IMMR » Topics » Third-party validation studies may not demonstrate all the benefits of our medical training simulators, which could affect customer motivation to buy.

These excerpts taken from the IMMR 10-K filed Mar 9, 2009.
Third-party validation studies may not demonstrate all the benefits of our medical training simulators, which could affect customer motivation to buy.
 
In medical training, validation studies are generally used to confirm the usefulness of new techniques, devices, and training methods. For medical training simulators, several levels of validation are generally tested: content, concurrent, construct, and predictive. A validation study performed by a third party, such as a hospital, a teaching institution, or even an individual healthcare professional, could result in showing little or no benefit for one or more types of validation for our medical training simulators. Such validation study results published in medical journals could impact the willingness of customers to buy our training simulators, especially new simulators that have not previously been validated. In addition, customers may be reluctant to purchase these products if no studies have been published or until a favorable study has been published, which would negatively impact our revenues from sales of these products.


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Medical licensing and certification authorities may not recommend or require use of our technologies for training and/or testing purposes and certain legislation that may encourage the use of simulators may not become law, significantly slowing or inhibiting the market penetration of our medical simulation technologies.
 
Several key medical certification bodies, including the American Board of Internal Medicine (“ABIM”), the American Board of Surgery (“ABS”), and the American College of Cardiology (“ACC”), have great influence in recommending particular medical methodologies, including medical training and testing methodologies, for use by medical professionals. In the event that the ABIM and the ACC, as well as other, similar bodies, do not endorse medical simulation products in general, or our products in particular, as a training and/or testing tool, and in addition in the event that the Enhancing Simulation Act of 2009 does not pass into law, market penetration for our products in the medical market could be significantly and adversely affected.
 
Third-party validation studies may not demonstrate all the benefits of our medical training simulators, which could affect customer motivation to buy.
 
In medical training, validation studies are generally used to confirm the usefulness of new techniques, devices, and training methods. For medical training simulators, several levels of validation are generally tested: content, concurrent, construct, and predictive. A validation study performed by a third party, such as a hospital, a teaching institution, or even an individual healthcare professional, could result in showing little or no benefit for one or more types of validation for our medical training simulators. Such validation study results published in medical journals could impact the willingness of customers to buy our training simulators, especially new simulators that have not previously been validated. In addition, customers may be reluctant to purchase these products if no studies have been published or until a favorable study has been published, which would negatively impact our revenues from sales of these products.


21


Table of Contents

Medical licensing and certification authorities may not recommend or require use of our technologies for training and/or testing purposes and certain legislation that may encourage the use of simulators may not become law, significantly slowing or inhibiting the market penetration of our medical simulation technologies.
 
Several key medical certification bodies, including the American Board of Internal Medicine (“ABIM”), the American Board of Surgery (“ABS”), and the American College of Cardiology (“ACC”), have great influence in recommending particular medical methodologies, including medical training and testing methodologies, for use by medical professionals. In the event that the ABIM and the ACC, as well as other, similar bodies, do not endorse medical simulation products in general, or our products in particular, as a training and/or testing tool, and in addition in the event that the Enhancing Simulation Act of 2009 does not pass into law, market penetration for our products in the medical market could be significantly and adversely affected.
 
Third-party validation studies may not demonstrate all the benefits of our medical training simulators, which could affect customer motivation to buy.
 
In medical training, validation studies are generally used to confirm the usefulness of new techniques, devices, and training methods. For medical training simulators, several levels of validation are generally tested: content, concurrent, construct, and predictive. A validation study performed by a third party, such as a hospital, a teaching institution, or even an individual healthcare professional, could result in showing little or no benefit for one or more types of validation for our medical training simulators. Such validation study results published in medical journals could impact the willingness of customers to buy our training simulators, especially new simulators that have not previously been validated. In addition, customers may be reluctant to purchase these products if no studies have been published or until a favorable study has been published, which would negatively impact our revenues from sales of these products.


21


Table of Contents

Medical licensing and certification authorities may not recommend or require use of our technologies for training and/or testing purposes and certain legislation that may encourage the use of simulators may not become law, significantly slowing or inhibiting the market penetration of our medical simulation technologies.
 
Several key medical certification bodies, including the American Board of Internal Medicine (“ABIM”), the American Board of Surgery (“ABS”), and the American College of Cardiology (“ACC”), have great influence in recommending particular medical methodologies, including medical training and testing methodologies, for use by medical professionals. In the event that the ABIM and the ACC, as well as other, similar bodies, do not endorse medical simulation products in general, or our products in particular, as a training and/or testing tool, and in addition in the event that the Enhancing Simulation Act of 2009 does not pass into law, market penetration for our products in the medical market could be significantly and adversely affected.
 
Third-party
validation studies may not demonstrate all the benefits of our
medical training simulators, which could affect customer
motivation to buy.



 



In medical training, validation studies are generally used to
confirm the usefulness of new techniques, devices, and training
methods. For medical training simulators, several levels of
validation are generally tested: content, concurrent, construct,
and predictive. A validation study performed by a third party,
such as a hospital, a teaching institution, or even an
individual healthcare professional, could result in showing
little or no benefit for one or more types of validation for our
medical training simulators. Such validation study results
published in medical journals could impact the willingness of
customers to buy our training simulators, especially new
simulators that have not previously been validated. In addition,
customers may be reluctant to purchase these products if no
studies have been published or until a favorable study has been
published, which would negatively impact our revenues from sales
of these products.





21





Table of Contents







Medical
licensing and certification authorities may not recommend or
require use of our technologies for training and/or testing
purposes and certain legislation that may encourage the use of
simulators may not become law, significantly slowing or
inhibiting the market penetration of our medical simulation
technologies.



 



Several key medical certification bodies, including the American
Board of Internal Medicine (“ABIM”), the American
Board of Surgery (“ABS”), and the American College of
Cardiology (“ACC”), have great influence in
recommending particular medical methodologies, including medical
training and testing methodologies, for use by medical
professionals. In the event that the ABIM and the ACC, as well
as other, similar bodies, do not endorse medical simulation
products in general, or our products in particular, as a
training
and/or
testing tool, and in addition in the event that the Enhancing
Simulation Act of 2009 does not pass into law, market
penetration for our products in the medical market could be
significantly and adversely affected.


 




Third-party
validation studies may not demonstrate all the benefits of our
medical training simulators, which could affect customer
motivation to buy.



 



In medical training, validation studies are generally used to
confirm the usefulness of new techniques, devices, and training
methods. For medical training simulators, several levels of
validation are generally tested: content, concurrent, construct,
and predictive. A validation study performed by a third party,
such as a hospital, a teaching institution, or even an
individual healthcare professional, could result in showing
little or no benefit for one or more types of validation for our
medical training simulators. Such validation study results
published in medical journals could impact the willingness of
customers to buy our training simulators, especially new
simulators that have not previously been validated. In addition,
customers may be reluctant to purchase these products if no
studies have been published or until a favorable study has been
published, which would negatively impact our revenues from sales
of these products.





21





Table of Contents







Medical
licensing and certification authorities may not recommend or
require use of our technologies for training and/or testing
purposes and certain legislation that may encourage the use of
simulators may not become law, significantly slowing or
inhibiting the market penetration of our medical simulation
technologies.



 



Several key medical certification bodies, including the American
Board of Internal Medicine (“ABIM”), the American
Board of Surgery (“ABS”), and the American College of
Cardiology (“ACC”), have great influence in
recommending particular medical methodologies, including medical
training and testing methodologies, for use by medical
professionals. In the event that the ABIM and the ACC, as well
as other, similar bodies, do not endorse medical simulation
products in general, or our products in particular, as a
training
and/or
testing tool, and in addition in the event that the Enhancing
Simulation Act of 2009 does not pass into law, market
penetration for our products in the medical market could be
significantly and adversely affected.


 




Third-party
validation studies may not demonstrate all the benefits of our
medical training simulators, which could affect customer
motivation to buy.



 



In medical training, validation studies are generally used to
confirm the usefulness of new techniques, devices, and training
methods. For medical training simulators, several levels of
validation are generally tested: content, concurrent, construct,
and predictive. A validation study performed by a third party,
such as a hospital, a teaching institution, or even an
individual healthcare professional, could result in showing
little or no benefit for one or more types of validation for our
medical training simulators. Such validation study results
published in medical journals could impact the willingness of
customers to buy our training simulators, especially new
simulators that have not previously been validated. In addition,
customers may be reluctant to purchase these products if no
studies have been published or until a favorable study has been
published, which would negatively impact our revenues from sales
of these products.





21





Table of Contents







Medical
licensing and certification authorities may not recommend or
require use of our technologies for training and/or testing
purposes and certain legislation that may encourage the use of
simulators may not become law, significantly slowing or
inhibiting the market penetration of our medical simulation
technologies.



 



Several key medical certification bodies, including the American
Board of Internal Medicine (“ABIM”), the American
Board of Surgery (“ABS”), and the American College of
Cardiology (“ACC”), have great influence in
recommending particular medical methodologies, including medical
training and testing methodologies, for use by medical
professionals. In the event that the ABIM and the ACC, as well
as other, similar bodies, do not endorse medical simulation
products in general, or our products in particular, as a
training
and/or
testing tool, and in addition in the event that the Enhancing
Simulation Act of 2009 does not pass into law, market
penetration for our products in the medical market could be
significantly and adversely affected.


 




These excerpts taken from the IMMR 10-K filed Mar 17, 2008.
Third-party validation studies may not demonstrate all the benefits of our medical training simulators, which could affect customer motivation to buy.
 
In medical training, validation studies are generally used to confirm the usefulness of new techniques, devices, and training methods. For medical training simulators, several levels of validation are generally tested: content, concurrent, construct, and predictive. A validation study performed by a third party, such as a hospital, a teaching institution, or even an individual healthcare professional, could result in showing little or no benefit for one or more types of validation for our medical training simulators. Such validation study results published in medical journals could impact the willingness of customers to buy our training simulators, especially new simulators that have not previously been validated. Due to the time generally required to complete and publish additional validation studies (usually more than a year), the negative impact on sales revenue could be significant.
 
Third-party
validation studies may not demonstrate all the benefits of our
medical training simulators, which could affect customer
motivation to buy.



 



In medical training, validation studies are generally used to
confirm the usefulness of new techniques, devices, and training
methods. For medical training simulators, several levels of
validation are generally tested: content, concurrent, construct,
and predictive. A validation study performed by a third party,
such as a hospital, a teaching institution, or even an
individual healthcare professional, could result in showing
little or no benefit for one or more types of validation for our
medical training simulators. Such validation study results
published in medical journals could impact the willingness of
customers to buy our training simulators, especially new
simulators that have not previously been validated. Due to the
time generally required to complete and publish additional
validation studies (usually more than a year), the negative
impact on sales revenue could be significant.


 




This excerpt taken from the IMMR 10-K filed Mar 16, 2007.
Third-party validation studies may not demonstrate all the benefits of our medical training simulators, which could affect customer motivation to buy.
 
In medical training, validation studies are generally used to confirm the usefulness of new techniques, devices, and training methods. For medical training simulators, several levels of validation are generally tested: content, concurrent, construct, and predictive. A validation study performed by a third party, such as a hospital, a teaching institution, or even an individual healthcare professional, could result in showing little or no benefit for one or more types of validation for our medical training simulators. Such validation study results published in medical journals could impact the willingness of customers to buy our training simulators, especially new simulators that have not


27


Table of Contents

previously been validated. Due to the time generally required to complete and publish additional validation studies (usually more than a year), the negative impact on sales revenue could be significant.
 
This excerpt taken from the IMMR 10-K filed Mar 10, 2006.
Third-party validation studies may not demonstrate all the benefits of our medical training simulators, which could affect customer motivation to buy.
 
In medical training, validation studies are generally used to confirm the usefulness of new techniques, devices, and training methods. For medical training simulators, several levels of validation are generally tested: content, concurrent, construct, and predictive. A validation study performed by a third party, such as a hospital, a teaching institution, or even an individual healthcare professional, could result in showing little or no benefit for one or more types of validation for our medical training simulators. Such validation study results published in medical journals could impact the willingness of customers to buy our training simulators, especially new simulators that have not previously been validated. Due to the time generally required to complete and publish additional validation studies (often more than a year), the negative impact on sales revenue could be significant.
 
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