. Individual purchase prices are impacted by foreign currency fluctuation.

4.
Accounts Receivable

Our accounts receivable balance consists of the following as of November 30, 2011 and 2010 (in thousands):

 
 
2011
 
2010
Accounts receivable
 
$
330,309

 
$
259,576

Less: Accounts receivable allowance
 
(4,300
)
 
(3,024
)
Accounts receivable, net
 
$
326,009

 
$
256,552


We record an accounts receivable allowance when it is probable that the accounts receivable balance will not be collected. The amounts comprising the allowance are based upon management’s estimates and historical collection trends. The activity in our accounts receivable allowance consists of the following as of November 30, 2011, 2010, and 2009, respectively (in thousands):

 
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
Balance at beginning of year
 
$
3,024

 
$
4,511

 
$
4,790

Provision for bad debts
 
2,666

 
987

 
2,663

Recoveries and other additions
 
2,289

 
1,674

 
1,249

Write-offs and other deductions
 
(3,679
)
 
(4,148
)
 
(4,191
)
Balance at end of year
 
$
4,300

 
$
3,024

 
$
4,511


5.
Property and Equipment

Property and equipment consists of the following as of November 30, 2011 and 2010 (in thousands):
 
 
2011
 
2010
Land, buildings and improvements
 
$
88,714

 
$
76,941

Machinery and equipment
 
149,410

 
128,293

 
 
238,124

 
205,234

Less: Accumulated depreciation
 
(109,706
)
 
(112,041
)
 
 
$
128,418

 
$
93,193


21



Depreciation expense was approximately $23.8 million, $18.7 million, and $15.1 million for the years ended November 30, 2011, 2010, and 2009, respectively.

6.
Intangible Assets

The following table presents details of our intangible assets, other than goodwill (in thousands): 
 
As of
November 30, 2011
 
As of
November 30, 2010
 
Gross
 
Accumulated
Amortization
 
Net
 
Gross
 
Accumulated
Amortization
 
Net
Intangible assets subject to amortization:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Information databases
$
259,524

 
$
(105,078
)
 
$
154,446

 
$
237,888

 
$
(80,870
)
 
$
157,018

Customer relationships
210,940

 
(43,468
)
 
167,472

 
132,878

 
(28,533
)
 
104,345

Non-compete agreements
8,515

 
(5,754
)
 
2,761

 
9,551

 
(5,934
)
 
3,617

Developed computer software
123,566

 
(25,718
)
 
97,848

 
52,258

 
(15,926
)
 
36,332

Other
27,667

 
(5,958
)
 
21,709

 
14,944

 
(3,218
)
 
11,726

Total
$
630,212

 
$
(185,976
)
 
$
444,236

 
$
447,519

 
$
(134,481
)
 
$
313,038

Intangible assets not subject to amortization:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Trademarks
69,539

 

 
69,539

 
70,366

 

 
70,366

Perpetual licenses
1,174

 

 
1,174

 
1,164

 

 
1,164

Total intangible assets
$
700,925

 
$
(185,976
)
 
$
514,949

 
$
519,049

 
$
(134,481
)
 
$
384,568


Intangible asset amortization expense was $64.2 million, $40.7 million, and $34.0 million for the years ended November 30, 2011, 2010, and 2009, respectively. Estimated future amortization expense related to intangible assets held as of November 30, 2011 is as follows:
Year
 
Amount (in thousands)
2012
 
$
76,454

2013
 
68,519

2014
 
57,325

2015
 
52,857

2016
 
47,529

Thereafter
 
141,552


Changes in intangible assets in both 2011 and 2010 were primarily the result of acquisitions (see Note 3) and to a lesser extent, foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations.

7.
Derivatives

In April and June 2011, to mitigate interest rate exposure on our outstanding credit facility debt, we entered into two interest rate derivative contracts that effectively swap $100 million of floating rate debt for fixed rate debt at a 3.30% weighted average interest rate, which rate includes the current credit facility spread. Both of these interest rate swaps expire in July 2015. Because the terms of the swaps and the variable rate debt coincide, we do not expect any ineffectiveness. We have designated and accounted for these instruments as cash flow hedges, with changes in fair value being deferred in accumulated other comprehensive loss in the consolidated balance sheets.

Since our swaps are not listed on an exchange, we have evaluated fair value by reference to similar transactions in active markets; consequently, we have classified the swaps within Level 2 of the fair value measurement hierarchy. As of November 30, 2011, the fair market value of our swaps was a loss of $3.1 million, and the current mark-to-market loss position is recorded in other liabilities in the consolidated balance sheets.

8.
Debt

22



On January 5, 2011, we entered into a $1.0 billion syndicated bank credit agreement (collectively, the Credit Facility). On October 11, 2011, we amended the Credit Facility to increase the total facility from $1.0 billion to $1.276 billion. The facility consists of a $351 million term loan and a $925 million revolver. All borrowings under the Credit Facility are unsecured. The loan and revolver included in the Credit Facility have a five-year term ending in January 2016. The interest rates for borrowings under the amended Credit Facility will be the applicable LIBOR plus 1.00% to 1.75%, depending upon our Leverage Ratio, which is defined as the ratio of Consolidated Funded Indebtedness to rolling four-quarter Consolidated Earnings Before Interest Expense, Taxes, Depreciation and Amortization (EBITDA), as defined in the Credit Facility. A commitment fee on any unused balance is payable periodically and ranges from 0.15% to 0.30% based upon our Leverage Ratio. The Credit Facility contains certain financial and other covenants, including a maximum Leverage Ratio and a maximum Interest Coverage Ratio, as defined in the Credit Facility.

As of November 30, 2011, we were in compliance with all of the covenants in the Credit Facility and had $455 million of outstanding borrowings under the revolver at a current annual interest rate of 1.75% and approximately $346 million of outstanding borrowings under the term loan at a current weighted average annual interest rate of 1.80%. We have classified $330 million of revolver borrowings as long-term and $125 million as short-term based upon our current estimate of expected repayments for the next twelve months. Short-term debt also includes $18 million of scheduled term loan principal repayments over the next twelve months. We had approximately $0.5 million of outstanding letters of credit under the agreement as of November 30, 2011.

Maturities of outstanding borrowings under the term loan as of November 30, 2011 are as follows (in thousands):

2012
$
17,539

2013
35,078

2014
70,156

2015
210,469

2016
13,154

 
$
346,396


Our debt as of November 30, 2011 also included approximately $2 million of non-interest bearing notes that were issued to the sellers of Prime Publications Limited, a company that we purchased in 2008. These notes are due upon demand and are therefore recorded in short-term debt in the consolidated balance sheets.

As of November 30, 2010, we were still operating under our 2007 amended and restated credit agreement, which had a $385 million credit facility. We also had approximately $3.9 million of non-interest bearing notes associated with the Prime acquisition as of that date.

9.
Restructuring Charges (Credits)

Net restructuring charges (credits) were $1.2 million, $9.0 million, and $(0.7) million for the years ended November 30, 2011, 2010, and 2009, respectively. The 2010 and 2011 restructuring charges are described below. The 2009 restructuring credit related to a revision of estimate from a 2008 restructuring initiative.

During the third quarter of 2010, we announced various plans to streamline operations and merge functions. As a result, we reduced our aggregate workforce by approximately 3% and consolidated several locations. The changes primarily affected the Americas and EMEA segments.
The restructuring charge that we recorded in 2010 consisted of direct and incremental costs associated with restructuring and related activities, including severance, outplacement and other employee related benefits; facility closures and relocations; and legal expenses associated with employee terminations incurred during the quarter. The entire $9.1 million restructuring charge was recorded during the third quarter of 2010, offset by a $0.1 million restructuring credit in the second quarter of 2010. Approximately $7.7 million of the charge related to our Americas segment and $1.3 million pertained to our EMEA segment, with the remainder in APAC.

In the second quarter of 2011, we recorded an additional $0.7 million of net restructuring costs in the Americas segment, which represented a revision to our third quarter 2010 estimate of cost to exit space in one of our facilities, partially offset by favorable resolution of employee severance costs. In the fourth quarter of 2011, we recorded $0.5 million of restructuring

23


charges for severance costs associated with the consolidation of positions in the EMEA segment to our recently established accounting and customer care Centers of Excellence locations.

The following table shows the 2010 and 2011 restructuring activity and provides a reconciliation of the restructuring liability as of November 30, 2011:
 
Employee
Severance and
Other
Termination
Benefits
 
Contract
Termination
Costs
 
Other
 
Total
 
(In thousands)
Balance at November 30, 2009
$

 
$

 
$

 
$

Add: Restructuring costs incurred *
8,024

 
972

 
108

 
9,104

Less: Amount paid
(6,738
)
 
(850
)
 
(61
)
 
(7,649
)
Balance at November 30, 2010
1,286

 
122

 
47

 
1,455

Add: Restructuring costs incurred
540

 

 

 
540

Revision to prior estimates
(394
)
 
1,143

 
(47
)
 
702

Less: Amount paid
(892
)
 
(1,265
)
 

 
(2,157
)
Balance at November 30, 2011
$
540

 
$

 
$

 
$
540

* Excludes $0.1 million restructuring credit as discussed above.

As of November 30, 2011, the entire remaining $0.5 million liability was in the EMEA segment and is expected to be paid in 2012.

 
10.
Acquisition-related Costs

During the year ended November 30, 2011, we incurred $8.0 million in costs to complete acquisitions and to leverage synergies from recent business combinations. As a result of these activities, we eliminated approximately 40 positions and closed one of the acquired offices. The changes only affected the Americas and EMEA segments.
The acquisition-related charges that we have recorded consist of direct and incremental costs associated with severance, outplacement, and other employee-related benefits; facility closure and other contract termination costs; and legal, investment banking, due diligence, and valuation service fees associated with the recent acquisitions that were incurred during the year ended November 30, 2011. Approximately $7.6 million of the charge related to our Americas segment and $0.4 million pertained to our EMEA segment.

The following table shows the composition of 2011 charges and provides a reconciliation of the related accrued liability as of November 30, 2011:
 
Employee
Severance and
Other
Termination
Benefits
 
Contract
Termination
Costs
 
Other
 
Total
 
(In thousands)
Balance at November 30, 2010
$

 
$

 
$

 
$

Add: Costs incurred
4,318

 
706

 
2,976

 
8,000

Less: Amount paid
(2,699
)
 
(237
)
 
(2,791
)
 
(5,727
)
Balance at November 30, 2011
$
1,619

 
$
469

 
$
185

 
$
2,273


As of November 30, 2011, the remaining $2.3 million liability was in the Americas segment, and is expected to be paid in 2012.

11.
Discontinued Operations

Effective December 31, 2009, we sold our small non-core South African business for approximately $2 million with no gain or loss on sale. The sale of this business included a building and certain intellectual property. In exchange for the sale of

24


these assets, we received two three-year notes receivable, one secured by a mortgage on the building and the second secured by a pledge on the shares of the South African company. In December 2010, we received full payment of the note receivable that was secured by a mortgage on the building.

During the fourth quarter of 2011, we discontinued operations of a small print-and-advertising business focused on a narrow, declining market. The abandonment of this business included certain intellectual property. We also discontinued a minor government-services business during that period.

Operating results of these discontinued operations for the years ended November 30, 2011, 2010, and 2009, respectively, were as follows (in thousands):
 
 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
Revenue
 
$
6,938

 
$
17,718

 
$
13,601

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Income from discontinued operations before income taxes
 
347

 
6,742

 
4,753

Tax expense
 
(221
)
 
(2,519
)
 
(1,741
)
Income from discontinued operations, net
 
$
126

 
$
4,223

 
$
3,012


12.
Income Taxes

The amounts of income from continuing operations before income taxes and noncontrolling interests by U.S. and foreign jurisdictions for the years ended November 30, 2011, 2010, and 2009, respectively, is as follows (in thousands):

 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
U.S.
$
(1,786
)
 
$
14,682

 
$
16,607

Foreign
163,770

 
158,066

 
142,746

 
$
161,984

 
$
172,748

 
$
159,353


The provision for income tax expense (benefit) from continuing operations for the years ended November 30, 2011, 2010, and 2009, respectively, is as follows (in thousands):

 
2011
 
2010
 
2009
Current:
 
 
 
 
 
U.S.
$
1,988

 
$
16,348

 
$
2,571

Foreign
23,974

 
25,516

 
15,652

State
2,416

 
3,066

 
3,422

Total current
28,378

 
44,930

 
21,645

Deferred: