KFT » Topics » Employee Benefit Plans:

This excerpt taken from the KFT 8-K filed Nov 3, 2009.

Employee Benefit Plans:

In September 2006, new guidance was issued surrounding employers’ accounting for defined benefit pension and other postretirement plans. The new guidance requires us to measure plan assets and benefit obligations as of the balance sheet date beginning in 2008. We previously measured our non-U.S. pension plans (other than certain Canadian and French pension plans) at September 30 of each year. On December 31, 2008, we recorded an after-tax decrease of $8 million to retained earnings using the 15-month approach to proportionally allocate the transition adjustment required upon adoption of the measurement provision of the new guidance. The plan assets and benefit obligations of our pension plans and the benefit obligations of our postretirement plans are now all measured at year-end.

We provide a range of benefits to our employees and retired employees. These include pension plans, postretirement health care benefits and postemployment benefits, consisting primarily of severance. We provide pension coverage for certain employees of our non-U.S. subsidiaries through separate plans. Local statutory requirements govern many of these plans. For certain employees hired in the U.S. after January 1, 2009, we have discontinued benefits under our U.S. pension plans, and we have replaced it with an enhanced company contribution to our employee savings plan. Our U.S. and Canadian subsidiaries provide health care and other benefits to most retired employees. Local government plans generally cover health care benefits for retirees outside the U.S. and Canada. Our postemployment benefit plans cover most salaried and certain hourly employees. The cost of these plans is charged to expense over the working life of the covered employees.

These excerpts taken from the KFT 10-K filed Feb 27, 2009.

Employee Benefit Plans:

In September 2006, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued SFAS No. 158, Employers’ Accounting for Defined Benefit Pension and Other Postretirement Plans (“SFAS No. 158”). SFAS No. 158 requires us to measure plan assets and benefit obligations as of the balance sheet date beginning in 2008. We previously measured our non-U.S. pension plans (other than certain Canadian and French pension plans) at September 30 of each year. On December 31, 2008, we recorded an after-tax decrease of $8 million to retained earnings using the 15-month approach to proportionally allocate the transition adjustment required upon adoption of the measurement provision of SFAS No. 158. The plan assets and benefit obligations of our pension plans and the benefit obligations of our postretirement plans are now all measured at year-end.

We provide a range of benefits to our employees and retired employees. These include pension plans, postretirement health care benefits and postemployment benefits, consisting primarily of severance. We provide pension coverage for certain employees of our non-U.S. subsidiaries through separate plans. Local statutory requirements govern many of these plans. For certain employees hired in the U.S. after January 1, 2009, we have discontinued benefits under our U.S. pension plans, and we have replaced it with an enhanced company contribution to our employee savings plan. Our U.S. and Canadian subsidiaries provide health care and other benefits to most retired employees. Local government plans generally cover health care benefits for retirees outside the U.S. and Canada. Our postemployment benefit plans cover most salaried and certain hourly employees. The cost of these plans is charged to expense over the working life of the covered employees.

Employee Benefit Plans:

In September 2006, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued SFAS No. 158, Employers’ Accounting for Defined Benefit Pension and Other Postretirement Plans (“SFAS No. 158”). SFAS No. 158 requires us to measure plan assets and benefit obligations as of the balance sheet date beginning in 2008. We previously measured our non-U.S. pension plans (other than certain Canadian and French pension plans) at September 30 of each year. On December 31, 2008, we recorded an after-tax decrease of $8 million to retained earnings using the 15-month approach to proportionally allocate the transition adjustment required upon adoption of the measurement provision of SFAS No. 158. The plan assets and benefit obligations of our pension plans and the benefit obligations of our postretirement plans are now all measured at year-end.

We provide a range of benefits to our employees and retired employees. These include pension plans, postretirement health care benefits and postemployment benefits, consisting primarily of severance. We provide pension coverage for certain employees of our non-U.S. subsidiaries through separate plans. Local statutory requirements govern many of these plans. For certain employees hired in the U.S. after January 1, 2009, we have discontinued benefits under our U.S. pension plans, and we have replaced it with an enhanced company contribution to our employee savings plan. Our U.S. and Canadian subsidiaries provide health care and other benefits to most retired employees. Local government plans generally cover health care benefits for retirees outside the U.S. and Canada. Our postemployment benefit plans cover most salaried and certain hourly employees. The cost of these plans is charged to expense over the working life of the covered employees.

Employee Benefit Plans:

In
September 2006, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued SFAS No. 158, Employers’ Accounting for Defined Benefit Pension and Other Postretirement Plans (“SFAS No. 158”). SFAS
No. 158 requires us to measure plan assets and benefit obligations as of the balance sheet date beginning in 2008. We previously measured our non-U.S. pension plans (other than certain Canadian and French pension plans) at September 30 of
each year. On December 31, 2008, we recorded an after-tax decrease of $8 million to retained earnings using the 15-month approach to proportionally allocate the transition adjustment required upon adoption of the measurement provision of SFAS
No. 158. The plan assets and benefit obligations of our pension plans and the benefit obligations of our postretirement plans are now all measured at year-end.

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="2">We provide a range of benefits to our employees and retired employees. These include pension plans, postretirement health care benefits and postemployment benefits, consisting primarily of severance. We provide
pension coverage for certain employees of our non-U.S. subsidiaries through separate plans. Local statutory requirements govern many of these plans. For certain employees hired in the U.S. after January 1, 2009, we have discontinued benefits
under our U.S. pension plans, and we have replaced it with an enhanced company contribution to our employee savings plan. Our U.S. and Canadian subsidiaries provide health care and other benefits to most retired employees. Local government plans
generally cover health care benefits for retirees outside the U.S. and Canada. Our postemployment benefit plans cover most salaried and certain hourly employees. The cost of these plans is charged to expense over the working life of the covered
employees.

Employee Benefit Plans:

In
September 2006, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued SFAS No. 158, Employers’ Accounting for Defined Benefit Pension and Other Postretirement Plans (“SFAS No. 158”). SFAS
No. 158 requires us to measure plan assets and benefit obligations as of the balance sheet date beginning in 2008. We previously measured our non-U.S. pension plans (other than certain Canadian and French pension plans) at September 30 of
each year. On December 31, 2008, we recorded an after-tax decrease of $8 million to retained earnings using the 15-month approach to proportionally allocate the transition adjustment required upon adoption of the measurement provision of SFAS
No. 158. The plan assets and benefit obligations of our pension plans and the benefit obligations of our postretirement plans are now all measured at year-end.

FACE="Times New Roman" SIZE="2">We provide a range of benefits to our employees and retired employees. These include pension plans, postretirement health care benefits and postemployment benefits, consisting primarily of severance. We provide
pension coverage for certain employees of our non-U.S. subsidiaries through separate plans. Local statutory requirements govern many of these plans. For certain employees hired in the U.S. after January 1, 2009, we have discontinued benefits
under our U.S. pension plans, and we have replaced it with an enhanced company contribution to our employee savings plan. Our U.S. and Canadian subsidiaries provide health care and other benefits to most retired employees. Local government plans
generally cover health care benefits for retirees outside the U.S. and Canada. Our postemployment benefit plans cover most salaried and certain hourly employees. The cost of these plans is charged to expense over the working life of the covered
employees.

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