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Mondelez International, Inc. 10-Q 2014
10-Q
Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q

(Mark One)

  x QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2014

OR

 

  ¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                      to                     

Commission file number 1-16483

 

 

LOGO

Mondelēz International, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Virginia   52-2284372

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

Three Parkway North,

Deerfield, Illinois

  60015
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (847) 943-4000

Not Applicable

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer  x  

Accelerated filer  ¨

   Non-accelerated filer  ¨   Smaller reporting company  ¨
  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ¨    No  x

At July 31, 2014, there were 1,685,888,380 shares of the registrant’s Class A common stock outstanding.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

Mondelēz International, Inc.

Table of Contents

 

         Page No.  
PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION   
Item 1.  

Financial Statements (Unaudited)

  
 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Earnings
for the Three and Six Months Ended June 30, 2014 and 2013

     1   
 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Earnings
for the Three and Six Months Ended June 30, 2014 and 2013

     2   
 

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets
at June 30, 2014 and December 31, 2013

     3   
 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Equity
for the Year Ended December 31, 2013 and the
Six Months Ended June 30, 2014

     4   
 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
for the Six Months Ended June 30, 2014 and 2013

     5   
 

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

     6   
Item 2.  

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

     28   
Item 3.  

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

     57   
Item 4.  

Controls and Procedures

     57   
PART II – OTHER INFORMATION   
Item 1.  

Legal Proceedings

     59   
Item 1A.  

Risk Factors

     59   
Item 2.  

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

     60   
Item 6.  

Exhibits

     61   
Signature        62   

In this report, for all periods presented, “we,” “us,” “our,” “the Company” and “Mondelēz International” refer to Mondelēz International, Inc. and subsidiaries. References to “Common Stock” refer to our Class A common stock.

 

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Table of Contents

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1.  Financial Statements.

Mondelēz International, Inc. and Subsidiaries

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Earnings

(in millions of U.S. dollars, except per share data)

(Unaudited)

 

                                                                           
     For the Three Months Ended     For the Six Months Ended  
     June 30,     June 30,  
     2014      2013     2014      2013  

Net revenues

   $ 8,436       $ 8,595      $ 17,077       $ 17,339   

Cost of sales

     5,331         5,364        10,768         10,866   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Gross profit

     3,105         3,231        6,309         6,473   

Selling, general and administrative expenses

     2,038         2,269        4,303         4,601   

Asset impairment and exit costs

     55         48        97         92   

Gains on acquisition and divestitures, net

             (6             (28

Amortization of intangibles

     55         55        109         109   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Operating income

     957         865        1,800         1,699   

Interest and other expense, net

     224         235        944         514   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Earnings before income taxes

     733         630        856         1,185   

Provision for income taxes

     91         28        64         41   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net earnings

     642         602        792         1,144   

Noncontrolling interest

     20         1        7         7   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net earnings attributable to Mondelēz International

   $ 622       $ 601      $ 785       $ 1,137   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Per share data:

          

Basic earnings per share attributable to
Mondelēz International

   $ 0.37       $ 0.34      $ 0.46       $ 0.64   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Diluted earnings per share attributable to
Mondelēz International

   $ 0.36       $ 0.33      $ 0.46       $ 0.63   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Dividends declared

   $ 0.14       $ 0.13      $ 0.28       $ 0.26   

See accompanying notes to the condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

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Table of Contents

Mondelēz International, Inc. and Subsidiaries

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Earnings

(in millions of U.S. dollars)

(Unaudited)

 

                                                                           
     For the Three Months Ended     For the Six Months Ended  
     June 30,     June 30,  
     2014     2013     2014     2013  

Net earnings

   $ 642      $ 602      $ 792      $ 1,144   

Other comprehensive earnings / (losses):

        

Currency translation adjustment:

        

Translation adjustment

     373        (933     140        (1,702

Tax (expense) / benefit

     (9     7        (3     (30

Pension and other benefits:

        

Net actuarial gain / (loss) arising during period

     (6     (9            (3

Reclassification of (gains) / losses into
net earnings:

        

Amortization of experience losses and
prior service costs

     35        47        69        97   

Settlement losses

     9        2        16        5   

Tax (expense) / benefit

     (8     (9     (21     (26

Derivatives accounted for as hedges:

        

Net derivative gains / (losses)

     (56     92        (112     123   

Reclassification of (gains) / losses into
net earnings

     (2     22        (4     45   

Tax (expense) / benefit

     20        (42     43        (58
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total other comprehensive earnings / (losses)

     356        (823     128        (1,549

Comprehensive earnings / (losses)

     998        (221     920        (405

less: Comprehensive earnings / (losses)
attributable to noncontrolling interests

     20        1        6          
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Comprehensive earnings / (losses)
attributable to Mondelēz International

   $ 978      $ (222   $ 914      $ (405
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

See accompanying notes to the condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

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Table of Contents

Mondelēz International, Inc. and Subsidiaries

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets

(in millions of U.S. dollars, except share data)

(Unaudited)

 

                                     
     June 30,     December 31,  
     2014     2013  

ASSETS

    

Cash and cash equivalents

   $            2,132      $            2,664   

Receivables (net of allowances of $77 in 2014 and $86 in 2013)

     5,533        5,403   

Inventories, net

     4,088        3,743   

Deferred income taxes

     570        517   

Other current assets

     777        889   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

     13,100        13,216   

Property, plant and equipment, net

     10,483        10,247   

Goodwill

     25,527        25,597   

Intangible assets, net

     22,066        21,994   

Prepaid pension assets

     58        54   

Other assets

     1,446        1,449   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

TOTAL ASSETS

   $ 72,680      $ 72,557   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

LIABILITIES

    

Short-term borrowings

   $ 2,044      $ 1,636   

Current portion of long-term debt

     2,242        1,003   

Accounts payable

     5,303        5,345   

Accrued marketing

     1,938        2,318   

Accrued employment costs

     948        1,043   

Other current liabilities

     2,440        3,051   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

     14,915        14,396   

Long-term debt

     14,255        14,482   

Deferred income taxes

     6,086        6,282   

Accrued pension costs

     1,869        1,962   

Accrued postretirement health care costs

     426        412   

Other liabilities

     2,722        2,491   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

TOTAL LIABILITIES

     40,273        40,025   

Commitments and Contingencies (Note 12)

    

EQUITY

    

Common Stock, no par value (1,996,537,778 shares issued in 2014 and 2013)

              

Additional paid-in capital

     31,583        31,396   

Retained earnings

     13,666        13,419   

Accumulated other comprehensive losses

     (2,760     (2,889

Treasury stock, at cost (309,616,525 shares at June 30, 2014 and
291,141,184 shares at December 31, 2013)

     (10,221     (9,553
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Mondelēz International Shareholders’ Equity

     32,268        32,373   

Noncontrolling interest

     139        159   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

TOTAL EQUITY

     32,407        32,532   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

   $ 72,680      $ 72,557   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

See accompanying notes to the condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

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Table of Contents

Mondelēz International, Inc. and Subsidiaries

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Equity

(in millions of U.S. dollars, except per share data)

(Unaudited)

 

                                                                                                                                    
     Mondelēz International Shareholders’ Equity                
     Common
Stock
     Additional
Paid-in
Capital
     Retained
Earnings
     Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Earnings /
(Losses)
     Treasury
Stock
     Noncontrolling
Interest
     Total
Equity
 

Balances at January 1, 2013

   $       $ 31,548       $ 10,551       $ (2,666    $ (7,157    $ 140       $ 32,416   

Comprehensive earnings / (losses):

                    

Net earnings

                     3,915                         20         3,935   

Other comprehensive losses,
net of income taxes

                             (223                      (223

Exercise of stock options and issuance of other stock awards

             10         (97              343                 256   

Common Stock repurchased

             (161                      (2,739         (2,900

Cash dividends declared
($0.54 per share)

                     (950                              (950

Dividends paid on noncontrolling interest and other activities

             (1                              (1      (2
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Balances at December 31, 2013

   $       $ 31,396       $ 13,419       $ (2,889    $ (9,553    $ 159       $ 32,532   

Comprehensive earnings / (losses):

                    

Net earnings

                     785                         7         792   

Other comprehensive losses,
net of income taxes

                             129                 (1      128   

Exercise of stock options and issuance of other stock awards

             (5      (64              244                 175   

Common Stock repurchased

             192                         (912              (720

Cash dividends declared
($0.28 per share)

                     (474                              (474

Dividends paid on noncontrolling interest

                                             (26      (26
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Balances at June 30, 2014

   $       $ 31,583       $ 13,666       $ (2,760    $ (10,221    $ 139       $ 32,407   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

See accompanying notes to the condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

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Table of Contents

Mondelēz International, Inc. and Subsidiaries

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

(in millions of U.S. dollars)

(Unaudited)

 

                                     
     For the Six Months Ended  
     June 30,  
     2014     2013  

CASH PROVIDED BY / (USED IN) OPERATING ACTIVITIES

    

Net earnings

   $ 792      $ 1,144   

Adjustments to reconcile net earnings to operating cash flows:

    

Depreciation and amortization

     533        532   

Stock-based compensation expense

     68        68   

Deferred income tax benefit

     (180     (113

Gains on acquisition and divestitures, net

            (28

Asset impairments

     27        27   

Loss on early extinguishment of debt

     493          

Other non-cash items, net

     132        102   

Change in assets and liabilities, net of acquisitions and divestitures:

    

Receivables, net

     70        25   

Inventories, net

     (353     (337

Accounts payable

     (18     (170

Other current assets

     (60     (23

Other current liabilities

     (1,095     (817

Change in pension and postretirement assets and liabilities, net

     (41     8   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

     368        418   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

CASH PROVIDED BY / (USED IN) INVESTING ACTIVITIES

    

Capital expenditures

     (724     (568

Acquisition, net of cash received

            (119

Proceeds from divestitures, net of disbursements

            48   

Cash received from Kraft Foods Group related to the Spin-Off

            55   

Other

     26        2   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash used in investing activities

     (698     (582
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

CASH PROVIDED BY / (USED IN) FINANCING ACTIVITIES

    

Issuances of commercial paper, maturities greater than 90 days

     1,956        70   

Repayments of commercial paper, maturities greater than 90 days

     (1,164       

Net (repayments) / issuances of other short-term borrowings, net

     (384     427   

Long-term debt proceeds

     3,029          

Long-term debt repaid

     (2,516     (1,749

Repurchase of Common Stock

     (720     (92

Dividends paid

     (476     (464

Other

     112        80   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net cash used in financing activities

     (163     (1,728
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents

     (39     (107
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents:

    

Increase / (decrease)

     (532     (1,999

Balance at beginning of period

     2,664        4,475   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at end of period

   $ 2,132      $ 2,476   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

See accompanying notes to the condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

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Table of Contents

Mondelēz International, Inc. and Subsidiaries

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

Note 1.  Basis of Presentation

The condensed consolidated financial statements include Mondelēz International as well as our wholly owned and majority owned subsidiaries.

Our interim condensed consolidated financial statements are unaudited. Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) have been omitted. It is management’s opinion that these financial statements include all normal and recurring adjustments necessary for a fair presentation of our financial position and operating results. Net revenues and net earnings for any interim period are not necessarily indicative of future or annual results.

We derived the condensed consolidated balance sheet data as of December 31, 2013 from audited financial statements, but do not include all disclosures required by U.S. GAAP. You should read these statements in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and related notes in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2013.

Revision of Financial Statements:

In finalizing our 2013 results, we identified certain out-of-period, non-cash, income tax-related errors in prior interim and annual periods. These errors were not material to any previously reported financial results; however, we revised our 2013 interim and prior-year financial statements and accompanying notes in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2013, to reflect these items in the appropriate periods. The net effect of the revision was to lower tax expense in years prior to 2013. The impact of the revision for the six months ended June 30, 2013 was a $47 million reduction of net earnings. The impact of the revision to fiscal years prior to 2013 was an increase in cumulative net earnings of $94 million.

We evaluated the cumulative impact of the errors on prior periods under the guidance in Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 250-10, Accounting Changes and Error Corrections, and the guidance from the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) in Staff Accounting Bulletin (“SAB”) No. 99, Materiality. We also evaluated the impact of correcting the errors through an adjustment to our financial statements under the guidance in ASC 250-10 relating to SAB No. 108, Considering the Effects of Prior Year Misstatements When Quantifying Misstatements in Current Year Financial Statements. We concluded that these errors were not material, individually or in the aggregate, to any of the prior reporting periods and, therefore, amendments of previously filed reports were not required.

The effects of the revision on the condensed consolidated financial statements for the three and six months ended June 30, 2013 are detailed below.

Condensed Consolidated Statement of Earnings

 

                                                                                                                 
    For the Three Months Ended     For the Six Months Ended  
    June 30, 2013     June 30, 2013  
    Reported     Correction     Revised     Reported     Correction     Revised  
    (in millions, except per share data)  

Provision / (benefit) for
income taxes

  $ 13      $ 15      $ 28      $ (6   $ 47      $ 41   

Net earnings

    617        (15     602        1,191        (47     1,144   

Net earnings attributable to Mondelēz International

    616        (15     601        1,184        (47     1,137   

Net earnings attributable to Mondelēz International:

           

Per share, basic

  $ 0.34      $      $ 0.34      $ 0.66      $ (0.02   $ 0.64   

Per share, diluted

  $ 0.34      $ (0.01   $ 0.33      $ 0.66      $ (0.03   $ 0.63   

 

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Table of Contents

Condensed Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Earnings

 

                                                                                                                 
    For the Three Months Ended     For the Six Months Ended  
    June 30, 2013     June 30, 2013  
    Reported     Correction     Revised     Reported     Correction     Revised  
    (in millions)  

Net earnings

  $ 617      $ (15   $ 602      $ 1,191      $ (47   $ 1,144   

Translation adjustment

    (938     5        (933     (1,709     7        (1,702

Total other comprehensive losses

    (828     5        (823     (1,556     7        (1,549

Comprehensive losses

    (211     (10     (221     (365     (40     (405

Comprehensive losses attributable to Mondelēz International

    (212     (10     (222     (365     (40     (405

Condensed Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows

 

                                                        
     For the Six Months Ended  
     June 30, 2013  
     Reported     Correction     Revised  
     (in millions)  

Net earnings

   $ 1,191      $ (47   $ 1,144   

Deferred income tax benefit

     (166     53        (113

Other non-cash items, net

     97        5        102   

Change in Other current assets

     (22     (1     (23

Change in Other current liabilities

     (807     (10     (817

Net cash provided by operating activities

     418               418   

Currency Translation and Highly Inflationary Accounting:

We translate the results of operations of our subsidiaries from multiple currencies using average exchange rates during each period and translate balance sheet accounts using exchange rates at the end of each period. We record currency translation adjustments as a component of equity and realized exchange gains and losses on transactions in earnings.

Venezuela. As prescribed by U.S. GAAP for highly inflationary economies, we have been accounting for the results of our Venezuelan subsidiaries using the U.S. dollar as the functional currency since January 1, 2010.

On February 8, 2013, the Venezuelan government announced the devaluation of the official Venezuelan bolivar exchange rate from 4.30 bolivars to 6.30 bolivars to the U.S. dollar and the elimination of the second-tier, government-regulated SITME exchange rate previously applied to value certain types of transactions. In connection with the announced changes, we recorded a $54 million currency remeasurement loss related to the devaluation of our net monetary assets in Venezuela within selling, general and administrative expenses in our Latin America segment during the three months ended March 31, 2013.

On January 24, 2014, the Venezuelan government announced the expansion of the auction-based currency transaction program referred to as SICAD or SICAD I and new profit margin controls. The application of the SICAD I rate was extended to include foreign investments and significant operating activities, including contracts for leasing and services, use and exploitation of patents and trademarks, payments of royalties and contracts for technology import and technical assistance. As of June 30, 2014, the SICAD I exchange rate was 10.60 bolivars to the U.S. dollar.

Additionally, on March 24, 2014, the Venezuelan government launched a new market-based currency exchange market, SICAD II. SICAD II may be used voluntarily to exchange bolivars into U.S. dollars. As of June 30, 2014, the SICAD II exchange rate was 49.98 bolivars to the U.S. dollar. There have been few market transactions to date and we continue to evaluate the new SICAD II market.

Our Venezuelan operations produce a wide range of biscuit, cheese & grocery, confectionery and beverage products. Based on the currency exchange developments this quarter, we have reviewed our domestic and international sourcing of goods and services and the exchange rates we believe will be applicable. We evaluated the level of primarily raw material imports that we believe would continue to be sourced in exchange for U.S. dollars converted at the official 6.30 exchange rate. Our remaining imported goods and services would primarily be valued at the SICAD I exchange rate. Imports that do not currently qualify for either the official rate or SICAD I rate may be sourced at the SICAD II rate.

 

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We believe the SICAD I rate is the most appropriate rate to use as it is most representative of the various exchange rates at which U.S. dollars are currently available to our entire Venezuelan business. While some of our net monetary assets or liabilities qualify for settlement at the official exchange rate, other operations do not, and we have utilized both the SICAD I and SICAD II auction processes. In addition, there is significant uncertainty about our ability to secure approval for transactions and the limited availability of U.S. dollars offered at the official rate. As such, we believe it is more economically representative to use the SICAD I rate than the official rate to value our net monetary assets and translate future operating results.

As of March 31, 2014, we began to apply the SICAD I exchange rate to remeasure our bolivar-denominated net monetary assets, and we began translating our Venezuelan operating results at the new rate in the second quarter of 2014. On March 31, 2014, we recognized a $142 million currency remeasurement loss within selling, general and administrative expenses of our Latin America segment as a result of revaluing our bolivar-denominated net monetary assets from the official exchange rate of 6.30 bolivars to the U.S. dollar to the then-prevailing SICAD I exchange rate of 10.70 bolivars to the U.S. dollar. For the three months ended June 30, 2014, the impact of the SICAD I rate change was not significant and there were no additional remeasurement charges recorded in operating income.

The following table sets forth net revenues for our Venezuelan operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2014 (with the first quarter translated at the 6.30 official rate prior to the remeasurement), and cash, net monetary assets and net assets of our Venezuelan subsidiaries as of June 30, 2014 (translated at 10.70 bolivars to the U.S. dollar):

 

Venezuela operations

  

Three Months Ended June 30, 2014

Net Revenues    $155 million or 1.8% of consolidated net revenue

 

     

Six Months Ended June 30, 2014

Net Revenues    $392 million or 2.3% of consolidated net revenue

 

    

As of June 30, 2014

Cash    $261 million
Net Monetary Assets    $227 million
Net Assets    $460 million

The SICAD I and II rates are variable rates. Unlike the official rate that was devalued and fixed at 6.30 bolivars to the U.S. dollar, the SICAD I rate reflects currently offered rates based on recently cleared auction transactions, and the SICAD II rate reflects voluntary market-based currency exchange transactions cleared by the Central Bank of Venezuela. As such, these rates are expected to vary over time. If any of the rates, or application of the rates to our business, were to change, we may recognize additional currency losses or gains, which could be significant.

In light of the current difficult macroeconomic environment in Venezuela, we continue to monitor and actively manage our investment and exposures in Venezuela. We have taken protective measures against currency devaluation, such as converting monetary assets into non-monetary assets that we can use in our business. However, suitable protective measures have become less available and more expensive and may not be available to offset further currency devaluation that could occur.

Argentina. On January 23, 2014, the Central Bank of Argentina adjusted its currency policy, removed its currency stabilization measures and allowed the Argentine peso exchange rate to float relative to the U.S. dollar. On that day, the value of the Argentine peso relative to the U.S. dollar fell by 15%, and from December 31, 2013 through June 30, 2014, the value of the peso declined 25%. Further volatility and declines in the exchange rate are expected. Based on the current state of Argentine currency rules and regulations, the business environment remains challenging; however, we do not expect the existing controls and restrictions to have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations. Our Argentinian operations contributed approximately $170 million, or 2.0% of consolidated net revenues, in the three months and $340 million, or 2.0% of consolidated net revenues, in the six months ended June 30, 2014. Argentina is not designated as a highly-inflationary economy at this time for accounting purposes, so we continue to record currency translation adjustments within equity and realized exchange gains and losses on transactions in earnings.

 

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New Accounting Pronouncements:

In June 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued an accounting standards update (“ASU”) to clarify the accounting for certain stock-based compensation grants in which a performance target can be achieved after a requisite service period is completed. Under this new guidance, entities are required to treat performance targets that affect vesting, and could be achieved after the requisite service period, as a performance condition. The performance targets are not reflected in estimating the grant-date fair value of the grants. Compensation cost is recognized in the period in which it becomes probable that the performance target will be achieved and should represent the compensation cost attributable to the periods for which the requisite service has already been rendered. If the performance target becomes probable of being achieved before the end of the requisite service period, the remaining unrecognized compensation cost should be recognized prospectively over the remaining requisite service period. The ASU is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2015, with early adoption permitted. We are currently assessing the impact of the new standard on our consolidated financial statements.

In May 2014, the FASB issued an accounting standards update on revenue recognition from contracts with customers. The new ASU outlines a new, single comprehensive model for companies to use in accounting for revenue. The core principle is that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to a customer in an amount that reflects the consideration the entity expects to be entitled to receive in exchange for the goods or services. The ASU also requires additional disclosure about the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows from customer contracts, including significant judgments made in recognizing revenue. The guidance is effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016, with early adoption prohibited. The ASU may be applied retrospectively to historical periods presented or as a cumulative-effect adjustment as of the date of adoption. We will adopt the new standard on January 1, 2017 and are currently assessing the impact of the new standard on our consolidated financial statements.

In April 2014, the FASB issued an accounting standards update on the reporting of discontinued operations. The guidance changed the definition of a discontinued operation to include dispositions that represent a strategic shift and have a major effect on operations and financial results. Strategic shifts may include the disposal of operations in a major geographical area, a major line of business, a major investment accounted for under the equity method or other major parts of an entity. For disposals that qualify, additional disclosures, including cash flow and balance sheet information for the discontinued operation, will be required. The guidance is effective for fiscal years and interim reporting periods beginning on or after December 15, 2014, with early adoption permitted. We will apply these provisions to prospective divestitures beginning in 2015, including the planned coffee business transactions. Please see Note 2, Divestitures and Acquisition – Planned Coffee Business Transactions, for additional information.

Note 2.  Divestitures and Acquisition

Planned Coffee Business Transactions:

On May 7, 2014, we announced that we entered into an agreement to combine our wholly owned coffee portfolio (outside of France) with D.E Master Blenders 1753 B.V. In conjunction with this transaction, Acorn Holdings B.V. (“AHBV”), owner of D.E Master Blenders 1753, has made a binding offer to receive our coffee business in France. The parties have also invited our partners in certain joint ventures to join the new company. The transactions remain subject to regulatory approvals and the completion of employee information and consultation requirements.

Upon completion of all proposed transactions, we will receive cash of approximately $5 billion and a 49 percent equity interest in the new company, to be called Jacobs Douwe Egberts. AHBV will hold a majority share in the proposed combined company and will have a majority of the seats on the board, which will be chaired by current D.E Master Blenders 1753 Chairman Bart Becht. AHBV is owned by an investor group led by JAB Holding Company s.à r.l. We will have certain minority rights.

The transactions are expected to be completed in the course of 2015, subject to limited closing conditions, including regulatory approvals. During this time, we and D.E Master Blenders 1753 will undertake consultations with all Works Councils and employee representatives as required in connection with the transactions.

Certain expenses related to readying the businesses for the planned transactions have been incurred. During the three months ended June 30, 2014, the expenses totaled $12 million, of which $7 million was recorded in interest and other expense, net and $5 million in selling, general and administrative expenses primarily within our Europe segment.

 

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Spin-Off Costs following Kraft Foods Group Divestiture:

On October 1, 2012, we completed the Spin-Off of our North American grocery business, Kraft Foods Group, Inc. (“Kraft Foods Group”), to our shareholders (the “Spin-Off”). Following the Spin-Off, Kraft Foods Group is an independent public company and we do not beneficially own any shares of Kraft Foods Group common stock. We continue to incur primarily Spin-Off transition costs, and historically we have incurred Spin-Off transaction, transition and financing and related costs (“Spin-Off Costs”) in our operating results. Within selling, general and administrative expenses, we recorded $16 million of pre-tax Spin-Off Costs in the three months and $19 million in the six months ended June 30, 2014 and $15 million in the three months and $24 million in the six months ended June 30, 2013. In fiscal year 2014, we expect to incur approximately $30 million of Spin-Off Costs related primarily to customer service and logistics, information systems and processes, as well as legal costs associated with revising intellectual property and other long-term agreements.

Acquisition and Other Divestitures:

During the three months ended June 30, 2013, we completed two divestitures within our EEMEA segment which generated cash proceeds of $48 million during the quarter and pre-tax gains of $6 million. The divestitures included a salty snacks business in Turkey and a confectionery business in South Africa. The aggregate operating results of these divestitures were not material to our condensed consolidated financial statements during the periods presented.

On February 22, 2013, we acquired the remaining interest in a biscuit operation in Morocco, which is now a wholly-owned subsidiary within our EEMEA segment. We paid net cash consideration of $119 million, consisting of $155 million purchase price net of cash acquired of $36 million. Prior to the acquisition, our interest in the operation was accounted for under the equity method. As a result of obtaining a controlling interest, we consolidated the operation and upon finalizing the valuation of the acquired net assets, as of December 31, 2013, we had recorded the fair value of acquired assets (including identifiable intangible assets of $48 million), the liabilities assumed and goodwill of $209 million. During the three months ended March 31, 2013, we also recorded a pre-tax gain of $22 million related to the remeasurement of our previously-held equity interest in the operation to fair value in accordance with U.S. GAAP and acquisition costs of $7 million in selling, general and administrative expenses and interest and other expense, net. We recorded integration charges of $2 million for the three months and $3 million for the six months ended June 30, 2014 and $1 million for the three months ended June 30, 2013 within selling, general and administrative expenses.

Note 3.  Inventories

Inventories at June 30, 2014 and December 31, 2013 were:

 

                                     
     June 30,      December 31,  
     2014      2013  
     (in millions)  

Raw materials

   $ 1,388       $ 1,165   

Finished product

     2,700         2,578   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Inventories, net

   $ 4,088       $ 3,743   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Note 4.  Property, Plant and Equipment

Property, plant and equipment at June 30, 2014 and December 31, 2013 were:

 

                                     
     June 30,     December 31,  
     2014     2013  
     (in millions)  

Land and land improvements

   $ 593      $ 617   

Buildings and building improvements

     3,328        3,270   

Machinery and equipment

     12,550        12,351   

Construction in progress

     1,593        1,376   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
     18,064        17,614   

Accumulated depreciation

     (7,581     (7,367
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Property, plant and equipment, net

   $ 10,483      $ 10,247   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

In connection with our 2012-2014 Restructuring Program (see Note 6, Restructuring Programs), we recorded non-cash asset write-downs (including accelerated depreciation and asset impairments) of $27 million in the six months ended

 

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June 30, 2014 and $23 million in the six months ended June 30, 2013. These charges were recorded in the condensed consolidated statements of earnings within asset impairment and exit costs and arose from restructuring activities further described in Note 6, Restructuring Programs – 2012-2014 Restructuring Program.

Note 5.  Goodwill and Intangible Assets

Goodwill by reportable segment at June 30, 2014 and December 31, 2013 was:

 

                                     
     June 30,
2014
     December 31,
2013
 
     (in millions)  

Latin America

   $ 1,312       $ 1,262   

Asia Pacific

     2,588         2,504   

EEMEA

     2,494         2,764   

Europe

     10,089         10,026   

North America

     9,044         9,041   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Goodwill

   $ 25,527       $ 25,597   
  

 

 

    

 

 

 

Intangible assets at June 30, 2014 and December 31, 2013 were:

 

                                     
     June 30,     December 31,  
     2014     2013  
     (in millions)  

Non-amortizable intangible assets

   $ 20,236      $ 20,067   

Amortizable intangible assets

     2,870        2,852   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
     23,106        22,919   

Accumulated amortization

     (1,040     (925
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Intangible assets, net

   $ 22,066      $ 21,994   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Non-amortizable intangible assets consist principally of brand names purchased through our acquisitions of Nabisco Holdings Corp., the Spanish and Portuguese operations of United Biscuits, the global LU biscuit business of Groupe Danone S.A. and Cadbury Limited. Amortizable intangible assets consist primarily of trademarks, customer-related intangibles, process technology, licenses and non-compete agreements. At June 30, 2014, the weighted-average life of our amortizable intangible assets was 13.3 years.

Amortization expense for intangible assets was $55 million for the three months and $109 million for the six months ended June 30, 2014 and 2013. We currently estimate annual amortization expense for each of the next five years to be approximately $217 million.

During our 2013 review of non-amortizable intangible assets, there were no impairments identified; however, we noted seven brands with $511 million of aggregate book value as of December 31, 2013 that each had a fair value in excess of book value of 10% or less. While these intangible assets passed our annual impairment testing and we believe our current plans for each of these brands will allow them to continue to not be impaired, if expectations are not met or specific valuation factors outside of our control, such as discount rates, change significantly, then a brand or brands might become impaired in the future.

Changes in goodwill and intangible assets consisted of:

 

                                     
           Intangible  
     Goodwill     Assets, at Cost  
     (in millions)  

Balance at January 1, 2014

   $ 25,597      $ 22,919   

Changes due to:

    

Currency

     (121     187   

Other

     51          
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2014

   $ 25,527      $ 23,106   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Note 6.  Restructuring Programs

2014-2018 Restructuring Program

On May 6, 2014, our Board of Directors approved a $3.5 billion restructuring program, comprised of approximately $2.5 billion in cash costs and $1 billion in non-cash costs (the “2014-2018 Restructuring Program”), and up to $2.2 billion of capital expenditures. The primary objective of the 2014-2018 Restructuring Program is to reduce our operating cost structure in both our supply chain and overhead costs. The program is intended primarily to cover severance as well as asset disposals and other manufacturing-related one-time costs. We expect to incur the majority of the program’s charges in 2015 and 2016 and to complete the program by year-end 2018.

Restructuring Costs:

We recorded restructuring charges for cash severance and related costs of $1 million in the three and six months ended June 30, 2014 within asset impairment and exit costs. At June 30, 2014, there was no restructuring liability recorded related to the 2014-2018 Restructuring Program.

Implementation Costs:

Implementation costs are directly attributable to restructuring activities; however, they do not qualify for special accounting treatment as exit or disposal activities. These costs primarily relate to reorganizing our operations and facilities in connection with our supply chain reinvention program and other identified productivity and cost saving initiatives. The costs include incremental expenses related to the closure of facilities, costs to terminate certain contracts and the simplification of our information systems. We believe the disclosure of implementation costs provides readers of our financial statements greater transparency to the total costs of our 2014-2018 Restructuring Program. Within our continuing results of operations, we recorded implementation costs of $9 million in the three and six months ended June 30, 2014. We recorded these costs within cost of sales and general corporate expense within selling, general and administrative expenses.

Restructuring and Implementation Costs in Operating Income:

During the three and six months ended June 30, 2014, we recorded restructuring and implementation costs related to the 2014-2018 Restructuring Program within operating income as follows:

 

                                                        
     For the Three and Six Months Ended June 30, 2014  
     Restructuring      Implementation         
     Costs      Costs      Total  
     (in millions)  

Latin America

   $ 1       $ 1       $ 2   

Corporate

             8         8   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 1       $ 9       $ 10   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

2012-2014 Restructuring Program

In 2012, our Board of Directors approved $1.5 billion of restructuring and related implementation costs (the “2012-2014 Restructuring Program”) reflecting primarily severance, asset disposals and other manufacturing-related one-time costs. The primary objective of the 2012-2014 Restructuring Program was to ensure that Mondelēz International and Kraft Foods Group were each set up to operate efficiently and execute on our respective business strategies upon separation and in the future.

Of the $1.5 billion of 2012-2014 Restructuring Program costs, we retained approximately $925 million and Kraft Foods Group retained the balance of the program. Since inception, we have incurred $579 million of our estimated $925 million total 2012-2014 Restructuring Program charges.

Restructuring Costs:

We recorded restructuring charges of $54 million in the three months and $96 million in the six months ended June 30, 2014 and $48 million in the three months and $88 million in the six months ended June 30, 2013 within asset impairment and exit costs.

 

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The activity for the 2012-2014 Restructuring Program liability for the six months ended June 30, 2014 was:

 

                                                        
     Severance
and related
costs
    Asset
Write-downs
    Total  
     (in millions)  

Liability balance, January 1, 2014

   $ 68      $      $ 68   

Charges

     69        27        96   

Cash spent

     (66            (66

Non-cash settlements

     3        (27     (24
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Liability balance, June 30, 2014

   $ 74      $      $ 74   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

We spent $38 million in the three months and $66 million in the six months ended June 30, 2014 in cash severance and related costs. We also recognized non-cash asset write-downs (including accelerated depreciation and asset impairments) and other non-cash settlements totaling $11 million in the three months and $24 million in the six months ended June 30, 2014. At June 30, 2014, our net restructuring liability was $74 million recorded within other current liabilities.

Implementation Costs:

Implementation costs are directly attributable to restructuring activities; however, they do not qualify for special accounting treatment as exit or disposal activities. These costs primarily include costs to reorganize our operations and facilities, the discontinuance of certain product lines and the incremental expenses related to the closure of facilities, replicating our information systems infrastructure and reorganizing costs related to our sales function. We believe the disclosure of implementation costs provides readers of our financial statements greater transparency to the total costs of our 2012-2014 Restructuring Program. Within our continuing results of operations, we recorded implementation costs of $19 million in the three months and $43 million in the six months ended June 30, 2014 and $7 million in the three months and $11 million in the six months ended June 30, 2013. We recorded these costs within cost of sales and selling, general and administrative expenses primarily within our Europe, North America and EEMEA segments.

Restructuring and Implementation Costs in Operating Income:

During the three and six months ended June 30, 2014 and 2013, we recorded restructuring and implementation costs related to the 2012-2014 Restructuring Program within operating income as follows:

 

                                                                                                                 
     For the Three Months Ended June 30, 2014     For the Six Months Ended June 30, 2014  
     Restructuring      Implementation           Restructuring      Implementation        
     Costs      Costs     Total     Costs      Costs     Total  
     (in millions)  

Latin America

   $ 3       $ 1      $ 4      $ 4       $ 1      $ 5   

Asia Pacific

     1                1        1                1   

EEMEA

     8         1        9        12         2        14   

Europe

     26         13        39        43         28        71   

North America

     16         6        22        36         13        49   

Corporate(1)

             (2     (2             (1     (1
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

   $ 54       $ 19      $ 73      $ 96       $ 43      $ 139   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                 
     For the Three Months Ended June 30, 2013     For the Six Months Ended June 30, 2013  
     Restructuring      Implementation           Restructuring      Implementation        
     Costs      Costs     Total     Costs      Costs     Total  
     (in millions)  

Latin America

   $       $      $      $       $      $   

Asia Pacific

                                            

EEMEA

     3                3        4                4   

Europe

     18         2        20        37         4        41   

North America

     26         5        31        46         7        53   

Corporate(1)

     1                1        1                1   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

   $ 48       $   7      $ 55      $ 88       $ 11      $   99   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

  (1) Includes adjustment for rounding.

 

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Note 7.  Integration Program

As a result of our combination with Cadbury Limited (formerly, Cadbury Plc or “Cadbury”) in 2010, we launched an integration program (the “Integration Program”) to combine the Cadbury operations with our operations and realize expected annual cost savings of approximately $750 million by the end of 2013 and revenue synergies from investments in distribution, marketing and product development. We achieved cost savings of approximately $800 million in 2012, a year ahead of schedule, and achieved our planned revenue synergies in 2013. Through the end of 2013, we incurred total integration charges of approximately $1.5 billion and completed incurring planned charges on the Integration Program.

We recorded reversals of Integration Program charges of $3 million in the three months and $5 million in the six months ended June 30, 2014 related to accruals no longer required. We recorded Integration Program charges of $52 million during the three months and $73 million during the six months ended June 30, 2013 in selling, general and administrative expenses within our Europe, Asia Pacific, Latin America and EEMEA segments. Changes in the remaining Integration Program liability during the six months ended June 30, 2014 were:

 

                  
     2014  
     (in millions)  

Balance at January 1

   $ 145   

Charges

     (5

Cash spent

     (42

Currency / other

     (10
  

 

 

 

Balance at June 30

   $ 88   
  

 

 

 

At June 30, 2014, $50 million of our net Integration Program liability was recorded within other current liabilities and $38 million, primarily related to leased facilities no longer in use, was recorded within other long-term liabilities.

Note 8. Debt

Short-Term Borrowings:

At June 30, 2014 and December 31, 2013, our short-term borrowings and related weighted-average interest rates consisted of:

 

                                                                           
     June 30, 2014      December 31, 2013  
     Amount      Weighted-      Amount      Weighted-  
     Outstanding      Average Rate      Outstanding      Average Rate  
     (in millions)             (in millions)         

Commercial paper

   $ 1,682         0.4%       $ 1,410         0.4%   

Bank loans

     362         6.4%         226         7.0%   
  

 

 

       

 

 

    

Total short-term borrowings                        

   $ 2,044          $ 1,636      
  

 

 

       

 

 

    

As of June 30, 2014, the commercial paper issued and outstanding had between 1 and 163 days remaining to maturity. Bank loans include borrowings on primarily uncommitted credit lines maintained by some of our international subsidiaries to meet short-term working capital needs.

Borrowing Arrangements:

We maintain a revolving credit facility for general corporate purposes, including for working capital purposes and to support our commercial paper program. Our $4.5 billion four-year senior unsecured revolving credit facility expires on October 11, 2018. The revolving credit agreement includes a covenant that we maintain a minimum shareholders’ equity of at least $24.6 billion, excluding accumulated other comprehensive earnings / (losses) and the cumulative effects of any changes in accounting principles. At June 30, 2014, we met the covenant as our shareholders’ equity as defined by the covenant was $35.0 billion. The revolving credit facility agreement also contains customary representations, covenants and events of default. There are no credit rating triggers, provisions or other financial covenants that could require us to post collateral as security. As of June 30, 2014, no amounts were drawn on the facility.

 

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Long-Term Debt:

On February 19, 2014, $500 million of our 6.75% U.S. dollar notes matured. The notes and accrued interest to date were paid with cash on hand and the issuance of commercial paper.

On February 6, 2014, we completed a cash tender offer and retired $1.56 billion of our long-term U.S. dollar debt consisting of:

   

$393 million of our 7.000% Notes due in August 2037

   

$382 million of our 6.875% Notes due in February 2038

   

$250 million of our 6.875% Notes due in January 2039

   

$535 million of our 6.500% Notes due in February 2040

We financed the repurchase of these notes, including the payment of accrued interest and other costs incurred, from net proceeds received from the $3.0 billion notes issuance on January 16, 2014. In connection with retiring this debt, during the first six months of 2014, we recorded a $493 million loss on extinguishment of debt within interest expense related to the amount we paid to retire the debt in excess of its carrying value and from recognizing unamortized discounts and deferred financing costs in earnings at the time of the debt extinguishment. The loss on extinguishment is included in long-term debt repayments in the 2014 consolidated statement of cash flows. We also recognized $2 million in interest expense related to interest rate cash flow hedges that were deferred in accumulated other comprehensive losses and recognized into earnings over the life of the debt. Upon extinguishing the debt, the deferred cash flow hedge amounts were recorded in earnings.

On January 16, 2014, we issued $3.0 billion of U.S. dollar notes, consisting of:

   

$400 million of floating rate notes that bear interest at a rate equal to three-month LIBOR plus 0.52% and mature on February 1, 2019

   

$850 million of 2.250% fixed rate notes that mature on February 1, 2019

   

$1,750 million of 4.000% fixed rate notes that mature on February 1, 2024

We received net proceeds of $2,982 million that were used to fund the February 2014 tender offer, pay down commercial paper borrowings and for other general corporate purposes. We recorded approximately $18 million of discounts and deferred financing costs, which will be amortized into interest expense over the life of the notes.

Our weighted-average interest rate on our total debt was 4.2% as of June 30, 2014, following the completion of our tender offer and debt retirement in the first quarter of 2014. Our weighted-average interest rate on our total debt as of December 31, 2013 was 4.8%, down from 5.8% as of December 31, 2012.

Fair Value of Our Debt:

The fair value of our short-term borrowings at June 30, 2014 and December 31, 2013 reflects current market interest rates and approximates the amounts we have recorded on our condensed consolidated balance sheet. The fair value of our long-term debt was determined using quoted prices in active markets (Level 1 valuation data) for the publicly traded debt obligations. At June 30, 2014, the aggregate fair value of our total debt was $20,283 million and its carrying value was $18,541 million. At December 31, 2013, the aggregate fair value of our total debt was $18,835 million and its carrying value was $17,121 million.

 

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Note 9.  Financial Instruments

Derivative instruments were recorded at fair value in the condensed consolidated balance sheets as of June 30, 2014 and December 31, 2013 as follows:

 

                                                                           
     June 30, 2014      December 31, 2013  
     Asset      Liability      Asset      Liability  
     Derivatives      Derivatives      Derivatives      Derivatives  
     (in millions)  

Derivatives designated as
hedging instruments:

           

Currency exchange contracts

   $ 5       $ 3       $ 3       $ 11   

Commodity contracts

     8         18         2         3   

Interest rate contracts

     98                 209           
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 111       $ 21       $ 214       $ 14   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Derivatives not designated as
hedging instruments:

           

Currency exchange contracts

   $ 29       $ 56       $ 84       $ 8   

Commodity contracts

     94         68         60         51   

Interest rate contracts

     60         35         64         38   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 183       $ 159       $ 208       $ 97   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total fair value

   $ 294       $ 180       $ 422       $ 111   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

We record derivative assets and liabilities on a gross basis in our condensed consolidated balance sheet. The fair value of our asset derivatives is recorded within other current assets and the fair value of our liability derivatives is recorded within other current liabilities. See our consolidated financial statements and related notes in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2013 for additional information on our risk management strategies and use of derivatives and related accounting.

The fair values (asset / (liability)) of our derivative instruments at June 30, 2014 were determined using:

 

                                                                           
           Quoted Prices in               
           Active Markets      Significant     Significant  
     Total     for Identical      Other Observable     Unobservable  
     Fair Value of Net     Assets      Inputs     Inputs  
     Asset / (Liability)     (Level 1)      (Level 2)     (Level 3)  
     (in millions)  

Currency exchange contracts

   $ (25   $       $ (25   $   

Commodity contracts

     16        1         15          

Interest rate contracts

     123                123          
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total derivatives

   $ 114      $ 1       $ 113      $   
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

The fair values (asset / (liability)) of our derivative instruments at December 31, 2013 were determined using:

 

                                                                           
            Quoted Prices in               
            Active Markets     Significant      Significant  
     Total      for Identical     Other Observable      Unobservable  
     Fair Value of Net      Assets     Inputs      Inputs  
     Asset / (Liability)      (Level 1)     (Level 2)      (Level 3)  
     (in millions)  

Currency exchange contracts

   $ 68       $      $ 68       $   

Commodity contracts

     8         (4     12           

Interest rate contracts

     235                235           
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total derivatives

   $ 311       $ (4   $ 315       $   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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Level 1 financial assets and liabilities consist of exchange-traded commodity futures and listed options. The fair value of these instruments is determined based on quoted market prices on commodity exchanges. Our exchange-traded derivatives are generally subject to master netting arrangements that permit net settlement of transactions with the same counterparty when certain criteria are met, such as in the event of default. We also are required to maintain cash margin accounts in connection with funding the settlement of our open positions and the margin requirements generally fluctuate daily based on market conditions. We have recorded margin deposits related to our exchange-traded derivatives of $26 million as of June 30, 2014 and $22 million as of December 31, 2013 within other current assets. Based on our net asset or liability positions with individual counterparties, in the event of default and immediate net settlement of all of our open positions, as of June 30, 2014, our counterparties would owe us a total of $27 million, and as of December 31, 2013, our counterparties would owe us a total of $7 million.

Level 2 financial assets and liabilities consist primarily of over-the-counter (“OTC”) currency exchange forwards, options and swaps; commodity forwards and options; and interest rate swaps. Our currency exchange contracts are valued using an income approach based on observable market forward rates less the contract rate multiplied by the notional amount. Commodity derivatives are valued using an income approach based on the observable market commodity index prices less the contract rate multiplied by the notional amount or based on pricing models that rely on market observable inputs such as commodity prices. Our calculation of the fair value of interest rate swaps is derived from a discounted cash flow analysis based on the terms of the contract and the observable market interest rate curve. Our calculation of the fair value of financial instruments takes into consideration the risk of nonperformance, including counterparty credit risk. Our OTC derivative transactions are governed by International Swap Dealers Association (“ISDA”) agreements and other standard industry contracts. Under these agreements, we do not post nor require collateral from our counterparties. The majority of our commodity OTC derivatives do not have a legal right of set-off. In connection with our OTC derivatives that could be net-settled in the event of default, assuming all parties were to fail to comply with the terms of the agreements, for derivatives we have in a net liability position, we would owe $77 million as of June 30, 2014 and $47 million as of December 31, 2013, and for derivatives we have in a net asset position, our counterparties would owe us a total of $176 million as of June 30, 2014 and $349 million as of December 31, 2013. We manage the credit risk in connection with these and all our derivatives by entering into transactions with counterparties with investment grade credit ratings, limiting the amount of exposure with each counterparty and monitoring the financial condition of our counterparties.

Derivative Volume:

The net notional values of our derivative instruments as of June 30, 2014 and December 31, 2013 were:

 

                                     
     Notional Amount  
     June 30,      December 31,  
     2014      2013  
     (in millions)  

Currency exchange contracts:

     

Intercompany loans and forecasted interest payments

   $ 6,037       $ 4,369   

Forecasted transactions

     7,533         2,565   

Commodity contracts

     802         805   

Interest rate contracts

     4,041         2,273   

Net investment hedge – euro notes

     4,450         4,466   

Net investment hedge – pound sterling notes

     1,112         1,076   

Cash Flow Hedges:

Cash flow hedge activity, net of taxes, within accumulated other comprehensive earnings / (losses) included:

 

                                                                           
    For the Three Months Ended     For the Six Months Ended  
  June 30,     June 30,  
    2014     2013     2014     2013  
    (in millions)  

Accumulated gain / (loss) at beginning of period

  $ 82      $      $ 117      $ (38

Transfer of realized losses / (gains) in fair value
to earnings

    (2     15        (3     32   

Unrealized gain / (loss) in fair value

    (36     57        (70     78   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Accumulated gain / (loss) at end of period

  $ 44      $ 72      $ 44      $ 72   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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After-tax gains / (losses) reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive earnings / (losses) into net earnings were:

 

                                                                           
     For the Three Months Ended     For the Six Months Ended  
   June 30,     June 30,  
     2014     2013     2014     2013  
     (in millions)  

Currency exchange contracts – forecasted transactions

   $ (2   $ (4   $ (4   $ (12

Commodity contracts

     4        (10     9        (19

Interest rate contracts

            (1     (2     (1
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

   $ 2      $ (15   $ 3      $ (32
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

After-tax gains / (losses) recognized in other comprehensive earnings / (losses) were:

 

                                                                           
     For the Three Months Ended     For the Six Months Ended  
   June 30,     June 30,  
     2014     2013     2014     2013  
     (in millions)  

Currency exchange contracts – forecasted transactions

   $ 5      $ (2   $ 7      $ 4   

Commodity contracts

     (8     (4     3        (8

Interest rate contracts

     (33     63        (80     82   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total

   $ (36   $ 57      $ (70   $ 78   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash flow hedge ineffectiveness and amounts excluded from effectiveness testing were not material for all periods presented.

We record pre-tax (i) gains or losses reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive earnings / (losses) into earnings, (ii) gains or losses on ineffectiveness, and (iii) gains or losses on amounts excluded from effectiveness testing in:

   

cost of sales for commodity contracts;

   

cost of sales for currency exchange contracts related to forecasted transactions; and

   

interest and other expense, net for interest rate contracts and currency exchange contracts related to intercompany loans.

Based on current market conditions, we would expect to transfer unrealized losses of $6 million (net of taxes) for commodity cash flow hedges, unrealized gains of $4 million (net of taxes) for currency cash flow hedges and unrealized losses of less than $1 million (net of taxes) for interest rate cash flow hedges to earnings during the next 12 months.

Hedge Coverage:

As of June 30, 2014, we hedged transactions forecasted to impact cash flows over the following periods:

   

commodity transactions for periods not exceeding the next 9 months;

   

interest rate transactions for periods not exceeding the next 31 years and 8 months; and

   

currency exchange transactions for periods not exceeding the next 18 months.

Fair Value Hedges:

Pre-tax gains / (losses) due to changes in fair value of our interest rate swaps and related hedged long-term debt were recorded in interest and other expense, net:

 

                                     
     For the Three and Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
     2014     2013  
     (in millions)  

Derivatives

   $ 14      $   

Borrowings

     (14       

Fair value hedge ineffectiveness and amounts excluded from effectiveness testing were not material for all periods presented.

 

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Economic Hedges:

Pre-tax gains / (losses) recorded in net earnings for economic hedges which are not designated as hedging instruments were:

 

                                                                                              
                             Location of
     For the Three Months Ended     For the Six Months Ended     Gain / (Loss)
     June 30,     June 30,     Recognized
     2014     2013     2014     2013     in Earnings
     (in millions)      

Currency exchange contracts:

          

Intercompany loans and forecasted interest payments

   $ 3      $ (17   $ 1      $ 3      Interest expense

Forecasted purchases

     (30     38        (40     26      Cost of sales

Forecasted transactions

     (9            (14          Interest expense

Forecasted transactions

     (2     4        (3     3      Selling, general and
administrative
expenses

Interest rate contracts

     1               1        (2   Interest expense

Commodity contracts

     32        17        70        34      Cost of sales
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total

   $ (5   $ 42      $ 15      $ 64     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

Hedges of Net Investments in International Operations:

After-tax gains / (losses) related to hedges of net investments in international operations in the form of euro and pound sterling-denominated debt were:

     For the Three Months Ended     For the Six Months Ended     Location of
Gain / (Loss)

Recognized  in
AOCI
     June 30,     June 30,    
     2014     2013     2014     2013    
     (in millions)      

Euro notes

   $ 5      $ (10   $      $ 10      Currency Translation

Pound sterling notes

     (19     (1     (23     43      Adjustment

Note 10. Benefit Plans

Pension Plans

Components of Net Periodic Pension Cost:

Net periodic pension cost for the three and six months ended June 30, 2014 and 2013 consisted of:

 

                                                                           
     U.S. Plans     Non-U.S. Plans  
     For the Three Months Ended June 30,  
     2014     2013     2014     2013  
     (in millions)  

Service cost

   $ 13      $ 19      $ 45      $ 43   

Interest cost

     16        15        100        88   

Expected return on plan assets

     (20     (17     (125     (107

Amortization:

        

Net loss from experience differences

     7        13        27        33   

Prior service cost

     1               1        1   

Settlement losses(1)

     4        2        5          
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net periodic pension cost

   $ 21      $ 32      $ 53      $ 58   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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     U.S. Plans     Non-U.S. Plans  
     For the Six Months Ended June 30,  
     2014     2013     2014     2013  
     (in millions)  

Service cost

   $ 28      $ 36      $ 89      $ 86   

Interest cost

     33        30        197        177   

Expected return on plan assets

     (40     (34     (248     (215

Amortization:

        

Net loss from experience differences

     15        27        54        68   

Prior service cost

     1        1        1        1   

Settlement losses(1)

     6        5        10          
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net periodic pension cost

   $ 43      $ 65      $ 103      $ 117   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

  (1) Includes settlement losses of $9 million in the three and six months ended June 30, 2013 related to employees who elected to take lump-sum payments in connection with our 2012-2014 Restructuring Program. These costs are reflected within asset impairments and exit costs on the condensed consolidated statement of earnings and within the charges for severance and related costs in Note 6, Restructuring Programs – 2012-2014 Restructuring Program. In the six months ended June 30, 2013, these were partially offset by $4 million of gains due to improvements in current market rates for routine settlement losses. 

Employer Contributions:

We make contributions to our U.S. and non-U.S. pension plans primarily to the extent that they are tax deductible and do not generate an excise tax liability. During the six months ended June 30, 2014, we contributed $5 million to our U.S. plans and $196 million to our non-U.S. plans. Based on current tax law, we plan to make further contributions of approximately $5 million to our U.S. plans and approximately $113 million to our non-U.S. plans during the remainder of 2014. However, our actual contributions may differ due to many factors, including changes in tax and other benefit laws or significant differences between expected and actual pension asset performance or interest rates.

Postretirement Benefit Plans

Net postretirement health care costs during the three and six months ended June 30, 2014 and 2013 consisted of:

 

                                                                           
     For the Three Months Ended     For the Six Months Ended  
     June 30,     June 30,  
     2014     2013     2014     2013  
     (in millions)  

Service cost

   $ 3      $ 4      $ 6      $ 8   

Interest cost

     6        4        11        9   

Amortization:

        

Net loss from experience differences

     1        3        3        6   

Prior service credit

     (2     (3     (5     (6
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net postretirement health care costs

   $ 8      $ 8      $ 15      $ 17   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Postemployment Benefit Plans

Net postemployment costs during the three and six months ended June 30, 2014 and 2013 consisted of:

 

                                                                           
     For the Three Months Ended      For the Six Months Ended  
     June 30,      June 30,  
     2014      2013      2014      2013  
     (in millions)  

Service cost

   $ 2       $ 2       $ 4       $ 4   

Interest cost

     1         2         3         3   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net postemployment costs

   $ 3       $ 4       $ 7       $ 7   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

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Note 11.  Stock Plans

On May 21, 2014, our shareholders approved the Amended and Restated 2005 Performance Incentive Plan (the “2005 Plan”). Under the amended plan, we now make grants to non-employee directors under the 2005 Plan, and we will no longer make any grants under the Amended and Restated 2006 Stock Compensation Plan for Non-Employee Directors (the “2006 Directors Plan”). We also increased the number of shares available for issuance under the 2005 Plan by 75.7 million, which includes the shares remaining available for issuance under the 2006 Directors Plan as of March 14, 2014. Under the 2005 Plan, we are now authorized to issue a maximum of 243.7 million shares of our Common Stock. We may not make any grants under the 2005 Plan after May 21, 2024. As of June 30, 2014, there were 90.1 million shares available to be granted under the 2005 Plan.

Stock Options:

In February 2014, as part of our annual equity program, we granted 9.9 million stock options to eligible employees at an exercise price of $34.17 per share. During the six months ended June 30, 2014, we granted 0.1 million of additional stock options with a weighted-average exercise price of $34.12 per share. In total, 10.0 million stock options were granted with a weighted-average exercise price of $34.16 per share. During the six months ended June 30, 2014, 5.3 million stock options, with an intrinsic value of $79.1 million, were exercised.

Restricted and Deferred Stock:

In January 2014, in connection with our long-term incentive plan, we granted 1.2 million shares of restricted and deferred stock at a market value of $34.97 per share. In February 2014, as part of our annual equity program, we granted 2.0 million shares of restricted and deferred stock to eligible employees at a market value of $34.17 per share. During the six months ended June 30, 2014, we issued 0.7 million of additional restricted and deferred shares with a weighted-average market value of $32.24 per share. In total, 3.9 million restricted and deferred shares were issued with a weighted-average market value of $34.05 per share. During the six months ended June 30, 2014, 3.9 million shares of restricted and deferred stock vested with a market value on the vesting date of $135.6 million.

Share Repurchase Program:

During 2013, our Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of $7.7 billion of our Common Stock through December 31, 2016. Repurchases under the program are determined by management and are wholly discretionary. During the six months ended June 30, 2014, we repurchased 26.0 million shares of Common Stock at an average cost of $35.13 per share, or an aggregate cost of $0.9 billion, of which $0.7 billion was paid during the first half of 2014 and $0.2 billion was prepaid in December 2013 at the inception of an accelerated share repurchase program. All share repurchases were funded through available cash and commercial paper issuances. As of June 30, 2014, we have $4.0 billion in remaining share repurchase capacity.

In December 2013, we initiated an accelerated share repurchase (“ASR”) program. On December 3, 2013, we paid $1.7 billion and received an initial delivery of 44.8 million shares of Common Stock valued at $1.5 billion. We increased treasury stock by $1.5 billion, and the remaining $0.2 billion was recorded against additional paid in capital. In May 2014, the ASR program concluded and we received an additional 5.1 million shares, valued at $0.2 billion, for a total of 49.9 million shares with an average repurchase price of $34.10 per share over the life of the ASR program. The final settlement was based on the volume-weighted average price of our Common Stock during the purchase period less a fixed per share discount. Upon conclusion of the ASR program and receipt of the remaining repurchased shares, the $0.2 billion recorded in additional paid in capital was reclassified to treasury stock.

 

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Note 12.  Commitments and Contingencies

Legal Proceedings:

We routinely are involved in legal proceedings, claims and governmental inspections or investigations (“Legal Matters”) arising in the ordinary course of our business.

A compliant and ethical corporate culture, which includes adhering to laws and industry regulations in all jurisdictions in which we do business, is integral to our success. Accordingly, after we acquired Cadbury in February 2010 we began reviewing and adjusting, as needed, Cadbury’s operations in light of applicable standards as well as our policies and practices. We initially focused on such high priority areas as food safety, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”) and antitrust. Based upon Cadbury’s pre-acquisition policies and compliance programs and our post-acquisition reviews, our preliminary findings indicated that Cadbury’s overall state of compliance was sound. Nonetheless, through our reviews, we determined that in certain jurisdictions, including India, there appeared to be facts and circumstances warranting further investigation. We are continuing our investigations in certain jurisdictions, including in India, and we continue to cooperate with governmental authorities.

As we previously disclosed, on February 1, 2011, we received a subpoena from the SEC in connection with an investigation under the FCPA, primarily related to a facility in India that we acquired in the Cadbury acquisition. The subpoena primarily requests information regarding dealings with Indian governmental agencies and officials to obtain approvals related to the operation of that facility. We are continuing to cooperate with the U.S. and Indian governments in their investigations of these matters, including through preliminary meetings with the U.S. government to discuss potential conclusion of the investigation.

On February 28, 2013, Cadbury India Limited (now known as Mondelez India Foods Limited), a subsidiary of Mondelēz International, and other parties received a show cause notice from the Indian Department of Central Excise Authority (the “Excise Authority”). The notice calls upon the parties to demonstrate why the Excise Authority should not collect approximately $46 million of unpaid excise tax as well as approximately $46 million of penalties and interest related to production at the same Indian facility. Subsequently, the Excise Authority issued another show cause notice, dated March 3, 2014, on the same issue but covering the period February to December 2013, thereby adding approximately $20 million of unpaid excise taxes as well as approximately $20 million of penalties and interest to the amount claimed by the Excise Authority. The latest notice includes an accruing claim for excise as finished products leave the facility on an ongoing basis. We believe that the decision to claim the excise tax benefit is valid and we are contesting the show cause notice through the administrative and judicial process.

In April 2013, the staff of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) advised us and Kraft Foods Group that it was investigating activities related to the trading of December 2011 wheat futures contracts that occurred prior to the Spin-Off of Kraft Foods Group. We are cooperating with the staff in its investigation. In March 2014, the staff advised us that they are prepared to recommend that the CFTC consider commencing a formal action. We are seeking to resolve this matter prior to any formal action being taken. It is not possible to predict the outcome of this matter; however, based on our Separation and Distribution Agreement with Kraft Foods Group dated as of September 27, 2012, we expect to predominantly bear any monetary penalties or other payments that the CFTC may impose.

While we cannot predict with certainty the results of any Legal Matters in which we are currently involved, we do not expect that the ultimate costs to resolve any of these Legal Matters, individually or in the aggregate, will have a material effect on our financial results.

Third-Party Guarantees:

We enter into third-party guarantees primarily to cover the long-term obligations of our vendors. As part of these transactions, we guarantee that third parties will make contractual payments or achieve performance measures. At June 30, 2014, we had no material third-party guarantees recorded on our condensed consolidated balance sheet.

 

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Note 13.  Reclassifications from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income

The components of accumulated other comprehensive earnings / (losses) attributable to Mondelēz International were:

 

                                                                           
     Currency
Translation
Adjustments
    Pension and
Other Benefits
    Derivatives
Accounted for
as Hedges
    Total  
     (in millions)  

Balances at January 1, 2014

   $ (1,414   $ (1,592   $ 117      $ (2,889

Other comprehensive earnings / (losses),
before reclassifications:

        

Currency translation adjustment(1)

     167        (6            161   

Pension and other benefits

                            

Derivatives accounted for as hedges

     (20            (112     (132

Losses / (gains) reclassified into
net earnings

            85        (4     81   

Tax (expense) / benefit

     (3     (21     43        19   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total other comprehensive
earnings / (losses)

           129   
        

 

 

 

Balances at June 30, 2014

   $ (1,270   $ (1,534   $ 44      $ (2,760
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

  (1) The condensed consolidated statement of comprehensive earnings for the six months ended June 30, 2014 includes $(1) million of currency translation adjustment attributable to noncontrolling interests.

Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive earnings / (losses) during the three and six months ended June 30, 2014 and their locations in the condensed consolidated financial statements were as follows:

 

                                                        
     For the Three     For the Six     Location of
     Months Ended     Months Ended     Gain / (Loss)
     June 30,     June 30,     Recognized
     2014     2014     in Net Earnings
     (in millions)      

Pension and other benefits:

      

Reclassification of losses / (gains) into net earnings:

      

Amortization of experience losses and
prior service costs

   $ 35      $ 69     

Settlement losses(1)

     9        16     

Tax impact

     (8     (21   Provision for income taxes

Derivatives accounted for as hedges:

      

Reclassification of losses / (gains) into net earnings:

      

Currency exchange contracts – forecasted transactions

     2        4      Cost of sales

Commodity contracts

     (4     (11   Cost of sales

Interest rate contracts

            3      Interest and other expense, net

Tax impact

     1        1      Provision for income taxes
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

Total reclassifications into net earnings, net of tax

   $ 35      $ 61     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

  (1) These items are included in the components of net periodic benefit costs disclosed in Note 10, Benefit Plans.

 

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Note 14.  Income Taxes

See Note 1, Basis of Presentation – Revision of Financial Statements, for information related to the revision of income taxes. During the three months ended June 30, 2014, as part of our ongoing remediation efforts related to the material weakness in internal controls over the accounting for income taxes, we recorded a number of out-of-period adjustments that had an immaterial benefit on the provision for income taxes for the three months ended June 30, 2014 of $5 million. The out-of-period adjustments were not material to the consolidated financial statements for any prior period.

Based on current tax laws, our estimated annual effective tax rate for 2014 is 19.6%, reflecting favorable impacts from the mix of pre-tax income in various non-U.S. tax jurisdictions, partially offset by the remeasurement of our Venezuelan net monetary assets. Our 2014 second quarter effective tax rate of 12.4% was favorably impacted by net tax benefits from $52 million of discrete one-time events, of which $37 million related to tax return to provision adjustments and $9 million related to favorable tax audit settlements and expirations of statutes of limitations in several jurisdictions. Our effective tax rate for the six months ended June 30, 2014 of 7.5% was due to net tax benefits from discrete one-time events and lower pre-tax income due to the tender-related loss on debt extinguishment and the remeasurement of the Venezuela net monetary assets. Of the discrete net tax benefits of $104 million, $60 million related to favorable tax audit settlements and expirations of statutes of limitations in several jurisdictions and $37 million related to tax return to provision adjustments.

As of the second quarter of 2013, our estimated annual effective tax rate for 2013 was 19.7%, reflecting favorable impacts from the mix of pre-tax income in various non-U.S. tax jurisdictions. Our 2013 second quarter effective tax rate of 4.4% was favorably impacted by net tax benefits from $93 million of discrete one-time events, of which $52 million related to favorable tax audit settlements and expirations of statutes of limitations in several jurisdictions and $39 million was associated with a business divestiture. Our effective tax rate for the six months ended June 30, 2013 of 3.5% was favorably impacted by net tax benefits from $186 million of discrete one-time events, of which, $132 million related to favorable tax audit settlements and expirations of statutes of limitations in several jurisdictions and $39 million was associated with a business divestiture.

Note 15.  Earnings Per Share

Basic and diluted earnings per share (“EPS”) were calculated using the following:

 

                                                                           
     For the Three Months Ended      For the Six Months Ended  
     June 30,      June 30,  
     2014      2013      2014      2013  
     (in millions, except per share data)  

Net earnings

   $ 642       $ 602       $ 792       $ 1,144   

Noncontrolling interest

     20         1         7         7   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net earnings attributable to
Mondelēz International

   $ 622       $ 601       $ 785       $ 1,137   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Weighted-average shares for basic EPS

     1,694         1,788         1,699         1,786   

Plus incremental shares from assumed
conversions of stock options and
long-term incentive plan shares

     18         15         18         14   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Weighted-average shares for diluted EPS

     1,712         1,803         1,717         1,800   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Basic earnings per share attributable to
Mondelēz International:

   $ 0.37       $ 0.34       $ 0.46       $ 0.64   

Diluted earnings per share attributable to
Mondelēz International:

   $ 0.36       $ 0.33       $ 0.46       $ 0.63   

We exclude antidilutive Mondelēz International stock options from our calculation of weighted-average shares for diluted EPS. We excluded 9.9 million antidilutive stock options for the three months and 7.3 million antidilutive stock options for the six months ended June 30, 2014 and we excluded 8.1 million antidilutive stock options for the three months and 8.6 million antidilutive stock options for the six months ended June 30, 2013.

 

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Note 16.  Segment Reporting

Our operations, management structure and segments are organized into five reportable operating segments:

   

Latin America

   

Asia Pacific

   

EEMEA

   

Europe

   

North America

We manage the operations within Latin America, Asia Pacific and EEMEA by location and Europe and North America by product category.

We use segment operating income to evaluate segment performance and allocate resources. We believe it is appropriate to disclose this measure to help investors analyze segment performance and trends. Segment operating income excludes unrealized gains and losses on hedging activities (which are a component of cost of sales), general corporate expenses (which are a component of selling, general and administrative expenses), amortization of intangibles, gains and losses on divestitures or acquisitions and acquisition-related costs (which are a component of selling, general and administrative expenses) in all periods presented. We exclude these items from segment operating income in order to provide better transparency of our segment operating results. Furthermore, we centrally manage interest and other expense, net. Accordingly, we do not present these items by segment because they are excluded from the segment profitability measure that management reviews.

Our segment net revenues and earnings were:

 

                                                                           
     For the Three Months Ended
June 30,
    For the Six Months Ended
June 30,
 
     2014     2013     2014     2013  
     (in millions)  

Net revenues:

        

Latin America

   $ 1,242      $ 1,339      $ 2,598      $ 2,737   

Asia Pacific

     1,084        1,240        2,307        2,607   

EEMEA

     1,008        1,039        1,846        1,902   

Europe

     3,379        3,273        6,936        6,731   

North America

     1,723        1,704        3,390        3,362   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net revenues

   $ 8,436      $ 8,595      $ 17,077      $ 17,339   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Earnings before income taxes:

        

Operating income:

        

Latin America

   $ 140      $ 162      $ 184      $ 254   

Asia Pacific

     111        129        299        318   

EEMEA

     146        112        210        173   

Europe

     463        369        926        775   

North America

     269        194        472        364   

Unrealized gains / (losses) on
hedging activities

     (54     24        (47     43   

General corporate expenses

     (63     (76     (135     (145

Amortization of intangibles

     (55     (55     (109     (109

Gains on acquisition and divestitures, net

            6               28   

Acquisition-related costs

                          (2
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating income

     957        865        1,800        1,699   

Interest and other expense, net

     (224     (235     (944     (514
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Earnings before income taxes

   $ 733      $ 630      $ 856      $ 1,185   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

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Items impacting our segment operating results are discussed in Note 1, Basis of Presentation, including the Venezuelan currency remeasurements, Note 2, Divestitures and Acquisition, Note 6, Restructuring Programs, and Note 7, Integration Program.

Net revenues by consumer sector were:

 

                                                                                                                 
     For the Three Months Ended June 30, 2014  
     Latin      Asia                    North         
   America      Pacific      EEMEA      Europe      America      Total  
     (in millions)  

Biscuits

   $ 333       $ 273       $ 171       $ 809       $ 1,384       $ 2,970   

Chocolate

     256         329         221         1,113         50         1,969   

Gum & Candy

     293         188         200         238         275         1,194   

Beverages

     197         137         327         848                 1,509   

Cheese & Grocery

     163         157         89         371         14         794   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total net revenues

   $ 1,242       $ 1,084       $ 1,008       $ 3,379       $ 1,723       $   8,436   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                 
     For the Three Months Ended June 30, 2013  
     Latin      Asia                    North         
   America      Pacific      EEMEA      Europe      America      Total  
     (in millions)  

Biscuits

   $ 334       $ 355       $ 174       $ 780       $ 1,349       $ 2,992   

Chocolate

     270         363         240         1,062         58         1,993   

Gum & Candy

     363         207         190         246         278         1,284   

Beverages

     212         145         353         835                 1,545   

Cheese & Grocery

     160         170         82         350         19         781   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total net revenues

   $ 1,339       $ 1,240       $ 1,039       $ 3,273       $ 1,704       $   8,595   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                 
     For the Six Months Ended June 30, 2014  
     Latin      Asia                    North         
   America      Pacific      EEMEA      Europe      America      Total  
     (in millions)  

Biscuits

   $ 660       $ 604       $ 318       $ 1,545       $ 2,711       $ 5,838   

Chocolate

     580         747         464         2,590         113         4,494   

Gum & Candy

     579         394         347