Annual Reports

  • 10-K (Sep 11, 2014)
  • 10-K (Sep 10, 2014)
  • 10-K (Sep 5, 2013)
  • 10-K (Sep 12, 2012)
  • 10-K (Sep 14, 2011)
  • 10-K (Sep 21, 2010)

 
Quarterly Reports

 
8-K

 
Other

STARRETT L S CO 10-K 2009

Documents found in this filing:

  1. 10-K
  2. Graphic
  3. Ex-21
  4. Ex-23
  5. Ex-31.A
  6. Ex-31.B
  7. Ex-32
  8. Ex-32
form10k2009.htm
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
____________
 
FORM 10-K
 
____________
 
(check one)
x
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the fiscal year ended June 27, 2009
 
OR
 
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the transition period from              to             
 
Commission File No. 1-367
 
____________
 
THE L.S. STARRETT COMPANY
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
____________
 
     
MASSACHUSETTS
 
04-1866480
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
 
     
121 CRESCENT STREET, ATHOL, MASSACHUSETTS
 
01331
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
 
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code 978-249-3551
 
____________
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
     
Title of each class
 
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Class A Common - $1.00 Per Share Par Value
 
New York Stock Exchange
Class B Common - $1.00 Per Share Par Value
 
Not applicable
 
____________
 
1

Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.   Yes  ¨    No  x
 
Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.   Yes  ¨    No   x
 
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.   Yes  x    No  ¨
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).     Yes  ¨ No  ¨
 
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein and will not be contained, to the best of Registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or amendment to this Form 10-K.    x
 
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one)
 
Large Accelerated Filer  ¨    Accelerated Filer  x
 
Non-Accelerated Filer  ¨    Smaller Reporting Company ¨
 
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).    Yes  ¨    No  x
 
The Registrant had 5,739,388 and 879,135 shares, respectively, of its $1.00 par value Class A and B common stock outstanding on December 27, 2008. On December 27, 2008, the last business day of the Registrant’s second fiscal quarter, the aggregate market value of the common stock held by nonaffiliates was approximately $105,763,000.
 
There were 5,788,667 and 863,446 shares, respectively, of the Registrant’s $1.00 par value Class A and Class B common stock outstanding as of August 31, 2009.
 
The exhibit index is located on pages 53-55.
 
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
 
The Registrant intends to file a definitive Proxy Statement for the Company’s 2009 Annual Meeting of Stockholders within 120 days of the end of the fiscal year ended June 27, 2009. Portions of such Proxy Statement are incorporated by reference in Part III.
 
 
Portions of the Proxy Statement for October 14, 2009 Annual Meeting (Part III).

 
2

 

THE L.S. STARRETT COMPANY

FORM 10-K

FOR THE PERIOD ENDED JUNE 27, 2009

TABLE OF CONTENTS

   
Page
Number
 
PART I
 
     
ITEM 1.
Business
4-7
ITEM 1A.
Risk Factors
7-9
ITEM 1B.
Unresolved Staff Comments
9
ITEM 2.
Properties
9-10
ITEM 3.
Legal Proceedings
10
ITEM 4.
Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders
10
     
 
PART II
 
     
ITEM 5.
Market for the Company’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
10-11
ITEM 6.
Selected Financial Data
12
ITEM 7.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
12-19
ITEM 7A.
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk
12-19
ITEM 8.
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
19-48
ITEM 9.
Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
48
ITEM 9A.
Controls and Procedures
48-50
ITEM 9B.
Other Information
51
     
 
PART III
 
     
ITEM 10.
Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
51
ITEM 11.
Executive Compensation
52
ITEM 12.
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
52
ITEM 13.
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
52
ITEM 14.
Principal Accounting Fees and Services
52
     
 
PART IV
 
     
ITEM 15.
Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules
53
EXHIBIT INDEX
 
54-55
SIGNATURES
 
56

All references in this Annual Report to “Starrett”, the “Company”, “we”, “our” and “us” means The L.S. Starrett Company and its subsidiaries.
3

PART I

 
Item 1 - Business
 
General
Founded in 1880 by Laroy S. Starrett and incorporated in 1929, the Company is engaged in the business of manufacturing over 5,000 different products for industrial, professional and consumer markets. As a global manufacturer with major subsidiaries in Brazil (1956), Scotland (1958) and China (1997), the Company offers its broad array of products to the market through multiple channels of distribution throughout the world. The Company’s products include precision tools, electronic gages, gage blocks, optical and vision measuring equipment, custom engineered granite solutions, tape measures, levels, chalk products, squares, band saw blades, hole saws, hacksaw blades, jig saw blades, reciprocating saw blades, M1® lubricant and precision ground flat stock.

Starrett® is brand recognized around the world for precision, quality and innovation.

Products
The Company’s tools and instruments are sold throughout North America and in over 100 foreign countries. By far the largest consumer of these products is the metalworking industry including aerospace, medical, and automotive but other important consumers are marine and farm equipment shops, do-it-yourselfers and tradesmen such as builders, carpenters, plumbers and electricians.

For 129 years the Company has been a recognized leader in providing measurement solutions consisting of hand measuring tools and precision instruments such as micrometers, vernier calipers, height gages, depth gages, electronic gages, dial indicators, steel rules, combination squares, custom and non contact gaging  and many other items. Skilled personnel, superior products, manufacturing expertise, innovation  and unmatched service has earned the Company its reputation as the “Best in Class” provider of measuring application solutions for industry. During fiscal 2008, the Company enhanced its wireless data collection solutions, making them more customer-friendly and more software-compatible.

The Company’s saw product lines enjoy strong global brand recognition and market share. These products encompass a breadth of uses. Over the last twelve months, the Company introduced several new products including its ADVANZ carbide tipped products and its VERSATIX products with a patent pending tooth geometry designed for the cutting of structurals and small solids. This launch was further enhanced through the global introduction of new support programs and marketing collateral. These actions are aimed at positioning Starrett for global growth in wide band products for production applications as well as product range expansions for shop applications. A full line of complementary saw products, including hack, jig, reciprocating saw blades and hole saws provide cutting solutions for the building trades and are offered primarily through construction, electrical, plumbing and retail distributors.  During fiscal 2008, the Company was issued a patent for its bi-metal unique® manufacturing process and products. This break-through Split Chip Advantage technology enables the Company to produce saw blades, which are up to 50% stronger and offer up to 170% more contact area than traditional electron beam (EB) products. This technology is now used on many of the Company’s saw products.

Recent acquisitions have added to the Company’s portfolio of custom measuring solutions that complement the Company’s existing special gaging expertise. On July 17, 2007, the Company purchased all of the assets of Kinemetric Engineering. Kinemetric Engineering specializes in precision video-based metrology, specialty motion devices and custom engineered systems for measurement and inspection. Kinemetric Engineering brings a wealth of experience, engineering and manufacturing capability. This business unit also oversees the sales and support of the Company’s high quality line of Starrett Optical Projectors, combining to make a very comprehensive product offering.

The Company’s custom engineered granite product offering was further enhanced by the acquisition of Tru-Stone Technologies Inc. (Tru-Stone) in fiscal 2006. This strategic acquisition significantly improved the granite surface plate capabilities providing access to high-end metrology markets such as the electronics and flat panel display industry. The consolidation of the Company’s granite surface plate operations with Tru-Stone provided savings in labor and operating expenses.

4

Personnel
At June 27, 2009, the Company had 1,768 employees, approximately 50% of whom were domestic. This represents a net decrease from June 28, 2008 of 453 employees. The headcount reduction is the result of the global recession and includes reductions at all of the Company’s operating units with the exception of Mexico.

None of the Company’s operations are subject to collective bargaining agreements. In general, the Company considers relations with its employees to be excellent. Domestic employees hold a large share of Company stock resulting from various stock purchase plans. The Company believes that this dual role of owner-employee has strengthened employee morale over the years.

Competition
The Company is competing on the basis of its reputation as the best in class for quality, precision and innovation combined with its commitment to customer service and strong customer relationships. To that end, Starrett is increasingly focusing on providing customer centric solutions. Although the Company is generally operating in highly competitive markets, the Company’s competitive position cannot be determined accurately in the aggregate or by specific market since none of its competitors offer all of the same product lines offered by the Company or serve all of the markets served by the Company.

The Company is one of the largest producers of mechanics’ hand measuring tools and precision instruments. In the United States, there are three other major companies and numerous small competitors in the field, including direct foreign competitors. As a result, the industry is highly competitive. During fiscal 2009, there were no material changes in the Company’s competitive position in spite of the current global economic crisis, which is accelerating the migration of American manufacturing jobs to lower cost countries. Internationally, the Company’s significant investments in manufacturing and sales operations in China appears to have resulted in market share gains and enhanced brand recognition. The Company’s products for the building trades, such as tape measures and levels, are under constant margin pressure due to a channel shift to large national home and hardware retailers. The Company is responding to such challenges by expanding its manufacturing operations in China and in the Dominican Republic. Certain large customers offer private labels (“own brand”) that compete with Starrett branded products. These products are often sourced directly from low cost countries.

Saw products encounter competition from several domestic and international sources. The Company’s competitive position varies by market segment and country. Continued research and development, new patented products and processes, and strong customer support have enabled the Company to compete successfully in both general and performance oriented applications.

Foreign Operations
The operations of the Company’s foreign subsidiaries are consolidated in its financial statements. The subsidiaries located in Brazil, Scotland and China are actively engaged in the manufacturing and distribution  of precision measuring tools, saw blades, optical and vision measuring equipment and hand tools. Subsidiaries in Canada, Argentina, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico and Germany are engaged in distribution of the Company’s products. The Company expects its foreign subsidiaries to continue to play a significant role in its overall operations. A summary of the Company’s foreign operations is contained in Note 14 to the Company’s fiscal 2009 financial statements under the caption “OPERATING DATA” found in Item 8 of this Form 10-K.

Orders and Backlog
The Company generally fills orders from finished goods inventories on hand. Sales order backlog of the Company at any point in time is not significant. Total inventories amounted to $60.2 million at June 27, 2009 and $61.1 million at June 28, 2008. The Company uses the last-in, first-out (LIFO) method of valuing most domestic inventories (approximately 55% of all inventories). LIFO inventory amounts reported in the financial statements are approximately $33.7 million and $27.5 million, respectively, lower than if determined on a first-in, first-out (FIFO) basis at June 27, 2009 and June 28, 2008.

5

Intellectual Property
When appropriate, the Company applies for patent protection on new inventions and currently owns a number of patents. Its patents are considered important in the operation of the business, but no single patent is of material importance when viewed from the standpoint of its overall business. As noted previously, during fiscal 2008 the Company was issued a patent for its bi-metal unique® manufacturing process and products.  The Company relies on its continuing product research and development efforts, with less dependence on its current patent position. It has for many years maintained engineers and supporting personnel engaged in research, product development and related activities. The expenditures for these activities during fiscal years 2009, 2008 and 2007 were approximately $1.6 million, $2.4 million and $2.7 million respectively, all of which were expensed in the Company’s financial statements.

The Company uses trademarks with respect to its products and considers its trademark portfolio as one of its most valuable assets. All of the Company’s important trademarks are registered and rigorously enforced.

Environmental
Compliance with federal, state, local, and foreign provisions that have been enacted or adopted regulating the discharge of materials into the environment or otherwise relating to protection of the environment is not expected to have a material effect on the capital expenditures, earnings and competitive position of the Company. Specifically, the Company has taken steps to reduce, control and treat water discharges and air emissions. The Company takes seriously its responsibility to the environment and has embraced renewable energy alternatives and expects to bring on line a new hydro – generation facility at its Athol, MA plant in 2010 to reduce its carbon foot print and energy costs, an investment in excess of $1 million.

Strategic Activities
Globalization has had a profound impact on product offerings and buying behaviors of industry and consumers in North America and around the world, forcing the Company to adapt to this new, highly competitive business environment. The Company continuously evaluates most all aspects of its business, aiming for new world-class ideas to set itself apart from its competition.

Our strategic concentration is on global brand building and providing unique customer value propositions through technically supported application solutions for our customers. Our job is to recommend and produce the best suited standard product or design and build custom solutions. The combination of the right tool for the right job with value added service will give us a competitive advantage. The Company continues its focus on lean manufacturing, plant consolidations, global sourcing and improved logistics to optimize its value chain.

The execution of these strategic initiatives has expanded the Company’s manufacturing and distribution in developing economies which has increased its international sales revenues to 49% of its consolidated sales.

On September 21, 2006, the Company sold its Alum Bank, PA level manufacturing plant and relocated the manufacturing to the Dominican Republic, where production began in fiscal 2005. The tape measure production of the Evans Rule Division facilities in Puerto Rico and Charleston, SC has been transferred to the Dominican Republic. The Company vacated and plans to sell its Evans Rule facility in North Charleston, SC.  This move has achieved labor savings while satisfying the demands of its customers for lower prices.

The Tru-Stone acquisition in April 2006 represented a strategic acquisition for the Company in that it provides an enhancement of the Company’s granite surface plate capabilities. Profit margins for the Company’s standard plate business have improved as the Company’s existing granite surface plate facility was consolidated into Tru-Stone, where average gross margins have been higher. Along the same lines, the Kinemetric Engineering acquisition in July 2007 represented another strategic acquisition in the field of precision video-based metrology which, when combined with the Company’s existing optical projection line, will provide a very comprehensive product offering.

6

SEC Filings and Certifications
The Company makes its public filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), including its Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and all exhibits and amendments to these reports, available free of charge at its website, www.starrett.com, as soon as reasonably practicable after the Company files such material with the SEC. Information contained on the Company’s website is not part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Item 1A – Risk Factors
SAFE HARBOR STATEMENT UNDER THE PRIVATE SECURITIES LITIGATION REFORM ACT OF 1995

This Annual Report on Form 10-K and the Company’s 2009 Annual Report to Stockholders, including the President’s letter, contains forward-looking statements about the Company’s business, competition, sales, gross margins, expenditures, foreign operations, plans for reorganization, interest rate sensitivity, debt service, liquidity and capital resources, and other operating and capital requirements. In addition, forward-looking statements may be included in future Company documents and in oral statements by Company representatives to security analysts and investors. The Company is subject to risks that could cause actual events to vary materially from such forward-looking statements, including the following risk factors:

Risks Related to the Economy:> The Company’s results of operations are materially affected by the conditions in the global economy.  As a result of the global economic recession, U.S. and foreign economies have experienced and continue to experience significant declines in employment, household wealth, consumer spending, and lending.  Businesses, including the Company and its customers, have faced and are likely to continue to face weakened demand for their products and services, difficulty obtaining access to financing, increased funding costs, and barriers to expanding operations.  The Company’s results of operations have been negatively impacted by the global economic recession and the Company can provide no assurance that its results of operations will improve.



Risks Related to Foreign Operations:> Approximately 49% of the Company’s sales and 40% of net assets relate to foreign operations. Foreign operations are subject to special risks that can materially affect the sales, profits, cash flows and financial position of the Company, including taxes and other restrictions on distributions and payments, currency exchange rate fluctuations, political and economic instability, inflation, minimum capital requirements and exchange controls. In fact, during fiscal 2009, the Company experienced negative foreign exchange effects as the British Pound and Brazilian Real weakened against the U.S. dollar. Finally, the Company’s Brazilian operations, which constitute over half of the Company’s revenues from foreign operations, can be very volatile, changing from year to year due to the political situation, currency risk and the economy. As a result, the future performance of the Brazilian operations may be difficult to forecast.

Risks Related to Industrial Manufacturing Sector:> The market for most of the Company’s products is subject to economic conditions affecting the industrial manufacturing sector, including the level of capital spending by industrial companies and the general movement of manufacturing to low cost foreign countries where the Company does not have a substantial market presence. Accordingly, economic weakness in the industrial manufacturing sector may, and in some cases has, resulted in decreased demand for certain of the Company’s products, which adversely affects sales and performance. Economic weakness in the consumer market will also adversely impact the Company’s performance. In the event that demand for any of the Company’s products declines significantly, the Company could be required to recognize certain costs as well as asset impairment charges on long-lived assets related to those products.

7



Risks Related to Raw Material and Energy Costs:> Steel is the principal raw material used in the manufacture of the Company’s products. The price of steel has historically fluctuated on a cyclical basis and has often depended on a variety of factors over which the Company has no control. The cost of producing the Company’s products is also sensitive to the price of energy. The selling prices of the Company’s products have not always increased in response to raw material, energy or other cost increases, and the Company is unable to determine to what extent, if any, it will be able to pass future cost increases through to its customers. The Company’s inability to pass increased costs through to its customers could materially and adversely affect its financial condition or results of operations.


Risks Related to Acquisitions: >Acquisitions, such as the Company’s acquisition of Tru-Stone in fiscal 2006 and Kinemetric Engineering in fiscal 2008, involve special risks, including the potential assumption of unanticipated liabilities and contingencies, difficulty in assimilating the operations and personnel of the acquired businesses, disruption of the Company’s existing business, dissipation of the Company’s limited management resources, and impairment of relationships with employees and customers of the acquired business as a result of changes in ownership and management. While the Company believes that strategic acquisitions can improve its competitiveness and profitability, the failure to successfully integrate and realize the expected benefits of such acquisitions could have an adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition and operating results.



8



Item 1B – Unresolved Staff Comments
 
None.

Item 2 - Properties
The Company’s principal plant and its corporate headquarters are located in Athol, MA on about 15 acres of Company-owned land. The plant consists of 25 buildings, mostly of brick construction of varying dates, with approximately 535,000 square feet.

The Company’s Webber Gage Division in Cleveland, OH, owns and occupies two buildings totaling approximately 50,000 square feet.

The Company-owned facility in Mt. Airy, NC consists of one building totaling approximately 320,000 square feet. It is occupied by the Company’s Saw Division, Ground Flat Stock Division and a distribution center. A separate 36,000 square foot building which formerly housed the distribution center was vacated in November 2008 and is currently listed for sale.

The Company’s Evans Rule Division owns a 173,000 square foot building in North Charleston, SC. In fiscal 2006, manufacturing operations were moved to a new 50,000 square foot facility in the Dominican Republic from both the North Charleston site and Mayaguez, Puerto Rico operations. The Company now occupies a 3,400 square foot leased office in North Charleston for administrative personnel and has the North Charleston property listed for sale.

The Company’s Exact Level Division was relocated to the Evans Rule facility in the Dominican Republic. Its 50,000 square foot building located in Alum Bank, PA was sold on September 21, 2006.

The Company’s subsidiary in Itu, Brazil owns and occupies several buildings totaling 209,000 square feet. The Company’s subsidiary in Jedburgh, Scotland owns and occupies a 175,000 square foot building. Two wholly owned subsidiaries in Suzhou and Shanghai (People’s Republic of China), lease approximately 41,000 square feet and 5,000 square feet, respectively. The Company signed a lease for a new 133,000 square foot building in Suzhou to accommodate our need for increased manufacturing space. We plan to close the Shanghai distribution center and sales office and consolidate all operations into the new building.

In addition, the Company operates warehouses and/or sales-support offices in the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, Germany, Japan, and Argentina.

A warehouse in Glendale, AZ encompassing 35,000 square feet was closed in fiscal 2006 and the building was sold during fiscal 2008.

9

With the acquisition of Tru-Stone in fiscal 2006, the Company added a 90,000 square foot facility in Waite Park, MN.

With the acquisition of Kinemetric Engineering in fiscal 2008, the Company added a 9,000 square foot leased facility in Laguna Hills, CA, which was expanded to 14,000 square feet.

The Company has vacated a sales office in Kennesaw, GA and plans to terminate the lease.

In the Company’s opinion, all of its property, plants and equipment are in good operating condition, well maintained and adequate for its needs.

Item 3 - Legal Proceedings
The Company is, in the ordinary course of business, from time to time involved in litigation that is not considered material to its financial condition or operations.

Item 4 - Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders
No matters were submitted to a vote of security holders during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2009.


PART II

Item 5 - Market for the Company’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
The Company’s Class A common stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange. Quarterly dividend and high/low closing market price information is presented in the table below. The Company’s Class B common stock is generally nontransferable, except to lineal descendants, and thus has no established trading market, but it can be converted into Class A common stock at any time. The Class B common stock was issued on October 5, 1988, and the Company has paid the same dividends thereon as have been paid on the Class A common stock since that date. On June 27, 2009, there were approximately 5,100 registered holders of Class A common stock and approximately 1,900 registered holders of Class B common stock.

Quarter Ended
 
Dividends
   
High
   
Low
 
September 2007
  $ 0.10       19.48       15.27  
December 2007
    0.20       20.27       17.00  
March 2008
    0.10       19.99       13.69  
June 2008
    0.12       23.83       18.15  
September 2008
    0.12       28.50       13.50  
December 2008
    0.12       21.80       9.51  
March 2009
    0.12       16.31       5.30  
June 2009
    0.12       11.42       6.01  

While the Company’s dividend policy is subject to periodic review by the Board of Directors, the Company currently intends to continue to pay comparable dividends in the future.

ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 
Summary of Stock Repurchases:

A summary of the Company’s repurchases of shares of its common stock for the fourth quarter fiscal 2009 is as follows:

Period
Shares Purchased
 
Average Price
   
Shares Purchased Under Announced Programs
   
Shares yet to be Purchased Under Announced Programs
 
April 2009
None
                 
May 2009
None
                 
June 2009
None
                 


10

PERFORMANCE GRAPH

The following graph sets forth information comparing the cumulative total return to holders of the Company’s Class A common stock over the last five fiscal years with (1) the cumulative total return of the Russell 2000 Index (“Russell 2000”) and (2) a peer group index (the “Peer Group”) reflecting the cumulative total returns of certain small cap manufacturing companies as described below. The peer group is comprised of the following companies: Acme United, Q.E.P. Co. Inc., Thermadyne Holdings Corp., Badger Meter, Federal Screw Works, National Presto Industries, Regal-Beloit Corp., Tecumseh Products Co., Tennant Company, The Eastern Company and WD-40.
form10kgraph
 

   
BASE
   
FY2005
   
FY2006
   
FY2007
   
FY2008
   
FY2009
 
STARRETT
    100.00       115.51       88.66       121.98       162.11       48.59  
RUSSELL 2000
    100.00       109.45       125.40       146.01       122.36       91.76  
PEER GROUP
    100.00       110.10       140.46       162.20       162.58       143.14  


 
11

 

Item 6 - Selected Financial Data
   
Years ended in June ($000 except per share data)
 
   
2009
   
2008
   
2007
   
2006
   
2005
 
Net sales
  $ 203,659     $ 242,371     $ 222,356     $ 200,916     $ 195,909  
Net earnings (loss)
    (3,220 )     10,831       6,653       (3,782 )     3,979  
Basic earnings (loss) per share
    (0.49 )     1.64       1.00       (0.57 )     0.60  
Diluted earnings (loss) per share
    (0.49 )     1.64       1.00       (0.57 )     0.60  
Long-term debt (1)
    1,264       5,834       8,520       13,054       2,885  
Total assets
    194,241       250,285       234,011       228,082       224,114  
Dividends per share
    0.48       0.52       0.40       0.40       0.40  

(1)  
Note that the significant increase in long-term debt in fiscal 2006 is related to the Tru-Stone acquisition.

Items 7 and 7A- Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations and Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosure about Market Risk
RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Fiscal 2009 Compared to Fiscal 2008

Overview>  The Company is engaged in the business of manufacturing over 5,000 different products for industrial, professional and consumer markets. As a global manufacturer with major subsidiaries in Brazil, Scotland, and China, the Company offers a broad array of products to the market through multiple channels of distribution globally. Net sales decreased 16% in fiscal 2009 compared to fiscal 2008. The Company continued to experience the severity of the global economic recession during the most recent quarter. The severe decline is due to the unprecedented slowdown in the global economy and the rapid strengthening of the U.S. dollar. This is a direct reflection of the financial market crisis, lack of liquidity and weak consumer confidence. The resultant effect has been a massive de-stocking throughout the supply chain which caused the most significant drop in Company sales in the third quarter ending March 28, 2009 in the past thirty years. Historically, the Company has lagged the economy and we expect the current harsh economic realities will be with the Company for the balance of this calendar year. For fiscal 2009, the Company incurred a net loss of $3.2 million, or $(0.49) per basic and diluted share compared to a net income of $10.8 million or $1.64 per basic and diluted share for fiscal 2008. This represents a decrease of $14.0 million comprised of a decrease in gross margin of $16.7 million, the aforementioned goodwill charge of $5.3 million, a decrease of $3.3 million in other income (expense) offset by a decrease of $2.8 million in selling, general and administrative costs and a decrease in income tax expense of $8.4 million from a $6.1 million provision in fiscal 2008 to a $2.3 million benefit in fiscal 2009. The above items are discussed below.

Net Sales>  Net sales for fiscal 2009 were down $38.7 million or 16% compared to fiscal 2008. North American sales decreased $27.7 million or 21%, reflecting declining U.S. demand partly caused by the widening of the recession in the manufacturing sector, decreased sales in Canada and Mexico, and lower Evans Rule sales. The declines are primarily related to unit volume declines. The impact of any price concessions and new product sales was not material. It is likely that the Company’s results will continue to be impacted by the current global economic recession. Foreign sales (excluding North America) decreased 9.9% (1% increase in local currency), driven by the weakening of the Brazilian Real, British Pound, Euro, and Australian Dollar against the U.S. dollar, offset by a growth in Chinese operations ($0.4 million increase). Beyond exchange rate effects, the declines were mainly related to unit volume declines relative to the global economic collapse.

12

The gross margin percentage decreased from 31.5% in fiscal 2008 to 29.2% in fiscal 2009. This was primarily driven by lower overhead absorption at certain domestic plants due to lower sales volumes ($4.5 million effect). Similarly, lower absorption at foreign plants due to lower sales volumes caused a $.2 million decline. This was compounded by certain material cost increases that could not be fully passed on to customers. LIFO liquidations in fiscal 2009 had an offsetting effect of $1.8 million. LIFO liquidations in fiscal 2008 were not considered material. Gross margins for fiscal 2010 could again be adversely impacted by lower absorption rates and material cost increases, which cannot be fully passed on to customers and by increased competitive pressures in various markets. As indicated above, selling, general and administrative costs decreased $2.8 million, although the percentage of sales increased from 25.9% in fiscal 2008 to 29.4% in fiscal 2009. The dollar decrease is a result of decreased sales commissions, profit sharing and bonuses ($1.9 million), decreases in marketing and advertising ($.4 million), a decrease in shipping costs ($.4 million), offset by increases in severance cost ($.7 million) and the bad debt provision ($.3 million). The decrease in other income (expense) is comprised of a decrease in net interest income ($.7 million), decreased net exchange gains ($.4 million) and the gain on the sale of the Glendale, AZ facility ($1.7 million) in fiscal 2008. The Company currently includes the Evans North Charleston building and a building in Mount Airy, NC on the June 27, 2009 Balance Sheet as assets held for sale of $2.8 million. The Company expects to sell both buildings for a gain based on a recent appraisal.

In response to the downturn in sales volume, the Company has reduced spending on raw materials and indirect production costs. The Company has also cut salaries at certain locations by 10% and has reduced hourly labor costs through shortened work weeks, layoffs and attrition. These reductions are done with careful consideration so as not to compromise customer service levels or the retention of key employees. This is having an approximate $2.0 million impact per quarter on cost of sales and selling, general and administrative costs. In addition, layoffs instituted in April 2009 at certain domestic locations, are having an approximate $1.1 million impact per quarter on cost of sales and selling, general and administrative costs. Finally, a reduction in labor force in Brazil is expected to have a $.2 million impact per quarter. This is in addition to temporary salary cuts in Brazil taking place over the next 6 months for a savings of $.4 million. Although the Company’s recent order activity is down compared to historical levels, this decline is spread relatively proportionately across most of our customers. The Company fully expects order activity to rebound once the supply chain de-stocking abates and excess inventory levels at the Company’s distributors are depleted. The Company does not anticipate any liquidity constraints given the adequacy of its working capital and its available credit line. See further discussion under Liquidity and Capital Resources.



No changes in valuation allowances relating to carryforwards for foreign NOL’s, foreign tax credits and certain state NOL’s are anticipated at this time other than reversals relating to realization of NOL benefits for certain foreign subsidiaries. The Company continues to believe it is more likely than not that it will be able to utilize its tax operating loss carryforward assets of approximately $8.8 million reflected on the balance sheet.


 
13

 
Fiscal 2008 Compared to Fiscal 2007



Earnings (loss) before taxes (benefit)>  Pre-tax earnings for fiscal 2008 was $16.9 million compared to pre-tax earnings of $8.9 million for fiscal 2007. This represents an increase in pre-tax earnings of $8.0 million or an increase of 90% over the prior year. This is comprised of an increase in gross margin of $10.4 million and other income of $4.7 million, offset by an increase in selling, general and administrative costs of $7.1 million. The gross margin percentage increased from 29.6% in fiscal 2007 to 31.5% in fiscal 2008. This was primarily driven by better overhead absorption at certain domestic plants due to higher sales volumes ($1 million), the impact of lean manufacturing initiatives, a reduction in cost of sales at the Evans Rule Division, and better overhead absorption at the U.K. and Brazilian operations ($2.0 million). This increase was achieved in spite of certain material cost increases that could not be fully passed on to customers.  Effects from LIFO liquidations in fiscal 2008 and 2007 were not considered material. Gross margins for fiscal 2009 could again be adversely impacted by material cost increases which cannot be fully passed on to customers and by increased competitive pressures in various markets. As indicated above, selling, general and administrative costs increased $7.1 million from fiscal 2007 to fiscal 2008, as the percentage of sales increased slightly from 25.0% in fiscal 2007 to 25.9% in fiscal 2008. The increase is a result of increased sales commissions, profit sharing and bonuses ($2.5 million), increases in marketing and advertising primarily relating to new product introductions ($.3 million), and the inclusion of nearly a full year of Kinemetrics’ selling, general and administrative costs in fiscal 2008 ($1.9 million), and an increase in bad debt write-offs ($.1 million). The increase in other income (expense) from fiscal 2007 to fiscal 2008 of $4.7 million is a net of increased net interest income, increased net exchange gains and the higher gain on the sale of the Glendale, AZ facility ($1.7 million) in fiscal 2008 versus the gain on the sale of the Alum Bank plant in fiscal 2007 ($.3 million). The Company currently includes the Evans North Charleston facility on June 28, 2008 Balance Sheet as an asset held for sale of $1.9 million.


Income Taxes>  The effective income tax rate was 36.0% for fiscal 2008, reflecting a combined federal, state and foreign worldwide rate adjusted for permanent book/tax differences, the most significant of which is the deduction allowable for the Brazilian dividend paid in December 2007. The effective tax rate for fiscal 2007 was 25%, reflecting the benefits of a release of tax reserves, the elimination of the valuation allowances for certain state and foreign NOL’s and the benefit of the tax treatment of the Brazilian dividend. A net reduction resulted from a release of tax reserves, resulting from the close out of certain examination years and additional analysis of transfer pricing exposure and return to provision adjustments resulting from the preparation of various tax returns. Valuation allowances were eliminated during fiscal 2007 for certain state and foreign NOL’s as strong earnings in fiscal 2007 increased the likelihood of realizing the benefits of those NOL’s. Only minor changes in valuation allowances were made in fiscal 2008. The change in the effective rate percentage from fiscal 2007 to fiscal 2008 primarily relates to the fiscal 2007 release of the tax reserves and valuation allowance, as well as additional reserves for transfer pricing issues provided in fiscal 2008.

14

FINANCIAL INSTRUMENT MARKET RISK

Market risk is the potential change in a financial instrument’s value caused by fluctuations in interest and currency exchange rates, and equity and commodity prices. The Company’s operating activities expose it to risks that are continually monitored, evaluated and managed. Proper management of these risks helps reduce the likelihood of earnings volatility.

As of June 28, 2008, the Company held $2.5 million in AAA-rated auction rate securities for which there were no current active quoted market prices. The Company liquidated this $2.5 million in September 2008 through November 2008 through the broker’s announced buyback program for auction rate securities. Thus, the above securities were all redeemed at par value. No such investments are held as of June 27, 2009.

During fiscal 2008 and fiscal 2009, the Company was party to an interest swap arrangement more fully described in Note 11 to the Consolidated Financial Statements. This arrangement expired on April 28, 2009. The Company does not engage in tracking, market-making or other speculative activities in derivatives markets. The Company does not enter into long-term supply contracts with either fixed prices or quantities. The Company engages in a limited amount of hedging activity to minimize the impact of foreign currency fluctuations. Net foreign monetary assets are approximately $6.9 million as of June 27, 2009.

A 10% change in interest rates would not have a significant impact on the aggregate net fair value of the Company’s interest rate sensitive financial instruments (primarily variable rate investments of $2.4 million) or the cash flows or future earnings associated with those financial instruments. A 10% change in interest rates would impact the fair value of the Company’s fixed rate investments of approximately $1.8 million by an immaterial amount. See Note 11 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for details concerning the Company’s long-term debt outstanding of $1.3 million.


LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

   
Years ended in June ($000)
 
   
2009
   
2008
   
2007
 
Cash provided by operations
  $ 659     $ 19,012     $ 12,849  
Cash provided by (used in) investing activities
    5,469       (13,584 )     (852 )
Cash (used in) financing activities
    (1,298 )     (6,851 )     (8,652 )

The significant increase in cash provided by operations from fiscal 2007 to fiscal 2008 was primarily driven by the $4.1 million improvement in net earnings, and an increase in non-cash items and other working capital changes ($2.0 million). Conversely, the significant decrease in cash provided by operations from fiscal 2008 to fiscal 2009 is primarily driven by the $14.1 million decrease in net earnings and working capital changes ($7.1 million). The non-cash items relating to depreciation and amortization are not expected to change significantly over the next few years.

“Retirement benefits” under noncash expenses in the detailed cash flow statement shows the effect on operating cash flow of the Company’s pension and retiree medical plans. Primarily because the Company’s domestic defined benefit plan had been overfunded, retirement benefits in total generated approximately $1.6 million, $2.8 million and $1.1 million of noncash income in fiscal 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. Consolidated retirement benefit expense (income) was approximately $(0.8) million in 2009, $(1.7) million in 2008, and $.1 million in 2007.

15

As disclosed in Note 10 to the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements, the overfunding status has been eliminated by current market conditions. However, the Company does not expect to be required to provide any funding to its domestic pension plan until 2011.

At the start of fiscal 2007, the Company switched from self-funding to a fixed monthly premium for both its domestic employee health care plans and its domestic worker’s compensation plan. This has reduced the cash flow uncertainty related to these Company expenses.

The Company’s investing activities consisted of the acquisition of Kinemetric Engineering in fiscal 2008, expenditures for plant and equipment, the investment of cash not immediately needed for operations and the proceeds from the sale of Company assets. Expenditures for plant and equipment have increased over each of the three years, although they are less than depreciation expense in each of those years. The Company will continue to invest in plant and equipment as necessary to optimize the operations of its plants. Details of the Kinemetric acquisition are disclosed in Note 6 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

Cash flows used in financing activities are primarily the payment of dividends. The Company increased its dividend from $.10 per share to $.12 per share during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2008. The Company has paid during fiscal 2009 and expects to consistently pay this increased dividend in the near future. The proceeds from the sale of stock under the various stock plans has historically been used to purchase treasury shares, although in recent years such purchases have been curtailed. Purchases for fiscal 2009 and fiscal 2008 amounted to $.3 million and $.3 million, respectively. Overall debt has increased slightly from $10.0 million at the end of fiscal 2008 to $11.4 million at the end of fiscal 2009, primarily due to an increase in capitalized lease obligations in Brazil. However, as described in Note 11, the amount outstanding on the Company’s line of credit as of August 31, 2009 is $2.5 million.

Effects of translation rate changes on cash primarily result from the movement of the U.S. dollar against the British Pound, the Euro and the Brazilian Real. The Company uses a limited number of forward contracts to hedge some of this activity and a natural hedge strategy of paying for foreign purchases in local currency when economically advantageous.

Liquidity and Credit Arrangements
The Company believes it maintains sufficient liquidity and has the resources to fund its operations in the near term. If the Company is unable to maintain consistent profitability, additional steps, beyond the salary reductions, layoffs, shortened work weeks as noted above, will have to be taken in order to maintain liquidity, including plant consolidations and work force and dividend reductions (see comments above).  In addition to its cash and investments, the Company had maintained a $10 million line of credit, of which, as of June 27, 2009, $975,000 is being utilized in the form of standby letters of credit for insurance purposes.  On April 28, 2009, the Company signed an amendment to its existing line of credit agreement extending the termination date of such agreement from April 28, 2009 to June 30, 2009. With this amendment, the scheduled principal payment of $2.4 million due under the Reducing Revolver was extended to June 30, 2009. Under the current credit line, the interest rate at June 27, 2009 for the Reducing Revolver is LIBOR plus 1.5% and 3.25% (Prime) for the line of credit. The Company has a working capital ratio of 4.4 to one as of June 27, 2009 and 4.8 to one as of June 28, 2008.

On June 30, 2009, The L.S. Starrett Company (the “Company”) and certain of the Company’s subsidiaries (the “Subsidiaries”) entered into a Loan and Security Agreement (the “New Credit Facility”) with TD Bank, N.A., as lender.

The New Credit Facility replaced the Company’s previous Bank of America facility with a $23 million line of credit. On June 30, 2009, the Company utilized this line of credit to pay off the remaining balances on the Reducing Revolver and Line of Credit. The interest rate under the New Credit Facility is based upon a grid which uses the ratio of Funded Debt/EBITDA to determine the floating margin that will be added to one-month LIBOR. The initial rate is one-month LIBOR plus 1.75%.  The New Credit Facility matures on April 30, 2012.

16

The obligations under the New Credit Facility are unsecured.  However, in the event of certain triggering events, the obligations under the New Credit Facility will become secured by the assets of the Company and the subsidiaries party to the New Credit Facility.

Availability under the New Credit Facility is subject to a borrowing base comprised of accounts receivable and inventory. The Company believes that the borrowing base will consistently produce availability under the New Credit Facility in excess of $23 million. In addition, the Company anticipates that it will not need to fully utilize the amounts available to the Company and its subsidiaries under the New Credit Facility.   As of August 31, 2009, the Company had borrowings of $2.5 million under the New Credit Facility.

The New Credit Facility contains financial covenants with respect to leverage, tangible net worth, and interest coverage, and also contains customary affirmative and negative covenants, including limitations on indebtedness, liens, acquisitions, asset dispositions, and fundamental corporate changes, and certain customary events of default. Upon the occurrence and continuation of an event of default, the lender may terminate the revolving credit commitment and require immediate payment of the entire unpaid principal amount of the New Credit Facility, accrued interest and all other obligations. As of June 30, 2009, the Company was in compliance with the covenants required for testing at that time under the New Credit Facility.

OFF-BALANCE SHEET ARRANGEMENTS

The Company does not have any material off-balance sheet arrangements as defined under the Securities and Exchange Commission rules.

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The preparation of financial statements and related disclosures in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make judgments, assumptions and estimates that affect the amounts reported in the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. The second footnote to the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements describes the significant accounting policies and methods used in the preparation of the consolidated financial statements.

Judgments, assumptions, and estimates are used for, but not limited to, the allowance for doubtful accounts receivable and returned goods; inventory allowances; income tax reserves; employee turnover, discount, and return rates used to calculate pension obligations.

Future events and their effects cannot be determined with absolute certainty. Therefore, the determination of estimates requires the exercise of judgment. Actual results inevitably will differ from those estimates, and such differences may be material to the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements. The following sections describe the Company’s critical accounting policies.

Sales of merchandise and freight billed to customers are recognized when title passes and all substantial risks of ownership change, which generally occurs either upon shipment or upon delivery based upon contractual terms. Sales are net of provisions for cash discounts, returns, customer discounts (such as volume or trade discounts), cooperative advertising and other sales related discounts. Outbound shipping costs absorbed by the Company and inbound freight included in material purchases are included in the cost of sales.

The allowance for doubtful accounts of $0.7 million and $0.7 million at the end of fiscal 2009 and 2008, respectively, is based on our assessment of the collectability of specific customer accounts, the aging of our accounts receivable. While the Company believes that the allowance for doubtful accounts is adequate, if there is a deterioration of a major customer’s credit worthiness, actual defaults are higher than our previous experience, or actual future returns do not reflect historical trends, the estimates of the recoverability of the amounts due the Company and sales could be adversely affected.

17

Inventory purchases and commitments are based upon future demand forecasts. If there is a sudden and significant decrease in demand for our products or there is a higher risk of inventory obsolescence because of rapidly changing technology and requirements, the Company may be required to increase the inventory reserve and, as a result, gross profit margin could be adversely affected.

The Company generally values property, plant and equipment (PP&E) at historical cost less accumulated depreciation. Impairment losses are recorded when indicators of impairment, such as plant closures, are present and the undiscounted cash flows estimated to be generated by those assets are less than the carrying amount. The Company continually reviews for such impairment and believes that PP&E is being carried at its appropriate value.

The Company assesses the fair value of its goodwill generally based upon a discounted cash flow methodology. The discounted cash flows are estimated utilizing various assumptions regarding future revenue and expenses, working capital, terminal value, and market discount rates. If the carrying amount of the goodwill is greater than the fair value an impairment charge is recognized to the extent the recorded goodwill exceeds the implied fair value of goodwill.

Accounting for income taxes requires estimates of future benefits and tax liabilities. Due to temporary differences in the timing of recognition of items included in income for accounting and tax purposes, deferred tax assets or liabilities are recorded to reflect the impact arising from these differences on future tax payments. With respect to recorded tax assets, the Company assesses the likelihood that the asset will be realized. If realization is in doubt because of uncertainty regarding future profitability or enacted tax rates, the Company provides a valuation allowance related to the asset. Should any significant changes in the tax law or the estimate of the necessary valuation allowance occur, the Company would record the impact of the change, which could have a material effect on our financial position or results of operations.

Pension and postretirement medical costs and obligations are dependent on assumptions used by actuaries in calculating such amounts. These assumptions include discount rates, healthcare cost trends, inflation, salary growth, long-term return on plan assets, employee turnover rates, retirement rates, mortality and other factors. These assumptions are made based on a combination of external market factors, actual historical experience, long-term trend analysis, and an analysis of the assumptions being used by other companies with similar plans. Actual results that differ from assumptions are accumulated and amortized over future periods. Significant differences in actual experience or significant changes in assumptions would affect pension and other postretirement benefit costs and obligations. See also Employee Benefit Plans (Note 10 to the Consolidated Financial Statements).

CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS

The following table summarizes future estimated payment obligations by period. The majority of the obligations represent commitments for production needs in the normal course of business.

   
Payments due by period (in millions)
 
   
Total
   
<1yr.
   
1-3yrs.
   
3-5yrs.
   
>5yrs.
 
Post-retirement benefit obligations
  $ 7.6     $ .8     $ 1.5     $ 1.4     $ 3.9  
Long-term debt obligations
    1.3       .5       .5       .3        
Capital lease obligations
    2.0       .7       .9       .3       .1  
Operating lease obligations
    2.7       1.4       1.2       .1        
Interest payments
    .3       .2       .1              
Purchase obligations
    10.9       10.8       .1              
Total
  $ 24.8     $ 14.4     $ 4.3     $ 2.1     $ 4.0  

It is assumed that post-retirement benefit obligations would continue on an annual basis from 2013 to 2016. Total future payments for other obligations cannot be reasonably estimated beyond year 5.

18

ANNUAL NYSE CEO CERTIFICATION AND SARBANES-OXLEY SECTION 302 CERTIFICATIONS


Item 8 - Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
 
Contents:
 
Page
 
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
    20  
Consolidated Statements of Operations
    21  
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
    22  
Consolidated Balance Sheets
    23  
Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity
    24  
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
    25-48  
 
19

 
To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of
The L.S. Starrett Company

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of The L.S. Starrett Company and subsidiaries (“the Company”) as of June 27, 2009 and June 28, 2008, and the related consolidated statements of operations, stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended June 27, 2009.  Our audits of the basic financial statements included the financial statement schedule listed in the index appearing under Item 15 (a)(2).  These consolidated financial statements and financial statement schedule are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements and financial statement schedule based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of The L.S. Starrett Company and subsidiaries as of June 27, 2009 and June 28, 2008, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended June 27, 2009 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.  Also in our opinion, the related financial statement schedule, when considered in relation to the basic financial statements taken as a whole, presents fairly, in all material respects, the information set forth therein.

As discussed in Note 9 to the consolidated financial statements, on July 1, 2007, the Company adopted the provisions of FASB Interpretation No. 48, “Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes - An Interpretation of FASB Statement No. 109” issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board.   As discussed in Note 10 to the consolidated financial statements, as of June 30, 2007, the Company adopted FASB Statement No. 158, “Employers’ Accounting for Defined Benefit Pension and Other Postretirement Plans.”

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), The L.S. Starrett Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of June 27, 2009, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) and our accompanying report dated September 10, 2009 expressed an adverse opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

/s/ Grant Thornton LLP
Boston, Massachusetts
September 10, 2009



 
20

 

Consolidated Statements of Operations
For the three years ended on June 27, 2009
(in thousands of dollars except per share data)
 
   
6/27/2009
   
6/28/08
   
6/30/07
 
   
(52 weeks)
   
(52 weeks)
   
(53 weeks)
 
Net sales
  $ 203,659     $ 242,371     $ 222,356  
Cost of goods sold
    (144,115 )     (166,133 )     (156,530 )
Selling, general and administrative expenses
    (59,904 )     (62,707 )     (55,596 )
Goodwill impairment (Note 5)
    (5,260 )            
Other income (expense)
    67       3,340       (1,378 )
                         
(Loss) earnings before income taxes
    (5,553 )     16,871       8,852  
Income tax (benefit) expense
    (2,333 )     6,040       2,199  
                         
Net (loss) earnings
  $ (3,220 )   $ 10,831     $ 6,653  
                         
                         
                         
Basic and diluted (loss) earnings per share
  $ (0.49 )   $ 1.64     $ 1.00  
                         
Average outstanding shares used in per share calculations (in thousands):
                       
Basic
    6,622       6,596       6,663  
Diluted
    6,628       6,605       6,671  
                         
                         
                         
Dividends per share
  $ 0.48     $ 0.52     $ 0.40  

See notes to consolidated financial statements

 
21

 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
For the three years ended on June 27, 2009
(in thousands of dollars)

   
6/27/2009
   
6/28/08
   
6/30/07
 
   
(52 weeks)
   
(52 weeks)
   
(53 weeks)
 
Cash flows from operating activities:
                 
Net (loss) income
  $ (3,220 )   $ 10,831     $ 6,653  
Noncash operating activities:
                       
Gain from sale of real estate
          (1,703 )     (299 )
Depreciation
    8,649       9,535       10,047  
Amortization
    1,247       1,240       1,103  
Impairment of fixed assets
    52       95       724  
Goodwill impairment
    5,260              
Net long-term tax payable
    604       847        
Deferred taxes
    (6,145 )     1,221       1,646  
Unrealized transaction gains
    1,077       (990 )     (592 )
Retirement benefits
    (2,088 )     (3,332 )     (1,519 )
Working capital changes:
                       
Receivables
    7,170       893       (2,720 )
Inventories
    (4,233 )     (45 )     2,252  
Other current assets
    (2,759 )     (157 )     (689 )
Other current liabilities
    (7,313 )     478       (3,127 )
Prepaid pension cost and other
    2,358       99       (630 )
Net cash provided by operating activities
    659       19,012       12,849  
                         
Cash flows from investing activities:
                       
Purchase of Kinemetric Engineering
    (208 )     (2,060 )      
Additions to plant and equipment
    (9,443 )     (8,924 )     (6,574 )
(Increase) decrease in investments
    15,120       (5,016 )     5,328  
Proceeds from sale of real estate
          2,416       394  
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities
    5,469       (13,584 )     (852 )
                         
Cash flows from financing activities:
                       
Proceeds from short-term borrowings
    29,518       5,007       2,934  
Short-term debt repayments
    (28,603 )     (5,800 )     (3,115 )
Proceeds from long-term borrowings
    1,188             203  
Long-term debt repayments
    (552 )     (2,929 )     (4,589 )
Common stock issued
    596       620       446  
Treasury shares purchased
    (263 )     (317 )     (1,867 )
Dividends
    (3,182 )     (3,432 )     (2,664 )
Net cash (used in) financing activities
    (1,298 )     (6,851 )     (8,652 )
Effect of translation rate changes on cash
    (1,097 )     230       387  
Net increase (decrease) in cash
    3,733       (1,193 )     3,732  
Cash beginning of year
    6,515       7,708       3,976  
Cash end of year
  $ 10,248     $ 6,515     $ 7,708  
                         
Supplemental cash flow information:
                       
Interest received
  $ 1,037     $ 1,648     $ 1,194  
Interest paid
    1,127       914       1,713  
Taxes paid, net
    3,663       3,546       1,231  

See notes to consolidated financial statements
22

THE L.S. STARRETT COMPANY
Consolidated Balance Sheets
(in thousands except share data)
   
June 27, 2009
   
June 28, 2008
 
ASSETS
           
Current assets:
           
Cash (Note 4)
  $ 10,248     $ 6,515  
Investments (Note 4)
    1,791       19,806  
Accounts receivable (less allowance for doubtful accounts of $678 and $701)
    27,233       39,627  
Inventories:
               
Raw materials and supplies
    19,672       15,104  
Goods in process and finished parts
    20,265       16,653  
Finished goods
    20,289       29,400  
Total inventories
    60,226       61,157  
Current deferred income tax asset (Note 9)
    5,170       5,996  
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
    8,054       5,535  
Total current assets
    112,722       138,636  
                 
Property, plant and equipment, at cost, net (Note 7)
    56,956       60,945  
Property held for sale (Note 7)
    2,771       1,912  
Intangible assets (less accumulated amortization of $3,724 and $2,477) (Note 5)
    2,517       3,764  
Goodwill (Note 5)
    981       6,032  
Pension asset (Note 10)
          34,643  
Other assets
    275       1,877  
Long-term taxes receivable (Note 9)
    2,807       2,476  
Long-term deferred income tax asset (Note 9)
    15,212          
Total assets
  $ 194,241     $ 250,285  
                 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY
               
Current liabilities:
               
Notes payable and current maturities (Note 11)
  $ 10,136     $ 4,121  
Accounts payable and accrued expenses
    10,369       18,041  
Accrued salaries and wages
    5,109       6,907  
Total current liabilities
    25,614       29,069  
Long-term taxes payable (Note 9)
    9,140       8,522  
Deferred income taxes (Note 9)
          6,312  
Long-term debt (Note 11)
    1,264       5,834  
Postretirement benefit and pension liability (Note 10)
    15,345       13,775  
Total liabilities
    51,363       63,512  
                 
Stockholders’ equity (Note 12):
               
Class A common stock $1 par (20,000,000 shrs. auth.; 5,769,894 outstanding at June 27, 2009, 5,708,100 outstanding at June 28, 2008)
    5,770       5,708  
Class B common stock $1 par (10,000,000 shrs. auth.; 869,426 outstanding at June 27, 2009, 906,065 outstanding at June 28, 2008)
    869       906  
Additional paid-in capital
    49,984       49,613  
Retained earnings reinvested and employed in the business
    127,707       134,109  
Accumulated other comprehensive loss
    (41,452 )     (3,563 )
Total stockholders’ equity
    142,878       186,773  
Total liabilities and stockholders’equity
  $ 194,241     $ 250,285  
 
See notes to consolidated financial statements

 
23

 

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity
For the three years ended on June 27, 2009 (in thousands)

   
Common Stock 
Out-standing
($1 Par)
                         
   
Class A
   
Class B
   
Addi-
tional
Paid-in
Capital
   
Retained
Earnings
   
Accumulated
Other Com-
prehensive Loss
   
Total
 
Balance, June 24, 2006
  $ 5,629     $ 1,040       50,569       123,034       (15,909 )     164,363  
Comprehensive income:
                                               
Net income
                            6,653               6,653  
Unrealized net loss on investments and swap agreement
                                    (15 )     (15 )
Minimum pension liability, net
                                    1,775       1,775  
Translation gain, net
                                    7,280       7,280  
Total comprehensive income
                                            15,693  
Dividends ($0.40 per share)
                            (2,664 )             (2,664 )
Treasury shares:
                                               
Purchased
    (105 )           (1,762 )                     (1,867 )
Issued
    23             320                       343  
Issuance of stock under ESPP
          8       155                       163  
Conversion
    85       (85 )                              
Balance, June 30, 2007 (before FAS 158)
  $ 5,632     $ 963     $ 49,282     $ 127,023     $ (6,869 )   $ 176,031  
Adjustment to initially adopt FAS 158(1):
                                               
Pension Plans (net of tax benefits)
                                    (1,365 )     (1,365 )
Post-retirement benefits (net of tax liability)
                                    2,448       2,448  
Balance, June 30, 2007
  $ 5,632     $ 963     $ 49,282     $ 127,023     $ (5,786 )   $ 177,114  
Comprehensive income:
                                               
Net income
                            10,831               10,831  
Unrealized net loss on investments and swap agreement
                                    (281 )     (281 )
Minimum pension liability, net
                                    (4,911 )     (4,911 )
Translation gain, net
                                    7,415       7,415  
Total comprehensive income
                                            13,054  
Tax adjustment for FIN 48 adoption
                            (313 )             (313 )
Dividends ($0.52 per share)
                            (3,432 )             (3,432 )
Treasury shares:
                                               
Purchased
    (20 )           (297 )                     (317 )
Issued
    24             394                       418  
Issuance of stock under ESPP
          15       234                       249  
Conversion
    72       (72 )                              
Balance, June 28, 2008
  $ 5,708     $ 906     $ 49,613     $ 134,109     $ (3,563 )   $ 186,773  
Comprehensive loss:
                                               
Net loss
                            (3,220 )             (3,220 )
Unrealized net gain on investments and swap agreement
                                    339       339  
Minimum pension liability, net
                                    (23,804 )     (23,804 )
Translation loss, net
                                    (14,424 )     (14,424 )
Total comprehensive loss
                                            (41,109 )
Dividends ($0.48 per share)
                            (3,182 )             (3,182 )
Treasury shares:
                                               
Purchased
    (26 )             (237 )                     (263 )
Issued
    44               480                       524  
Issuance of stock under ESPP
            7       128                       135  
Conversion
    44       (44 )                              
Balance, June 27, 2009
  $ 5,770     $ 869     $ 49,984     $ 127,707     $ (41,452 )   $ 142,878  

 
24

 


Cumulative balance:
       
Translation loss
  $
(13,819)
 
Unrealized net loss on investments
   
(1)
 
Amount not recognized as a component of net periodic benefit cost
   
(27,632)
 
    $
(41,452)
 

 (1) Components of adjustment to initially adopt FAS 158 are as follows:

   
Gross
   
Tax
   
Net
 
1. Pension Plan
    (2,242 )     877       (1,365 )
2. Post-retirement benefits:
    4,019       (1,571 )     2,448  
Net effect of adoption
    1,777       (694 )     1,083  

See notes to consolidated financial statements



THE L.S. STARRETT COMPANY
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

1. DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS

The Company is in the business of manufacturing industrial, professional and consumer measuring and cutting tools and related products. The largest consumer of these products is the metalworking industry, but others include automotive, aviation, marine, farm, do-it-yourselfers and tradesmen such as builders, carpenters, plumbers and electricians.

2. SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Principles of consolidation: The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of The L. S. Starrett Company and its subsidiaries, all of which are wholly-owned. All significant intercompany items have been eliminated. The Company’s fiscal year ends on the last Saturday in June. Fiscal 2007 represents a 53 week year while fiscal 2009 and 2008 represent 52 week years. The fiscal years of the Company’s major foreign subsidiaries end in May. This one month lag facilitates timely reporting of results and does not materially impact the Company’s Results of Operations.

Financial instruments and derivatives: The Company’s financial instruments consist primarily of cash, investments and receivables, current liabilities and long term debt. Current assets and liabilities, except investments, are stated at cost, which approximates fair market value. Long-term debts, which are at current market interest rates, also approximate fair market value. The Company has entered into an interest rate swap agreement to limit the amount of exposure resulting from increases in its variable LIBOR rate on its $12 million Reducing Revolver. This is being accounted for as an effective cash flow hedge under SFAS 133, “Accounting for Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities.” The amount of (increase) decrease in other comprehensive income for fiscal 2009, 2008 and 2007 relating to the swap agreement is ($106,174), $55,767, and $50,406, respectively. The Company’s U.K. subsidiary entered into various forward exchange contracts during fiscal 2007. The amount of contracts outstanding as of May 31, 2009 and 2008 (foreign subsidiary year-end) amounted to $6.8 million and $3.1 million (dollar equivalent), respectively. The value of these contracts do not differ materially from the corresponding receivables.

Accounts receivable: Accounts receivable consist of trade receivables from customers. The provision for bad debts amounted to $451,000, $461,000 and $370,000 in fiscal 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. In establishing the allowance for doubtful accounts, management considers historical losses, the aging of receivables and existing economic conditions.

25

Inventories: Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or market. For approximately 55% of all inventories, cost is determined on a last-in, first-out (LIFO) basis. For all other inventories, cost is determined on a first-in, first-out (FIFO) basis. LIFO inventories were $17.8 million and $17.9 million at the end of fiscal 2009 and 2008, respectively, such amounts being approximately $33.7 million and $27.5 million, respectively, less than if determined on a FIFO basis. The amounts of income (expense) related to LIFO liquidations amounted to $1.8 million and ($300,000) in fiscal 2009 and fiscal 2008, respectively. The Company has not adopted LIFO for its Tru-Stone and Kinemetric Engineering acquisitions and does not expect to adopt LIFO for any future acquisitions. The Company’s inventories turned 2.4 times and 2.7 times during fiscal 2009 and fiscal 2008, respectively.

Long-lived assets: Buildings and equipment are depreciated using straight-line and accelerated methods over estimated useful lives as follows: buildings and building improvements 10 to 50 years, machinery and equipment 3 to 12 years. Leases are capitalized as required under SFAS 13. Long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment when circumstances indicate the carrying amount may not be recoverable. The Company does this evaluation at the reporting unit level using an undiscounted cash flow model. Long-lived assets to be disposed of are reported at the lower of carrying amount or fair value less cost to sell. A gain or loss is recorded on individual fixed assets when retired or disposed of. Included in buildings and building improvements and machinery and equipment at June 27, 2009 and June 28, 2008 were $3.3 million and $3.9 million, respectively, of construction in progress. Also included in machinery and equipment at June 27, 2009 and June 28, 2008 were $420,500 and $273,000, respectively, of capitalized interest cost. Repairs and maintenance of equipment are expensed as incurred.

Intangible assets and goodwill: Intangibles are recorded at cost and are amortized on a straight-line basis over a 5 year period. Goodwill represents costs in excess of fair values assigned to the underlying net assets of acquired businesses. Goodwill is not subject to amortization but is tested for impairment annually and at any time when events suggest impairment may have occurred. The Company assesses the fair value of its goodwill using impairment tests, generally based upon a discounted cash flow methodology. The discounted cash flows are estimated utilizing various assumptions regarding future revenue and expenses, working capital, terminal value and market discount rates. In the event that the carrying value of goodwill exceeds the fair value of the goodwill, an impairment loss would be recorded for the amount of that excess.

Revenue recognition: Sales of merchandise and freight billed to customers are recognized when title passes and all substantial risks of ownership change, which generally occurs either upon shipment or upon delivery based upon contractual terms. Sales are net of provisions for cash discounts, returns, customer discounts (such as volume or trade discounts), cooperative advertising and other sales related discounts. While the Company does allow its customers the right to return in certain circumstances, revenue is not deferred, but rather a reserve for sales returns is provided based on experience, which historically has not been significant.

Advertising costs: The Company’s policy is to generally expense advertising costs as incurred. Advertising costs were expensed as follows $4.6 million in fiscal 2009, $4.9 million in fiscal 2008 and $4.6 million in fiscal 2007.

Freight costs: The cost of outbound freight absorbed by the Company for customers or the cost for inbound freight included in material purchase cost are both included in cost of sales.

Warranty expense: The Company’s warranty obligation is generally one year from shipment to the end user and is affected by product failure rates, material usage, and service delivery costs incurred in correcting a product failure. Any such failures tend to occur soon after shipment. Historically, the Company has not incurred significant predictable warranty expense and consequently its warranty reserves are not material. In the event a material warranty liability is deemed probable, a reserve is established for the event.

Income taxes: Deferred tax expense results from differences in the timing of certain transactions for financial reporting and tax purposes. Deferred taxes have not been recorded on approximately $60.4 million of undistributed earnings of foreign subsidiaries as of June 27, 2009 or the related unrealized translation adjustments because such amounts are considered permanently invested. In addition, it is possible that remittance taxes, if any, would be reduced by U.S. foreign tax credits. Valuation allowances are recognized if, based on the available evidence, it is more likely than not that some portion of the deferred tax assets will not be realized.

26

Sales and use tax: Sales and use tax is recorded as incurred and represents a cost of certain purchased materials.

Research and development: Research and development costs were expensed as follows: $1.6 million in fiscal 2009, $2.4 million in fiscal 2008 and $2.7 million in fiscal 2007.

Earnings per share (EPS): Basic EPS excludes dilution and is computed by dividing earnings available to common shareholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the period. Diluted EPS reflects the potential dilution by securities that could share in the earnings. The Company had 5,501, 8,330, and 7,904 of potentially dilutive common shares in fiscal 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively, resulting from shares issuable under its stock option plan. For fiscal 2009 and 2008, these shares had no impact on the calculated per share amounts due to their magnitude. These additional shares are not used for the diluted EPS calculation in loss years.

Translation of foreign currencies: Assets and liabilities are translated at exchange rates in effect on reporting dates, and income and expense items are translated at average rates or rates in effect on transaction dates as appropriate. The resulting differences due to changing exchange rates are charged or credited directly to the “Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss” account included as part of stockholders’ equity.

Use of accounting estimates: The preparation of the financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the U.S. requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of sales and expenses during the reporting period. Judgments, assumptions and estimates are used for, but not limited to, the allowance for doubtful accounts receivable and returned goods; inventory allowances; income tax reserves; employee turnover, discount, and return rates used to calculate pension obligations; normal expense accruals for such things as workers compensation and employee medical expenses. Amounts ultimately realized could differ from those estimates.

Related party transactions: The Company’s policy is to disclose all significant related party transactions. At this time, there are no reportable transactions.

Treasury stock: Treasury stock is accounted for using the par value method. The number of treasury shares held by the Company at June 27, 2009 and June 28, 2008 was 1,727,517 and 1,745,662, respectively.

Other: Accounts payable and accrued expenses at June 27, 2009 and June 28, 2008 consist primarily of accounts payable ($3.7 million and $9.0 million), accrued benefits ($1.2 million and $1.1 million) and accrued taxes other than income ($2.1 million and $2.1 million) and accrued expenses and other ($3.4 million and $5.8 million).

Reclassifications: Certain reclassifications have been made to the prior periods as a result of the current year presentation with no effect on net earnings.

3. RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

In February 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 159, The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities – including an amendment of FAS 115 (“SFAS No. 159”). SFAS 159 permits companies to make a one-time election to carry eligible types of financial assets and liabilities at fair value, even if fair value measurement is not required under generally accepted accounting principles in the United States (“U.S. GAAP”). SFAS 159 has been adopted by the Company beginning in the first quarter of fiscal 2009, and the Company has determined SFAS 159 has no material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

27

In December 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 141 (Revised 2007), “Business Combinations” (“SFAS 141(R)”). SFAS 141(R) will significantly change the accounting for business combinations. Under SFAS 141(R), an acquiring entity will be required to recognize all the assets acquired and liabilities assumed in a transaction at the acquisition-date fair value with limited exceptions. SFAS 141(R) applies prospectively to business combinations for which the acquisition date is on or after the beginning of the first annual reporting period beginning on or after December 15, 2008. The Company will be required to adopt FAS 141(R) for fiscal 2010. The Company does not expect the adoption of SFAS 141(R) to have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.

In December 2008, the FASB issued FSP FAS 132R-1 “Employers’ Disclosures about Postretirement Benefit Plan Assets”, which amends FASB Statement 132 (revised 2003), Employers’ Disclosures about Pensions and Other Postretirement Benefits. Beginning in fiscal years ending after December 15, 2009, employers will be required to provide more transparency about the assets in their postretirement benefit plans, including defined benefit pension plans. FSP FAS 132R-1 was issued in response to users’ concerns that employers’ financial statements do not provide adequate transparency about the types of assets and associated risks in employers’ postretirement plans. In current disclosures of the major categories of plan assets, many employers provide information about only four asset categories: equity, debt, real estate, and other investments. For many employers, the “other investment” category has increased to include a significant percentage of plan assets. Users indicate that such disclosure is not sufficiently specific to permit evaluation of the nature and risks of assets held as investments.

In addition, the FSP requires new disclosures similar to those in FASB Statement 157, “Fair Value Measurements,” in terms of the three-level fair value hierarchy, including a reconciliation of the beginning and ending balances of plan assets that fall within Level 3 of the hierarchy.

FSP FAS 132R-1’s amended disclosure requirements about plan assets are principles-based. The objectives of the disclosures are to provide users with an understanding of the following:
-  
How investment decisions are made, including factors necessary to understanding investment policies and strategies
-  
The major categories of plan assets
-  
The inputs and valuation techniques used to measure the fair value of plan assets
-  
The effect of fair value measurements using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3 measurements in Statement 157 on changes in plan assets for the period)
-  
Significant concentrations of risk within plan assets
Employers are required to consider these overall disclosure objectives in providing the detailed disclosures required by Statement 132R, as amended by FSP FAS 132R-1.

FSP FAS 132R-1 is effective for periods ending after December 15, 2009. The disclosure requirements are annual and do no apply to interim financial statements. The technical amendment to Statement 132R was effective as of December 30, 2008. The Company is currently evaluating the additional disclosure requirements upon the adoption of FSP 132R-1.

In September 2006, the FASB issued SFAS No. 157, “Fair Value Measurements” (“FAS 157”), which addresses how companies should measure fair value when they are required to use a fair value measure for recognition or disclosure purposes under generally accepted accounting principles. FAS 157 defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value in generally accepted accounting principles and expands disclosures about fair value measurements. In February 2008, the FASB issued FASB Staff Position 157-2, “Effective Date of FASB Statement No. 157” (FSP 157-2), which partially defers the effective date of FAS 157 for one year for non-financial assets and liabilities that are recognized or disclosed at fair value in the financial statements on a non-recurring basis. Consequently, FAS 157 will be effective for the Company in fiscal 2009 for financial assets and liabilities carried at fair value and non-financial assets and liabilities that are recognized or disclosed at fair value on a recurring basis. As a result of the deferral, FAS 157 will be effective in fiscal 2010 for non-recurring, non-financial assets and liabilities that are recognized or disclosed at fair value. The Company is currently evaluating the potential impact of FAS 157 on its financial position and results of operations.

28

In December 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 160, “Noncontrolling Interests in Consolidated Financial Statements – an amendment of ARB No. 51” (“SFAS 160”). SFAS 160 clarifies the classification of noncontrolling interests in consolidated balance sheets and reporting transactions between the reporting entity and holders of noncontrolling interests. Under this statement, noncontrolling interests are considered equity and reported as an element of consolidated equity. Further, net income encompasses all consolidated subsidiaries with disclosure of the attribution of net income between controlling and noncontrolling interests. SFAS 160 is effective prospectively for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2008. As of June 27,2009, there were no noncontrolling interests in any of the Company’s subsidiaries.

In March 2008, the FASB issued SFAS No. 161, “Disclosures About Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities – an amendment of FASB Statement No. 133” (“SFAS 161”), which expands the disclosure requirements in SFAS 133 about an entity’s derivative instruments and hedging activities. SFAS 161 expands the disclosure provisions to apply to all entities with derivative instruments subject to SFAS 133 and its related interpretations. The provisions also apply to related hedged items, bifurcated derivatives, and nonderivative instruments that are designated and qualify as hedging instruments. Entities with instruments subject to SFAS 161 must provide more robust qualitative disclosures and expanded quantitative disclosures. Such disclosures, as well as existing SFAS 133 required disclosures, generally will need to be presented for every annual and interim reporting period. SFAS 161 is effective for fiscal years and interim periods beginning after November 15, 2008. The Company has not determined the impact, if any, of the adoption of SFAS 161.

In April 2008, the FASB issued FSP SFAS No. 142-3, “Determination of the Useful Life of Intangible Assets” (“FAS 142-3”). FAS 142-3 amends the factors that should be considered in developing renewal or extension assumptions used to determine the useful life of a recognized intangible asset under FAS 142, “Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets” (“FAS 142”). The intent of FAS 142-3 is to improve the consistency between the useful life of a recognized intangible asset under FAS 142 and the period of expected cash flows used to measure the fair value of the asset under FAS 141(R) and other applicable accounting literature. FAS 142-3 is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2008 and must be applied prospectively to intangible assets acquired after the effective date. The Company has not determined the impact, if any, of the adoption of FAS 142-3.

In April 2009, the FASB issued FASB Staff Position 107-1 and  28-1, Interim Disclosures about Fair Value of Financial Instruments (“FSP FAS 107-1 and 28-1”), to require disclosures about fair value of financial instruments for interim reporting periods of publicly traded companies as well as in annual financial statements. FSP 107-1 and 28-1 also amends APB Opinion No. 28, Interim Financial Reporting, to require those disclosures in summarized financial information at interim reporting periods.  FSP 107-1 and 28-1 shall be effective for interim reporting periods ending after June 15, 2009, with early adoption permitted for periods ending after March 15, 2009.  The Company has not determined the impact, if any, FSP 107-1 and 28-1 will have on its financial position or results of operations.
 
In May 2009, the FASB issued SFAS No. 165, “Subsequent Events” (“SFAS 165”). SFAS 165 establishes general standards of accounting for and disclosure of events that occur after the balance sheet date but before financial statements are issued, and specifically requires the disclosure of the date through which an entity has evaluated subsequent events and the basis for that date. SFAS 165 became effective for the Company for the three months ended June 27, 2009, and the Company has evaluated all subsequent events through September 10, 2009, the date of issuance of the Company’s financial statements and noted no material events except as described in Note 15.
 
In June 2009, the FASB concurrently issued SFAS No. 166, “Accounting for Transfers of Financial Assets, an amendment of FASB Statement No. 140,” and SFAS No. 167, “Amendments to FASB Interpretation No. 46(R),” (collectively, “SFAS 166 and SFAS 167”) that change the way entities account for securitizations and other transfers of financial instruments. In addition to increased disclosure, SFAS 166 and SFAS 167 eliminate the concept of qualifying special purpose entities and change the test for consolidation of variable interest entities. SFAS 166 and SFAS 167 are effective for the Company on January 1, 2010. The Company is in the process of evaluating these standards to determine whether they will impact the Company’s financial condition or results of operations.
 
29

In June 2009, the FASB issued SFAS No. 168, “The FASB Accounting Standards Codification™ and the Hierarchy of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (a replacement of FASB Statement No. 162)” (“SFAS 168”). SFAS 168 establishes the FASB Accounting Standards Codification™ (“Codification”) as the single source of authoritative U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”). The Codification does not create any new GAAP standards but incorporates existing accounting and reporting standards into a new topical structure. The Codification will be effective for the Company June 27, 2009, and beginning with the Company’s interim report for the period ending September 26, 2009, a new referencing system will be used to identify authoritative accounting standards, replacing the existing references to SFAS, EITF, FSP, etc. Existing standards will be designated by their Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) topical reference and new standards will be designated as Accounting Standards Updates, with a year and assigned sequence number.

4. CASH AND INVESTMENTS

As of June 28, 2008, the Company held $2.5 million in AAA-rated auction rate securities for which there were no current active quoted market prices. The Company liquidated this $2.5 million in September 2008 through November 2008 through the broker’s announced buyback program for auction rate securities. Thus, the above securities were all redeemed at par value. No such investments are held as June 27, 2009.

Included in investments at June 27, 2009 is $1.8 million of AAA rated Puerto Rico debt obligations that have maturities greater than one year but carry the benefit of possibly reducing repatriation taxes. These investments represent “core cash” and are part of the Company’s overall cash management and liquidity program and, under Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 115, “Accounting for Certain Investments in Debt and Equity Securities” (“SFAS 115”), are considered “available for sale.” The investments themselves are highly liquid, carry no early redemption penalties, and are not designated for acquiring non-current assets. On July 1, 2009, $0.5 million of these bonds were redeemed at face value. Cash and investments held in foreign locations amounted to $8.4 million and $18.8 million at June 27, 2009 and June 28, 2008, respectively. Of this amount, $1.8 million in U.S. dollar equivalents was held in British Pound Sterling.  The reduction in cash and investments from June 28, 2008 to June 27, 2009 resulted primarily from foreign exchange effects and the movement of cash and investments to the U.S.

On October 1, 2008, the Company adopted Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 157, “Fair Value Measurements” (“SFAS 157”). SFAS 157 defines and establishes a framework for measuring fair value and expands disclosures about fair value instruments. In accordance with SFAS 157, the Company has categorized its financial assets, based on the priority of the inputs to the valuation technique, into a three-level fair value hierarchy as set forth below. The Company does not have any financial liabilities that are required to be measured at fair value on a recurring basis. If the inputs used to measure the financial instruments fall within different levels of the hierarchy, the categorization is based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement of the instrument.

Financial assets recorded on the balance sheets are categorized based on the inputs to the valuation techniques as follows:

o  
Level 1 – Financial assets whose values are based on unadjusted quoted prices for identical assets or liabilities in an active market which the company has the ability to access at the measurement date (examples include active exchange-traded equity securities and most U.S. Government and agency securities).

o  
Level 2 – Financial assets whose value are based on quoted market prices in markets where trading occurs infrequently or whose values are based on quoted prices of instruments with similar attributes in active markets. The Company does not currently have any Level 2 financial assets.

30

o  
Level 3 – Financial assets whose values are based on prices or valuation techniques that require inputs that are both unobservable and significant to the overall fair value measurement. These inputs reflect management’s own view about the assumptions a market participant would use in pricing the asset. The Company does not currently have any Level 3 financial assets.

As of June 27, 2009 and June 28, 2008, the Company’s Level 1 financial assets were as follows (in thousands):
   
Level 1
 
   
6/27/09
   
6/28/08
 
Money Market Funds
          1,450  
Certificates of Deposits
          13,205  
International Bonds (Puerto Rican debt obligations)
    1,791       1,667  
Domestic Bonds
          2,750  
Municipal Securities
          734  
    $ 1,791     $ 19,806  

5. GOODWILL AND INTANGIBLES

The Company performed its annual goodwill impairment test for Tru-Stone as of June 28, 2008, which resulted in an implied fair value greater than its carrying value. As noted in the Company’s second quarter fiscal year 2009 Form 10-Q, a triggering event occurred during the second quarter relating to the $5.3 million of goodwill resulting from the acquisition of Tru-Stone. Based upon the Company’s analysis, it was determined that the implied fair value of the goodwill associated with Tru-Stone continued to be greater than its carrying value ($5.3 million).

Due to continued declines in Tru-Stone’s results during the third quarter of fiscal year 2009, an impairment review was performed on its long-lived assets in accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 144 “Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long-Lived Assets” (“SFAS 144”) and its goodwill in accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 142 “Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets” (“SFAS 142”). Based on the undiscounted cash flows’ projection, the carrying value of the long lived assets is currently recoverable; accordingly, no impairment write-down was necessary. Projections of cash flow were generated for this asset group utilizing estimates from sales, operations, and finance to arrive at the projected cash flows. A significant drop in sales growth rates could result in a future impairment charge. Similarly, the Company estimates that a 25% drop in cash flows (primarily related to a drop in sales growth rates) could result in future impairment charges. The difference between Tru-Stone’s carrying value and its fair value after the goodwill impairment writedown of $5.3 million was approximately $700,000.

To estimate the fair value of its Tru-Stone reporting unit, the Company utilized a combination of income and market approaches. The income approach, specifically a discounted cash flow methodology, included assumptions for, among others, forecasted revenues, gross profit margins, operating profit margins, working capital cash flow, perpetual growth rates and long term discount rates, all of which require significant judgments by management. These assumptions take into account the current recessionary environment and its impact on the Company’s business. In addition, the Company utilized a discount rate appropriate to compensate for the additional risk in the equity markets regarding the Company’s future cash flows in order to arrive at a control premium considered supportable based upon historical comparable transactions.

As the carrying value of Tru-Stone exceeded its estimated fair value as of March 28, 2009, the Company performed the second step of the impairment analysis for Tru-Stone. Step two of the impairment test requires the Company to fair value all of the reporting unit’s assets and liabilities, including identifiable intangible assets, and compare the implied fair value of goodwill to its carrying value. The results of step two indicated that the goodwill in Tru-Stone’s reporting unit was fully impaired, resulting in a $5.3 million impairment recorded in the third quarter. Both step one and step two were performed by an independent third party appraiser under the supervision of management. The impairment charge of $5.3 million is comprised of goodwill and was a direct result of the SFAS No. 142 testing. This impairment charge was due primarily to the combination of a decline in the market capitalization of the Company at March 28, 2009 and the decline in the estimated forecasted discounted cash flows expected by the Company.

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The Company performed its annual goodwill impairment test for Kinemetrics as of June 27, 2009, which resulted in an implied fair value greater than its carrying value. The approach used is similar to that outlined above for Tru-Stone adjusting the assumptions as necessary for the Kinemetrics business unit.

The following tables present information about the Company’s goodwill and other intangible assets on the dates or for the periods indicated (in thousands):

   
As of June 27, 2009
   
As of June 28, 2008
 
   
Carrying Amount
   
Accumulated Amortization
   
Net
   
Carrying Amount
   
Accumulated Amortization
   
Net
 
                                     
Goodwill
  $ 981       -     $ 981     $ 6,032       -     $ 6,032  
                                                 
Other Intangible Assets
  $ 6,241     $ (3,724 )   $ 2,517     $ 6,241     $ (2,477 )   $ 3,764  

The estimated amortization of intangible assets for the next four succeeding years is: $1,254 for year 1, $1,083 for year 2, $187 for year 3 and $11 for year 4.

6. ACQUISITIONS

On July 17, 2007, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company entered into an asset purchase agreement with Kinemetric Engineering, LLC (Kinemetric Engineering), pursuant to which the Company purchased all of the assets of Kinemetric Engineering for $2.3 million in cash. The asset purchase was financed through existing cash and a draw on the Company’s existing line of credit. In connection with the asset purchase agreement, $.3 million of the purchase price was placed into escrow to support the indemnification obligations of Kinemetric Engineering and its shareholders. Kinemetric Engineering specializes in precision video-based metrology, specialty motion devices, and custom engineered systems for measurement and inspection. This business unit also oversees the sales and support of the Company’s high quality line of Starrett Optical Projectors. The Company has completed the final purchase price allocation based on the fair value of the assets and liabilities acquired. The total purchase price of $2.5 million was allocated to current assets ($.6 million), fixed assets ($.2 million), intangibles ($.9 million) and goodwill ($.8 million).

7. PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

   
2009
 
   
Cost
   
Accumulated
Depreciation
   
Net
 
Land
  $ 1,384     $     $ 1,384  
Buildings and building improvements
    39,550       (19,403 )     20,147  
Machinery and equipment
    133,977       (98,552 )     35,425  
Total
  $ 174,911     $ (117,955 )   $ 56,956  
       

   
2008
 
   
Cost
   
Accumulated
Depreciation
   
Net
 
Land
  $ 1,608     $     $ 1,608  
Buildings and building improvements
    40,798       (19,576 )     21,222  
Machinery and equipment
    145,195       (107,080 )     38,115  
Total
  $ 187,601     $ (126,656 )   $ 60,945  

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Assets held for sale for fiscal 2008 represents the North Charleston building. Assets held for sale for fiscal 2009 represent the north Charleston building and a building in Mt. Airy, NC. Included in machinery and equipment are capital leases of $2.0 million as of June 27, 2009 and $3.9 million as of June 28, 2008 relating to the domestic and Brazilian operations (Note 11). The amortization relating to these leases was $.7 million and $.6 million for fiscal 2009 and 2008, respectively. This equipment primarily represents factory machinery in their main plant. Operating lease expense was $1.6 million, $1.6 million and $1.1 million in fiscal 2009, 2008 and 2007, respectively. Operating lease payments for the next 5 years are as follows:
Year
  $ 000’s  
2010
  $ 1,361  
2011
    734