LPNT » Topics » Revenue Sources

This excerpt taken from the LPNT 10-Q filed Nov 7, 2008.
Revenue Sources
 
Our hospitals generate revenues by providing healthcare services to our patients. The majority of these healthcare services are directed by physicians. We are paid for these healthcare services from a number of different sources, depending upon the patient’s medical insurance coverage. Primarily, we are paid by governmental Medicare and Medicaid programs, commercial insurance, including managed care organizations, and directly by the patient. The amounts we are paid for providing healthcare services to our patients vary depending upon the payor. Governmental payors generally pay significantly less than the hospital’s customary charges for the services provided. Please refer to Part I, Item 1. Business, “Sources of Revenuein our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2007 for a detailed discussion of our revenue sources.
 
Revenues from governmental payors, such as Medicare and Medicaid, are controlled by complex rules and regulations that stipulate the amount a hospital is paid for providing healthcare services. Our compliance with these rules and regulations requires an extensive effort to ensure we remain eligible to participate in these governmental programs. In addition, these rules and regulations are subject to frequent changes as a result of legislative and administrative action on both the federal and the state levels. For these reasons, revenues from governmental programs change frequently and require us to monitor regularly the environment in which these governmental programs operate.
 
Revenues from HMOs, PPOs and other private insurers are subject to contracts and other arrangements that require us to discount the amounts we customarily charge for healthcare services. These discounted arrangements often limit our ability to increase charges in response to increasing costs. We actively negotiate with these payors to seek to maintain or increase the pricing of our healthcare services. Insured patients are generally not responsible for any difference between customary hospital charges and the amounts received from commercial insurance payors. However, insured patients are responsible for payments not covered by insurance, such as exclusions, deductibles and co-payments.
 
Self-pay revenues are primarily generated through the treatment of uninsured patients. Our hospitals experienced an increase in self-pay revenues during recent years.
 
This excerpt taken from the LPNT 10-Q filed Aug 8, 2008.
Revenue Sources
 
Our hospitals generate revenues by providing healthcare services to our patients. The majority of these healthcare services are directed by physicians. We are paid for these healthcare services from a number of different sources, depending upon the patient’s medical insurance coverage. Primarily, we are paid by governmental Medicare and Medicaid programs, commercial insurance, including managed care organizations, and directly by the patient. The amounts we are paid for providing healthcare services to our patients vary depending upon the payor. Governmental payors generally pay significantly less than the hospital’s customary charges for the services provided. Please refer to Part I, Item 1. Business, “Sources of Revenuein our 2007 Annual Report on Form 10-K for a detailed discussion of our revenue sources.
 
Revenues from governmental payors, such as Medicare and Medicaid, are controlled by complex rules and regulations that stipulate the amount a hospital is paid for providing healthcare services. Our compliance with these rules and regulations requires an extensive effort to ensure we remain eligible to participate in these governmental programs. In addition, these rules and regulations are subject to frequent changes as a result of legislative and administrative action on both the federal and the state levels. For these reasons, revenues from governmental programs change frequently and require us to monitor regularly the environment in which these governmental programs operate.
 
Revenues from HMOs, PPOs and other private insurers are subject to contracts and other arrangements that require us to discount the amounts we customarily charge for healthcare services. These discounted arrangements often limit our ability to increase charges in response to increasing costs. We actively negotiate with these payors to seek to maintain or increase the pricing of our healthcare services. Insured patients are generally not responsible for any difference between customary hospital charges and the amounts received from commercial insurance payors. However, insured patients are responsible for payments not covered by insurance, such as exclusions, deductibles and co-payments.
 
Self-pay revenues are primarily generated through the treatment of uninsured patients. Our hospitals experienced an increase in self-pay revenues during recent years.
 
This excerpt taken from the LPNT 10-Q filed May 2, 2008.
Revenue Sources
 
Our hospitals generate revenues by providing healthcare services to our patients. The majority of these healthcare services are directed by physicians. We are paid for these healthcare services from a number of different sources, depending upon the patient’s medical insurance coverage. Primarily, we are paid by governmental Medicare and Medicaid programs, commercial insurance, including managed care organizations, and directly by the patient. The amounts we are paid for providing healthcare services to our patients vary depending upon the payor. Governmental payors generally pay significantly less than the hospital’s customary charges for the services provided. Please refer to Part I, Item 1. Business, “Sources of Revenuein our 2007 Annual Report on Form 10-K for a detailed discussion of our revenue sources.
 
Revenues from governmental payors, such as Medicare and Medicaid, are controlled by complex rules and regulations that stipulate the amount a hospital is paid for providing healthcare services. Our compliance with these rules and regulations requires an extensive effort to ensure we remain eligible to participate in these governmental programs. In addition, these rules and regulations are subject to frequent changes as a result of legislative and administrative action on both the federal and the state levels. For these reasons, revenues from governmental programs change frequently and require us to monitor regularly the environment in which these governmental programs operate.
 
Revenues from HMOs, PPOs and other private insurers are subject to contracts and other arrangements that require us to discount the amounts we customarily charge for healthcare services. These discounted arrangements often limit our ability to increase charges in response to increasing costs. We actively negotiate with these payors to seek to maintain or increase the pricing of our healthcare services. Insured patients are generally not responsible for any difference between customary hospital charges and the amounts received


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from commercial insurance payors. However, insured patients are responsible for payments not covered by insurance, such as exclusions, deductibles and co-payments.
 
Self-pay revenues are primarily generated through the treatment of uninsured patients. Our hospitals experienced an increase in self-pay revenues during recent years.
 
This excerpt taken from the LPNT 10-Q filed Oct 26, 2007.
Revenue Sources
 
Our hospitals generate revenues by providing healthcare services to our patients. The majority of these healthcare services are directed by physicians. We are paid for these healthcare services from a number of different sources, depending upon the patient’s medical insurance coverage. Primarily, we are paid by governmental Medicare and Medicaid programs, commercial insurance, including managed care organizations and directly by the patient. The amounts we are paid for providing healthcare services to our patients vary


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depending upon the payor. Governmental payors generally pay significantly less than a hospital’s customary charges for the services provided. Part I, Item 1. Business, “Sources of Revenue” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2006, contains a detailed discussion of our revenue sources.
 
Revenues from governmental payors, such as Medicare and Medicaid, are controlled by complex rules and regulations that stipulate the amount a hospital is paid for providing healthcare services. Our compliance with these rules and regulations requires an extensive effort to ensure we remain eligible to participate in these governmental programs. In addition, these rules and regulations are subject to frequent changes as a result of legislative and administrative action on both the federal and state level. For these reasons, revenues from governmental programs change frequently and require us to monitor regularly the environment in which these governmental programs operate.
 
Revenues from health maintenance organizations (“HMOs”), preferred provider organizations (“PPOs”) and other private insurers are subject to contracts and other arrangements that require us to discount the amounts we customarily charge for healthcare services. These discounted arrangements often limit our ability to increase charges in response to increasing costs. We actively negotiate with these payors to maintain or increase the pricing of our healthcare services. Insured patients are generally not responsible for any difference between customary hospital charges and the amounts received from commercial insurance payors. However, insured patients are responsible for payments not covered by insurance, such as exclusions, deductibles and co-payments.
 
Self-pay revenues are primarily generated through the treatment of uninsured patients. Our hospitals have experienced an increase in self-pay revenues during the past few years.
 
Hospital operating margins have been, and may continue to be, under pressure because of deterioration in pricing flexibility and payor mix, and growth in operating expenses in excess of the increase in prospective payment system payments under the Medicare program.
 
This excerpt taken from the LPNT 10-Q filed Jul 30, 2007.
Revenue Sources
 
Our hospitals generate revenues by providing healthcare services to our patients. The majority of these healthcare services are directed by physicians. We are paid for these healthcare services from a number of different sources, depending upon the patient’s medical insurance coverage. Primarily, we are paid by governmental Medicare and Medicaid programs, commercial insurance, including managed care organizations and directly by the patient. The amounts we are paid for providing healthcare services to our patients vary depending upon the payor. Governmental payors generally pay significantly less than the hospital’s customary charges for the services provided. Part I, Item 1. Business, “Sources of Revenue” in our 2006 Annual Report on Form 10-K contains a detailed discussion of our revenue sources.
 
Revenues from governmental payors, such as Medicare and Medicaid, are controlled by complex rules and regulations that stipulate the amount a hospital is paid for providing healthcare services. Our compliance with these rules and regulations requires an extensive effort to ensure we remain eligible to participate in these governmental programs. In addition, these rules and regulations are subject to frequent changes as a result of legislative and administrative action on both the federal and state level. For these reasons, revenues from governmental programs change frequently and require us to monitor regularly the environment in which these governmental programs operate.
 
Revenues from health maintenance organizations (“HMOs”), preferred provider organizations (“PPOs”) and other private insurers are subject to contracts and other arrangements that require us to discount the amounts we customarily charge for healthcare services. These discounted arrangements often limit our ability to increase charges in response to increasing costs. We actively negotiate with these payors to maintain or


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increase the pricing of our healthcare services. Insured patients are generally not responsible for any difference between customary hospital charges and the amounts received from commercial insurance payors. However, insured patients are responsible for payments not covered by insurance, such as exclusions, deductibles and co-payments.
 
Self-pay revenues are primarily generated through the treatment of uninsured patients. Our hospitals have experienced an increase in self-pay revenues during the past few years.
 
This excerpt taken from the LPNT 10-Q filed Apr 27, 2007.
Revenue Sources
 
Our hospitals generate revenues by providing healthcare services to our patients. The majority of these healthcare services are directed by physicians. We are paid for these healthcare services from a number of different sources, depending upon the patient’s medical insurance coverage. Primarily, we are paid by governmental Medicare and Medicaid programs, commercial insurance, including managed care organizations, and directly by the patient. The amounts we are paid for providing healthcare services to our patients vary depending upon the payor. Governmental payors generally pay significantly less than the hospital’s customary charges for the services provided. Part I, Item 1. Business, “Sources of Revenue” in our 2006 Annual Report on Form 10-K contains a detailed discussion of our revenue sources.


25


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Revenues from governmental payors, such as Medicare and Medicaid, are controlled by complex rules and regulations that stipulate the amount a hospital is paid for providing healthcare services. Our compliance with these rules and regulations requires an extensive effort to ensure we remain eligible to participate in these governmental programs. In addition, these rules and regulations are subject to frequent changes as a result of legislative and administrative action on both the federal and state level. For these reasons, revenues from governmental programs change frequently and require us to monitor regularly the environment in which these governmental programs operate.
 
Revenues from HMOs, PPOs and other private insurers are subject to contracts and other arrangements that require us to discount the amounts we customarily charge for healthcare services. These discounted arrangements often limit our ability to increase charges in response to increasing costs. We actively negotiate with these payors to seek to maintain or increase the pricing of our healthcare services. Insured patients are generally not responsible for any difference between customary hospital charges and the amounts received from commercial insurance payors. However, insured patients are responsible for payments not covered by insurance, such as exclusions, deductibles and co-payments.
 
Self-pay revenues are primarily generated through the treatment of uninsured patients. Our hospitals have experienced an increase in self-pay revenues during the past few years.
 
This excerpt taken from the LPNT 10-K filed Feb 6, 2007.
Revenue Sources
 
Our hospitals generate revenues by providing healthcare services to our patients. The majority of these healthcare services are directed by physicians. We are paid for these healthcare services from a number of different sources, depending upon the patient’s medical insurance coverage. Primarily, we are paid by governmental Medicare and Medicaid programs, commercial insurance, including managed care organizations, and directly by the patient. The amounts we are paid for providing healthcare services to our patients vary depending upon the payor. Governmental payors generally pay significantly less than the hospital’s customary charges for the services provided. Please refer to Part I, Item 1. Business, “Sources of Revenuefor a detailed discussion of our revenue sources.
 
Revenues from governmental payors, such as Medicare and Medicaid, are controlled by complex rules and regulations that stipulate the amount a hospital is paid for providing healthcare services. Our compliance with these rules and regulations requires an extensive effort to ensure we remain eligible to participate in these governmental programs. In addition, these rules and regulations are subject to frequent changes as a result of legislative and administrative action on both the federal and the state levels. For these reasons, revenues from governmental programs change frequently and require us to monitor regularly the environment in which these governmental programs operate.


59


Table of Contents

Revenues from HMOs, PPOs and other private insurers are subject to contracts and other arrangements that require us to discount the amounts we customarily charge for healthcare services. These discounted arrangements often limit our ability to increase charges in response to increasing costs. We actively negotiate with these payors to seek to maintain or increase the pricing of our healthcare services. Insured patients are generally not responsible for any difference between customary hospital charges and the amounts received from commercial insurance payors. However, insured patients are responsible for payments not covered by insurance, such as exclusions, deductibles and co-payments.
 
Self-pay revenues are primarily generated through the treatment of uninsured patients. Our hospitals experienced an increase in self-pay revenues during the past few years.


60


Table of Contents

This excerpt taken from the LPNT 10-Q filed Oct 26, 2006.
Revenue Sources
 
Our hospitals generate revenues by providing healthcare services to our patients. The majority of these healthcare services are directed by physicians. We are paid for these healthcare services from a number of


37


Table of Contents

different sources, depending upon the patient’s medical insurance coverage. Primarily, we are paid by governmental Medicare and Medicaid programs, commercial insurance, including managed care organizations, and directly by the patient. The amounts we are paid for providing healthcare services to our patients vary depending upon the payor. Governmental payors generally pay significantly less than the hospital’s customary charges for the services provided. Part I, Item 1. Business, “Sources of Revenue” in our 2005 Annual Report on Form 10-K contains a detailed discussion of our revenue sources.
 
Revenues from governmental payors, such as Medicare and Medicaid, are controlled by complex rules and regulations that stipulate the amount a hospital is paid for providing healthcare services. Our compliance with these rules and regulations requires an extensive effort to ensure we remain eligible to participate in these governmental programs. In addition, these rules and regulations are subject to frequent changes as a result of legislative and administrative action on both the federal and state level. For these reasons, revenues from governmental programs change frequently and require us to monitor regularly the environment in which these governmental programs operate.
 
Revenues from HMOs, PPOs and other private insurers are subject to contracts and other arrangements that require us to discount the amounts we customarily charge for healthcare services. These discounted arrangements often limit our ability to increase charges in response to increasing costs. We actively negotiate with these payors to ensure we are appropriately pricing our healthcare services. Insured patients are generally not responsible for any difference between customary hospital charges and the amounts received from commercial insurance payors. However, insured patients are responsible for payments not covered by insurance, such as exclusions, deductibles and co-payments.
 
Self-pay revenues are primarily generated through the treatment of uninsured patients. Our hospitals experienced an increase in self-pay revenues during the past three years.
 
This excerpt taken from the LPNT 10-Q filed Jul 27, 2006.
Revenue Sources
 
Our hospitals generate revenues by providing healthcare services to our patients. The majority of these healthcare services are directed by physicians. We are paid for these healthcare services from a number of different sources, depending upon the patient’s medical insurance coverage. Primarily, we are paid by governmental Medicare and Medicaid programs, commercial insurance, including managed care organizations, and directly by the patient. The amounts we are paid for providing healthcare services to our patients vary depending upon the payor. Governmental payors generally pay significantly less than the hospital’s customary charges for the services provided. Part I, Item 1. Business, “Sources of Revenue” in our 2005 Annual Report on Form 10-K contains a detailed discussion of our revenue sources.
 
Revenues from governmental payors, such as Medicare and Medicaid, are controlled by complex rules and regulations that stipulate the amount a hospital is paid for providing healthcare services. Our compliance with these rules and regulations requires an extensive effort to ensure we remain eligible to participate in these governmental programs. In addition, these rules and regulations are subject to frequent changes as a result of legislative and administrative action on both the federal and state level. For these reasons, revenues from governmental programs change frequently and require us to monitor regularly the environment in which these governmental programs operate.
 
Revenues from HMOs, PPOs and other private insurers are subject to contracts and other arrangements that require us to discount the amounts we customarily charge for healthcare services. These discounted arrangements often limit our ability to increase charges in response to increasing costs. We actively negotiate with these payors to ensure we are appropriately pricing our healthcare services. Insured patients are generally not responsible for any difference between customary hospital charges and the amounts received from commercial insurance payors. However, insured patients are responsible for payments not covered by insurance, such as exclusions, deductibles and co-payments.
 
Self-pay revenues are primarily generated through the treatment of uninsured patients. Our hospitals experienced an increase in self-pay revenues during the past three years.
 
This excerpt taken from the LPNT 10-Q filed Apr 28, 2006.
Revenue Sources
 
Our hospitals generate revenues by providing healthcare services to our patients. The majority of these healthcare services are directed by physicians. We are paid for these healthcare services from a number of different sources, depending upon the patient’s medical insurance coverage. Primarily, we are paid by governmental Medicare and Medicaid programs, commercial insurance, including managed care organizations, and directly by the patient. The amounts we are paid for providing healthcare services to our patients vary depending upon the payor. Governmental payors generally pay significantly less than the hospital’s customary charges for the services provided. Part I, Item 1. Business, “Sources of Revenuein our 2005 Annual Report on Form 10-K contains a detailed discussion of our revenue sources.
 
Revenues from governmental payors, such as Medicare and Medicaid, are controlled by complex rules and regulations that stipulate the amount a hospital is paid for providing healthcare services. Our compliance with these rules and regulations requires an extensive effort to ensure we remain eligible to participate in these governmental programs. In addition, these rules and regulations are subject to frequent changes as a result of legislative and administrative action on both the federal and state level. For these reasons, revenues from governmental programs change frequently and require us to monitor regularly the environment in which these governmental programs operate.
 
Revenues from HMOs, PPOs and other private insurers are subject to contracts and other arrangements that require us to discount the amounts we customarily charge for healthcare services. These discounted arrangements often limit our ability to increase charges in response to increasing costs. We actively negotiate with these payors to ensure we are appropriately pricing our healthcare services. Insured patients are generally not responsible for any difference between customary hospital charges and the amounts received from commercial insurance payors. However, insured patients are responsible for payments not covered by insurance, such as exclusions, deductibles and co-payments.
 
Self-pay revenues are primarily generated through the treatment of uninsured patients. Our hospitals experienced an increase in self-pay revenues during the past three years.
 

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Sun Healthcare Group (SUNH)
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