MCCC » Topics » Franchises

These excerpts taken from the MCCC 10-K filed Mar 16, 2009.
Franchises
 
Cable systems are generally operated under non-exclusive franchises granted by local governmental authorities. Historically, these franchises typically imposed numerous conditions, such as: time limitations on commencement and completion of construction; conditions of service, including population density specifications for service, the bandwidth capacity of the system, the broad categories of programming required, the provision of free service to schools and other public institutions, and the provision and funding of public, educational and governmental access channels (“PEG access channels”); a provision for franchise fees; and the maintenance or posting of insurance or indemnity bonds by the cable operator. Many of the provisions of local franchises are subject to federal regulation under the Communications Act of 1934, or Communications Act, as amended (the “Cable Act”).
 
Many of the states in which we operate have recently enacted comprehensive state-issued franchising statutes that cede control over our franchises away from local communities and towards state agencies, such as the various public service commissions that regulate other utilities. As of December 31, 2008, about 42% of our customer base was under a state-issued franchise. Some of these states permit us to exchange local franchises for state issued franchises before the expiration date of the local franchise. These state statutes make the terms and conditions of our franchises more uniform, and in some cases, eliminate locally imposed requirements such as PEG access channels.
 
As of December 31, 2008, we held 1,368 cable franchises. These franchises provide for the payment of fees to the issuing authority. In most of our cable systems, such franchise fees are passed through directly to the customers. The Cable Act prohibits franchising authorities from imposing franchise fees in excess of 5% of gross revenues from specified cable services and permits the cable operator to seek renegotiation and modification of franchise requirements if warranted by changed circumstances.
 
We have never had a franchise revoked or failed to have a franchise renewed. In addition, substantially all of our franchises eligible for renewal have been renewed or extended prior to their stated expirations, and no franchise


9


Table of Contents

community has refused to consent to a franchise transfer to us. The Cable Act provides, among other things, for an orderly franchise renewal process in which franchise renewal will not be unreasonably withheld or, if renewal is denied and the franchising authority acquires ownership of the cable system or effects a transfer of the cable system to another person, the cable operator generally is entitled to the “fair market value” for the cable system covered by such franchise. The Cable Act also established comprehensive renewal procedures, which require that an incumbent franchisee’s renewal application be assessed on our own merits and not as part of a comparative process with competing applications. We believe that we have satisfactory relationships with our franchising communities.
 
Franchises
 
Cable systems are generally operated under non-exclusive franchises granted by local governmental authorities. Historically, these franchises typically imposed numerous conditions, such as: time limitations on commencement and completion of construction; conditions of service, including population density specifications for service, the bandwidth capacity of the system, the broad categories of programming required, the provision of free service to schools and other public institutions, and the provision and funding of public, educational and governmental access channels (“PEG access channels”); a provision for franchise fees; and the maintenance or posting of insurance or indemnity bonds by the cable operator. Many of the provisions of local franchises are subject to federal regulation under the Communications Act of 1934, or Communications Act, as amended (the “Cable Act”).
 
Many of the states in which we operate have recently enacted comprehensive state-issued franchising statutes that cede control over our franchises away from local communities and towards state agencies, such as the various public service commissions that regulate other utilities. As of December 31, 2008, about 42% of our customer base was under a state-issued franchise. Some of these states permit us to exchange local franchises for state issued franchises before the expiration date of the local franchise. These state statutes make the terms and conditions of our franchises more uniform, and in some cases, eliminate locally imposed requirements such as PEG access channels.
 
As of December 31, 2008, we held 1,368 cable franchises. These franchises provide for the payment of fees to the issuing authority. In most of our cable systems, such franchise fees are passed through directly to the customers. The Cable Act prohibits franchising authorities from imposing franchise fees in excess of 5% of gross revenues from specified cable services and permits the cable operator to seek renegotiation and modification of franchise requirements if warranted by changed circumstances.
 
We have never had a franchise revoked or failed to have a franchise renewed. In addition, substantially all of our franchises eligible for renewal have been renewed or extended prior to their stated expirations, and no franchise


9


Table of Contents

community has refused to consent to a franchise transfer to us. The Cable Act provides, among other things, for an orderly franchise renewal process in which franchise renewal will not be unreasonably withheld or, if renewal is denied and the franchising authority acquires ownership of the cable system or effects a transfer of the cable system to another person, the cable operator generally is entitled to the “fair market value” for the cable system covered by such franchise. The Cable Act also established comprehensive renewal procedures, which require that an incumbent franchisee’s renewal application be assessed on our own merits and not as part of a comparative process with competing applications. We believe that we have satisfactory relationships with our franchising communities.
 
Franchises
 
Cable systems are generally operated under non-exclusive franchises granted by local governmental authorities. Historically, these franchises typically imposed numerous conditions, such as: time limitations on commencement and completion of construction; conditions of service, including population density specifications for service, the bandwidth capacity of the system, the broad categories of programming required, the provision of free service to schools and other public institutions, and the provision and funding of public, educational and governmental access channels (“PEG access channels”); a provision for franchise fees; and the maintenance or posting of insurance or indemnity bonds by the cable operator. Many of the provisions of local franchises are subject to federal regulation under the Communications Act of 1934, or Communications Act, as amended (the “Cable Act”).
 
Many of the states in which we operate have recently enacted comprehensive state-issued franchising statutes that cede control over our franchises away from local communities and towards state agencies, such as the various public service commissions that regulate other utilities. As of December 31, 2008, about 42% of our customer base was under a state-issued franchise. Some of these states permit us to exchange local franchises for state issued franchises before the expiration date of the local franchise. These state statutes make the terms and conditions of our franchises more uniform, and in some cases, eliminate locally imposed requirements such as PEG access channels.
 
As of December 31, 2008, we held 1,368 cable franchises. These franchises provide for the payment of fees to the issuing authority. In most of our cable systems, such franchise fees are passed through directly to the customers. The Cable Act prohibits franchising authorities from imposing franchise fees in excess of 5% of gross revenues from specified cable services and permits the cable operator to seek renegotiation and modification of franchise requirements if warranted by changed circumstances.
 
We have never had a franchise revoked or failed to have a franchise renewed. In addition, substantially all of our franchises eligible for renewal have been renewed or extended prior to their stated expirations, and no franchise


9


Table of Contents

community has refused to consent to a franchise transfer to us. The Cable Act provides, among other things, for an orderly franchise renewal process in which franchise renewal will not be unreasonably withheld or, if renewal is denied and the franchising authority acquires ownership of the cable system or effects a transfer of the cable system to another person, the cable operator generally is entitled to the “fair market value” for the cable system covered by such franchise. The Cable Act also established comprehensive renewal procedures, which require that an incumbent franchisee’s renewal application be assessed on our own merits and not as part of a comparative process with competing applications. We believe that we have satisfactory relationships with our franchising communities.
 
Franchises
 
Cable systems are generally operated under non-exclusive franchises granted by local governmental authorities. Historically, these franchises typically imposed numerous conditions, such as: time limitations on commencement and completion of construction; conditions of service, including population density specifications for service, the bandwidth capacity of the system, the broad categories of programming required, the provision of free service to schools and other public institutions, and the provision and funding of public, educational and governmental access channels (“PEG access channels”); a provision for franchise fees; and the maintenance or posting of insurance or indemnity bonds by the cable operator. Many of the provisions of local franchises are subject to federal regulation under the Communications Act of 1934, or Communications Act, as amended (the “Cable Act”).
 
Many of the states in which we operate have recently enacted comprehensive state-issued franchising statutes that cede control over our franchises away from local communities and towards state agencies, such as the various public service commissions that regulate other utilities. As of December 31, 2008, about 42% of our customer base was under a state-issued franchise. Some of these states permit us to exchange local franchises for state issued franchises before the expiration date of the local franchise. These state statutes make the terms and conditions of our franchises more uniform, and in some cases, eliminate locally imposed requirements such as PEG access channels.
 
As of December 31, 2008, we held 1,368 cable franchises. These franchises provide for the payment of fees to the issuing authority. In most of our cable systems, such franchise fees are passed through directly to the customers. The Cable Act prohibits franchising authorities from imposing franchise fees in excess of 5% of gross revenues from specified cable services and permits the cable operator to seek renegotiation and modification of franchise requirements if warranted by changed circumstances.
 
We have never had a franchise revoked or failed to have a franchise renewed. In addition, substantially all of our franchises eligible for renewal have been renewed or extended prior to their stated expirations, and no franchise


9


Table of Contents

community has refused to consent to a franchise transfer to us. The Cable Act provides, among other things, for an orderly franchise renewal process in which franchise renewal will not be unreasonably withheld or, if renewal is denied and the franchising authority acquires ownership of the cable system or effects a transfer of the cable system to another person, the cable operator generally is entitled to the “fair market value” for the cable system covered by such franchise. The Cable Act also established comprehensive renewal procedures, which require that an incumbent franchisee’s renewal application be assessed on our own merits and not as part of a comparative process with competing applications. We believe that we have satisfactory relationships with our franchising communities.
 
Franchises


 



Cable systems are generally operated under non-exclusive
franchises granted by local governmental authorities.
Historically, these franchises typically imposed numerous
conditions, such as: time limitations on commencement and
completion of construction; conditions of service, including
population density specifications for service, the bandwidth
capacity of the system, the broad categories of programming
required, the provision of free service to schools and other
public institutions, and the provision and funding of public,
educational and governmental access channels (“PEG access
channels”); a provision for franchise fees; and the
maintenance or posting of insurance or indemnity bonds by the
cable operator. Many of the provisions of local franchises are
subject to federal regulation under the Communications Act of
1934, or Communications Act, as amended (the “Cable
Act”).


 



Many of the states in which we operate have recently enacted
comprehensive state-issued franchising statutes that cede
control over our franchises away from local communities and
towards state agencies, such as the various public service
commissions that regulate other utilities. As of
December 31, 2008, about 42% of our customer base was under
a state-issued franchise. Some of these states permit us to
exchange local franchises for state issued franchises before the
expiration date of the local franchise. These state statutes
make the terms and conditions of our franchises more uniform,
and in some cases, eliminate locally imposed requirements such
as PEG access channels.


 



As of December 31, 2008, we held 1,368 cable franchises.
These franchises provide for the payment of fees to the issuing
authority. In most of our cable systems, such franchise fees are
passed through directly to the customers. The Cable Act
prohibits franchising authorities from imposing franchise fees
in excess of 5% of gross revenues from specified cable services
and permits the cable operator to seek renegotiation and
modification of franchise requirements if warranted by changed
circumstances.


 



We have never had a franchise revoked or failed to have a
franchise renewed. In addition, substantially all of our
franchises eligible for renewal have been renewed or extended
prior to their stated expirations, and no franchise





9





Table of Contents






community has refused to consent to a franchise transfer to us.
The Cable Act provides, among other things, for an orderly
franchise renewal process in which franchise renewal will not be
unreasonably withheld or, if renewal is denied and the
franchising authority acquires ownership of the cable system or
effects a transfer of the cable system to another person, the
cable operator generally is entitled to the “fair market
value” for the cable system covered by such franchise. The
Cable Act also established comprehensive renewal procedures,
which require that an incumbent franchisee’s renewal
application be assessed on our own merits and not as part of a
comparative process with competing applications. We believe that
we have satisfactory relationships with our franchising
communities.


 




Franchises


 



Cable systems are generally operated under non-exclusive
franchises granted by local governmental authorities.
Historically, these franchises typically imposed numerous
conditions, such as: time limitations on commencement and
completion of construction; conditions of service, including
population density specifications for service, the bandwidth
capacity of the system, the broad categories of programming
required, the provision of free service to schools and other
public institutions, and the provision and funding of public,
educational and governmental access channels (“PEG access
channels”); a provision for franchise fees; and the
maintenance or posting of insurance or indemnity bonds by the
cable operator. Many of the provisions of local franchises are
subject to federal regulation under the Communications Act of
1934, or Communications Act, as amended (the “Cable
Act”).


 



Many of the states in which we operate have recently enacted
comprehensive state-issued franchising statutes that cede
control over our franchises away from local communities and
towards state agencies, such as the various public service
commissions that regulate other utilities. As of
December 31, 2008, about 42% of our customer base was under
a state-issued franchise. Some of these states permit us to
exchange local franchises for state issued franchises before the
expiration date of the local franchise. These state statutes
make the terms and conditions of our franchises more uniform,
and in some cases, eliminate locally imposed requirements such
as PEG access channels.


 



As of December 31, 2008, we held 1,368 cable franchises.
These franchises provide for the payment of fees to the issuing
authority. In most of our cable systems, such franchise fees are
passed through directly to the customers. The Cable Act
prohibits franchising authorities from imposing franchise fees
in excess of 5% of gross revenues from specified cable services
and permits the cable operator to seek renegotiation and
modification of franchise requirements if warranted by changed
circumstances.


 



We have never had a franchise revoked or failed to have a
franchise renewed. In addition, substantially all of our
franchises eligible for renewal have been renewed or extended
prior to their stated expirations, and no franchise





9





Table of Contents






community has refused to consent to a franchise transfer to us.
The Cable Act provides, among other things, for an orderly
franchise renewal process in which franchise renewal will not be
unreasonably withheld or, if renewal is denied and the
franchising authority acquires ownership of the cable system or
effects a transfer of the cable system to another person, the
cable operator generally is entitled to the “fair market
value” for the cable system covered by such franchise. The
Cable Act also established comprehensive renewal procedures,
which require that an incumbent franchisee’s renewal
application be assessed on our own merits and not as part of a
comparative process with competing applications. We believe that
we have satisfactory relationships with our franchising
communities.


 




Franchises


 



Cable systems are generally operated under non-exclusive
franchises granted by local governmental authorities.
Historically, these franchises typically imposed numerous
conditions, such as: time limitations on commencement and
completion of construction; conditions of service, including
population density specifications for service, the bandwidth
capacity of the system, the broad categories of programming
required, the provision of free service to schools and other
public institutions, and the provision and funding of public,
educational and governmental access channels (“PEG access
channels”); a provision for franchise fees; and the
maintenance or posting of insurance or indemnity bonds by the
cable operator. Many of the provisions of local franchises are
subject to federal regulation under the Communications Act of
1934, or Communications Act, as amended (the “Cable
Act”).


 



Many of the states in which we operate have recently enacted
comprehensive state-issued franchising statutes that cede
control over our franchises away from local communities and
towards state agencies, such as the various public service
commissions that regulate other utilities. As of
December 31, 2008, about 42% of our customer base was under
a state-issued franchise. Some of these states permit us to
exchange local franchises for state issued franchises before the
expiration date of the local franchise. These state statutes
make the terms and conditions of our franchises more uniform,
and in some cases, eliminate locally imposed requirements such
as PEG access channels.


 



As of December 31, 2008, we held 1,368 cable franchises.
These franchises provide for the payment of fees to the issuing
authority. In most of our cable systems, such franchise fees are
passed through directly to the customers. The Cable Act
prohibits franchising authorities from imposing franchise fees
in excess of 5% of gross revenues from specified cable services
and permits the cable operator to seek renegotiation and
modification of franchise requirements if warranted by changed
circumstances.


 



We have never had a franchise revoked or failed to have a
franchise renewed. In addition, substantially all of our
franchises eligible for renewal have been renewed or extended
prior to their stated expirations, and no franchise





9





Table of Contents






community has refused to consent to a franchise transfer to us.
The Cable Act provides, among other things, for an orderly
franchise renewal process in which franchise renewal will not be
unreasonably withheld or, if renewal is denied and the
franchising authority acquires ownership of the cable system or
effects a transfer of the cable system to another person, the
cable operator generally is entitled to the “fair market
value” for the cable system covered by such franchise. The
Cable Act also established comprehensive renewal procedures,
which require that an incumbent franchisee’s renewal
application be assessed on our own merits and not as part of a
comparative process with competing applications. We believe that
we have satisfactory relationships with our franchising
communities.


 




Franchises


 



Cable systems are generally operated under non-exclusive
franchises granted by local governmental authorities.
Historically, these franchises typically imposed numerous
conditions, such as: time limitations on commencement and
completion of construction; conditions of service, including
population density specifications for service, the bandwidth
capacity of the system, the broad categories of programming
required, the provision of free service to schools and other
public institutions, and the provision and funding of public,
educational and governmental access channels (“PEG access
channels”); a provision for franchise fees; and the
maintenance or posting of insurance or indemnity bonds by the
cable operator. Many of the provisions of local franchises are
subject to federal regulation under the Communications Act of
1934, or Communications Act, as amended (the “Cable
Act”).


 



Many of the states in which we operate have recently enacted
comprehensive state-issued franchising statutes that cede
control over our franchises away from local communities and
towards state agencies, such as the various public service
commissions that regulate other utilities. As of
December 31, 2008, about 42% of our customer base was under
a state-issued franchise. Some of these states permit us to
exchange local franchises for state issued franchises before the
expiration date of the local franchise. These state statutes
make the terms and conditions of our franchises more uniform,
and in some cases, eliminate locally imposed requirements such
as PEG access channels.


 



As of December 31, 2008, we held 1,368 cable franchises.
These franchises provide for the payment of fees to the issuing
authority. In most of our cable systems, such franchise fees are
passed through directly to the customers. The Cable Act
prohibits franchising authorities from imposing franchise fees
in excess of 5% of gross revenues from specified cable services
and permits the cable operator to seek renegotiation and
modification of franchise requirements if warranted by changed
circumstances.


 



We have never had a franchise revoked or failed to have a
franchise renewed. In addition, substantially all of our
franchises eligible for renewal have been renewed or extended
prior to their stated expirations, and no franchise





9





Table of Contents






community has refused to consent to a franchise transfer to us.
The Cable Act provides, among other things, for an orderly
franchise renewal process in which franchise renewal will not be
unreasonably withheld or, if renewal is denied and the
franchising authority acquires ownership of the cable system or
effects a transfer of the cable system to another person, the
cable operator generally is entitled to the “fair market
value” for the cable system covered by such franchise. The
Cable Act also established comprehensive renewal procedures,
which require that an incumbent franchisee’s renewal
application be assessed on our own merits and not as part of a
comparative process with competing applications. We believe that
we have satisfactory relationships with our franchising
communities.


 




These excerpts taken from the MCCC 10-K filed Mar 14, 2008.
Franchises
 
Cable systems are generally operated under non-exclusive franchises granted by local governmental authorities. These franchises typically contain many conditions, such as: time limitations on commencement and completion of construction; conditions of service, including population density specifications for service, the bandwidth capacity of the system, the broad categories of programming required, the provision of free service to schools and other public institutions, and the provision and funding of public, educational and governmental access channels (“PEG Access Channels”); a provision for franchise fees; and the maintenance or posting of insurance or indemnity bonds by the cable operator. Many of the provisions of local franchises are subject to federal regulation under the Communications Act of 1934, or Communications Act, as amended.
 
Many of the states in which we operate, including Missouri, Georgia, Florida, Michigan, North Carolina, Kansas, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa and California, have recently enacted comprehensive state-issued franchising statutes that cede control over our franchises away from local communities and towards state agencies, such as the various public service commissions that regulate other utilities. Some of these states permit us to exchange local franchises for state held franchises before the expiration date of the local franchise. These state statutes make the terms and conditions of our franchises more uniform, and in some cases, eliminate locally imposed requirements such as PEG Access Channels.
 
As of December 31, 2007, we held 1,366 cable television franchises. These franchises provide for the payment of fees to the issuing authority. In most of our cable systems, such franchise fees are passed through directly to the customers. The Cable Communications Policy Act of 1984, or 1984 Cable Act, prohibits franchising authorities from imposing franchise fees in excess of 5% of gross revenues from specified cable services and permits the cable operator to seek renegotiation and modification of franchise requirements if warranted by changed circumstances.
 
We have never had a franchise revoked or failed to have a franchise renewed. In addition, substantially all of our franchises eligible for renewal have been renewed or extended prior to their stated expirations, and no franchise community has refused to consent to a franchise transfer to us. The 1984 Cable Act provides, among other things, for an orderly franchise renewal process in which franchise renewal will not be unreasonably withheld or, if renewal is denied and the franchising authority acquires ownership of the cable system or effects a transfer of the cable system to another person, the cable operator generally is entitled to the “fair market value” for the cable system covered by such franchise. In addition, the 1984 Cable Act established comprehensive renewal procedures, which require that an incumbent franchisee’s renewal application be assessed on our own merits and not as part of a comparative process with competing applications. We believe that we have satisfactory relationships with our franchising communities.


10


Table of Contents

Franchises


 



Cable systems are generally operated under non-exclusive
franchises granted by local governmental authorities. These
franchises typically contain many conditions, such as: time
limitations on commencement and completion of construction;
conditions of service, including population density
specifications for service, the bandwidth capacity of the
system, the broad categories of programming required, the
provision of free service to schools and other public
institutions, and the provision and funding of public,
educational and governmental access channels (“PEG Access
Channels”); a provision for franchise fees; and the
maintenance or posting of insurance or indemnity bonds by the
cable operator. Many of the provisions of local franchises are
subject to federal regulation under the Communications Act of
1934, or Communications Act, as amended.


 



Many of the states in which we operate, including Missouri,
Georgia, Florida, Michigan, North Carolina, Kansas, Illinois,
Indiana, Iowa and California, have recently enacted
comprehensive state-issued franchising statutes that cede
control over our franchises away from local communities and
towards state agencies, such as the various public service
commissions that regulate other utilities. Some of these states
permit us to exchange local franchises for state held franchises
before the expiration date of the local franchise. These state
statutes make the terms and conditions of our franchises more
uniform, and in some cases, eliminate locally imposed
requirements such as PEG Access Channels.


 



As of December 31, 2007, we held 1,366 cable television
franchises. These franchises provide for the payment of fees to
the issuing authority. In most of our cable systems, such
franchise fees are passed through directly to the customers. The
Cable Communications Policy Act of 1984, or 1984 Cable Act,
prohibits franchising authorities from imposing franchise fees
in excess of 5% of gross revenues from specified cable services
and permits the cable operator to seek renegotiation and
modification of franchise requirements if warranted by changed
circumstances.


 



We have never had a franchise revoked or failed to have a
franchise renewed. In addition, substantially all of our
franchises eligible for renewal have been renewed or extended
prior to their stated expirations, and no franchise community
has refused to consent to a franchise transfer to us. The 1984
Cable Act provides, among other things, for an orderly franchise
renewal process in which franchise renewal will not be
unreasonably withheld or, if renewal is denied and the
franchising authority acquires ownership of the cable system or
effects a transfer of the cable system to another person, the
cable operator generally is entitled to the “fair market
value” for the cable system covered by such franchise. In
addition, the 1984 Cable Act established comprehensive renewal
procedures, which require that an incumbent franchisee’s
renewal application be assessed on our own merits and not as
part of a comparative process with competing applications. We
believe that we have satisfactory relationships with our
franchising communities.





10





Table of Contents







This excerpt taken from the MCCC 10-K filed Mar 8, 2007.
Franchises
 
Cable systems are generally operated under non-exclusive franchises granted by local governmental authorities. These franchises typically contain many conditions, such as: time limitations on commencement and completion of construction; conditions of service, including number of channels, types of programming and the provision of free service to schools and other public institutions; and the maintenance or posting of insurance or indemnity bonds by the cable operator. Many of the provisions of local franchises are subject to federal regulation under the Communications Act of 1934, or Communications Act, as amended.
 
As of December 31, 2006, we held 1,383 cable television franchises. These franchises provide for the payment of fees to the issuing authority. In most of the cable systems, such franchise fees are passed through directly to the customers. The Cable Communications Policy Act of 1984, or 1984 Cable Act, prohibits franchising authorities from imposing franchise fees in excess of 5% of gross revenues from specified cable services and permits the cable operator to seek renegotiation and modification of franchise requirements if warranted by changed circumstances.
 
Substantially all of our cable systems require a franchise to operate. The table below groups the franchises of our cable systems by year of expiration and presents the approximate number and percentage of basic subscribers for each group as of December 31, 2006.
 
                                 
          Percentage of
    Number of
    Percentage of
 
    Number of
    Total
    Basic
    Total Basic
 
Year of Franchise Expiration
  Franchises     Franchises     Subscribers     Subscribers  
 
2007 through 2010
    524       37.9 %     690,000       50.0 %
2011 and thereafter
    859       62.1 %     690,000       50.0 %
                                 
Total
    1,383       100.0 %     1,380,000       100.0 %
                                 
 
We have never had a franchise revoked or failed to have a franchise renewed. In addition, substantially all of our franchises eligible for renewal have been renewed or extended prior to their stated expirations, and no franchise community has refused to consent to a franchise transfer to us. The 1984 Cable Act provides, among other things, for an orderly franchise renewal process in which franchise renewal will not be unreasonably withheld or, if renewal is denied and the franchising authority acquires ownership of the cable system or effects a transfer of the cable system to another person, the cable operator generally is entitled to the “fair market value” for the cable system covered by such franchise. In addition, the 1984 Cable Act established comprehensive renewal procedures, which require that an incumbent franchisee’s renewal application be assessed on its own merits and not as part of a comparative process with competing applications. We believe that we have satisfactory relationships with our franchising communities.
 
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