INFA » Topics » If we do not compete effectively with companies selling data integration products, our revenues may not grow and could decline.

These excerpts taken from the INFA 10-K filed Feb 28, 2008.
If we do not compete effectively with companies selling data integration products, our revenues may not grow and could decline.
 
The market for our products is highly competitive, quickly evolving, and subject to rapidly changing technology. In addition, consolidation among vendors in the software industry continues at a rapid pace. Our competition consists of hand-coded, custom-built data integration solutions developed in-house by various companies in the industry segments that we target, as well as other vendors of integration software products, including Ab Initio, Business Objects (which acquired FirstLogic and was recently acquired by SAP), IBM (which acquired Ascential Software, DataMirror and Cognos), Oracle (which acquired Sunopsis, Hyperion Solutions and Siebel and recently entered into an agreement to acquire BEA Systems), SAS Institute, and certain other privately held companies. In the past, we have competed with business intelligence vendors that currently offer, or may develop, products with functionalities that compete with our products, such as Business Objects, and to a lesser degree, Cognos, and certain privately held companies. We also compete against certain database and enterprise application vendors, which offer products that typically operate specifically with these competitors’ proprietary databases. Such competitors include IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, and SAP. With regard to Data Quality, we compete against Business Objects, Trillium (which is part of Harte-Hanks), SAS Institute, as well as various other privately held companies. Many of these competitors have longer operating histories, substantially greater financial, technical, marketing, or other resources, or greater name recognition than we do. Our competitors may be able to respond more quickly than we can to new or emerging technologies and changes in customer requirements. Our current and potential competitors may develop and market new technologies that render our existing or future products obsolete, unmarketable, or less competitive.
 
We believe we currently compete on the basis of the breadth and depth of our products’ functionality, as well as on the basis of price. We may have difficulty competing on the basis of price in circumstances where our competitors develop and


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market products with similar or superior functionality and pursue an aggressive pricing strategy or bundle data integration technology at no cost to the customer or at deeply discounted prices. These difficulties may increase as larger companies target the data integration market. As a result, increased competition and bundling strategies could seriously impede our ability to sell additional products and services on terms favorable to us.
 
Our current and potential competitors may make strategic acquisitions, consolidate their operations, or establish cooperative relationships among themselves or with other solution providers, thereby increasing their ability to provide a broader suite of software products or solutions and more effectively address the needs of our prospective customers. Such acquisitions could cause customers to defer their purchasing decisions. Our current and potential competitors may establish or strengthen cooperative relationships with our current or future strategic partners, thereby limiting our ability to sell products through these channels. If any of this were to occur, our ability to market and sell our software products would be impaired. In addition, competitive pressures could reduce our market share or require us to reduce our prices, either of which could harm our business, results of operations, and financial condition.
 
If we
do not compete effectively with companies selling data
integration products, our revenues may not grow and could
decline.



 



The market for our products is highly competitive, quickly
evolving, and subject to rapidly changing technology. In
addition, consolidation among vendors in the software industry
continues at a rapid pace. Our competition consists of
hand-coded, custom-built data integration solutions developed
in-house by various companies in the industry segments that we
target, as well as other vendors of integration software
products, including Ab Initio, Business Objects (which acquired
FirstLogic and was recently acquired by SAP), IBM (which
acquired Ascential Software, DataMirror and Cognos), Oracle
(which acquired Sunopsis, Hyperion Solutions and Siebel and
recently entered into an agreement to acquire BEA Systems), SAS
Institute, and certain other privately held companies. In the
past, we have competed with business intelligence vendors that
currently offer, or may develop, products with functionalities
that compete with our products, such as Business Objects, and to
a lesser degree, Cognos, and certain privately held companies.
We also compete against certain database and enterprise
application vendors, which offer products that typically operate
specifically with these competitors’ proprietary databases.
Such competitors include IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, and SAP. With
regard to Data Quality, we compete against Business Objects,
Trillium (which is part of
Harte-Hanks),
SAS Institute, as well as various other privately held
companies. Many of these competitors have longer operating
histories, substantially greater financial, technical,
marketing, or other resources, or greater name recognition than
we do. Our competitors may be able to respond more quickly than
we can to new or emerging technologies and changes in customer
requirements. Our current and potential competitors may develop
and market new technologies that render our existing or future
products obsolete, unmarketable, or less competitive.


 



We believe we currently compete on the basis of the breadth and
depth of our products’ functionality, as well as on the
basis of price. We may have difficulty competing on the basis of
price in circumstances where our competitors develop and





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market products with similar or superior functionality and
pursue an aggressive pricing strategy or bundle data integration
technology at no cost to the customer or at deeply discounted
prices. These difficulties may increase as larger companies
target the data integration market. As a result, increased
competition and bundling strategies could seriously impede our
ability to sell additional products and services on terms
favorable to us.


 



Our current and potential competitors may make strategic
acquisitions, consolidate their operations, or establish
cooperative relationships among themselves or with other
solution providers, thereby increasing their ability to provide
a broader suite of software products or solutions and more
effectively address the needs of our prospective customers. Such
acquisitions could cause customers to defer their purchasing
decisions. Our current and potential competitors may establish
or strengthen cooperative relationships with our current or
future strategic partners, thereby limiting our ability to sell
products through these channels. If any of this were to occur,
our ability to market and sell our software products would be
impaired. In addition, competitive pressures could reduce our
market share or require us to reduce our prices, either of which
could harm our business, results of operations, and financial
condition.


 




This excerpt taken from the INFA 10-K filed Feb 28, 2007.
If we do not compete effectively with companies selling data integration products, our revenues may not grow and could decline.
 
The market for our products is highly competitive, quickly evolving, and subject to rapidly-changing technology. Our competition consists of hand-coded, custom-built data integration solutions developed in-house by various companies in the industry segments that we target, as well as other vendors of integration software products, including Ab Initio, Business Objects (which acquired FirstLogic), Embarcadero Technologies, IBM (which acquired Ascential Software), Oracle (which acquired Sunopsis), SAS Institute, and certain other privately held companies. In the past, we have competed with business intelligence vendors that currently offer, or may develop, products with functionalities that compete with our products, such as Business Objects, and to a lesser degree, Cognos and certain privately held companies. We also compete against certain database and enterprise application vendors, which offer products that typically operate specifically with these competitors’ proprietary databases. Such competitors include IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, and SAP. Many of these competitors have longer operating histories, substantially greater financial, technical, marketing, or other resources, or greater name recognition than we do. Our competitors may be able to respond more quickly than we can to new or emerging technologies and changes in customer requirements. Our current and potential competitors may develop and market new technologies that render our existing or future products obsolete, unmarketable, or less competitive.
 
We believe we currently compete on the basis of the breadth and depth of our products’ functionality, as well as on the basis of price. We may have difficulty competing on the basis of price in circumstances where our competitors develop and market products with similar or superior functionality and pursue an aggressive pricing strategy or bundle data integration technology at no cost to the customer or at deeply discounted prices. These difficulties may increase as larger companies target


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the data integration market. As a result, increased competition and bundling strategies could seriously impede our ability to sell additional products and services on terms favorable to us.
 
Our current and potential competitors may make strategic acquisitions, consolidate their operations, or establish cooperative relationships among themselves or with other solution providers, thereby increasing their ability to provide a broader suite of software products or solutions and more effectively address the needs of our prospective customers. Such acquisitions could cause customers to defer their purchasing decisions. Our current and potential competitors may establish or strengthen cooperative relationships with our current or future strategic partners, thereby limiting our ability to sell products through these channels. If any of this were to occur, our ability to market and sell our software products would be impaired. In addition, competitive pressures could reduce our market share or require us to reduce our prices, either of which could harm our business, results of operations, and financial condition.
 
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