KOG » Topics » QEF Election

These excerpts taken from the KOG 10-K filed Mar 14, 2008.

QEF Election

        The procedure for making a QEF Election, and the U.S. federal income tax consequences of making a QEF Election, will depend on whether such QEF Election is timely. A QEF Election generally will be "timely" if it is made for the first year in a U.S. Holder's holding period for the Common Shares in which the Company is a PFIC. In this case, a U.S. Holder may make a timely QEF Election by filing the appropriate QEF Election documents with such U.S. Holder's U.S. federal income tax return for such first year. However, if the Company was a PFIC in a prior year in a U.S. Holder's holding period for the Common Shares, then in order to be treated as making a "timely" QEF Election, such U.S. Holder must elect to recognize gain (which will be taxed under the rules of Section 1291 of the Code discussed above) as if the Common Shares were sold on the qualification date for an amount equal to the fair market value of the Common Shares on the qualification date. The "qualification date" is the first day of the first taxable year in which the Company was a QEF with respect to such U.S. Holder. In addition, under very limited circumstances, a U.S. Holder may make a retroactive QEF Election if such U.S. Holder failed to file the QEF Election documents in a timely manner.

        A QEF Election will apply to the taxable year for which such QEF Election is made and to all subsequent taxable years, unless such QEF Election is invalidated or terminated or the IRS consents to revocation of such QEF Election. If a U.S. Holder makes a QEF Election and, in a subsequent taxable year, the Company ceases to be a PFIC, the QEF Election will remain in effect (although it will not be applicable) during those taxable years in which the Company is not a PFIC. Accordingly, if the Company becomes a PFIC in another subsequent taxable year, the QEF Election will be effective and the U.S. Holder will be subject to the QEF rules described above during any such subsequent taxable year in which the Company qualifies as a PFIC. In addition, the QEF Election will remain in effect (although it will not be applicable) with respect to a U.S. Holder even after such U.S. Holder disposes of all of such U.S. Holder's direct and indirect interest in the Common Shares. Accordingly, if such U.S. Holder reacquires an interest in the Company, such U.S. Holder will be subject to the QEF rules described above for each taxable year in which the Company is a PFIC.

        A U.S. Holder that makes a timely QEF Election generally will not be subject to the rules of Section 1291 of the Code discussed above. For example, a U.S. Holder that makes a timely QEF Election generally will recognize capital gain or loss on the sale or other taxable disposition of Common Shares.

        However, for each taxable year in which the Company is a PFIC, a U.S. Holder that makes a QEF Election will be subject to U.S. federal income tax on such U.S. Holder's pro rata share of (a) the net capital gain of the Company, which will be taxed as long-term capital gain to such U.S. Holder, and (b) and the ordinary earnings of the Company, which will be taxed as ordinary income to such U.S. Holder. Generally, "net capital gain" is the excess of (a) net long-term capital gain over (b) net short-term capital loss, and "ordinary earnings" are the excess of (a)"earnings and profits" over (b) net capital gain. A U.S. Holder that makes a QEF Election will be subject to U.S. federal income tax on such amounts for each taxable year in which the Company is a PFIC, regardless of whether such amounts are actually distributed to such U.S. Holder by the Company. However, a U.S. Holder that makes a QEF Election may, subject to certain limitations, elect to defer payment of current U.S. federal income tax on such amounts, subject to an interest charge. If such U.S. Holder is not a corporation, any such interest paid will be treated as "personal interest," which is not deductible.

        A U.S. Holder that makes a QEF Election generally (a) may receive a tax-free distribution from the Company to the extent that such distribution represents "earnings and profits" of the Company that were previously included in income by the U.S. Holder because of such QEF Election and (b) will adjust such U.S. Holder's tax basis in the Common Shares to reflect the amount included in income or allowed as a tax-free distribution because of such QEF Election.

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        Each U.S. Holder should consult its own tax advisor regarding the availability of, and procedure for making, a QEF Election. U.S. Holders should be aware that there can be no assurance that the Company will satisfy record keeping requirements that apply to a QEF, or that the Company will supply U.S. Holders with information that such U.S. Holders require to report under the QEF rules, in the event that the Company is a PFIC and a U.S. Holder wishes to make a QEF Election.

QEF Election



        The procedure for making a QEF Election, and the U.S. federal income tax consequences of making a QEF Election, will depend on whether such QEF Election is
timely. A QEF Election generally will be "timely" if it is made for the first year in a U.S. Holder's holding period for the Common Shares in which the Company is a PFIC. In this case, a U.S. Holder
may make a timely QEF Election by filing the appropriate QEF Election documents with such U.S. Holder's U.S. federal income tax return for such first year. However, if the Company was a PFIC in a
prior year in a U.S. Holder's holding period for the Common Shares, then in order to be treated as making a "timely" QEF Election, such U.S. Holder must elect to recognize gain (which will be taxed
under the rules of Section 1291 of the Code discussed above) as if the Common Shares were sold on the qualification date for an amount equal to the fair market value of the Common Shares on the
qualification date. The "qualification date" is the first day of the first taxable year in which the Company was a QEF with respect to such U.S. Holder. In addition, under very limited circumstances,
a U.S. Holder may make a retroactive QEF Election if such U.S. Holder failed to file the QEF Election documents in a timely manner.



        A
QEF Election will apply to the taxable year for which such QEF Election is made and to all subsequent taxable years, unless such QEF Election is invalidated or terminated or the IRS
consents to revocation of such QEF Election. If a U.S. Holder makes a QEF Election and, in a subsequent taxable year, the Company ceases to be a PFIC, the QEF Election will remain in effect (although
it will not be applicable) during those taxable years in which the Company is not a PFIC. Accordingly, if the Company becomes a PFIC in another subsequent taxable year, the QEF Election will be
effective and the U.S. Holder will be subject to the QEF rules described above during any such subsequent taxable year in which the Company qualifies as a PFIC. In addition, the QEF Election will
remain in effect (although it will not be applicable) with respect to a U.S. Holder even after such U.S. Holder disposes of all of such U.S. Holder's direct and indirect interest in the Common Shares.
Accordingly, if such U.S. Holder reacquires an interest in the Company, such U.S. Holder will be subject to the QEF rules described above for each taxable year in which the Company is a PFIC.



        A
U.S. Holder that makes a timely QEF Election generally will not be subject to the rules of Section 1291 of the Code discussed above. For example, a U.S. Holder that makes a
timely QEF Election generally will recognize capital gain or loss on the sale or other taxable disposition of Common Shares.



        However,
for each taxable year in which the Company is a PFIC, a U.S. Holder that makes a QEF Election will be subject to U.S. federal income tax on such U.S. Holder's pro rata share of
(a) the net capital gain of the Company, which will be taxed as long-term capital gain to such U.S. Holder, and (b) and the ordinary earnings of the Company, which will be
taxed as ordinary income to such U.S. Holder. Generally, "net capital gain" is the excess of (a) net long-term capital gain over (b) net short-term capital loss,
and "ordinary earnings" are the excess of (a)"earnings and profits" over (b) net capital gain. A U.S. Holder that makes a QEF Election will be subject to U.S. federal income tax on such amounts
for each taxable year in which the Company is a PFIC, regardless of whether such amounts are actually distributed to such U.S. Holder by the Company. However, a U.S. Holder that makes a QEF Election
may, subject to certain limitations, elect to defer payment of current U.S. federal income tax on such amounts, subject to an interest charge. If such U.S. Holder is not a corporation, any such
interest paid will be treated as "personal interest," which is not deductible.



        A
U.S. Holder that makes a QEF Election generally (a) may receive a tax-free distribution from the Company to the extent that such distribution represents "earnings
and profits" of the Company that were previously included in income by the U.S. Holder because of such QEF Election and (b) will adjust such U.S. Holder's tax basis in the Common Shares to
reflect the amount included in income or allowed as a tax-free distribution because of such QEF Election.



36









        Each
U.S. Holder should consult its own tax advisor regarding the availability of, and procedure for making, a QEF Election. U.S. Holders should be aware that there can be no assurance
that the Company will satisfy record keeping requirements that apply to a QEF, or that the Company will supply U.S. Holders with information that such U.S. Holders require to report under the QEF
rules, in the event that the Company is a PFIC and a U.S. Holder wishes to make a QEF Election.



This excerpt taken from the KOG 10-K filed Mar 27, 2007.

QEF Election

The procedure for making a QEF Election, and the U.S. federal income tax consequences of making a QEF Election, will depend on whether such QEF Election is timely. A QEF Election generally will be “timely” if it is made for the first year in a U.S. Holder’s holding period for the Common Shares in which the Company is a PFIC. In this case, a U.S. Holder may make a timely QEF Election by filing the appropriate QEF Election documents with such U.S. Holder’s U.S. federal income tax return for such first year. However, if the Company was a PFIC in a prior year in a U.S. Holder’s holding period for the Common Shares, then in order to be treated as making a “timely” QEF Election, such U.S. Holder must elect to recognize gain (which will be taxed under the rules of Section 1291 of the Code discussed above) as if the Common Shares were sold on the qualification date for an

 

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amount equal to the fair market value of the Common Shares on the qualification date. The “qualification date” is the first day of the first taxable year in which the Company was a QEF with respect to such U.S. Holder. In addition, under very limited circumstances, a U.S. Holder may make a retroactive QEF Election if such U.S. Holder failed to file the QEF Election documents in a timely manner.

A QEF Election will apply to the taxable year for which such QEF Election is made and to all subsequent taxable years, unless such QEF Election is invalidated or terminated or the IRS consents to revocation of such QEF Election. If a U.S. Holder makes a QEF Election and, in a subsequent taxable year, the Company ceases to be a PFIC, the QEF Election will remain in effect (although it will not be applicable) during those taxable years in which the Company is not a PFIC. Accordingly, if the Company becomes a PFIC in another subsequent taxable year, the QEF Election will be effective and the U.S. Holder will be subject to the QEF rules described above during any such subsequent taxable year in which the Company qualifies as a PFIC. In addition, the QEF Election will remain in effect (although it will not be applicable) with respect to a U.S. Holder even after such U.S. Holder disposes of all of such U.S. Holder’s direct and indirect interest in the Common Shares. Accordingly, if such U.S. Holder reacquires an interest in the Company, such U.S. Holder will be subject to the QEF rules described above for each taxable year in which the Company is a PFIC.

A U.S. Holder that makes a timely QEF Election generally will not be subject to the rules of Section 1291 of the Code discussed above. For example, a U.S. Holder that makes a timely QEF Election generally will recognize capital gain or loss on the sale or other taxable disposition of Common Shares.

However, for each taxable year in which the Company is a PFIC, a U.S. Holder that makes a QEF Election will be subject to U.S. federal income tax on such U.S. Holder’s pro rata share of (a) the net capital gain of the Company, which will be taxed as long-term capital gain to such U.S. Holder, and (b) and the ordinary earnings of the Company, which will be taxed as ordinary income to such U.S. Holder. Generally, “net capital gain” is the excess of (a) net long-term capital gain over (b) net short-term capital loss, and “ordinary earnings” are the excess of (a) ”earnings and profits” over (b) net capital gain. A U.S. Holder that makes a QEF Election will be subject to U.S. federal income tax on such amounts for each taxable year in which the Company is a PFIC, regardless of whether such amounts are actually distributed to such U.S. Holder by the Company. However, a U.S. Holder that makes a QEF Election may, subject to certain limitations, elect to defer payment of current U.S. federal income tax on such amounts, subject to an interest charge. If such U.S. Holder is not a corporation, any such interest paid will be treated as “personal interest,” which is not deductible.

A U.S. Holder that makes a QEF Election generally (a) may receive a tax-free distribution from the Company to the extent that such distribution represents “earnings and profits” of the Company that were previously included in income by the U.S. Holder because of such QEF Election and (b) will adjust such U.S. Holder’s tax basis in the Common Shares to reflect the amount included in income or allowed as a tax-free distribution because of such QEF Election.

Each U.S. Holder should consult its own tax advisor regarding the availability of, and procedure for making, a QEF Election. U.S. Holders should be aware that there can be no assurance that the Company will satisfy record keeping requirements that apply to a QEF, or that the Company will supply U.S. Holders with information that such U.S. Holders require to report under the QEF rules, in the event that the Company is a PFIC and a U.S. Holder wishes to make a QEF Election.

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