INFY » Topics » Restrictions on immigration may affect our ability to compete for and provide services to clients in the United States, which could hamper our growth and cause our revenues to decline.

This excerpt taken from the INFY 6-K filed Jul 28, 2005.

Restrictions on immigration may affect our ability to compete for and provide services to clients in the United States, which could hamper our growth and cause our revenues to decline.

                  The vast majority of our employees are Indian nationals. Most of our projects require a portion of the work to be completed at the client’s location. The ability of our technology professionals to work in the United States,




Europe and in other countries depends on the ability to obtain the necessary visas and work permits. As of June 30, 2005, the majority of our technology professionals in the United States held either H-1B visas (approximately 4,800 persons, not including Progeon employees or employees of our wholly owned subsidiaries), allowing the employee to remain in the United States during the term of the work permit and work as long as he or she remains an employee of the sponsoring firm, or L-1 visas (approximately 730 persons, not including Progeon employees or employees of our wholly owned subsidiaries), allowing the employee to stay in the United States only temporarily. Although there is no limit to new L-1 visas, there is a limit to the aggregate number of new H-1B visas that the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, or CIS, may approve in any government fiscal year. In 2000, the United States temporarily increased the annual limit for H-1B visas to 195,000, however, this increase expired in 2003 and the limit was returned to 65,000 annually. In November 2004, the United States Congress passed a measure that increased the number of available H-1B visas for 2004 to 85,000. This legislation also increases the annual H1-B visa quota by 20,000 visas but these visas are only available to skilled workers who possess a Master’s or higher degree from educational institutions in the United States. Further, in response to the terrorist attacks in the United States, the CIS has increased its level of scrutiny in granting new visas. This may, in the future, also lead to limits on the number of L-1 visas granted. In addition, the granting of L-1 visas precludes companies from obtaining such visas for employees with specialized knowledge: (1) if such employees will be stationed primarily at the worksite of another company in the U.S. and the employee will not be controlled and supervised by his employer, or (2) if the placement is essentially an arrangement to provide labor for hire rather than in connection with the employee’s specialized knowledge. Immigration laws in the United States may also require us to meet certain levels of compensation, and to comply with other legal requirements, including labor certifications, as a condition to obtaining or maintaining work visas for our technology professionals working in the United States.

                  Immigration laws in the United States and in other countries are subject to legislative change, as well as to variations in standards of application and enforcement due to political forces and economic conditions. It is difficult to predict the political and economic events that could affect immigration laws, or the restrictive impact they could have on obtaining or monitoring work visas for our technology professionals. Our reliance on work visas for a significant number of technology professionals makes us particularly vulnerable to such changes and variations as it affects our ability to staff projects with technology professionals who are not citizens of the country where the work is to be performed. As a result, we may not be able to obtain a sufficient number of visas for our technology professionals or may encounter delays or additional costs in obtaining or maintaining the conditions of such visas.

This excerpt taken from the INFY 20-F filed Apr 26, 2005.

Restrictions on immigration may affect our ability to compete for and provide services to clients in the United States, which could hamper our growth and cause our revenues to decline.

 

The vast majority of our employees are Indian nationals. Most of our projects require a portion of the work to be completed at the client’s location. The ability of our technology professionals to work in the United States, Europe and in other countries depends on the ability to obtain the necessary visas and work permits. As of March 31, 2005, the majority of our technology professionals in the United States held either H-1B visas (approximately 4,350 persons, not including Progeon employees or employees of our wholly owned subsidiaries), allowing the employee to remain in the United States during the term of the work permit and work as long as he or she remains an employee of the sponsoring firm, or L-1 visas (approximately 700 persons, not including Progeon employees or employees of our wholly owned subsidiaries), allowing the employee to stay in the United States only temporarily. Although there is no limit to new L-1 visas, there is a limit to the aggregate number of new H-1B visas that the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, or CIS, may approve in any government fiscal year. In 2000, the United States temporarily increased the annual limit for H-1B visas to 195,000, however, this increase expired in 2003 and the limit was returned to 65,000 annually. In November 2004, the United States Congress passed a measure that would increase the number of available H-1B visas for 2004 to 85,000. This legislation, when effective, will increase the H1-B visa quota by approximately 20,000 visas but these visas will only be available to skilled workers who possess a Master’s or higher degree from educational institutions in the United States. The increase is expected to be fully utilized and may not be extended to future years. Further, in response to the terrorist attacks in the United States, the CIS has increased its level of scrutiny in granting new visas. This may, in the future, also lead to limits on the number of L-1 visas granted. The recent 2005 Appropriations Bill further precludes foreign companies from obtaining L-1 visas for employees with specialized knowledge: (1) if such employees will be stationed primarily at the worksite of another company in the U.S. and the employee will not be controlled and supervised by his employer, or (2) if the placement is essentially an arrangement to provide labor for hire rather than in connection with the employee’s specialized knowledge. Immigration laws in the United States may also require us to meet certain levels of compensation, and to comply with other legal requirements, including labor certifications, as a condition to obtaining or maintaining work visas for our technology professionals working in the United States.

 

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Immigration laws in the United States and in other countries are subject to legislative change, as well as to variations in standards of application and enforcement due to political forces and economic conditions. It is difficult to predict the political and economic events that could affect immigration laws, or the restrictive impact they could have on obtaining or monitoring work visas for our technology professionals. Our reliance on work visas for a significant number of technology professionals makes us particularly vulnerable to such changes and variations as it affects our ability to staff projects with technology professionals who are not citizens of the country where the work is to be performed. As a result, we may not be able to obtain a sufficient number of visas for our technology professionals or may encounter delays or additional costs in obtaining or maintaining the conditions of such visas.

 

This excerpt taken from the INFY 6-K filed Feb 23, 2005.

Restrictions on immigration may affect our ability to compete for and provide services to clients in the United States, which could hamper our growth and cause our revenues to decline.

 

The vast majority of our employees are Indian nationals. Most of our projects require a portion of the work to be completed at the client’s location. The ability of our technology professionals to work in the United States, Europe and in other countries depends on the ability to obtain the necessary visas and work permits. As of December 31, 2004, the majority of our technology professionals in the United States held either H-1B visas (approximately 4,000 persons, not including Progeon employees or employees of our wholly owned subsidiaries), allowing the employee to remain in the United States during the term of the work permit and work as long as he or she remains an employee of the sponsoring firm, or L-l visas (approximately 700 persons, not including Progeon employees or employees of our wholly owned subsidiaries), allowing the employee to stay in the United States only temporarily. Although there is no limit to new L-l visas, there is a limit to the aggregate number of new H-1B visas that the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, or CIS, may approve in any government fiscal year. In 2000, the United States temporarily increased the annual limit for H-1B visas to 195,000, however, this increase expired in 2003 and the limit was returned to 65,000 annually. Further, in response to the terrorist attacks in the United States, the CIS has increased its level of scrutiny in granting new visas. This may, in the future, also lead to limits on the number of L-l visas granted. Immigration laws in the United States may also require us to meet certain levels of compensation, and to comply with other legal requirements, including labor certifications, as a condition to obtaining or maintaining work visas for our technology professionals working in the United States. The CIS announced on October 1, 2004 that it had received on the first day of the new government fiscal year sufficient applications to fill up all 65,000 visas that were available for the year. In November 2004, the United States Congress passed a measure that would increase the number of available H-1B visas for 2004 to 85,000. This legislation, which comes into effect on March 8, 2005, will increase the Hl-B visa quota by 20,000 visas but these visas would only be available to skilled workers who possess a Master’s or higher degree from educational institutions in the United States. The increase is expected to be fully utilized and may not be extended to future years.

 

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Infosys Technologies Limited

    

 

Immigration laws in the United States and in other countries are subject to legislative change, as well as to variations in standards of application and enforcement due to political forces and economic conditions. It is difficult to predict the political and economic events that could affect immigration laws, or the restrictive impact they could have on obtaining or monitoring work visas for our technology professionals. Our reliance on work visas for a significant number of technology professionals makes us particularly vulnerable to such changes and variations as it affects our ability to staff projects with technology professionals who are not citizens of the country where the work is to be performed. As a result, we may not be able to obtain a sufficient number of visas for our technology professionals or may encounter delays or additional costs in obtaining or maintaining the conditions of such visas.

 

This excerpt taken from the INFY 6-K filed Jan 18, 2005.

Restrictions on immigration may affect our ability to compete for and provide services to clients in the United States, which could hamper our growth and cause our revenues to decline.

 

The vast majority of our employees are Indian nationals. Most of our projects require a portion of the work to be completed at the client’s location. The ability of our technology professionals to work in the United States, Europe and in other countries depends on the ability to obtain the necessary visas and work permits. As of December 31, 2004, the majority of our technology professionals in the United States held either H-1B visas (approximately 4,000 persons, not including Progeon employees or employees of our wholly owned subsidiaries), allowing the employee to remain in the United States during the term of the work permit and work as long as he or she remains an employee of the sponsoring firm, or L-1 visas (approximately 700 persons, not including Progeon employees or employees of our wholly owned subsidiaries), allowing the employee to stay in the United States only temporarily. Although there is no limit to new L-1 visas, there is a limit to the aggregate number of new H-1B visas that the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, or CIS, may approve in any government fiscal year. In 2000, the United States temporarily increased the annual limit for H-1B visas to 195,000, however, this increase expired in 2003 and the limit was returned to 65,000 annually. Further, in response to the terrorist attacks in the United States, the CIS has increased its level of scrutiny in granting new visas. This may, in the future, also lead to limits on the number of L-1 visas granted. Immigration laws in the United States may also require us to meet certain levels of compensation, and to comply with other legal requirements, including labor certifications, as a condition to obtaining or maintaining work visas for our technology professionals working in the United States. The CIS announced on October 1, 2004 that it had received on the first day of the new government fiscal year sufficient applications to fill up all 65,000 visas that were available for the year. In November 2004, the United States Congress passed a measure that would increase the number of available H-1B visas for 2004 to 85,000. This legislation, which comes into effect on March 8, 2005, will increase the H1-B visa quota by 20,000 visas but these visas would only be available to skilled workers who possess a Master’s or higher degree from educational institutions in the United States. The increase is expected to be fully utilized and may not be extended to future years.

 

Immigration laws in the United States and in other countries are subject to legislative change, as well as to variations in standards of application and enforcement due to political forces and economic conditions. It is difficult to predict the political and economic events that could affect immigration laws, or the restrictive impact they could have on obtaining or monitoring work visas for our technology professionals. Our reliance on work visas for a significant number of technology professionals makes us particularly vulnerable to such changes and variations as it affects our ability to staff projects with technology professionals who are not citizens of the country where the work is to be performed. As a result, we may not be able to obtain a sufficient number of visas for our technology professionals or may encounter delays or additional costs in obtaining or maintaining the conditions of such visas.

 

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