INTC » Topics » Microprocessors

These excerpts taken from the INTC 10-K filed Feb 23, 2009.
Microprocessors
 
A microprocessor—the central processing unit (CPU) of a computer system—processes system data and controls other devices in the system, acting as the “brains” of the computer. We offer microprocessors with one or multiple processor cores designed for desktops, nettops, workstations, servers, embedded products, communications products, notebooks, netbooks, mobile Internet devices (MIDs), and consumer electronics. The following are characteristics of our microprocessors:
  •  Multi-core microprocessors contain two or more processor cores, which can enable improved multitasking and energy-efficient performance by distributing computing tasks across multiple cores.
  •  Cache is a memory that can be located directly on the microprocessor, permitting quicker access to frequently used data and instructions. Incorporating additional amounts and/or levels of cache can enable higher performance.
  •  Our microprocessors can also include integrated memory controllers, which increase the speed of data transfer from cache and system memory.


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Table of Contents

During 2008, we introduced a new microarchitecture based on our 45-nanometer (nm) Hi-k metal gate silicon process technology (latest generation Intel® Coretm microarchitecture). Microarchitecture refers to the layout, density, and logical design of a microprocessor. The latest generation Intel Core microarchitecture incorporates features designed to increase performance and energy efficiency, such as:
 
     
Feature   Performance Enhancement
Intel® QuickPath Technology
  Utilizes an integrated memory controller to allow faster memory access than a standard front side bus
Intel® Turbo Boost Technology
  Increases processor frequency when applications demand more performance
Intel® Hyper-Threading Technology
  Allows each processor core to process two software tasks or threads simultaneously
 
During 2008, we also introduced the Intel® Atomtm processor family. These low-power processors are specifically designed for embedded solutions, MIDs, consumer electronics, and two new classes of simple and affordable Internet-focused computers called netbooks and nettops.
 
Microprocessors


 



A microprocessor—the central
processing unit (CPU) of a computer system—processes system
data and controls other devices in the system, acting as the
“brains” of the computer. We offer microprocessors
with one or multiple processor cores designed for desktops,
nettops, workstations, servers, embedded products,
communications products, notebooks, netbooks, mobile Internet
devices (MIDs), and consumer electronics. The following are
characteristics of our microprocessors:





































  • 


Multi-core microprocessors contain
two or more processor cores, which can enable improved
multitasking and energy-efficient performance by distributing
computing tasks across multiple cores.

  • 


Cache is a memory that can be
located directly on the microprocessor, permitting quicker
access to frequently used data and instructions. Incorporating
additional amounts
and/or
levels of cache can enable higher performance.

  • 


Our microprocessors can also
include integrated memory controllers, which increase the speed
of data transfer from cache and system memory.






1





Table of Contents






During 2008, we introduced a new
microarchitecture based on our 45-nanometer (nm) Hi-k metal gate
silicon process technology (latest generation
Intel®

Coretm


microarchitecture). Microarchitecture refers to the layout,
density, and logical design of a microprocessor. The latest
generation Intel Core microarchitecture incorporates features
designed to increase performance and energy efficiency, such as:



 






























     

Feature

 

Performance Enhancement


Intel®

QuickPath Technology


 

Utilizes an integrated memory controller to allow faster memory
access than a standard front side bus


Intel®

Turbo Boost Technology


 

Increases processor frequency when applications demand more
performance


Intel®

Hyper-Threading Technology


 

Allows each processor core to process two software tasks or
threads simultaneously







 



During 2008, we also introduced
the
Intel®

Atomtm


processor family. These low-power processors are specifically
designed for embedded solutions, MIDs, consumer electronics, and
two new classes of simple and affordable Internet-focused
computers called netbooks and nettops.



 




Microprocessors
 
We continue to be largely dependent on the success of our microprocessor business. Our ability to compete depends on our ability to deliver new microprocessor products with improved overall performance and improved energy-efficient performance at competitive prices. Some of our microprocessor competitors, such as AMD, market software-compatible products that compete with our processors. We also face competition from companies offering rival architecture designs, such as Cell Broadband Engine Architecture developed jointly by International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), Sony Corporation, and Toshiba Corporation; Power Architecture* offered by IBM; ARM architecture developed by ARM Limited; and Scalable Processor Architecture (SPARC*) offered by Sun Microsystems, Inc. NVIDIA has developed a programming interface to attempt to expand the use of its graphics processors to accomplish general-purpose computing functions typically performed by a microprocessor in highly parallel applications.
 
The following is a list of our main microprocessor competitors by market segment:
  •  Desktop: AMD and VIA
  •  Mobile: AMD and VIA
  •  Enterprise: AMD, IBM, and Sun Microsystems
  •  Embedded: AMD, Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., and VIA
 
In addition, our Intel Atom processor family competes against processors offered by AMD and VIA, and from companies using rival architectures, such as ARM and MIPS.


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Table of Contents

Microprocessors


 



We continue to be largely
dependent on the success of our microprocessor business. Our
ability to compete depends on our ability to deliver new
microprocessor products with improved overall performance and
improved energy-efficient performance at competitive prices.
Some of our microprocessor competitors, such as AMD, market
software-compatible products that compete with our processors.
We also face competition from companies offering rival
architecture designs, such as Cell Broadband Engine Architecture
developed jointly by International Business Machines Corporation
(IBM), Sony Corporation, and Toshiba Corporation; Power
Architecture* offered by IBM; ARM architecture developed by ARM
Limited; and Scalable Processor Architecture (SPARC*) offered by
Sun Microsystems, Inc. NVIDIA has developed a programming
interface to attempt to expand the use of its graphics
processors to accomplish general-purpose computing functions
typically performed by a microprocessor in highly parallel
applications.



 



The following is a list of our
main microprocessor competitors by market segment:














































  • 


Desktop: AMD and VIA

  • 


Mobile: AMD and VIA

  • 


Enterprise: AMD, IBM, and Sun
Microsystems

  • 


Embedded: AMD, Freescale
Semiconductor, Inc., and VIA



 



In addition, our Intel Atom
processor family competes against processors offered by AMD and
VIA, and from companies using rival architectures, such as ARM
and MIPS.






11





Table of Contents







These excerpts taken from the INTC 10-K filed Feb 20, 2008.
Microprocessors
 
We continue to be largely dependent on the success of our microprocessor business. Our ability to compete depends on our ability to deliver new microprocessor products with improved overall performance and/or improved energy-efficient performance at competitive prices. Some of our microprocessor competitors, such as Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (AMD), market software-compatible products that compete with our processors. We also face competition from companies offering rival architecture designs, such as Cell Broadband Engine Architecture developed jointly by International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), Sony Corporation, and Toshiba Corporation; Power Architecture* offered by IBM; ARM architecture (Advanced RISC Machine) developed by ARM Limited; and Scalable Processor Architecture (SPARC*) offered by Sun Microsystems, Inc.
 
The following is a list of our main microprocessor competitors by market segment:
  •  Desktop: AMD and VIA
  •  Mobile: AMD and VIA
  •  Enterprise: AMD, IBM, and Sun Microsystems
  •  Embedded: AMD, Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., and VIA
 
Microprocessors


 



We continue to be largely dependent on the success of our
microprocessor business. Our ability to compete depends on our
ability to deliver new microprocessor products with improved
overall performance and/or improved energy-efficient performance
at competitive prices. Some of our microprocessor competitors,
such as Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (AMD), market
software-compatible products that compete with our processors.
We also face competition from companies offering rival
architecture designs, such as Cell Broadband Engine Architecture
developed jointly by International Business Machines Corporation
(IBM), Sony Corporation, and Toshiba Corporation; Power
Architecture* offered by IBM; ARM architecture (Advanced RISC
Machine) developed by ARM Limited; and Scalable Processor
Architecture (SPARC*) offered by Sun Microsystems, Inc.


 



The following is a list of our main microprocessor competitors
by market segment:













































  • 

Desktop: AMD and VIA
  • 

Mobile: AMD and VIA
  • 

Enterprise: AMD, IBM, and Sun Microsystems
  • 

Embedded: AMD, Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., and VIA


 




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