MRLN » Topics » Collection Process

These excerpts taken from the MRLN 10-K filed Mar 13, 2009.
Collection Process
 
Our centralized collections department is structured to collect delinquent accounts, minimize credit losses and collect post-default recovery dollars. Our collection strategy employs a blend of proven methods, including a life-cycle approach, under which a single collector handles an account through an account’s entire period of


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delinquency, and a delinquency bucket segmentation approach, where certain collectors are assigned to accounts based on their delinquency status. The life-cycle approach allows the collector to communicate consistently with the end user customer’s decision maker to ensure that delinquent customers are providing consistent information. It also creates account ownership by the collectors, allowing us to evaluate them based on the delinquency level of their assigned accounts. The collectors are individually accountable for their results and a significant portion of their compensation is based on the delinquency performance of their accounts. The delinquency bucket segmentation approach allows us to assign our more experienced collectors to the later stage delinquent accounts.
 
Our collectors are grouped into teams that support a single sales origination channel. By supporting a single channel, the collector is able to gain knowledge about the origination sources and the types of transactions and other characteristics within that channel. Our collection activities begin with phone contact when a payment becomes ten days past due and continue throughout the delinquency period. We utilize a predictive dialer that automates outbound telephone dialing. The dialer is primarily used to focus on and reduce the number of accounts that are between ten and 30 days delinquent. A series of collection notices are sent once an account reaches the 30-, 60-, 75- and 90-day delinquency stages. Collectors input notes directly into our servicing system, enabling the collectors to monitor the status of problem accounts and promptly take any necessary actions. In addition, late charges are assessed when a leasing customer fails to remit payment on a lease by its due date. If the lease continues to be delinquent, we may exercise our remedies under the terms of the contract, including acceleration of the entire lease balance, litigation and/or repossession.
 
In addition, the collections department employs specialist collectors who focus on delinquent late fees, property taxes, bankrupt and large balance accounts.
 
After an account becomes 120 days or more past due, it is charged-off and referred to our internal recovery group, consisting of a team of paralegals and collectors. The group utilizes several resources in an attempt to maximize recoveries on charged-off accounts, including: 1) initiating litigation against the end user customer and any personal guarantor using our internal legal staff; 2) referring the account to an outside law firm or collection agency; and/or 3) repossessing and remarketing the equipment through third parties.
 
At the end of the initial lease term, a customer may return the equipment, continue leasing the equipment, or purchase the equipment for the amount set forth in the purchase option granted to the customer. The end of term department maintains a team of employees who seek to realize our recorded residual in the leased equipment at the end of the lease term.
 
Collection
Process



 



Our centralized collections department is structured to collect
delinquent accounts, minimize credit losses and collect
post-default recovery dollars. Our collection strategy employs a
blend of proven methods, including a life-cycle approach, under
which a single collector handles an account through an
account’s entire period of





11





Table of Contents






delinquency, and a delinquency bucket segmentation approach,
where certain collectors are assigned to accounts based on their
delinquency status. The life-cycle approach allows the collector
to communicate consistently with the end user customer’s
decision maker to ensure that delinquent customers are providing
consistent information. It also creates account ownership by the
collectors, allowing us to evaluate them based on the
delinquency level of their assigned accounts. The collectors are
individually accountable for their results and a significant
portion of their compensation is based on the delinquency
performance of their accounts. The delinquency bucket
segmentation approach allows us to assign our more experienced
collectors to the later stage delinquent accounts.


 



Our collectors are grouped into teams that support a single
sales origination channel. By supporting a single channel, the
collector is able to gain knowledge about the origination
sources and the types of transactions and other characteristics
within that channel. Our collection activities begin with phone
contact when a payment becomes ten days past due and continue
throughout the delinquency period. We utilize a predictive
dialer that automates outbound telephone dialing. The dialer is
primarily used to focus on and reduce the number of accounts
that are between ten and 30 days delinquent. A series of
collection notices are sent once an account reaches the 30-,
60-, 75- and
90-day
delinquency stages. Collectors input notes directly into our
servicing system, enabling the collectors to monitor the status
of problem accounts and promptly take any necessary actions. In
addition, late charges are assessed when a leasing customer
fails to remit payment on a lease by its due date. If the lease
continues to be delinquent, we may exercise our remedies under
the terms of the contract, including acceleration of the entire
lease balance, litigation
and/or
repossession.


 



In addition, the collections department employs specialist
collectors who focus on delinquent late fees, property taxes,
bankrupt and large balance accounts.


 



After an account becomes 120 days or more past due, it is
charged-off and referred to our internal recovery group,
consisting of a team of paralegals and collectors. The group
utilizes several resources in an attempt to maximize recoveries
on charged-off accounts, including: 1) initiating
litigation against the end user customer and any personal
guarantor using our internal legal staff; 2) referring the
account to an outside law firm or collection agency;
and/or
3) repossessing and remarketing the equipment through third
parties.


 



At the end of the initial lease term, a customer may return the
equipment, continue leasing the equipment, or purchase the
equipment for the amount set forth in the purchase option
granted to the customer. The end of term department maintains a
team of employees who seek to realize our recorded residual in
the leased equipment at the end of the lease term.


 




Collection
Process



 



Our centralized collections department is structured to collect
delinquent accounts, minimize credit losses and collect
post-default recovery dollars. Our collection strategy employs a
blend of proven methods, including a life-cycle approach, under
which a single collector handles an account through an
account’s entire period of





11





Table of Contents






delinquency, and a delinquency bucket segmentation approach,
where certain collectors are assigned to accounts based on their
delinquency status. The life-cycle approach allows the collector
to communicate consistently with the end user customer’s
decision maker to ensure that delinquent customers are providing
consistent information. It also creates account ownership by the
collectors, allowing us to evaluate them based on the
delinquency level of their assigned accounts. The collectors are
individually accountable for their results and a significant
portion of their compensation is based on the delinquency
performance of their accounts. The delinquency bucket
segmentation approach allows us to assign our more experienced
collectors to the later stage delinquent accounts.


 



Our collectors are grouped into teams that support a single
sales origination channel. By supporting a single channel, the
collector is able to gain knowledge about the origination
sources and the types of transactions and other characteristics
within that channel. Our collection activities begin with phone
contact when a payment becomes ten days past due and continue
throughout the delinquency period. We utilize a predictive
dialer that automates outbound telephone dialing. The dialer is
primarily used to focus on and reduce the number of accounts
that are between ten and 30 days delinquent. A series of
collection notices are sent once an account reaches the 30-,
60-, 75- and
90-day
delinquency stages. Collectors input notes directly into our
servicing system, enabling the collectors to monitor the status
of problem accounts and promptly take any necessary actions. In
addition, late charges are assessed when a leasing customer
fails to remit payment on a lease by its due date. If the lease
continues to be delinquent, we may exercise our remedies under
the terms of the contract, including acceleration of the entire
lease balance, litigation
and/or
repossession.


 



In addition, the collections department employs specialist
collectors who focus on delinquent late fees, property taxes,
bankrupt and large balance accounts.


 



After an account becomes 120 days or more past due, it is
charged-off and referred to our internal recovery group,
consisting of a team of paralegals and collectors. The group
utilizes several resources in an attempt to maximize recoveries
on charged-off accounts, including: 1) initiating
litigation against the end user customer and any personal
guarantor using our internal legal staff; 2) referring the
account to an outside law firm or collection agency;
and/or
3) repossessing and remarketing the equipment through third
parties.


 



At the end of the initial lease term, a customer may return the
equipment, continue leasing the equipment, or purchase the
equipment for the amount set forth in the purchase option
granted to the customer. The end of term department maintains a
team of employees who seek to realize our recorded residual in
the leased equipment at the end of the lease term.


 




These excerpts taken from the MRLN 10-K filed Mar 5, 2008.
Collection Process
 
Our centralized collections department is structured to collect delinquent accounts, minimize credit losses and collect post-default recovery dollars. Our collection strategy generally utilizes a life-cycle approach, under which a single collector handles an account through an account’s entire period of delinquency. This approach allows the collector to communicate consistently with the end user customer’s decision maker to ensure that delinquent customers are providing consistent information. It also creates account ownership by the collectors, allowing us to


10


Table of Contents

evaluate them based on the delinquency level of their assigned accounts. The collectors are individually accountable for their results and a significant portion of their compensation is based on the delinquency performance of their accounts.
 
Our collectors are grouped into teams that support a single sales origination channel. By supporting a single channel, the collector is able to gain knowledge about the origination sources and the types of transactions and other characteristics within that channel. Our collection activities begin with phone contact when a payment becomes ten days past due and continue throughout the delinquency period. We utilize a predictive dialer that automates outbound telephone dialing. The dialer is used to focus on and reduce the number of accounts that are between ten and 30 days delinquent. A series of collection notices are sent once an account reaches the 30-, 60-, 75- and 90-day delinquency stages. Collectors input notes directly into our servicing system, enabling the collectors to monitor the status of problem accounts and promptly take any necessary actions. In addition, late charges are assessed when a leasing customer fails to remit payment on a lease by its due date. If the lease continues to be delinquent, we may exercise our remedies under the terms of the contract, including acceleration of the entire lease balance, litigation and/or repossession.
 
In addition, the collections department employs specialist collectors who focus on delinquent late fees, property taxes, bankrupt and large balance accounts. Bankrupt accounts are assigned to a bankruptcy paralegal and accounts with more than $30,000 outstanding are assigned to more experienced collection personnel.
 
After an account becomes 120 days or more past due, it is charged-off and referred to our internal recovery group, consisting of a lawyer and a team of paralegals. The group utilizes several resources in an attempt to maximize recoveries on charged-off accounts, including: 1) initiating litigation against the end user customer and any personal guarantor using our internal legal staff; 2) referring the account to an outside law firm or collection agency; and/or 3) repossessing and remarketing the equipment through third parties.
 
At the end of the initial lease term, a customer may return the equipment, continue leasing the equipment, or purchase the equipment for the amount set forth in the purchase option granted to the customer. The collections department maintains a team of employees who seek to realize our recorded residual in the leased equipment at the end of the lease term.
 
In October 2005, the Company submitted an application for an Industrial Bank Charter with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) and the State of Utah Department of Financial Institutions. On March 26, 2007, the Company announced that it received correspondence from the FDIC approving the application for FDIC deposit insurance made by the Company’s proposed Utah Industrial Bank, Marlin Business Bank (“Bank”), subject to the conditions set forth in the Order issued by the FDIC. The Company then filed a request to modify its initial approved plan for the Bank.
 
In February 2008, the Company received notification from the FDIC approving the modified bank application. The Company anticipates opening the Bank in the first half of 2008. The FDIC’s Order, the conditions of the approval and other related documents are available on the FDIC’s Web site at www.fdic.gov.
 
Collection
Process



 



Our centralized collections department is structured to collect
delinquent accounts, minimize credit losses and collect
post-default recovery dollars. Our collection strategy generally
utilizes a life-cycle approach, under which a single collector
handles an account through an account’s entire period of
delinquency. This approach allows the collector to communicate
consistently with the end user customer’s decision maker to
ensure that delinquent customers are providing consistent
information. It also creates account ownership by the
collectors, allowing us to





10





Table of Contents






evaluate them based on the delinquency level of their assigned
accounts. The collectors are individually accountable for their
results and a significant portion of their compensation is based
on the delinquency performance of their accounts.


 



Our collectors are grouped into teams that support a single
sales origination channel. By supporting a single channel, the
collector is able to gain knowledge about the origination
sources and the types of transactions and other characteristics
within that channel. Our collection activities begin with phone
contact when a payment becomes ten days past due and continue
throughout the delinquency period. We utilize a predictive
dialer that automates outbound telephone dialing. The dialer is
used to focus on and reduce the number of accounts that are
between ten and 30 days delinquent. A series of collection
notices are sent once an account reaches the 30-, 60-, 75- and
90-day
delinquency stages. Collectors input notes directly into our
servicing system, enabling the collectors to monitor the status
of problem accounts and promptly take any necessary actions. In
addition, late charges are assessed when a leasing customer
fails to remit payment on a lease by its due date. If the lease
continues to be delinquent, we may exercise our remedies under
the terms of the contract, including acceleration of the entire
lease balance, litigation
and/or
repossession.


 



In addition, the collections department employs specialist
collectors who focus on delinquent late fees, property taxes,
bankrupt and large balance accounts. Bankrupt accounts are
assigned to a bankruptcy paralegal and accounts with more than
$30,000 outstanding are assigned to more experienced collection
personnel.


 



After an account becomes 120 days or more past due, it is
charged-off and referred to our internal recovery group,
consisting of a lawyer and a team of paralegals. The group
utilizes several resources in an attempt to maximize recoveries
on charged-off accounts, including: 1) initiating
litigation against the end user customer and any personal
guarantor using our internal legal staff; 2) referring the
account to an outside law firm or collection agency;
and/or
3) repossessing and remarketing the equipment through third
parties.


 



At the end of the initial lease term, a customer may return the
equipment, continue leasing the equipment, or purchase the
equipment for the amount set forth in the purchase option
granted to the customer. The collections department maintains a
team of employees who seek to realize our recorded residual in
the leased equipment at the end of the lease term.


 



In October 2005, the Company submitted an application for an
Industrial Bank Charter with the Federal Deposit Insurance
Corporation (“FDIC”) and the State of Utah Department
of Financial Institutions. On March 26, 2007, the Company
announced that it received correspondence from the FDIC
approving the application for FDIC deposit insurance made by the
Company’s proposed Utah Industrial Bank, Marlin Business
Bank (“Bank”), subject to the conditions set forth in
the Order issued by the FDIC. The Company then filed a request
to modify its initial approved plan for the Bank.


 



In February 2008, the Company received notification from the
FDIC approving the modified bank application. The Company
anticipates opening the Bank in the first half of 2008. The
FDIC’s Order, the conditions of the approval and other
related documents are available on the FDIC’s Web site at
www.fdic.gov.


 




This excerpt taken from the MRLN 10-K filed Mar 9, 2007.
Collection Process
 
Our centralized collections department is structured to collect delinquent accounts, minimize credit losses and collect post-default recovery dollars. Our collection strategy generally utilizes a life-cycle approach, under which a single collector handles an account through an account’s entire period of delinquency. This approach allows the collector to communicate consistently with the end user customer’s decision-maker to ensure that delinquent customers are providing consistent information. It also creates account ownership by the collectors, allowing us to


10


Table of Contents

evaluate them based on the delinquency level of their assigned accounts. The collectors are individually accountable for their results and a significant portion of their compensation is based on the delinquency performance of their accounts.
 
Our collectors are grouped into teams that support a single sales origination channel. By supporting a single channel, the collector is able to gain knowledge about the origination sources and the types of transactions and other characteristics within that channel. Our collection activities begin with phone contact when a payment becomes ten days past due and continue throughout the delinquency period. We utilize a predictive dialer that automates outbound telephone dialing. The dialer is used to focus on and reduce the number of accounts that are between ten and 30 days delinquent. A series of collection notices are sent once an account reaches the 30-, 60-, 75- and 90-day delinquency stages. Collectors input notes directly into our servicing system, enabling the collectors to monitor the status of problem accounts and promptly take any necessary actions. In addition, late charges are assessed when a leasing customer fails to remit payment on a lease by its due date. If the lease continues to be delinquent, we may exercise our remedies under the terms of the contract, including acceleration of the entire lease balance, litigation and/or repossession.
 
In addition, the collections department employs specialist collectors who focus on delinquent late fees, property taxes, bankrupt and large balance accounts. Bankrupt accounts are assigned to a bankruptcy paralegal and accounts with more than $30,000 outstanding are assigned to more experienced collection personnel.
 
After an account becomes 120 days or more past due, it is charged-off and referred to our internal recovery group, consisting of a lawyer and a team of paralegals. The group utilizes several resources in an attempt to maximize recoveries on charged-off accounts, including: 1) initiating litigation against the end user customer and any personal guarantor using our internal legal staff; 2) referring the account to an outside law firm or collection agency; and/or 3) repossessing and remarketing the equipment through third parties.
 
At the end of the initial lease term, a customer may return the equipment, continue leasing the equipment, or purchase the equipment for the amount set forth in the purchase option granted to the customer. The collections department maintains a team of employees who seek to realize our recorded residual in the leased equipment at the end of the lease term.
 
In October 2005, we submitted an application for an Industrial Bank Charter with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and the State of Utah Department of Financial Institutions to form Marlin Business Bank (“Bank”). On July 28, 2006 the FDIC announced that it placed a six-month moratorium on all industrial bank applications, in response to the increasing number of applications by companies not already engaged in financial services. On January 31, 2007, the FDIC extended the moratorium for an additional year to sunset on January 31, 2008, but the FDIC excepted from the moratorium applicants engaged only in financial activities. Subject to regulatory approvals, Marlin Business Bank will operate from our Salt Lake City office. More information regarding the moratorium may be found at http://www.fdic.gov.
 
This excerpt taken from the MRLN 10-K filed Apr 14, 2006.
Collection Process
 
Our centralized collections department is structured to collect delinquent accounts, minimize credit losses and collect post-default recovery dollars. Our collection strategy generally utilizes a life-cycle approach, under which a single collector handles an account through an account’s entire period of delinquency. This approach allows the collector to consistently communicate with the end user customer’s decision-maker to ensure that delinquent customers are providing consistent information. It also creates account ownership by the collectors, allowing us to evaluate them based on the delinquency level of their assigned accounts. The collectors are individually accountable for their results and a significant portion of their compensation is based on the delinquency performance of their accounts.
 
Our collectors are grouped into teams that support a single sales origination channel. By supporting a single channel, the collector is able to gain knowledge about the origination sources and the types of transactions and other characteristics within that channel. Our collection activities begin with phone contact when a payment becomes ten days past due and continue throughout the delinquency period. We utilize a predictive dialer that automates outbound telephone dialing. The dialer is used to focus on and reduce the number of accounts that are between ten and 30 days delinquent. A series of collection notices are sent once an account reaches the 30-, 60-, 75- and 90-day delinquency stages. Collectors input notes directly into our servicing system, enabling them to monitor the status of problem accounts and promptly take any necessary actions. In addition, late charges are assessed when a leasing customer fails to remit payment on a lease by its due date. If the lease continues to be delinquent, we may exercise our remedies under the terms of the contract, including acceleration of the entire lease balance, litigation and/or repossession.


10


Table of Contents

In addition, the collections department employs specialist collectors who focus on delinquent late fees, property taxes, bankrupt and large balance accounts. Bankrupt accounts are assigned to a bankruptcy paralegal and accounts with more than $30,000 outstanding are assigned to more experienced collection personnel.
 
After an account becomes 120 days or more past due, it is charged-off and referred to our internal recovery group, consisting of a lawyer and a team of paralegals. The group utilizes several resources in an attempt to maximize recoveries on charged-off accounts, including: 1) initiating litigation against the end user customer and any personal guarantor using our internal legal staff; 2) referring the account to an outside law firm or collection agency; and/or 3) repossessing and remarketing the equipment through third parties.
 
At the end of the initial lease term, a customer may return the equipment, continue leasing the equipment, or purchase the equipment for the amount set forth in the purchase option granted to the customer. The collections department maintains a team of employees who seek to realize our recorded residual in the leased equipment at the end of the lease term.
 
Marlin Business Bank.  In October 2005 we filed an application for an Industrial Bank Charter with the FDIC and the State of Utah Department of Financial Institutions to form Marlin Business Bank (“Bank”). Subject to regulatory approvals, we plan to begin operating the Bank in 2006 to further diversify our funding by issuing FDIC insured deposits. Marlin Business Bank will operate from our Salt Lake City office.
 
The Bank will be wholly owned by Marlin Business Services Corp. In addition to further diversifying our funding sources, over time the Bank may add other product offerings to better serve our customer base. The Bank will be subject to FDIC and Utah Department of Financial Institutions rules and regulations. Marlin will provide the necessary capital to maintain the Bank at “well-capitalized” status as defined by banking regulations. Initial cash capital requirements are expected to be $15.0 million.
 
Initially FDIC deposits will be raised from the brokered certificates of deposit market. All deposits will be transacted via telephone, mail, and/or ACH and wire transfer. There will be limited if any face to face interaction with deposit and lease/loan customers in the Bank’s office. The Bank’s initial asset product offering will consist of small ticket leasing similar to what we originate currently.
 
We have assembled a team of experienced bank managers and directors to provide leadership for the Bank. Many of the operational aspects of the Bank will be outsourced to Marlin Leasing Corp.
 
This excerpt taken from the MRLN 10-K filed Mar 2, 2006.
Collection Process
 
Our centralized collections department is structured to collect delinquent accounts, minimize credit losses and collect post-default recovery dollars. Our collection strategy generally utilizes a life-cycle approach, under which a single collector handles an account through an account’s entire period of delinquency. This approach allows the collector to consistently communicate with the end user customer’s decision-maker to ensure that delinquent customers are providing consistent information. It also creates account ownership by the collectors, allowing us to evaluate them based on the delinquency level of their assigned accounts. The collectors are individually accountable for their results and a significant portion of their compensation is based on the delinquency performance of their accounts.
 
Our collectors are grouped into teams that support a single sales origination channel. By supporting a single channel, the collector is able to gain knowledge about the origination sources and the types of transactions and other characteristics within that channel. Our collection activities begin with phone contact when a payment becomes ten days past due and continue throughout the delinquency period. We utilize a predictive dialer that automates outbound telephone dialing. The dialer is used to focus on and reduce the number of accounts that are between ten and 30 days delinquent. A series of collection notices are sent once an account reaches the 30-, 60-, 75- and 90-day delinquency stages. Collectors input notes directly into our servicing system, enabling them to monitor the status of problem accounts and promptly take any necessary actions. In addition, late charges are assessed when a leasing customer fails to remit payment on a lease by its due date. If the lease continues to be delinquent, we may exercise our remedies under the terms of the contract, including acceleration of the entire lease balance, litigation and/or repossession.


10


Table of Contents

In addition, the collections department employs specialist collectors who focus on delinquent late fees, property taxes, bankrupt and large balance accounts. Bankrupt accounts are assigned to a bankruptcy paralegal and accounts with more than $30,000 outstanding are assigned to more experienced collection personnel.
 
After an account becomes 120 days or more past due, it is charged-off and referred to our internal recovery group, consisting of a lawyer and a team of paralegals. The group utilizes several resources in an attempt to maximize recoveries on charged-off accounts, including: 1) initiating litigation against the end user customer and any personal guarantor using our internal legal staff; 2) referring the account to an outside law firm or collection agency; and/or 3) repossessing and remarketing the equipment through third parties.
 
At the end of the initial lease term, a customer may return the equipment, continue leasing the equipment, or purchase the equipment for the amount set forth in the purchase option granted to the customer. The collections department maintains a team of employees who seek to realize our recorded residual in the leased equipment at the end of the lease term.
 
Marlin Business Bank.  In October 2005 we filed an application for an Industrial Bank Charter with the FDIC and the State of Utah Department of Financial Institutions to form Marlin Business Bank (“Bank”). Subject to regulatory approvals, we plan to begin operating the Bank in 2006 to further diversify our funding by issuing FDIC insured deposits. Marlin Business Bank will operate from our Salt Lake City office.
 
The Bank will be wholly owned by Marlin Business Services Corp. In addition to further diversifying our funding sources, over time the Bank may add other product offerings to better serve our customer base. The Bank will be subject to FDIC and Utah Department of Financial Institutions rules and regulations. Marlin will provide the necessary capital to maintain the Bank at “well-capitalized” status as defined by banking regulations. Initial cash capital requirements are expected to be $15.0 million.
 
Initially FDIC deposits will be raised from the brokered certificates of deposit market. All deposits will be transacted via telephone, mail, and/or ACH and wire transfer. There will be limited if any face to face interaction with deposit and lease/loan customers in the Bank’s office. The Bank’s initial asset product offering will consist of small ticket leasing similar to what we originate currently.
 
We have assembled a team of experienced bank managers and directors to provide leadership for the Bank. Many of the operational aspects of the Bank will be outsourced to Marlin Leasing Corp.
 

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